How to alleviate tailbone pain

By: Dr. David Oliver, DC, Last Updated: February 7, 2021

How to alleviate tailbone pain

In this video, Dr. Oliver shares 5 ways to ease tailbone pain naturally. When we talk about the tailbone what we’re really describing is the coccyx bone which is right at the base of you spine.

Tailbone pain is typically worst when you are sitting because it puts more pressure on that area. It usually occurs for these reasons:

  • A fall where you land on your tailbone
  • Sitting on hard surfaces for extended periods
  • Anything that puts repetitive or excessive pressure on your tailbone
  • Stopping the irritation that is causing pain
  • Self Massaging the muscles in the area
  • Stretching to reduce the irritation caused by tight muscles

Now, let’s talk about how you can deal with this pain.

5 Ways to Ease Tailbone Pain

#1 – Ice It

How to alleviate tailbone pain
If you’re feeling pain and the area is inflamed, the first thing you should do is apply ice. For this particular area, apply ice for 20 minutes, remove it off for at least 1 hour, and then repeat as needed. This will help reduce the inflammation.

– Do NOT sit while you are icing. This will only cause more pressure on your tailbone. You should lay down while you are applying an ice pack.

#2 – Self Massage

How to alleviate tailbone pain
One of the consequences of Tailbone pain is that the muscles in the area can tighten up. These muscles include your glutes, piriformis, and hip rotators. You can massage these muscles by applying pressure with a massage ball, or a foam roller – to reduce the tension.

– Please note, we don’t want to massage the bone directly, but rather the muscles in the area that are tight.

#3 – Reduce Pressure

How to alleviate tailbone pain

One of the most important things you need to do is to stop irritating your tailbone. Since sitting tends to cause the most pressure, you should eliminate or reduce the amount of time you spend sitting. If that’s not possible, there are special pillows you can purchase.

Look for a pillow that has a hole right where your tailbone is located. You can also try sitting on an airplane neck pillow or anything else that will help reduce the pressure. You can use it at your desk, in your car, or anywhere else you’ll be sitting, especially with hard surfaces.

#4 – Cat & Cow Stretch

How to alleviate tailbone pain
Another way to help calm the area is by light stretching.

The first stretch is the Cat-Cow. This stretch takes your spine through full ranges of motion to reduce the tone in that area. By mobilizing your lumbar spine and pelvis, you will decrease the stress on your tailbone. You can do a version of the Cat-Cow while seated too.

– Most of the movement for this stretch comes from tucking and untucking your pelvis.

#5 – Figure-4 Stretch

How to alleviate tailbone pain
The second stretch you can do is a Figure-4. You’ll lay on your back for this, but make sure you’re not putting any pressure on your tailbone. Try to lay on a soft surface or put a towel/pillow if needed.

Hold this position for 20-30 seconds so that you can feel the stretch through your glutes. If it triggers the pain in your tailbone then this is not a good stretch for you to do.

How to alleviate tailbone pain

Dr. Oliver has been practicing in Massachusetts since 2007. He is a graduate of Marist College where he received a Pre-Med Bachelor of Science degree in Biology. Dr. Oliver then went on to pursue his chiropractic career by attending Palmer College of Chiropractic West, where he graduated Cum Laude. Dr. Oliver has his diploma in rehabilitation, which allows him to combine rehab and corrective exercise with traditional chiropractic treatment. This gives his patients better long term results.

Many studies find that non-surgical treatments are successful in approximately 90% of coccydynia cases. 1 Treatments for coccydynia are usually noninvasive and include activity modification.

The first line of treatment typically includes self-care that can be done without the assistance of a medical professional, such as some of the following:

  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Common NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen (Aleve), or COX-2 inhibitors (Celebrex), help reduce the inflammation around the coccyx that is usually a cause of the pain.
  • Ice or cold pack. Applying ice or a cold pack to the area several times a day for the first few days after pain starts can help reduce inflammation, which typically occurs after injury and adds to pain.
  • Heat or heating pad. Applying heat to the bottom of the spine after the first few days of pain may help relieve muscle tension, which may accompany or exacerbate coccyx pain. Common heat sources include a hot water bottle, chemical heat pack, long-lasting adhesive heat strip, or hot bath (as long as weight is kept off the tailbone in the bathtub).
  • Activity modification. Alterations to everyday activities can help take cumulative pressure off of the tailbone and alleviate pain. These activity modifications may include using a standing desk to avoid prolonged sitting, using a pillow to take the weight off the coccyx, or adjusting posture so weight is taken off the tailbone when sitting.
  • Supportive pillows. A custom pillow that takes pressure off the coccyx when sitting may be used. Pillows for alleviating coccydynia may include U- or V-shaped pillows, or wedge-shaped pillows with a cutout or hole where the tailbone is. Any type of pillow or sitting arrangement that keeps pressure off the coccyx is ideal and largely a matter of personal preference. A supportive cushion can be useful in the car, as well as in an office, classroom, or at home.

Dietary changes. If tailbone pain is caused by or worsened with bowel movements or constipation, increased fiber and water intake, as well as stool softeners, is recommended.

If the above treatments do not help manage or alleviate coccyx pain, additional treatments administered by a doctor, chiropractor, or other medical professional may be necessary.

Additional Non-Surgical Treatments for Coccydynia

If tailbone pain is persistent or severe, additional non-surgical treatment options for coccydynia may include:

  • Injection. An injection of a numbing agent (lidocaine) and steroid (to decrease inflammation) in the area surrounding the coccyx may provide pain relief. The physician uses imaging guidance to ensure that the injection is administered to the correct area. Pain relief can last from 1 week up to several years. If the first injection is effective, patients may receive up to 3 injections in a year.
  • Manual manipulation. Some patients find pain relief through manual manipulation of the coccyx. Through manual manipulation, the joint between the sacrum and the coccyx can be adjusted, potentially reducing pain caused by inadequate coccyx mobility.

