How to address envelopes with attn

How to address envelopes with attn

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How to Add an Attention on Mailing Envelopes

Addressing an envelope may seem like a simple task, but a small mistake might mean your letter is not received by the intended recipient. If you are writing a letter to an individual at a large organization such as a company or a school, it’s important to address the envelope to their attention. The United States Postal Services recommends that you do this with an “Attention” line, which should be the first line of the address.

Write “Attn” and the recipient’s name on the center of the envelope. For example: “Attn Jane Smith.”

Write the organization name below the recipient’s name, such as “Hartford Bank” or “Green Elementary School.”

Write the street address of the organization below its name, such as “123 Black St.”

Write the city, state abbreviation and zip code below the street address, such as “Hartwood, WA 98001.”

You can write the recipient’s name larger than the rest of the address, so it stands out.

How to address envelopes with attn

Have you gotten out of the habit of sending snail mail and stress out about the simple act of addressing an envelope? That’s what happens when you haven’t done it in a while, but don’t let it stop you from putting a pen to paper and mailing something that requires a stamp.

It’s important to put the intended recipient’s and sender’s addresses in the correct spots on the envelope. Double check the recipient’s address to make sure you have the correct one.

Whether you’re doing business through the postal service or mailing someone a love letter, you need to know the proper way to address the envelope. Sometimes you’re required to send hardcopy business correspondence through the mail. While sending messages and thank you notes via email has become acceptable, even better etiquette is to send a handwritten note.

Simple Steps

In some cases, it’s fine to send email, but there are occasions when you’ll want to use an old fashioned method of correspondence. Whether you’re mailing an invitation, thank you note, or a letter, you’ll need to include some basic information on the envelope to ensure that it reaches its destination in a timely manner.

Addressing an envelope isn’t difficult if you understand some of the basics. The USPS needs to know the destination as well as where the piece of mail is coming from in case there’s a problem with the delivery and it has to be returned.

The purpose of having guidelines for addressing the envelope is to make the postal workers’ jobs easier in sorting and delivering the mail. If you get too creative, you’ll slow the carrier down and may even risk having your letter go to the wrong address. Please save your creativity for what is inside for the sake of the USPS.

Also make sure you write clearly to make the address easy to read. Using cursive or an italics font can put a strain on the carrier’s eyes.

General Guidelines for U.S. Mail

Most of the time you can fall back on the general recommended rules of addressing your envelope, whether you are sending a business letter or a thank you note. In the upper left-hand corner, you’ll need the sender’s name on the top line, the street address or post office box on the second line, and the city, state and zip on the third line.

In the center of the envelope, you should put the name of the intended recipient on the top line, his or her street address on the next line, and the city, state and zip on the third line – exactly how you would write the sender’s information. However, you may need an additional line for the name of the company or unit of the address such as an apartment or suite number.

You’ll want to add any titles such as “Dr.” or “Ms.” if you know that the recipient prefers to be addressed as such. You should also do this when sending to an elderly person or someone in a position of authority to show respect.

In some cases, such as when a woman lives alone, people prefer not to have their full first names on the outside of an envelope. You may use an initial, such as “M. Peabody.” This makes the name less gender specific and may give the person a more secure feeling of anonymity.

If the recipient is temporarily staying in someone else’s home or you are concerned that the USPS may not deliver the mail with an unfamiliar name, you may add a note beneath the recipient’s name that this is in care of someone who lives at this address. For example, you may use “C/O John Smith” on the line beneath “Mildred Thomas.”

Sample Address

Emma Smith
456 NW Silver Street

Apt 3N
Seattle, WA 98126

Business Letter Rules

When sending a business letter, you’ll need to maintain professional etiquette throughout the entire process. Start with the general guidelines and add a couple more pieces of information.

After the recipient’s name, add his or her position, such as “Director of Marketing.” Try to do this on the same line as the name, but if there isn’t enough room, you may move the title down to the next line.

Beneath that, add the name of the company, followed by the address as directed in the general guidelines above. If you’re unsure of the recipient’s name, you may write “Attn: Director of Marketing.”

