How to add baking soda to a pool

How to add baking soda to a pool

Treating a pool requires balancing acidity and alkalinity and sustaining a pH of between 7.2 and 7.8. Along with chlorine, baking soda is an important part of your pool maintenance routine. There are many reasons to use baking soda in your pool to keep your water clean, clear, and safe for swimmers.

Baking Soda to Raise pH and Alkalinity in Pools

Most people know that chlorine is an important chemical in keeping pool water safe for swimming. But adding too much chlorine can lower your pool’s pH as well as its total alkalinity. When alkalinity falls, it is more difficult to maintain a stable pH. Plus, a lower pH and alkalinity of your pool water creates several negative effects, from itchy skin and stinging eyes for swimmers to corrosion of your pool ladders, liner, or other components.

When your water’s alkalinity is too low, any chemicals you add will exponentially affect the pH, creating a condition known as pH bounce. You’ll also need to add more chlorine to get the same sanitizing effect, and your swimmers will complain. Overall, pool water with inadequate alkalinity levels can be frustrating and costly.

Fortunately, there is a simple and cost-effective way to maintain your pool’s alkalinity and pH. You might use it in your cookie recipes or to freshen your fridge. This handy tool for pools is none other than Arm & Hammer baking soda , although you’ll need pounds of it rather than a pinch.

What Does Baking Soda Do For a Pool?

Baking soda, also known as sodium bicarbonate is naturally alkaline, with a pH of 8. When you add baking soda to your pool water, you will raise both the pH and the alkalinity, improving stability and clarity. Many commercial pool products for raising alkalinity utilize baking soda as their main active ingredient. You can maintain your pool for a fraction of the cost by going straight to the source and using pure baking soda in your pool.

Using Baking Soda to Increase Alkalinity

Follow these steps to test and raise your pool’s alkalinity and pH with baking soda.

  • Test your pool’s alkalinity daily. Ideally, your pH is between 7.2 and 7.8 and the alkalinity is between 110 and 150 ppm (parts per million). If your alkalinity level is lower, and especially if less than 80 ppm, then you need to raise the pool water alkalinity.
  • Purchase baking soda in bulk (available in pouches up to 15 lbs.). You will be adding anywhere from 1.5 lbs. to as much as 8-10 lbs. of baking soda to your pool, depending on how low your alkalinity is.
  • Determine amount to add. You’ll need to figure out how much baking soda to add to your pool. Pool chemical measurements are based on 10,000 gallons of water. If your pool is larger or smaller, you’ll need to adjust your math. A rule of thumb is 1.5 lbs. of baking soda per 10,000 gallons of water will raise alkalinity by about 10 ppm. If your pool’s pH tested below 7.2, add 3-4 pounds of baking soda. If you’re new to adding pool chemicals, start by adding only one-half or three-fourths of the recommended amount. After retesting, you can always add more if the level is still low. Otherwise, you could swing too far in the delicate pH balance and need to add an acid.
  • Add baking soda to the pool. Sodium bicarbonate is packaged in powder form and can be sprinkled directly into your pool water. Spread in wide arcs across the pool’s surface to avoid dumping it all in one spot. Beware of adding baking soda on a windy day, as the powder can go airborne.
  • Wait at least six hours. Let the baking soda dissolve into the water. Turn on your pool’s circulation system to help it disperse.
  • Retest and repeat if needed. Between 6 and 24 hours after you added the baking soda, retest your pool’s pH and total alkalinity. If the pH is below 7.2 and the alkalinity below 110 ppm, then repeat these steps.

Correcting Common Pool Problems with Baking Soda

Baking Soda and Green, Blue, or Yellow Algae

If you have algae in your pool, you’ll notice dull green water, slimy walls and pool bottom, and a slippery pool surface. You’ll need to use an algaecide to kill the algae and superchlorinate your pool to clear the water. After this treatment, test your pH and alkalinity and add baking soda to raise alkalinity to at least 100 ppm and pH to between 7.2 and 7.8.

