How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

Whether at a pool, beach, lake or park, putting on a swimsuit can be a highlight of the summer, but don’t let the laundry aspect scare you. There’s no reason to stress about how to wash your swimsuit after a day in the sun.

TODAY Style spoke with the experts to get some tips for how to keep your swimsuit clean as you enjoy your summer.

Can you put a bathing suit in the washing machine?

The short answer is: It depends. Most bathing suits will tell you on the label that hand washing is preferable.

According to ProSwimwear, an international competitive swimwear retailer, the wash cycle can damage the swimsuit’s fabric. Outdoor clothing company Recreational Equipment, Inc., commonly referred to as REI, also recommends washing by hand.

Hand washing not only ensures that your bright coral swimsuits stay bright (and coral), but it also gives your suit more longevity and helps keep its shape.

Detergent company The Laundress suggests washing swimwear by hand in a bath of warm water.

But there are also some companies that intentionally use machine-friendly fabrics.

Jake Danehy, CEO and co-founder of sustainable swimwear brand Fair Harbor, says that his company’s wares are made so that they can be machine washed, so be sure to check the label on your specific swimwear.

Should I use baking soda?

If your swimsuit does require hand washing , baking soda is a perfect product to use.

Tyler Mulholland, clothing sales lead for REI, calls baking soda an “excellent means of cleaning all types of swimwear.”

Baking soda brand Arm & Hammer recommends using half a cup of baking soda to “brighten,” “freshen,” “remove odors” and “give new life” to laundry. Just fill the sink with cool water, add the baking soda, let your suit soak, rinse it out and hang it to dry.

Not only is baking soda great for a general clean, but it also does the trick for pesky stains. Arm & Hammer also recommends pre-treating stains, such as coffee or wine, by mixing 6 tablespoons of baking soda with 1/3 cup warm water to create a paste. Test it on the swimsuit in a discreet area, to make sure there is no color bleeding or fading, and then apply the paste to the stain. Once the paste dries, wash it out and hang to dry.

So, what is the best way to wash a bathing suit?

Using mild or even no detergent at all is the best way to clean your suit. Corey Simpson, PR and communications coordinator at Patagonia told TODAY that washing in cold water without detergent is recommended, while Danehy recommends using mild detergents for machine-friendly swimsuits.

The Laundress recommends using a small amount of detergent in a warm bath, agitating the water to incorporate the soap and letting the swimsuit soak for 30 minutes before rinsing clean.

When should I wash my suit?

Representatives from Patagonia, REI and Fair Harbor all agree that suits don’t need to be washed every time you wear them.

“Let them air dry,” said Danehy. “And only wash them when need be.”

Mulholland suggests washing swimsuits roughly every three to five wears.

There is one occasion when it’s beneficial to wash immediately. The ProSwimwear site suggests using a mild soap as soon as you’re out of chlorinated water. Chlorine that is not washed away with soap can eat away at your suit, degrading the fabric.

Simpson agrees that removing excess salt water and chlorine is essential to improve longevity, and recommends rinsing the garment in fresh water as “minimum best practice.”

What if I need to machine wash?

It is important to consider fabrics when buying swimsuits, especially if you are someone who prefers to machine wash. Look for longer-lasting materials, like polyesters and nylons, when possible.

What about drying?

The one thing emphasized by all our experts? Always, always hang dry your suit. Simpson says that dryers significantly decrease the lifetime of a suit, especially those with materials such as Spandex or Lycra.

If you want your bikini to last through the years, make sure you hang it to dry.

Now that you know how to keep your suit clean, you’re ready to hit the beach in style!

Getting a bathing suit to fit properly can be a challenge. Often the bottoms are too tight or too saggy for the rest of the suit. You can only make a too-tight suit larger if it comes with strings or ties to adjust the size. You can make a suit smaller by adjusting the ties and sewing loose areas along the waistband or leg holes of the bottoms. Try using the tie method first, as some sewing modifications to a suit bottom may be visible.

Put on the bathing suit. Wear the suit as you normally would, without the addition of underwear. If you are modifying the suit, you will not be able to return it anyway.

Note any ill-fitting areas. It is nearly impossible to make the bottoms larger–unless the suit is starting to sag–but you can make bottoms smaller. Note any area where the bottoms sag or have gaps. Typically, this is around the legs, waist and along the seat.

