How to achieve long‐term goals

Goals that can happen quickly are called short-term goals. Goals that take a long time to achieve are called long-term goals. Find out more about them.

A short-term goal is something you want to do in the near future. The near future can mean today, this week, this month, or even this year. A short-term goal is something you want to accomplish soon.

A short term goal is a goal you can achieve in 12 months or less. Examples include:

  • Take a class
  • Buy a new television
  • Write my resume

A long-term goal is something you want to do further in the future. Long-term goals require time and planning. They are not something you can do this week or even this year. Long-term goals usually take 12 months or more to achieve.

Here are examples of goals that can take several years to achieve:

  • Graduate from college
  • Save for retirement
  • Have my own business

Tips for Setting Long-Term Goals

  • Work backwards. Think about what you want to achieve then plan steps going back to what you can do right now.
  • Create a picture of where you want to be in life 10 years from now.
  • Think about what you need to do in five years, in one year, and in six months to get to your long-term goal.
  • Write down what you need to do each month to achieve your goals.
  • After each monthly goal is achieved, look at your goals and adjust them as needed.

Prioritizing Your Goals

How do you decide what to do first? How do you adjust your goals? This is called prioritizing.

Prioritizing means that you decide what is most important to you right now. All of your goals are important, but it’s impossible to work on all of them at once.

  1. Choose what is most important right now.
  2. Focus mainly on that goal.
  3. Add additional goals as you become comfortable with your efforts.
  4. Being flexible is important. Change your focus on goals as your life changes.

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How to achieve long‐term goals

Whether you’re working on a team project or defining goals for an entire company, it’s critical your employees are on the same page when it comes to terminology.

“Goals” and “Objectives” often seem like two interchangeable phrases. “We have ambitious goals for 2019,” you might tell your marketing team, following up with, “Our objectives are aggressive, but entirely possible.”

When used in a marketing context, it’s easy to misconstrue goals and objectives. To ensure efficiency and unity, then, it’s vital your employees are up-to-date on the two terms you likely use when outlining your quarterly and yearly strategy.

Here, we’ll explain the difference between goals and objectives to make sure there is no ambiguity when it comes to your long-term and short-term marketing plans.

Goals vs. objectives

A goal is a desired result you want to achieve, and is typically broad and long-term. You might use company goals to inform yearly strategies and guide the direction of all your marketing efforts. An objective, on the other hand, defines the specific, measurable actions each employee must take to achieve the overall goal. For instance, if your overall goal is to increase brand awareness, one objective might be to increase blog traffic by 10%.

Goals are undoubtedly critical to your business’s success. Ultimately, your company’s goals need to align with your vision and purpose, and propel each employee’s individual actions and decisions.

For instance, let’s say this year your leadership team has outlined three broad goals for your company:

1. Create a more inclusive workplace culture

2. Grow international brand awareness

3. Increase customer retention by 40%

Great . now what?

Here’s where objectives come into play — objectives are essentially the measurable actions you can take to achieve your overall goals. Typically, you’d use the S.M.A.R.T. criteria to define and measure specific objectives.

“Create a more inclusive workplace culture” is an admirable and important goal to have, but it’s vague and too broad to measure — does “more inclusive” mean one diversity and inclusion panel discussion, or does it mean a 10% increase in women in leadership positions?

Ultimately, your objectives will help your employees understand exactly what you expect from them.

For instance, let’s say you inform your marketing department that your overall goal is to “grow international brand awareness”.

Now, when your social media marketing manager is crafting her quarterly video campaign, she’ll think to herself — Hmm. How can I increase international brand awareness?

She can cater her objectives to fit company goals, as well as her own personal vision. Perhaps she decides, “To demonstrate my success at increasing international brand awareness, my objectives for my video marketing campaign will be a) 10% of all form submissions come from outside the U.S., and b) an increase in engagement from Spanish-speaking Facebook fans by 5%.”

Your social media marketing manager can then use her unique objectives to measure whether or not she’s contributing to the larger company goal of increasing international brand awareness.

As you can see, objectives can be uniquely tailored to fit each departments’ needs, and allow for a large amount of autonomy. By instilling clear and firm company goals, you can feel confident that your employees are all working in the same direction, but taking largely different steps (e.g. objectives) to end up at the same finish line.