Baking Soda and Pool Corrosion

If you’re noticing corrosion on your pipes or ladders, or pits on your pool liner or tiles, you have very low water alkalinity. Test and add Arm & Hammer baking soda according to the instructions. You will typically need at least 8 lbs. if your levels are low enough to cause corrosion.

Scaling Buildup on Pool Surfaces

Too much calcium and pH as well as high alkalinity levels are culprits for pool scaling. So, too, is hard water. Stop using calcium-based disinfectants and keep your pool’s alkalinity between 80 and 110 ppm. Test your levels and carefully add a pool acid, such as muriatic acid to lower pH to below 7.8. If you go too far, add baking soda sparingly to reach the appropriate levels.

Cloudy Pool Water

If your pool water is cloudy or murky, there could be a number of causes. Check your pool’s filtration system; often the problem lies there. Also test your water’s hardness. If your water is naturally hard, or contains a lot of minerals, you will want to stop using any products containing additional calcium and keep your alkalinity levels lower than 110 ppm (but higher than 80 ppm). To cure cloudy pool water, superchlorination is usually the easiest fix. Be sure to test your pH levels after the hyper-chlorination treatment, and slowly add baking soda to your pool water, if needed, to get to between 7.2 and 7.8. Higher pH levels can lead to cloudiness.

For a more complete guide to pool care and rectifying common issues, see our comprehensive Arm & Hammer Pool Care Guide.

How to Clear a Cloudy Pool with Baking Soda

For a simple method to keep your pool crystal clear, we developed Arm & Hammer Clear Balance™ Pool Maintenance tablets. Our scientists have done the math for you, and 1 to 4 tablets per week, depending on the size of your pool, will keep your water clear all summer. Follow the package directions and dispense through your skimmer or floater. Tablets dissolve in about 15 minutes and will help keep your pool’s pH and alkalinity at proper levels. It’s super easy to use and Clear Balance™ can help prevent pH rebound and other pool problems all season.

Baking Soda for Pools: An Easy Way to Raise pH and Alkalinity

Don’t waste money on commercial alkaline-increasing pool products when you can use baking soda to raise your pool’s pH and alkalinity instead. Follow the procedure above and the guidelines in our Pool Care Guide to correct common pool issues. And use Arm & Hammer Clear Balance™ Pool Maintenance tablets to keep a clear, clean, safe pool without a lot of hassle.

A swimming pool is surely enough to provide an entertaining spot for everyone. That is why investing your money in a swimming pool is never a bad idea.

But, you have to be ready to deal with numbers of regular maintenance once you include a swimming pool as an addition to the feature of your house. From daily to yearly maintenance, all of the steps are definitely necessary to keep the pool look adorable and feel comfortable at the same time.

If you don’t maintain it regularly – even as simple as skimming the debris – you will have to face the worse problems and the cloudy pool is one of the common cases that can happen. Cloudy pool water can be caused by several factors like low chlorine level, imbalanced pH and alkalinity level, clogged filter, and algae invasion. Of course, a cloudy pool doesn’t only look nasty buy unsafe to swim to as well.

When you experience cloudy pool water, you have to solve it as soon as possible. Luckily, if the problem caused by the pH and alkalinity level which is not in an ideal range, you can fix it with household stuff that you got in your kitchen.

Yes, it’s baking soda. This kitchen’s must-have ingredient can surprisingly help the cloudy water problem. Wanna know how? Well, just keep scrolling to find out the tutorial on How to Clear a Cloudy Pool with Baking Soda below.

How to Clear a Cloudy Pool with Baking Soda

At first, you may wonder, how does baking soda can handle such a serious issue like cloudy pool water? The answer is, baking soda – also known as sodium bicarbonate – contains a pH of 8.3 along with the bicarbonate ions. In short, when those things contact with water, they can balance the pH and alkalinity level.

Prepare these supplies:

  • Pool water tester kit or strips
  • Baking soda
  • Clean water
  • Bucket
  • Wood bar
  • Protective gear (rubber gloves, dust mask, and eye goggles)

You just need to simply prepare those supplies for this effort to solve cloudy pool water.