Adjust any straps or strings that come with the bathing suit. Sometimes you can make the suit fit better just by adjusting these attachments. Make the ties looser to make the bottoms larger, or tighten the ties to make the suit smaller.

Check for any sagging once more. If you still have fit problems, gather the elastic seam along the legs or waist. Pin the band together with a safety pin. Remove the suit.

Fold the pinned areas together. Sew the pinned areas by hand with a needle and thread. You may need to use a thimble to get the needle to poke through the elastic. Sew through the pinned areas with two lines of stitches and secure with a knot.

Put on the bottoms and check the fit again. Make any additional adjustments for fit and sew in place. Repeat the process until the bottoms fit how you want them to.

Brenda Priddy has more than 10 years of crafting and design experience, as well as more than six years of professional writing experience. Her work appears in online publications such as Donna Rae at Home, Five Minutes for Going Green and Daily Mayo. Priddy also writes for Archstone Business Solutions and holds an Associate of Arts in English from McLennan Community College.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

Larkin Clark ・ June 27, 2018

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

But if anyone’s figured out how to find The One (yes, that perfect-fitting option is out there), it’s Mali Sananikone Gaw. The designer (as well as co-founder and CEO) of new performance-luxe swimwear line Via Eden is a real-deal enthusiast—over the years, she’s amassed more than 300 suits, some of which she’s had since she was a teenager growing up in Hawaii.

Given that swimsuits are to summer what a scoop of nut butter is to your a.m. smoothie (in other words: necessary), you’d think finding a flattering option would be a cinch.

“The sheer volume of my personal collection can be partially attributed to the fact that it was hard to find swimsuits that I could wear to paddleboard or surf that were also stylish, luxurious, and made me look great,” Gaw says. It’s why she and her co-founder spent 18 months traveling around the world researching fabrics—and another year testing samples on real women—before they started production.

“Most high-end swimwear is fit on models with ‘perfect’ bodies,” a method inherited from the ready-to-wear clothing industry, she says. “This becomes a problem [because a suit’s] so small in comparison to a dress, and needs to fit like a second skin. It’s obvious when the fit’s imperfect somewhere.” (Not to mention there’s no such thing as a “perfect” body, but I digress.)

While industry standards are partially responsible for ill-fitting swimwear, Gaw also says the customer has more power than she thinks in the process.

Here, she shares six mistakes you may be making that prevent a perfect fit—and how to fix them.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@zeeforkudetabali

You’re shopping alone: Gaw says many women have very specific preferences about how swimwear should look on their bodies—and that often limits their ability to find the right suit. Her advice? When you shop, bring a friend with you, pull a bunch of different styles you may not usually try on, and ask your BFF to take photos of you in your favorite options so you can see how they actually fit.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@haiimmaddie

You’re only looking at the size listed on the tag: It might sound obvious, but pay attention to the actual fit, rather than what a tag says. “Sizing in swimwear varies so widely between brands and countries that we always tell our customers to ignore the numbers and focus on how a garment fits,” Gaw says. Also consider buying from brands that sell their bikinis as separates, and always try on at least two sizes to see which feels best. “It’s really easy to get caught up in size discrepancies, especially when buying non-American brands, as they don’t vanity size like we do in the US,” she notes.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@loveandloathingla

You’re reaching for poorly constructed options: “Sometimes [fit issues are] the result of a garment that’s too small—but more often than not, pinching, cinching, or spillage is caused by unflattering construction techniques,” says Gaw. Her suggestion? Avoid swimwear that has elastic that’s exposed, hidden under zigzag stitching, or tucked under the folded-over edge of the fabric and stitched in place—all common construction techniques that can contribute to a not-so-comfy fit. Instead, look for super-flat, thin, elastic seams and “clean-finished” construction, in which the stretchy material’s tucked between more layers of fabric and away from your skin.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@haleykiss

You’re trying too hard to cover your butt: While at first, you may feel uncomfortable baring a bit of your backside, Gaw says it’s actually more flattering to wear the cheekiest bottom you’re comfortable with. (Besides, your 30-minute Dakota Johnson-inspired, plié-packed workout‘s been doing wonders.) That said, if you’re not willing to go full-on Brazilian with your suit’s cut, the designer recommends color blocking or contrasting bands around the waist and leg openings (which create the appearance of a skimpier bottom without actually showing more skin) or bikini bottoms that have pin-tucking, ruching, or a dipped-back waistline (which give your bum a visual lift).