Sample Address

Sydney Johnson, Creative Director
Smith & Co.
800 Ocean Avenue
Floor 10
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Mail to Overseas Military Installations

When you send a letter to a person in the military stationed overseas, use the same general guidelines with a few additions. You’ll want to add the recipient’s rank and full name. The unit or squadron number should go on the second line.

The next line should include APO or FPO, according to where the person is stationed, followed by the abbreviation of the region. The last line should include the name or abbreviation of the country in caps. Always add the full postal code to make sure it reaches the intended destination.

Sample Address

SGT Marcus Rosa
Unit 345 Box 21
APO AA 92136

Address Rules for Mailing to Other Countries

The general rules for addressing an envelope for European or other overseas destinations are similar. Start with the recipient’s name and title on the first line, followed by the street address on the second, the city, province, and state with the postal code on the next line. The last line should have the name of the country in all caps. Beneath your return address, you should include “U.S.A.”

Sample Address

Andrea Jimenez
Carrer de la Pau 15

46001 Valencia (Alicante)
SPAIN

How to address envelopes with attn

Jupiterimages/Polka Dot/Getty Images

How to Add an Attention on Mailing Envelopes

Addressing an envelope may seem like a simple task, but a small mistake might mean your letter is not received by the intended recipient. If you are writing a letter to an individual at a large organization such as a company or a school, it’s important to address the envelope to their attention. The United States Postal Services recommends that you do this with an “Attention” line, which should be the first line of the address.

Write “Attn” and the recipient’s name on the center of the envelope. For example: “Attn Jane Smith.”

Write the organization name below the recipient’s name, such as “Hartford Bank” or “Green Elementary School.”

Write the street address of the organization below its name, such as “123 Black St.”

Write the city, state abbreviation and zip code below the street address, such as “Hartwood, WA 98001.”

You can write the recipient’s name larger than the rest of the address, so it stands out.

How to address envelopes with attn

envelope image by Peter Baxter from Fotolia.com

How to Type a Business Letter With an Attention Line

The days when businesses ran completely on paper sent by “snail” mail (mail sent through the US Postal Service) are long gone. Today’s technology has significantly improved the tedium and repetition of office work, but every so often offices still have to send items the old-fashioned way. Correctly formatting a business letter for mailing is still important knowledge to have in the workplace. Sometimes letters need the added information of an “Attention To” in order for the letter to reach the correct person or position.

Place the name on the first line of the address followed by the title, if you know the person’s name and title. On the next line, place the street address or post office box. On the next line, place the city, state and address. You do not need an “Attention To” if you have the name and title.

If you don’t know the person’s name—for example, you want to send a resume to the Human Resources department—place the company name on the first line and then the address. Place the envelope lengthwise on your writing surface. Put “Attention: Human Resources” or “Attention To: Human Resources” on the bottom left corner of the envelope.

If you know a first name but not a last name, you can address the letter using the first name after the colon. For example, “Attention: Jane in Human Resources.” Placement is still on the bottom left corner of the envelope.

Try to obtain the contact person’s full name by using the Internet or calling the company. It is always better to be specific when addressing a business letter.

Warnings

Don’t type out an address or address label and then handwrite “Attention To:” as it will look like an afterthought.

How to Address Mail With ATTN

When mailing an envelope to a business address it is always best to be able to mark it to a specific person’s attention. The majority of mail received by a business is processed through a mailing room. If it is not clearly addressed to a specific person your mail will be sent to a general department and then resorted again.

It may or may not wind up in the right hands in a timely manner. Knowing how to add an “attention” to a mailing envelope in such a way as it neither confuses the address for the postal service and delays delivery, and so it provides direction to the mailing room of the business is essential to getting your envelope into the right hands at the right time.

Ensure You Have the Correct Name and Spelling

Consult the personnel directory of the business or school you are mailing your envelope to and make sure you have the correct name and spelling of the person to whom you need to mark the envelope. If you do not have a directory, call the main switchboard of the place you are mailing it to and ask them for the name and correct spelling.

Address Your Envelope

Address your envelope. Place your return address in the upper left hand corner and the address it is being mailed to centered on the envelope. The address you are mailing to should be written in a larger type then the return address. Both addresses should be printed in all capital letters with permanent ink (either pen or marker).