Test the Water

As mentioned above, baking soda can only help to clear the cloudy water problem when it’s caused by imbalanced pH and alkalinity level. Therefore, before you purchase some pounds of baking soda, make sure you check the root of the problem at first.

  • Use pool water tester strip or kit to check the level of pH and alkalinity of your pool water.
  • When they are below the ideal range, then you can continue to the next step.

Measure the Amount

You will need to do some math for this step since you may add too much baking soda which can worsen the problem. The amount of baking soda that you need depends on two factors which are the level of the pH and alkalinity and the size of your swimming pool.

  • The rule of thumb is 1.25 pounds of baking soda can work to raise the alkalinity level of 10,000 gallons of water by 10ppm.
  • Use the calculation of your pool volume and the level of alkalinity to determine the amount of baking soda that you need. For instance, you will need 3 to 4 pounds of baking soda when the pH level is below 7.2 for a 10,000-gallon swimming pool.

Add the Baking Soda

Now, it’s time to add the baking soda to the swimming pool. Be careful about pouring it into the water, you may need to avoid doing the step in a windy day.

  • You can either sprinkle the baking soda to the swimming pool in a circular motion so it can spread evenly or pour directly into the skimmer.
  • Keep the water moving to evenly spread the baking soda and prevent cloudiness.
  • Let it dissolve completely in the water for about 6 to 10 hours.

Retest the Water

After you are sure enough that the baking soda has dissolved well in your pool water, you can retest the water again.

  • Get your pool water tester kit or strip again.
  • Check the alkalinity and pH level of the pool water.
  • If you have to add more baking soda, do not add more than 2.5 pounds of it in one day. Wait until the next day to add more baking soda to the water.

Try now!

So those are the steps that you can follow if you want to use baking soda to clear the cloudy pool water. Keep in mind that this is a quick effort that you can try in an attempt to solve the problem. The most important thing is that you have to know the cause of the problem so you can really benefit from the material.

Baking soda has been known for helping the cloudy pool water by a lot of homeowners. This kitchen’s stuff can be one of the solutions to try when you are facing the problem. It’s a practical and affordable option that you can do all by yourself.

Adding the baking soda is safe for your swimming pool. As the natural material, it won’t harm both the people who use the pool or the pool itself.

However, you have to add the right amount of baking soda since it can raise the alkalinity level of the water. High alkalinity or pH level can cause calcium build-up which damages the pool construction and clogs the filter. That is why you have to carefully measure the amount of baking soda that you add to your pool water to avoid causing the worse problems.

In conclusion, adding baking soda is always a worth-to-consider idea to clear the cloudy pool water. You don’t have to spend a lot to purchase some pounds of baking soda and you can finish the job all by yourself. It’s a cheap and practical solution to keep in mind if only you do it right!

We all know baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) as a staple in baking needs and as an effective whitener and deodorizer. At times, you can use it as a cleaner.

However, it also has a place in pool maintenance. If you use baking soda, you can improve your water quality! Let’s discuss how this happens below.

How To Baking Soda In a Pool?

It’s easy to use a bag of baking soda in your pool. Let’s see each purpose.

Purpose of Baking Soda In Pool

Baking soda comes in to solve both acidity and alkalinity. When you use baking soda, you can lower acidity and raise alkalinity at the same time.

We may know baking soda as a cleaner. It is a perfect way to clean the bottom of your pool without requiring you to use a pool vacuum. While adding baking soda to clean grout and surfaces is great, you affect the pH by adding the baking soda into the water.

Instead of acidity, alkalinity, and pH levels jumping from high to low, baking soda can keep it neutral.

Baking soda is basically sodium bicarbonate. Baking soda’s alkalinity levels are at 8.3. The bicarbonate ions can stabilize the water. This way, you clear the water and stop corrosion quickly.

Is It Safe to Use for Your Pool?

Yes! It is harmless and won’t affect anything in an adverse manner.