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@parkncube

You’re not prioritizing support: You wouldn’t leave the house (or hey, get out of bed) with an ill-fitting bra—but when it comes to swimsuits. many women don’t give support a second thought. Needless to say, you probably should. Gaw recommends looking for options with an adjustable underbust seam for one-pieces or bikinis with underbust ties (which allow you to customize the fit without the stiffness of an underwire). “Make sure the underbust band or strap is as tight as you can comfortably tolerate,” she says. “It should fit snugly but allow for movement—and be parallel to the ground, not angled down, which compromises the support.”

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@imaanhammam

You’re using the bra cup pads the suit came with: Women with larger busts sometimes need more support than the average swimsuit cups offer. “Replace them with removable bra cup pads that you can buy from companies like Bravo, which sells its pads online or at fine-department and specialty swim stores,” Gaw suggests. “They’re ultra-thin, light, and natural looking, but still offer great support [and] nipple coverage.” Which means that your trusty cover-up might be getting less mileage this year. Consider it a well-deserved break.

Once you’ve found your new suit, it’s time to make vacation plans—like to one of these healthy-travel hotel destinations. Make more room in your suitcase with these brilliant, flight attendant-approved packing hacks.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

Larkin Clark ・ June 27, 2018

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

But if anyone’s figured out how to find The One (yes, that perfect-fitting option is out there), it’s Mali Sananikone Gaw. The designer (as well as co-founder and CEO) of new performance-luxe swimwear line Via Eden is a real-deal enthusiast—over the years, she’s amassed more than 300 suits, some of which she’s had since she was a teenager growing up in Hawaii.

Given that swimsuits are to summer what a scoop of nut butter is to your a.m. smoothie (in other words: necessary), you’d think finding a flattering option would be a cinch.

“The sheer volume of my personal collection can be partially attributed to the fact that it was hard to find swimsuits that I could wear to paddleboard or surf that were also stylish, luxurious, and made me look great,” Gaw says. It’s why she and her co-founder spent 18 months traveling around the world researching fabrics—and another year testing samples on real women—before they started production.

“Most high-end swimwear is fit on models with ‘perfect’ bodies,” a method inherited from the ready-to-wear clothing industry, she says. “This becomes a problem [because a suit’s] so small in comparison to a dress, and needs to fit like a second skin. It’s obvious when the fit’s imperfect somewhere.” (Not to mention there’s no such thing as a “perfect” body, but I digress.)

While industry standards are partially responsible for ill-fitting swimwear, Gaw also says the customer has more power than she thinks in the process.

Here, she shares six mistakes you may be making that prevent a perfect fit—and how to fix them.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@zeeforkudetabali

You’re shopping alone: Gaw says many women have very specific preferences about how swimwear should look on their bodies—and that often limits their ability to find the right suit. Her advice? When you shop, bring a friend with you, pull a bunch of different styles you may not usually try on, and ask your BFF to take photos of you in your favorite options so you can see how they actually fit.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@haiimmaddie

You’re only looking at the size listed on the tag: It might sound obvious, but pay attention to the actual fit, rather than what a tag says. “Sizing in swimwear varies so widely between brands and countries that we always tell our customers to ignore the numbers and focus on how a garment fits,” Gaw says. Also consider buying from brands that sell their bikinis as separates, and always try on at least two sizes to see which feels best. “It’s really easy to get caught up in size discrepancies, especially when buying non-American brands, as they don’t vanity size like we do in the US,” she notes.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@loveandloathingla

You’re reaching for poorly constructed options: “Sometimes [fit issues are] the result of a garment that’s too small—but more often than not, pinching, cinching, or spillage is caused by unflattering construction techniques,” says Gaw. Her suggestion? Avoid swimwear that has elastic that’s exposed, hidden under zigzag stitching, or tucked under the folded-over edge of the fabric and stitched in place—all common construction techniques that can contribute to a not-so-comfy fit. Instead, look for super-flat, thin, elastic seams and “clean-finished” construction, in which the stretchy material’s tucked between more layers of fabric and away from your skin.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@haleykiss

You’re trying too hard to cover your butt: While at first, you may feel uncomfortable baring a bit of your backside, Gaw says it’s actually more flattering to wear the cheekiest bottom you’re comfortable with. (Besides, your 30-minute Dakota Johnson-inspired, plié-packed workout‘s been doing wonders.) That said, if you’re not willing to go full-on Brazilian with your suit’s cut, the designer recommends color blocking or contrasting bands around the waist and leg openings (which create the appearance of a skimpier bottom without actually showing more skin) or bikini bottoms that have pin-tucking, ruching, or a dipped-back waistline (which give your bum a visual lift).