Add “Attention” or “ATTN” on the Envelope

Mark the envelope to the specific person’s attention. To do this print “ATTN” or “ATTENTION” above the first line of the address it is being mailed to and then write the person’s name after it in all capital letters. So, if your are marking an envelope to John Doe’s attention, above the first line of the mailing address you would right “ATTN JOHN DOE” or “ATTENTION JOHN DOE.”

For added surety that your correspondence goes to the right person use an extra envelope. Type or print the persons name on the center of the front face of the envelope, place your correspondence inside this envelope and then place the envelope inside the one that you will put the mailing address on and postage. This way if the wrong person opens it they will immediately know who it needs to go to.

Warnings

Envelopes that do not include the proper mailing address and zip code will not be delivered in a timely manner if they are delivered at all. Make sure you have all of the correct information before posting your envelope.

How to address envelopes with attn

Have you gotten out of the habit of sending snail mail and stress out about the simple act of addressing an envelope? That’s what happens when you haven’t done it in a while, but don’t let it stop you from putting a pen to paper and mailing something that requires a stamp.

It’s important to put the intended recipient’s and sender’s addresses in the correct spots on the envelope. Double check the recipient’s address to make sure you have the correct one.

Whether you’re doing business through the postal service or mailing someone a love letter, you need to know the proper way to address the envelope. Sometimes you’re required to send hardcopy business correspondence through the mail. While sending messages and thank you notes via email has become acceptable, even better etiquette is to send a handwritten note.

Simple Steps

In some cases, it’s fine to send email, but there are occasions when you’ll want to use an old fashioned method of correspondence. Whether you’re mailing an invitation, thank you note, or a letter, you’ll need to include some basic information on the envelope to ensure that it reaches its destination in a timely manner.

Addressing an envelope isn’t difficult if you understand some of the basics. The USPS needs to know the destination as well as where the piece of mail is coming from in case there’s a problem with the delivery and it has to be returned.

The purpose of having guidelines for addressing the envelope is to make the postal workers’ jobs easier in sorting and delivering the mail. If you get too creative, you’ll slow the carrier down and may even risk having your letter go to the wrong address. Please save your creativity for what is inside for the sake of the USPS.

Also make sure you write clearly to make the address easy to read. Using cursive or an italics font can put a strain on the carrier’s eyes.

General Guidelines for U.S. Mail

Most of the time you can fall back on the general recommended rules of addressing your envelope, whether you are sending a business letter or a thank you note. In the upper left-hand corner, you’ll need the sender’s name on the top line, the street address or post office box on the second line, and the city, state and zip on the third line.

In the center of the envelope, you should put the name of the intended recipient on the top line, his or her street address on the next line, and the city, state and zip on the third line – exactly how you would write the sender’s information. However, you may need an additional line for the name of the company or unit of the address such as an apartment or suite number.

You’ll want to add any titles such as “Dr.” or “Ms.” if you know that the recipient prefers to be addressed as such. You should also do this when sending to an elderly person or someone in a position of authority to show respect.

In some cases, such as when a woman lives alone, people prefer not to have their full first names on the outside of an envelope. You may use an initial, such as “M. Peabody.” This makes the name less gender specific and may give the person a more secure feeling of anonymity.

If the recipient is temporarily staying in someone else’s home or you are concerned that the USPS may not deliver the mail with an unfamiliar name, you may add a note beneath the recipient’s name that this is in care of someone who lives at this address. For example, you may use “C/O John Smith” on the line beneath “Mildred Thomas.”

Sample Address

Emma Smith
456 NW Silver Street

Apt 3N
Seattle, WA 98126

Business Letter Rules

When sending a business letter, you’ll need to maintain professional etiquette throughout the entire process. Start with the general guidelines and add a couple more pieces of information.

After the recipient’s name, add his or her position, such as “Director of Marketing.” Try to do this on the same line as the name, but if there isn’t enough room, you may move the title down to the next line.

Beneath that, add the name of the company, followed by the address as directed in the general guidelines above. If you’re unsure of the recipient’s name, you may write “Attn: Director of Marketing.”