How to Use Baking Soda For Your Pool

For Getting Rid of Algae

Use algaecide first, then spot-treat remaining algae with a small amount of baking soda.

Balancing pH Level of Your Pool

You can buy test kits from pool specialty stores, or purchase pool water alkalinity test strips. Dip deep! This way, you can get water unaffected by sunlight or air.

You may add a chemical or two with the kits. Results should read at 80 ppm to 100 ppm.

(If you aren’t aware, PPM is a unit of measure, also called parts per million. It’s a tool you can use to see how much chemical there is compared to the amount of water.)

If the total alkalinity results are lower than 80 ppm, scaling may develop. It’s time to add some baking soda products into the water!

If the total alkalinity results are higher than 100 ppm, you don’t need to add baking soda at all. Instead, you can add muriatic acid or sodium bisulfate products.

Some Tips to Adjust the pH Level

To add the right weight of soda to your pool, make sure you know how much water is in your pool, first. If you have 10,000 gallons of water in your pool, you can raise total alkalinity by 10 ppm by adding 1.25 pounds of baking soda.

You can add 3.75 pounds of baking soda per 10,000 gallons of water, for example, if you want to raise pH from 50 ppm to 80.

We do have a note of caution: be careful about adding too much baking soda! It isn’t advisable to add more than 1.25 pounds into a 10,000-gallon pool in a single day.

So, if you need to add a lot of baking soda, space it out for the week.

Cloudy Water

Cloudy water means there is scale build-up in your pool. If you notice irregularities in your pool water (corrosion or scale build-up), do a test kit right away.

Sprinkle the baking soda and keep the pool in motion. If you have regular problems with pH and cloudy pool water, you might need to raise the alkalinity quickly, but it’s best to go slow. Let it dissolve!

You can sit back and wait. While it can depend on the pool size, it will take around 6 to 10 hours before that much baking soda circulates.

General Cleaning of Your Pool

You can also use it for general cleaning.

Pool maintenance can be dizzying with the number of tasks.

One of the most important things you have to consider with your swimming pool is the chemicals you put in it. You have to make sure everything balances out to a specific pH level.

For example, you have to keep your pool at a pH level of 7.2 to 7.8. On the pH scale, your pool has to be basic or alkaline.

How to add baking soda to a pool

Wait, what do these words mean? How do you make sure your pool’s pH is at the right levels?

pH and Acidity

On the scale, you have the numbers 0 to 14. If the level is at 0 to 7, whatever you’re testing is acidic. The number 0 refers to the greatest acid activity. As it approaches the number 7, the weaker the activity gets.

Remember a pool’s minimum pH levels? If you let the pool level go below 7.2, acidity can turn metal and equipment corrosive.

In the end, you might need to repair, if not completely replace, your pool equipment.

Plus, a lower pH can make it harder to keep chlorine in the water.

Chlorine is a must for all swimming pools. After all, chlorine keeps germs, viruses, and bacteria away.

pH and Alkalinity

Just because the acid is bad for the water doesn’t mean alkaline is best.

If acidity is at levels 0 to 7, pH and alkalinity are at 7 to 14. Now, the minimum level for pools is 7.2, while the maximum pH levels are at 7.8.

If you raise the pH further than 7.8, that kind of pH and total alkalinity can lead to scale build-up.

How to add baking soda to a pool

If you start to notice white or crystalline deposits in the pool surfaces, pool liner, and pipes, then there may be high calcium build-up in your pool.

Scale build-up can render your heating system useless. That much alkalinity can look dingy and messes with the chlorine, too.

Frequently Asked Questions

Does baking soda kill algae in pools?

Only algaecides can “kill” algae in pool water. However, baking soda can help clear up algae. Use both so you can restore sparkly, clean water!

Is baking soda safe for swimming pools?

There are no risks if you want to add baking soda and pool water. Using baking soda is relatively safe and won’t harm any equipment. Your filtration system, pipes, plugs, and other machinery are going to be fine!

Will baking soda clear up a cloudy pool?