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@parkncube

You’re not prioritizing support: You wouldn’t leave the house (or hey, get out of bed) with an ill-fitting bra—but when it comes to swimsuits. many women don’t give support a second thought. Needless to say, you probably should. Gaw recommends looking for options with an adjustable underbust seam for one-pieces or bikinis with underbust ties (which allow you to customize the fit without the stiffness of an underwire). “Make sure the underbust band or strap is as tight as you can comfortably tolerate,” she says. “It should fit snugly but allow for movement—and be parallel to the ground, not angled down, which compromises the support.”

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suitPhoto: Instagram/@imaanhammam

You’re using the bra cup pads the suit came with: Women with larger busts sometimes need more support than the average swimsuit cups offer. “Replace them with removable bra cup pads that you can buy from companies like Bravo, which sells its pads online or at fine-department and specialty swim stores,” Gaw suggests. “They’re ultra-thin, light, and natural looking, but still offer great support [and] nipple coverage.” Which means that your trusty cover-up might be getting less mileage this year. Consider it a well-deserved break.

Once you’ve found your new suit, it’s time to make vacation plans—like to one of these healthy-travel hotel destinations. Make more room in your suitcase with these brilliant, flight attendant-approved packing hacks.

Trends come and go (and your mileage may vary), but here are the fundamentals.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

Buying a suit off the rack can be a pretty simple process, but that doesn’t mean it’s as easy as finding your size (you do know it, right?) and throwing something on. There are several factors well worth considering if you want to really nail it. As we head into 2020, the modern suit is made with more variation than ever before. Hell, this decade saw the rise of Thom Browne’s signature suit that does not include pants, but shorts, and the rise of a looser, loucher take on the style . Nonetheless, if you’re looking for a no-frills, well-fitted, classic suit, these are the main components worth obsessing over.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

And remember, a tailor can and should be your best friend. All men were created equal, but that doesn’t mean we’re all the same size. Though unfortunately we can’t all afford to go bespoke, the few slight tweaks a tailor can make are well worth their typically small cost.

Shoulders

Make sure the shoulder ends. with your shoulders. This is the first step for a reason. If the jacket you’re trying on is too big or small in the shoulders, put it back and find the one that does. Tailoring is a beautiful thing, but in terms of shoulders, it ain’t worth the squeeze (and is near-impossible).

Chest

Your flat hand should slip easily into your suit under the lapels when the top (or middle) button is fastened. If you put a fist in, the suit should pull at the button. Depending on your personal style, you can take a few liberties with this, but don’t go too far beyond this guideline in either direction unless you’re very sure of yourself (in which case, great!).

Buttons

The top button of a two-button suit—or the middle button of a three-button suit—should not fall below your navel. And remember, in terms of buttoning, from top to bottom, on a three button suit: Sometimes, Always, Never. And on a two-button suit: Always, Never.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

Length

With your arms at your sides, your knuckles should be even with the bottom of your jacket. Again, there are always exceptions to the rules as trends come and go, but as a jumping-off point, it’s never a bad idea to make sure your jacket covers your ass (no, literally).

Sleeves

Jacket sleeves should fall where the base of your thumb meets your wrist. If you’re a watch-wearer, a tailor can take up the sleeve of your shirts and jackets a little more as to more adequately show off the goods, but generally speaking, this guideline sets you up nicely for achieving the next step.

Those who drafted Mondesi early in Roto leagues shouldn’t panic just yet

It’s not even opening day (just yet) and we already have our first IL stint for an early-round draft pick with Adalberto Mondesi headed to the 10-day injury list, retroactive to March 30, with a right oblique strain. I didn’t move Mondesi down much based on the news that he’ll be on the IL to open the season for two reasons: One, we don’t know how serious it is yet, so he might end up just missing the minimum; Two, because even if Mondesi misses a month, he could still lead the league in steals. That being said, I do view his value differently if I’m trading him vs. looking to acquire him. If I have him, he’s probably too important to my team build to sell him at a discount, but if I was trading for him, I wouldn’t pay full price here. It’s a tough spot, but that’s what happens with surprise injuries.