Strategy vs. objective

An objective is a measurable, specific action an employee or team needs to take to meet the needs of a larger company goal. A strategy, on the other hand, defines how each employee or team will accomplish the objective. A strategy can change throughout the course of a campaign, while an objective should remain the same. For instance, perhaps your objective is to increase website traffic by 10%. A strategy to ensure success could be to focus heavily on SEO efforts, re-design the website, or put more money behind your paid advertising approach.

There’s one more term differentiation you need to know — objectives versus strategy.

Referencing our example above, let’s say your social media marketing manager decides one of her objectives will be “an increase in engagement from Spanish-speaking Facebook fans by 5%”.

This is aligned with your company’s goal to increase international brand awareness.

A strategy, then, tells your employee or team how she can accomplish her objectives. For instance, your social media marketing manager might decide to focus her paid efforts on Spanish-speaking countries, using Facebook’s location targeting features. Alternatively, maybe she decides to cultivate partnerships with international companies, and posts videos in Spanish on Facebook specifically highlighting the work of those international organizations.

Both of these options are examples of strategies.

Her strategy might change over time. She might decide her paid efforts aren’t working, and try something else. Ultimately, however, her objective (increase engagement from Spanish-speaking Facebook fans by 5%) should remain the same.

How to achieve long‐term goals

How to achieve long‐term goals

Originally published Apr 24, 2019 7:00:00 AM, updated October 29 2019

Change your perspective to make things work in the long run.

How to achieve long‐term goals

How to achieve long‐term goals

E very time people think they are getting somewhere with their life in the next day or week, actually it’s holding them back. Short-term goals dismantle you from seeing your actual potential.

However, long-term plans give time and space to achieve your goals in a meaningful way. These are the goals that provide you with fame and satisfaction at the end, the only problem here is that you’ve to stick to them no matter how long or complicated they become.

There are some things I did and still do when I thought of long-term goals that helped me achieve. Read on to learn them.

Every success story in human history has begun when a person knows what they want to achieve. To be one of them, you have to start with a precisely clear idea about your end goal, what you need to do, and when you want to achieve it by.

One way of achieving it is by following Stephen R Convey’s technique: every-time you act, you have to do it twice. First, your mind is visualizing it, and the next step is physical when you’re performing it.

Better to ask twice than to lose your way once.

So, the first time when you’re visualizing it, you’ve to be thinking about your end-goal, things you need to contribute, and how long is it going to take. This way, when you are performing it, you’ll be confident enough to do it without any second thoughts.

When you’re trying to achieve long-term goals, it’s easy to get lost in the process or to get distracted with easy money or short-term achievements. The only way you can beat these distractions is by having a burning desire of what you want to achieve and reminding yourself about it every day at least twice.

The best possible way you can do this is by writing down what you want to achieve on a piece of paper and then stick it in a place where you can see it as often as possible. Read your goal out loud when you wake up in the morning and before you go to bed every day.

Almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few minutes, including you — Anne Lamott

If you haven’t paused now and then to take care of yourself, you’re going to lose your effectiveness soon. It’s like how a lumberjack has spent all the time sawing down the trees and never thought of sharpening their tools.

You have to take time to maintain healthy habits like daily exercise, organize yourself, write something of your own, and help people that you love. In the long run, this kind of lifestyle will contribute to keep your mind sharp and fresh.

Taking time to do things that makes you feel happy when you wake up is the most vital thing to do when you’re working on your long-term goals irrespective of your work nature.

Throughout your goal, irrespective of one’s work nature, everyone will face difficulties, and most people give up. You should have an unwavering faith in yourself to achieve something that’s going to take time.

You should have a plan that takes you a step forward towards your goal every day. You should stick to it no matter how lost you feel in the process. For example, take Thomas Edison, who failed 10,000 times, and do you know what he said about that? He said that he just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.

It’s all about your perspective; if it’s getting hard, then it’s good because that means you’re on the right path to achieve great things. The greatest failure of your life is to give up by not knowing how close you are to succeeding.

You can find me on Medium, Twitter and LinkedIn.

A long-term goal is an ultimate objective that is meant to be achieved through a series of smaller goals over a long period, covering five to 10 years or more. Many professionals set long-term goals to establish a clear path of smaller goals and opportunities that lead to their success and fulfillment. In an interview, you may be asked to discuss your long-term goals and how they align with the company you’re interviewing with. You can review your long-term goals before an interview to prepare for this question.