Yes, within several hours! You can clear it up in a day or two.

Conclusion

Are you ready to take on your pool’s pH levels? We hope we helped! Baking soda can take a load off your shoulders.

If things don’t improve, you may need to use soda ash sodium carbonate instead.

There are times pH is low but overall alkalinity levels are fine. Soda ash may work instead. With a level of 11.4, adding soda to your pool can adjust pH levels, but not raise the alkalinity level by much.

Tell us about your pool maintenance experiences, issues, and any mishaps. We’re here to listen in the comments!

If you ever encountered a green pool, then read our page about how to clean a green pool next.

  • Forums
  • Water Chemistry
  • Testing and Balancing Your Water

archer636

Well-known member
  • Jul 26, 2016
  • #1
  • I am having a hard time raising my TA- am I supposed to add a few lbs at a time? or all at once?

    ignoranceisbliss

    Well-known member
    • Jul 26, 2016
  • #2
  • How to add baking soda to a pool

    Texas Splash

    • Jul 26, 2016
  • #3
  • archer636

    Well-known member
    • Jul 26, 2016
  • #4
  • With a TA of 50, you shouldn’t have to add too much right? Are you trying to sneak-up to about 60-70? As long as your pH is remaining stable, be cautious about raising the TA too much.

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    Texas Splash

    • Jul 26, 2016
  • #5
  • How to add baking soda to a pool

    borjis

    • Jul 26, 2016
  • #6
  • Is your ph already holding steady? If so, as others suggest, no need to change it. That’s what its job is.

    If you do add more, use pool math to figure exactly how much and start in 1/3 increments.

    I mix anything I add (except cya & bleach) in a 1 gallon bucket of water then pour it slowly over a return.

    archer636

    Well-known member
    • Jul 26, 2016
  • #7
  • Is your ph already holding steady? If so, as others suggest, no need to change it. That’s what its job is.

    If you do add more, use pool math to figure exactly how much and start in 1/3 increments.

    I mix anything I add (except cya & bleach) in a 1 gallon bucket of water then pour it slowly over a return.

    • Forums
    • Water Chemistry
    • Testing and Balancing Your Water

    Fishy1234

    • Dec 31, 2019
  • #1
  • How to add baking soda to a pool

    ajw22

    • Dec 31, 2019
  • #2
  • pH of 7.4 is fine. Just monitor the pH and see how it changes.

    If you need to raise the pH then aerate your pool by running your spa spillover.

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    mknauss

    • Dec 31, 2019
  • #3
  • Fishy1234

    • Dec 31, 2019
  • #4
  • How to add baking soda to a pool

    mknauss

    • Dec 31, 2019
  • #5
  • Fishy1234

    • Dec 31, 2019
  • #6
  • How to add baking soda to a pool

    mknauss

    • Dec 31, 2019
  • #7
  • Your ph will rise with the resumption of fill water in the next month or so. Unless you are using trichlor. If you are using trichlor, you should be keeping your TA at 90+.

    Fishy1234

    • Dec 31, 2019
  • #8
  • Your ph will rise with the resumption of fill water in the next month or so. Unless you are using trichlor. If you are using trichlor, you should be keeping your TA at 90+.

    Not a chemistry nerd? You don’t need to be!! This pool alkalinity thing is a breeze!! The total alkalinity (TA) is the measurement of how alkaline your pool water is. For swimming pool water, we concern ourselves with bicarbonate alkalinity which should be maintained between 80 ppm and 120 ppm. When the total alkalinity is within range, it stops the pH from bouncing up and down, or sometimes called “pH Bounce”. It also helps stabilize your pool’s pH level.

    Remember to take small steps when making adjustments to your (TA). You can always add more but it’s a little harder to get it out.

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    How Do I Know If I Need To Increase My Pool Alkalinity?

    That’s what we TEST TEST and TEST our pool water. There’s no way for us to know what our chemical readings are without taking the proper tests. Our alkalinity levels should be between 80 – 120 ppm and your pH should be a stable 7.2 – 7.8. The pool test kit I use and recommend is the Taylor K-2006. It’s the best on the market and will give you the most accurate readings.