Early on in the Fantasy Baseball season, you probably want to give your team a chance to prove itself before making any drastic moves. You drafted this team for a reason, and even if you didn’t come out of your draft feeling great about your team, you should give it a chance unless you can make an obvious winning move.

Of course, some of you may not have a choice. Eloy Jimenez might be out for most of the season, Zac Gallen might be out until May at the earliest, and we learned Wednesday of Mondesi’s IL stint. You might be left scrambling to fill holes already, and that’s not to mention guys like Stephen Strasburg or Zach Plesac, who look a bit iffy coming out of the spring, or any number of relievers like Joakim Soria, Amir Garrett, or Archie Bradley who didn’t end up in the roles we expected coming out of spring.

Or, you might be looking to take advantage of holes someone else has, offering from your depth to try to snag another elite player. Even in Week 1, there are ways to make your team better via trade. Each week, I’ll be publishing updated trade values for both H2H and Roto leagues to help you find a fair deal. Add up the values of the players involved in the trade and if the side you are acquiring comes out ahead, pull the trigger; if you’re trailing, maybe see if you can get the other person to sweeten the pot.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

Us Moms, we love ourselves some swim skirts. I say this, because every time I’m at the pool, the moms in swim skirts are out in force. And I get the appeal. After baby, there’s just a bit more cellulite, a bit of softening, a bit of droop. Yes. But swim skirts are tricky – they are hardly the panacea of mom-friendly swimwear.

What Swim Skirts Are

  • A great way to cover-up any bum issues: cellulite on bum, a droopy, saggy bum
  • Modest — a great way to provide more bum coverage when bending and chasing around the little one

What Swim Skirts Are Not

  • Something that will camouflage all lower body issues: cellulite and stretch marks on legs, big hips and thighs
  • Something that will fool others into thinking that underneath that skirt, she has hidden a smoking-hot pair of skinny, perfectly toned legs.

When in doubt, keep at least one of these tips in mind:

Tip 1 – Keep ‘Em Short

The key to getting a swim skirt right is proportion. A swim skirt must look like – gasp – actual swimwear. Which means that the bottom of the skirt must hit right below your bum . Any longer and you will look like a little old lady in her swim dress. No matter how bad you think your lower body issues are….. a too long swim skirt will make your overall appearance worse .

Tip 2 – Keep ‘Em Tight

In general, swim skirts should not swish around when you walk. They need to fit fairly tight to your
body. Not so tight as to appear to be a sausage casing, but tight (and short) enough to require built-in bikini bottoms underneath.

The bottom line? If your swim skirt is long and flowy enough to swish like an actual skirt…then it’s an actual skirt. Aka…your cover-up.

Tip 3 – Balance Them Out with the Right Top

Because swim skirts are fairly modest, they simply look better with a bikini top. And if you choose to stick with a slightly longer swim skirt, then it’s imperative that your top be just a wee bit more revealing.

If you had your heart set on a tankini top & swim skirt combo….it can be done, but it’s essential to find the right tankini. You’ll need something that shows more skin than the average tankini to offset the coverage of the swim skirt. Look for tankinis with plunging necklines, or a little sex appeal. One final word of caution: if you are looking for a tankini – skirted bottom to completely camoflauge your post-baby body…you might be better off in a sexy one-piece suit with a great cover-up.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

  1. DKNY Beyond Glam High Waist Skirted Bikini Bottom – Beyond GLAM they are. If you’re loving the high-waisted look, these are for you. The black is classic and as always, slimming plus the shirred material works out some imperfections. Pair them with the U-Wire Bikini Top and a sunhat and work-it over to the water.
  2. Ingrid & Isabel Ruched Maternity Skirted Swim Bottoms – To all pregnant mamas who aren’t forsaking the water: this one’s for you. These bottoms can be worn high on the hips or low, during pregnancy AND after thanks to the stretchy, ruched material. Pair ‘em with this cute little banded swim top and you (and the bump) are ready to go.
  3. Athleta Encintas Kata Swim Skirt – Here’s one for all you active mamas! Athleta has managed to deliver sporty and fun with this suit. Think – your favorite workout outfit turned swimsuit. This skirt is a great length, breathable with some stretch. So whether you’re hitting the sand for a run or doing laps in the pool this suit can keep up. If you’re not sold on the horizontal stripe for your body type, try a solid.
  4. Kenneth Cole Reaction Coastal Escapade Swim Skirt – Kenneth Cole Reaction has a great handle on fun swim skirts that fully cover the bum. Not only does this one stay true to the tips, the mixed pattern works as a camouflage so you won’t feel like you’re putting it ALL out there. Can’t tone it? Tan it. Print it.
  5. Kenneth Cole Reaction Zig to my Zag Rouched Skirt – Another similar option by Kenneth Cole. Again, this great print could work as camo. The matching top is halter-style for those of you who prefer that kind of support…but keep in mind – this skirt (and the rest) would also work with a solid top of your choice. Mixing and matching almost always works with swim and that’s what we love about it.
  6. Coco Rave Striped Skirted Bikini Bottom – This one hits just below the bum (tip 1) and doesn’t swish like an actual skirt. It’s tight enough to appear youthful and sexy but no SO tight that nothing’s left to the imagination. The matching top is lined with adjustable straps and a self-tie back so if you need a little extra room (or less) you’re covered, literally.