Sample Address

Sydney Johnson, Creative Director
Smith & Co.
800 Ocean Avenue
Floor 10
Los Angeles, CA 90021

Mail to Overseas Military Installations

When you send a letter to a person in the military stationed overseas, use the same general guidelines with a few additions. You’ll want to add the recipient’s rank and full name. The unit or squadron number should go on the second line.

The next line should include APO or FPO, according to where the person is stationed, followed by the abbreviation of the region. The last line should include the name or abbreviation of the country in caps. Always add the full postal code to make sure it reaches the intended destination.

Sample Address

SGT Marcus Rosa
Unit 345 Box 21
APO AA 92136

Address Rules for Mailing to Other Countries

The general rules for addressing an envelope for European or other overseas destinations are similar. Start with the recipient’s name and title on the first line, followed by the street address on the second, the city, province, and state with the postal code on the next line. The last line should have the name of the country in all caps. Beneath your return address, you should include “U.S.A.”

Sample Address

Andrea Jimenez
Carrer de la Pau 15

46001 Valencia (Alicante)
SPAIN

An Iowa College in the Liberal Arts Tradition

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Addressing an Envelope

How to address envelopes with attn

When addressing write the address parallel to the longest edge of the envelope.

The address you are mailing to should be written as follows:

  • Recipient’s name
  • Business’s name (if applicable)
  • Street address (with apartment or suite number)
  • City, State and ZIP code (on the same line)*
  • Country*

The return address should be written in the upper left-hand corner of the envelope.

  • The return address is not a requirement on all types of mail. However, omitting a return address prevents the USPS from returning the item to you if it is undeliverable. (examples damage, postage due, or an incorrect address)
  • Some classes or types of mail do require a valid return address.

The stamp or postage is placed in the upper right-hand corner of the envelope.

Addressing a Package

How to address envelopes with attn

When addressing write the address on the largest face and parallel to the longest edge of the package.

The address you are shipping to should be written as follows:

  • Recipient’s name
  • Business’s name (if applicable)
  • Street address (with apartment or suite number)
  • City, State and ZIP code (on the same line)*
  • Country*

*(for letters or packages going outside the USA, contact the Mail Center staff for any questions on address formatting for mailing internationally)

For any other questions regarding addressing an envelope or package contact the Mail Center staff or the USPS website link below.

TONYA CUNNINGHAM

CLASS

Computer mail such as email, faxing and Internet messages have become so commonplace that properly addressing traditional mailing envelopes seems to be a thing of the past. However, there are times that so-called “snail mail” is still the chosen method of sending and receiving correspondence. While schools teach the basics of addressing an envelope, the topic of how to list multiple recipients is often assumed or forgotten as an unlikely situation. If you find yourself stumped over the technicality of how to accomplish this task, there are a number of ways to address a piece of mail to many people at the same address.

Use the family name to cover all recipients. Addressing an envelope to multiple recipients belonging to the same family, with the same last name at the same address, is a quite simple process. On the first address line where one name would normally sit, the line should read the family name in such a manner as “The Family of Mr. and Mrs. John Doe” or “The Doe Family.” This informs the recipients that the mail is intended for everyone belonging to that family, particularly if they are all at that address.

Create a general statement of reference for contacts. For example, the first line of the address body could simply say “To the Residents of” followed by the line beneath, which will contain the address. If the recipients are part of a business, rather than a residence, you may want to replace “residents” with the appropriate titles of addressees, such as “employees” or “supervisors” or “owners” of the listed address.

List unmarried recipients of the same address as follows: “Mr. John Doe, Mrs. Jane Smith, Ms. Mary Mack, Mr. Jack White” when there are a number of recipients small enough to fit on one line of the envelope. If there are only a few more recipients than will fit on one line, it is acceptable to continue on an equally aligned second line without using the word “and,” so the second line will simply continue with “Ms. Sandy Green, Miss Lisa Brown, Mr. Gary Winter.” There are no rules that a third line cannot exist, but it is far less practical because this would require a large envelope, not to mention detailed reading on behalf of the mail receiver in order to distinguish who should and should not view the mail inside. In this case, referring back to writing a more general group name such as described in the previous paragraph would suffice.