    How Much Baking Soda Should I Add To My Pool?

    As a general rule, you’ll want to use 1.5 lbs. of baking soda per 10,000 gallons of pool water to increase your pool’s alkalinity 10 ppm. Or you can use this tool for your pool calculations. Once you know your pool water volume, you’re half way to success.

    How To Add Baking Soda To Your Pool

    No diluting your baking soda in a bucket is needed. Baking soda is safe to add directly to your pool. For this procedure you’ll need:

    • Enough baking soda for your size pool
    • A glass measuring cup
    • Safety goggles

    Try to not use baking soda on a windy day as this will cause frustration and possible loss of your chemical.

    • Add about 1/2 of the baking soda you’ve measured out. Evenly sprinkle it around the perimeter of the pool, starting in the deepest part of the pool.
    • Turn the pump motor on and filter for 8 – 10 hours.
    • Come back, retest, and make another adjustment if needed.

    This is a systemic procedure, meaning, the baking soda must go through the entire system, so allow for one full turn-over of the water before retesting. Increase your pool’s alkalinity by taking small steps. We can always add more baking soda if needed, but it’s much more difficult to take it out.

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    What Happens If I Add Too Much Baking Soda?

    If you accidently over-shoot your alkalinity mark and use too much baking soda, there are some simple things you can do such as:

    • Add some water to dilute the baking soda. Only do this if you already have lower alkalinity fill water.
    • Add muriatic acid to lower the alkalinity

    Baking Soda or Soda Ash?

    Since starting in the pool industry in 1999, I’ve always used sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) to raise total alkalinity and sodium carbonate (soda ash) to raise pH. The only the exception to this rule is if BOTH the total alkalinity and pH are low. Then of course, baking soda is my go-to product.

    Can Baking Soda Save Me Money?

    In short, absolutely YES!! Being that baking soda is simply sodium bicarbonate, and you can easily find it for a fraction of the price you’d pay for Alkalinity Decreaser at your local pool store. So go buy some baking soda and get your pool’s alkalinity in check.

    Can I Become A Pool Alkalinity Pro?

    Can you become a pro and take care of your pool? Yes and yes. Just by learning a few simple things, you’ll be well on your way to maintaining your pool like a professional that’s been cleaning pools for over 20 years. (Wink).

    You might like these

    15 Money Saving Tips For Your Pool

    Do you want to save more money on your pool maintenance? Use these money-saving swimming pool tips and see immediate results!

    Swimming Pool Resources For Beginners & eBooks

    Swimming Pool Resources Offers Your Swimming Pool Maintenance Tips Along W/ eBooks & Consultations.

    How to Balance the Calcium Hardness Level in Your Pool

    Learn how to control the calcium hardness in your pool to keep it safe, clean, swimmable all season long.

    Why Sodium Hypochlorite Liquid Chlorine Is The Best Pool Shock

    Do you need to shock your pool? Does pool shock make a difference/? Give sodium hypochlorite a try.

    How to Use Muriatic Acid to Lower Your Pool’s Alkalinity

    Muriatic Acid Is A Great Way To Lower Your Pool’s Alkalinity. But Be Careful As It’s Very Corrosive.

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    Introduction

    Did you know that the lower the alkalinity of your swimming pool, the higher its acidity? Consequentially, an acidic swimming pool is corrosive and unsafe for both swimmers and the lifespan of the swimming pool and if you have such, it is time to repair and remodel the pool. The issue is, it is hard to know the alkaline level of your swimming pool water in one glance. It may appear bright and clean but with unsafe alkaline levels.

    Why Is It Paramount to Raise Your Pool’s Alkalinity Level?

    Your swimming pool can come to immeasurable harm if it contains water with low alkalinity. You risk your pool walls becoming etched, delaminated, or cracked. Some metal surfaces will give way and melt under the corrosive water, which aftereffect is a stained pool wall.