The good news? There are a ton of completely practical yet totally sexy swim skirt options for moms. Check out the Swim Guide for more.

June 17, 2016 by Erin

One of the frequently expressed complaints that women have about swimsuits, both handmade and ready-to-wear, is that they don’t offer enough bust support. There are two easy ways you can add bust support to your swimsuit – by adding boning and/or cups. Even those of us that aren’t busty enough to require extra support can enjoy the benefits of boning and cups for they also help a swimsuit stay in place and hold its shape.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

Boning: Boning offers a little bit of support and helps a swimsuit (especially a bikini top) to keep its shape. It can be inserted into just about any swimsuit as you are constructing it – all you need is a side seam. After you sew the side seam, sew another seam 1/4″ from the side seam to create a vertical channel. Insert a piece of plastic boning (that you have cut to size and rounded the ends) into the channel. Remember that your boning will need to be shorter than the unfinished channel length because you still need to sew elastic to the top and bottom. [To see an example of boning insertion in a step-by-step tutorial, you can check out the Sewalong for my Nautilus Swimsuit Top.]

If you want to add boning to a one-piece suit, you will still want to make the boning the same length as if it were for a bikini (5″ is a good ballpark). Sew a channel in the same manner, but close off the bottom of the channel

5″ down with a line of horizontal stitches across the channel.

If you want to add boning to a ready-to-wear swimsuit, sew a strip of swimsuit lining to the inside of the suit at the side seam, insert the boning, and then stitch across the top and bottom of the channel. Alternatively, sew the channel seam, cut a small slit through the lining at the top of the channel, insert the boning, and sew the slit closed.

Bra Cups: Inserting cups into a swimsuit as you sew it is as simple as sliding purchased swimsuit cups between the suit fabric and lining as you construct the suit. Depending on the construction of the suit, the cups may stay in place on their own or you may need to tack them in place from the inside. Before tacking them in place, try on the finished suit, position the cups where they best fit your individual body, pin them in place, and then remove the suit and tack them down. [For more information on choosing cups see the post on my blog about How to Insert Bra Cups Into a Swimsuit.]

To insert cups into a ready-to-wear swimsuit, you can cut a small slit in the lining fabric, slide the cups in, and tack them in the same manner. You can sew the slit closed or just leave it as the lining fabric will not unravel.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

If you can’t find swimsuit cups that fit you or you want the extra support of an underwire, consider sacrificing an old (but well-fitting) bra instead. Cut your bra in half and remove the straps. Cut a piece of swimsuit lining, cut an X in the center (the size of the X will depend upon your cup size), push the cup through, and pin the cup into place.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

Sew the lining to the cups, being careful not to hit your underwire and use the lining piece in your normal swimsuit construction. You can machine sew through the cup itself or hand sew around the edge of cup.

How to adjust to wearing a bathing suit

To prevent visible lines from the front, you may want to cut away the excess lining fabric. If you want a pretty interior finish, you can cut a second piece of lining and use it on the inside of the sewn-in cups. [Thanks so much to Elaine for the idea and photos of inserting a bra into her swimsuit. Read her mini-tutorial on Curvy Sewing Collective for more.]

Alternatively, use your chopped-apart bra just like you would a purchased swimsuit cup – insert it between layers as you sew and tack it in place as described above.

*A bit of self-promotion: check out my Nautilus Swimsuit for a swimsuit pattern with multiple cup size options that includes instructions for both boning and cup insertion.*