In this article, we discuss the reasons potential employers are interested in knowing your long-term goals and explore some effective ways to answer the question.

Why employers ask about your long-term goals

Many potential employers may be looking for a candidate who is committed to advancing within an organization, gaining valuable skills to become a future leader in their field. They may ask this question to determine the likelihood of you successfully working at the company for a long period of time. Understanding the roles, responsibilities and skills you want to have in the next five to 10 years can help employers determine your suitability for a role.

This question also allows employers to assess a potential employee’s goal-setting abilities, such as their skills in identifying achievable objectives, anticipating obstacles and setting smaller goals relevant to the overall objective. When you showcase that you have good long-term goals, you can better show your qualifications.

How to answer the question, “What are your long-term goals?”

Your answer needs to describe your long-term goals, the steps you already took to achieve them and the steps you are planning on taking. You will also have to describe how the role you’re interviewing for can help you achieve those goals. Here are the steps needed to formulate an answer.

1. State your long-term professional goal

The first thing you need to do is accurately describe your long-term objectives. The most effective way to do so is by using the SMART goals framework. This strategy involves being specific with your targets, setting measurable milestones along the way to track your progress and making sure your goals are achievable and realistic. You can also use this method to ensure that your goals apply to your career.

2. Describe the steps you’ve already taken to reach it

To prove that you are determined and realistic with your long-term goals, you will need to describe what you have done to achieve them up to that point. Discuss some of your resume items that have helped you reach your long-term goals, including your education or early roles. This step enhances your credibility by showing your commitment and determination in planning and selecting appropriate steps for your long-term objectives.

3. Outline the steps you’ll be taking

After properly describing the previous steps you took to achieve your long-term goals, you will need to outline your future strategy and how you plan to successfully reach your targets. Consider discussing your ideal next role or some of the career steps you plan to take soon. This step provides context and shows you have a well-thought-of long-term plan that you are fully committed to following until you reach the desired outcome.

4. Discuss how this role or company helps you achieve your long-term goal

After describing your long-term ambitions and going over both your past achievements and plans, you can help the interviewer understand that the organization they represent provides the ideal platform for you to fulfill your objectives. Perhaps your next ideal role is the very one you are interviewing for or is the next step after working in this specific position. This step will show that your long-term progress will not only benefit you individually but will also benefit the company.

Tips for discussing long-term goals in an interview

Besides specific steps to craft your answer, you can also consider the following tips to help you optimize your answer and interviewing experience:

Show that your personality matches the company culture

Wanting to stay with a company for a long time is the first step, but the potential employer must see that you are the person who can do that. Your long-term career goals should show that you have the character traits and work ethic that fit that organization, proving that you are a long-term match. Research the company beforehand, see what kind of personality they prefer their employees to have and highlight the ways you match that profile.

Be ambitious, but realistic

Ambition is definitely one quality a potential employer is looking for in your answer, but you should also show that you are level-headed and realistic. If you portray your ambitions as being realistic and achievable, you can prove that you know what goals you can achieve in the near future and the long term.

Show a passion for the role

Employers are looking for people who find personal and professional motivations for their job. When discussing your long-term goals, it’s important to let the potential employer know that you have a desire to work to grow and refine your skills within the company. This tip can help you show your commitment should you be hired.

Example answers

Here are a few sample answers to help you craft your own:

Example 1

“My long-term goal is to manage the sales department at a company. I hope to achieve that by first getting to manage a smaller team within the next two to three years and generate enough results to be considered for department manager after another two years. I have prepared for this in the past year by taking sales courses, and I plan on taking up a management class in the near future. Your company’s sales department is very well-organized, and I feel would be the ideal place for me to achieve my goals.”

Example 2:

“My long-term goal is to become the head writer for a television show. This involves me gaining experience on a writing team in the next two years and producing work that gets me considered for higher-level roles when new shows go into development. This is the reason I earned my degree in creative writing, and I am planning on starting my master’s courses in screenwriting this fall. Your TV station is the ideal platform for me to succeed, as you have a long history of giving chances to young writers.”