    Even the slightest alterations on pool water chemical composition can cause severe fluctuations in the pH levels. When the pH level becomes unbalanced, the phenomenon is called pH bounce and can cause low alkalinity in the pool, as the case may be.

    With low alkalinity, the standard amount of chlorine added to your pool would be useless. It would only be useful when more than the usual amount is added for standard results. This means you buy more chlorine and waste more time trying to get to an adequate concentration level with the substance. Asides its effects on your pool, a low alkalinity swimming pool is unsafe for swimmers as the acidic water can cause nasal, eye, and skin irritations.

    What Causes Low Pool Alkalinity?

    The following points are to be considered as culprits for pool alkalinity;

    • Use of dry acid or muriatic acid. These chemicals, although useful in treating swimming pool water, are notorious for reducing pH concentration in water. A way of fixing this is by applying only a prescribed dose of the chemical in case there is a need to lower your pool’s pH. Then you can test your pool’s alkalinity level after 6 hours.
    • It probably rained hard. Rainwater might be low in alkaline levels, and when it rains hard, your pool may become flooded, and this will affect the average alkalinity of your pool.
    • If you drain or backwash your pool, adding freshwater with a low alkalinity level is bound to deplete the overall pH of your pool.

    So How Exactly Can I Increase My Swimming Pool’s Alkalinity?

    Bear these two things in mind – your target range and your swimming pool size. Ideally, your pool should be between 80-120 parts per million. However, depending on the area, your swimming pool is located, experts might require you to stay in the 100 – 120 ppm range.

    Your Swimming Pool Alkalinity Can Be Improved By The Following Methods:

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    Use Baking Soda

    Sodium bicarbonate, aka baking soda, is one of the most useful compounds in the pool industry. Substances like alka-plus, aka-buffer, or alkaline increases are all products used to increase the alkalinity of a swimming pool. The deal is finding the ones that are made of sodium bicarbonate.

    There is no substance that increases alkalinity like baking soda, and the fact that it is readily available and cheap makes it irreplaceable.

    You can get sodium bicarb from a retail store or a pool supplier – it is the same compound. The only difference is that buying from your pool supplier comes with perks like instructions on how to use. Buying from a retail shop, you may not be given such instructions.

    Procedures for Using Sodium Bicarbonate to Increase Pool Alkalinity

    • Check The Overall Pool Alkalinity: Finding out the total alkalinity level of your pool will determine if you need to increase or decrease it. If, after testing, your pool alkalinity is below 80 ppm, it is time to add up on the pH concentration.
    • Purchase Enough Sodium Bicarbonate: If your pool alkalinity is severely low, chances are a five-pound container of baking soda will not do the trick. It would be best if you had more than that. You should consult your pool supplier or talk with the retailer as to how much you can buy or what the size of the most massive possible container is.
    • Know The Right Quantity To Add: Too low alkaline level in your pool would make the water acidic. Too high? Just as many troubles. Knowing just the right amount of baking soda to add to your low-alkaline pool is the deal. Half or three-quarters of the recommended amount should do the trick. If, after adding this amount and your pool alkalinity is still low, you can add more baking soda.
    • Dilute the Baking Soda: Every container of sodium bicarbonate comes with instructions for diluting. Do not forget to dilute!
    • Pour It In The Pool: Baking soda is a soluble powder and dissolves quickly in water. You can add a recommended amount into the pool to increase alkalinity. Avoid pouring all in one place and also avoid doing this where the wind is much because the powder particles might be blown into your eyes and mouth.
    • Retest After Some Time: After adding all the treatments to your pool for increasing alkalinity, you can then retest to know the results after six hours. Even if you cannot recheck in six hours, it should not exceed 24 hours.

    If, after going through these processes, your pool alkalinity is still depleted, you can repeat the process and retest until the alkaline level becomes stable.