Example 3:

*“My long-term objectives are to become a full stack developer and work on a major social media platform. I know that to achieve that goal, I need to fully master both back-end and front-end development, and I am planning on learning both within the next three years by getting direct professional experience and completing various learning modules. I already studied back-end development in college and my previous role. In the next year, I plan on focusing on front end development so I can become equally skilled in both. Working as a junior front-end developer for your company will help me achieve that and set me on my way to becoming a full stack developer.”_

Digital marketing insights and perspectives

How to achieve long‐term goals

Wondering what the best plan of attack should be for some of your most audacious goals? Maybe you’re ready to start your own business, are saving for your first home or looking to finally pay off your credit card. When faced with such a large goal, it can be easy to get lost in the weeds along the way and wind up off track. That’s why utilizing the right system to keep you focused every step of the way is critical when it comes to successfully achieving your long-term life goals. One system, called the 4DX Method, helps you do just that.

How to use 4DX method to achieve long-term life goals

The 4DX Method focuses on four critical components of execution: focus, leverage, engagement, and accountability. Together, these components can help you harness more clarity, sustainability, and momentum as you work towards your goals.

1. Focus

High-quality action comes from focusing solely on what must be done and stopping less important action items from derailing your progress. Your goals list might be a mile long, but to move the needle on any of them you must make the sacrifice of focus. It’s a sacrifice because you must commit to focusing on only what the 4DX method calls your “wildly important goals” and leave the rest.

2. Leverage

Rather than measuring success based on past performance, leverage predictive measures instead—the required activities that drive desired outcomes. For example, if your goal is to grow your business, instead of measuring success based on revenue earned—which is a measure of past performance—try tracking future activities, such as “secure X new clients each week”, that you must complete to contribute to business growth.

3. Engagement

Establishing a clear and compelling measure of where you are and where you need to go keeps you motivated and fully engaged in the path to your goals. Make it something you can see everyday to motivate you to keep going.

4. Accountability

Regularly assessing what you’ve accomplished and where you’re falling short allows you to proactively track your performance and course-correct when necessary.

How to achieve your biggest goals

When it comes to achieving your biggest goals, going in with a plan can help you stay focused and get you where you want to go faster and more efficiently. To learn more about the 4DX Method, this visual created by CreditRepair expands on each discipline of execution and how you can implement it in your own life according to your specific goals.

Digital marketing insights and perspectives

How to achieve long‐term goals

Wondering what the best plan of attack should be for some of your most audacious goals? Maybe you’re ready to start your own business, are saving for your first home or looking to finally pay off your credit card. When faced with such a large goal, it can be easy to get lost in the weeds along the way and wind up off track. That’s why utilizing the right system to keep you focused every step of the way is critical when it comes to successfully achieving your long-term life goals. One system, called the 4DX Method, helps you do just that.

How to use 4DX method to achieve long-term life goals

The 4DX Method focuses on four critical components of execution: focus, leverage, engagement, and accountability. Together, these components can help you harness more clarity, sustainability, and momentum as you work towards your goals.

1. Focus

High-quality action comes from focusing solely on what must be done and stopping less important action items from derailing your progress. Your goals list might be a mile long, but to move the needle on any of them you must make the sacrifice of focus. It’s a sacrifice because you must commit to focusing on only what the 4DX method calls your “wildly important goals” and leave the rest.

2. Leverage

Rather than measuring success based on past performance, leverage predictive measures instead—the required activities that drive desired outcomes. For example, if your goal is to grow your business, instead of measuring success based on revenue earned—which is a measure of past performance—try tracking future activities, such as “secure X new clients each week”, that you must complete to contribute to business growth.

3. Engagement

Establishing a clear and compelling measure of where you are and where you need to go keeps you motivated and fully engaged in the path to your goals. Make it something you can see everyday to motivate you to keep going.

4. Accountability

Regularly assessing what you’ve accomplished and where you’re falling short allows you to proactively track your performance and course-correct when necessary.

How to achieve your biggest goals

When it comes to achieving your biggest goals, going in with a plan can help you stay focused and get you where you want to go faster and more efficiently. To learn more about the 4DX Method, this visual created by CreditRepair expands on each discipline of execution and how you can implement it in your own life according to your specific goals.

How to achieve long‐term goals

Whether you’re working on a team project or defining goals for an entire company, it’s critical your employees are on the same page when it comes to terminology.

“Goals” and “Objectives” often seem like two interchangeable phrases. “We have ambitious goals for 2019,” you might tell your marketing team, following up with, “Our objectives are aggressive, but entirely possible.”

When used in a marketing context, it’s easy to misconstrue goals and objectives. To ensure efficiency and unity, then, it’s vital your employees are up-to-date on the two terms you likely use when outlining your quarterly and yearly strategy.

Here, we’ll explain the difference between goals and objectives to make sure there is no ambiguity when it comes to your long-term and short-term marketing plans.

Goals vs. objectives

A goal is a desired result you want to achieve, and is typically broad and long-term. You might use company goals to inform yearly strategies and guide the direction of all your marketing efforts. An objective, on the other hand, defines the specific, measurable actions each employee must take to achieve the overall goal. For instance, if your overall goal is to increase brand awareness, one objective might be to increase blog traffic by 10%.

Goals are undoubtedly critical to your business’s success. Ultimately, your company’s goals need to align with your vision and purpose, and propel each employee’s individual actions and decisions.

For instance, let’s say this year your leadership team has outlined three broad goals for your company:

1. Create a more inclusive workplace culture

2. Grow international brand awareness

3. Increase customer retention by 40%

Great . now what?

Here’s where objectives come into play — objectives are essentially the measurable actions you can take to achieve your overall goals. Typically, you’d use the S.M.A.R.T. criteria to define and measure specific objectives.

“Create a more inclusive workplace culture” is an admirable and important goal to have, but it’s vague and too broad to measure — does “more inclusive” mean one diversity and inclusion panel discussion, or does it mean a 10% increase in women in leadership positions?

Ultimately, your objectives will help your employees understand exactly what you expect from them.

For instance, let’s say you inform your marketing department that your overall goal is to “grow international brand awareness”.

Now, when your social media marketing manager is crafting her quarterly video campaign, she’ll think to herself — Hmm. How can I increase international brand awareness?

She can cater her objectives to fit company goals, as well as her own personal vision. Perhaps she decides, “To demonstrate my success at increasing international brand awareness, my objectives for my video marketing campaign will be a) 10% of all form submissions come from outside the U.S., and b) an increase in engagement from Spanish-speaking Facebook fans by 5%.”

Your social media marketing manager can then use her unique objectives to measure whether or not she’s contributing to the larger company goal of increasing international brand awareness.

As you can see, objectives can be uniquely tailored to fit each departments’ needs, and allow for a large amount of autonomy. By instilling clear and firm company goals, you can feel confident that your employees are all working in the same direction, but taking largely different steps (e.g. objectives) to end up at the same finish line.

Strategy vs. objective

An objective is a measurable, specific action an employee or team needs to take to meet the needs of a larger company goal. A strategy, on the other hand, defines how each employee or team will accomplish the objective. A strategy can change throughout the course of a campaign, while an objective should remain the same. For instance, perhaps your objective is to increase website traffic by 10%. A strategy to ensure success could be to focus heavily on SEO efforts, re-design the website, or put more money behind your paid advertising approach.

There’s one more term differentiation you need to know — objectives versus strategy.

Referencing our example above, let’s say your social media marketing manager decides one of her objectives will be “an increase in engagement from Spanish-speaking Facebook fans by 5%”.

This is aligned with your company’s goal to increase international brand awareness.

A strategy, then, tells your employee or team how she can accomplish her objectives. For instance, your social media marketing manager might decide to focus her paid efforts on Spanish-speaking countries, using Facebook’s location targeting features. Alternatively, maybe she decides to cultivate partnerships with international companies, and posts videos in Spanish on Facebook specifically highlighting the work of those international organizations.

Both of these options are examples of strategies.

Her strategy might change over time. She might decide her paid efforts aren’t working, and try something else. Ultimately, however, her objective (increase engagement from Spanish-speaking Facebook fans by 5%) should remain the same.

How to achieve long‐term goals

How to achieve long‐term goals

Originally published Apr 24, 2019 7:00:00 AM, updated October 29 2019

How to achieve long‐term goals

Where do you see yourself in five years? This isn’t just a question that future employers will be asked to assess your drive and interests; it’s something that all professional nurses should think about. Many registered nurses are seeking ways to set themselves apart in this growing field, one way to do that is to advance your career as a professional nurse. Earning an MSN degree is a great way to advance your nursing career and find a specialty within nursing that you’re interested in.