    Conclusion

    A balanced alkaline level leads to a good swimming pool. Low alkalinity speaks doom for your swimming pool and the swimmers and can be managed by regular checks and tests. This will save you expenses of purchasing new swimming pool equipment or chemicals.
    Your swimming pool type also determines the healthy ppm range for the water. If you have concrete, glass, gunite, vinyl, or shotcrete pool surfaces, then a ppm of 100 – 120 would be healthy enough.

    Water chemistry is a delicate subject and must be strictly adhered to, to keep your pool healthy during peak swimming seasons and beyond.

    • Forums
    • Water Chemistry
    • Testing and Balancing Your Water

    Marcion333

    Well-known member
    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #1
  • How to add baking soda to a pool

    bdavis466

    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #2
  • JamesW

    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #3
  • If the pH is constantly going too high, then you don’t want to raise the TA.

    Is this a salt pool?

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    duraleigh

    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #4
  • pH up – 20 mule team borax (TA comes up to)
    pH down – Muriatic acid
    TA up – Baking soda (pH doesn’t come up much)
    TA down – aeration and acid. it’s process found in Pool School that you must read to make TA change quickly and permanently.

    It sounds like your guy has them a little mixed up.

    Marcion333

    Well-known member
    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #5
  • How to add baking soda to a pool

    YippeeSkippy

    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #6
  • You don’t report your TA level. that plays in to your pH rise also.

    Did you know that your bubblers and fountain will increase your pH from the aeration they produce.

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    bdavis466

    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #7
  • On 12/19, you added baking soda because the TA was 70? Why?

    I would consider a TA around 60 ideal. Raising the TA is only going to make your pH rise faster and higher due to carbon dioxide outgassing. With a TA of 60 and a pH of 7.6-7.8, your acid additions will be much further apart. Unless you are using an acidic form of chlorine (tricolor) or have very low TA fill water, there is no need to ever add baking soda.

    Also your FC level is more than likely below the minimum threshold for your CYA level.

    Marcion333

    Well-known member
    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #8
  • i thought TA should be 80-120.

    currently water features aren’t on

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    bdavis466

    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #9
  • JamesW

    • Dec 30, 2015
  • #10
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    How to add baking soda to a pool

    ewkearns

    Well-known member
    • Dec 31, 2015
  • #11
  • Well-known member
    • Dec 31, 2015
  • #12
  • Is the 80-120 TA rule on this site? If it is, and if it is not valid, I would like to suggest that that reference be revised. It’s difficult enough to understand pool chemistry as it is.

    Just saw in “The ABC’s of pool chemistry” TA recommended level (60-120).

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    bdavis466

    • Dec 31, 2015
  • #13
  • It was changed a couple months back for that very reason, but I think there are still some areas that say 80-120.

    My understanding was the higher range was more intended for those that use trichlor to prevent the pH from crashing; odd since pucks are so heavily discouraged. At any rate, a TA of 60 will significantly help with acid additions regardless of the method of chlorination.

    If trichlor is used, one must monitor the pH and TA to make sure that they don’t get too low. With LC and SWGs the natural tendancy is for the pH and TA to rise anyway so its not much of an issue(even with a TA as low as 50).

    JamesW

    • Dec 31, 2015
  • #14
  • The recommended levels are shown here.

    How to add baking soda to a pool

    JoyfulNoise

    • Dec 31, 2015
  • #15
  • Your pool and plaster are new, so you will likely have fast rising pH for a quite a long time to come (12 months or more). You’re going to need to find a pH and TA that works best for your pool as a new pool surface tends to behave a little differently from an older, seasoned pool. TFP Recommended levels are a good starting point but it will require a little experimentation on your part to find out what works.

    You can not mix what we teach here with pool store or pool service advice. The two are incompatible with TFP and you are just going to get all turned around trying to figure out why TFP says one thing but the pool service guy is doing another. I know you’re concerned about taking over pool care on your own as it seems like a daunting task especially if you’ve never had to deal with a pool previously. But, if you get the recommended test kit and you follow what we teach here, I can assure you that you will not need a pool service (and save that money being spent). The choice is yours and I wish you the best of luck with your new pool.