To determine where you might be in five years, it will be important to set long-term goals and establish objectives to guide you throughout your nursing career. There are a few steps that you can take to achieve your long-term nursing goals, here are 4:

1. Have a Clear Vision

Take a minute to remember your initial motivations for being a nurse. What career aspirations did you have when you first began your nursing career? If your current role seems like a platform to something else, what can you do to get to where you want to be? These considerations will help form your goals and provide a clear career roadmap. For example, if you want to gain more expertise in specialized areas, what steps must be taken to achieve this target?

If you’re not sure what you want to do, you can still create actionable goals to advance your career. Some people prefer to write down these benchmarks in order to stay organized and on track. Creating a list of goals will help you understand your interests and strengths and align your objectives with those specific traits. Your goals should be SMART.

S pecific

M easurable

A ttainable

R ealistic

T ime-based

For example, you might look to learn how to use an intravenous fusion pump within a week. This specificity anchors your goals to a particular schedule and is easily achievable.

Differentiate Yourself

To achieve your long-term goals and open up future career opportunities, it will be important to set yourself apart from your peers. One direct way to do this is to become trusted and well-respected within your current job. Individuals who provide excellent service and consistently work hard are highly sought-after and often earn recognition from their superiors. These characteristics can help you become a leading candidate for new opportunities that arise.

Building a solid network will be essential to helping you stand out and further your goals. Nursing professionals should look to foster as many positive relationships as possible. These connections can be forged within your facility as well as within communities and national associations designed to connect nurses. Teaming up with a more experienced mentor will help you grow and learn the necessary skills to keep up with emerging techniques. A mentor can also be a key ally when applying for a new position.

Specialization in a field can also help move closer toward long-term goals. If you have a specialty in mind, find out what type of training and skills are necessary to get into that practice area. Using mentors and connections in that field can reveal what steps must be taken and any advice needed to reach your objective.

Earn Your MSN Degree

A bachelor’s degree can open the door for entry-level positions, but a Master of Science in Nursing can provide a number of opportunities to grow in your career. In fact, most unit management and supervisory jobs require an MSN degree, according to Nurse.org. Obtaining this degree can yield a number of significant benefits and help you reach your long-term nursing goals.

An MSN grants a greater number of career choices. On the job, an MSN proves that you can work with less supervision and are capable of making critical decisions, according to Nurse Journal. Earning an MSN may grant you additional benefits outside of reaching your long-term nursing goals. For example, nurses with their MSN can usually expect an increase to base salary or the possibility of bonuses.

Registered nurse professionals should look into MSN programs to learn how they can improve their skills and meet future needs. In fact, it may someday be required for registered nurses to work toward an MSN degree to retain their license, Nurse Journal stated. There are also more program options than ever, enabling nurses to obtain their degree while still working. Specialty concentrations, such as those offered by the Duquesne University Master of Science in Nursing online program, can be done completely online. This will allow you to keep your current work and family commitments while pursuing higher education.

Setting your long-term nursing goals can be a major motivator for your career prospects. By establishing a clear vision, looking into certifications, differentiating yourself, and pursuing an MSN degree, you will take a significant step toward your objectives. Look for opportunities to learn and challenge yourself to keep up on new patient care techniques. This lifelong mindset to expanding knowledge will provide a precedent for constant improvement and goal advancement. Reaching your long-term nursing goals doesn’t stop at earning your MSN, as a nurse, part of your job is continuous learning, earning your MSN is just one step of the process.

Look into Certifications

Becoming certified demonstrates that you have expert knowledge in a particular field and can help to improve patient satisfaction and lower error rates across the board. As the number of registered nurses with certifications increases, it will be important to obtain these credentials to fill specialty needs, remain competitive, and meet long-term goals.

When you’re interested in a specialty, there are three online Post-Master’s Certificates offered at Duquesne:

  1. Family Nurse Practitioner: The FNP program is offered full-time or part-time, and trains nurses for the American Association of Nurse Practitioners Certification Program (AANPCP) exam or the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Family Nurse Practitioner exam.
  2. Forensic Nursing: Forensic nurse career outcomes include sexual assault nurse, nurse coroner, nurse investigator, and more. This certification is recognized by the International Association of Forensic Nurses.
  3. Nursing Education and Faculty Role: This certificate program educates nurses on current trends and modern evolutions in nursing, in order to best serve future generations of students. Career outcomes include clinical faculty members, online educators, lab directors, or higher education faculty members. The certifying body is the Certification for Nurse Educators – National League for Nursing.

Pursuing certification will help you gain the skills necessary for a specialty and open up new career opportunities.