Massage. Coccydynia may be reduced or alleviated by massaging tense pelvic floor muscles that attach to the coccyx. Tense muscles in this region can place added strain on the ligaments and sacrococcygeal joint, limiting its mobility or pulling on the coccyx.

Stretching. Gently stretching the ligaments attached to the coccyx can be helpful in reducing muscle tension in the coccygeal area. A physical therapist, chiropractor, physiatrist, or other appropriately trained healthcare practitioner can provide instruction on appropriate stretches for relieving coccyx pain.

  • TENS unit. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator (TENS) units apply electric stimulation that interferes with the transmission of pain signals from the coccyx to the brain. These devices can be good option for patients who wish to keep their intake of medications to a minimum. There are many varieties of TENS units, with some using high-frequency stimulation that are worn for short periods of time, and others using low-frequency stimulation that may be worn longer.
  • After attaining sufficient pain relief so movement is better tolerated, daily low-impact aerobic activity is beneficial, as the increased blood flow brings nutrients to the area and encourages the body’s natural healing abilities. An additional benefit of aerobic activity is the release of endorphins, the body’s innate pain-relieving chemicals.

    If non-surgical treatments or pain management methods are effective, prolonged use of these methods is a reasonable treatment option. In rare cases, a patient’s pain does not respond to non-surgical treatments and surgery on the coccyx may be considered.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    Are you sitting in a chair and developing a lot of tailbone pain?

    Let’s talk about it!

    We have started to explore COVID-related pains and tailbone pain has been a big one. I’ve had a lot of friends and patients reach out to me about the pain they’re having in their tailbone. A lot of these people tell me that they are working from home, sitting in hard flimsy chairs instead of their nice cushioned office chairs. They describe pain and soreness right in the tailbone. This tailbone pain is called coccygodynia or pain in the coccyx.

    The coccyx is a small bony point at the very bottom of the bony spine. Even though it is small, it plays a big role in the stability of your sitting and it has a lot of ligaments/tendons and muscles that run over it. Generally, the pain is caused by trauma directly to the tailbone, such as when someone falls straight down on their bottom. However, we are seeing an increased incidence of this pain with people working from home on non-supportive chairs.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    Essentially when you sit, you place pressure on three different pressure points, the pressure goes on the coccyx and your sitting bones called the ischial tuberosities. Prolonged sitting and especially leaning back in a chair can lead to increased pressure on the tailbone and thus pain.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    What are the symptoms of tailbone pain?

    Pain from an injured tailbone can result from mild to intense. The pain can get worse when sitting down, standing up from a chair, or when you leaning back while sitting in the chair. Standing or walking should relieve the pressure on your tailbone and ease the discomfort. The good news is that once you identify the source of the pain, such as an unsupportive chair, your pain will typically go away within a few weeks of avoiding that source.

    What can you do to make it better?

    Sitting on a heating pad or an ice pack or getting a massage may help. Correcting your posture can help because poor posture can lead to heavy pressure on your coccyx. Sit with your back against the chair and your feet flat on the ground to take the weight off your tailbone and lean forward when you sit down. Finally, you can also sit on a special donut-shaped pillow or wedge-shaped cushion to relieve the pressure on the sensitive area.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    Sometimes coccygodynia can be very stubborn and may need medical attention. If the pain doesn’t resolve within four to six weeks, see your doctor who may order some imaging and may give you some other options such as physical therapy, medication, and possibly injections.

    I hope you found this information helpful in alleviating your tailbone pain. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comment section of our YouTube video , and don’t forget to like and subscribe to our YouTube channel .

    Acute and chronic tailbone pain from a bruise or fracture, is also known as coccydynia — and it is truly a pain in the a$$! It is usually felt as a localized pain (in the butt) that is worsened by sitting and by any other activity that puts pressure on the injured coccyx (tailbone).

    The condition is more common in women than men, largely because childbirth is one of the main causes of trauma to the coccyx. Other causes are backward falls, bike accidents, impact trauma from contact sports, etc. or repetitive stress to the tailbone from activities such as horse back riding or prolonged sitting on hard surfaces.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    Coccydynia is usually distinguished by the following symptoms:

    • Pain and tenderness that is localized in the tailbone. Tailbone pain is usually felt as an aching soreness that can range from mild to severe, can come and go with movement or pressure, or can remain constant.
    • Pain that increases with sitting. Coccydynia pain is typically worsened when pressure is applied to the tailbone. Sitting on hard surfaces or leaning back in the chair put extra pressure on the tailbone and usually cause increased pain.
    • Increased pain when moving from a sitting to a standing position. The motion of moving from sitting to standing or the reverse, requires pelvic muscle rotation that may be painful. (This can be relieved by leaning forward and arching the back when rising from sitting to standing.)
    • Pain that may be worsened by sexual intercourse or bowel movements. Since the coccyx (tailbone) is proximal to the anus and genitals, some people can experience more pain during sexual activity or bowel elimination.

    1. Keeping pressure off the affected area by changing your lifestyle habits and using special seat cushions designed to direct the pressure away from the painful tailbone when sitting.

    2. Relieving pain, inflammation and any additional muscle tension with NSAIDs, steroid injections, ice/heat and muscle relaxers.

    If you or a loved one are experiencing tailbone pain, Dit Da Jow can help you eliminate this pain FAST. Plum Dragon has three excellent formulas that provide tailbone pain relief and help your body heal from this condition quickly:

    Bruise Juice and our original Bruise Dit Da Jow formula are perfect for relieving the inflammation that is causing the tailbone pain of coccydynia. Often, one of these formulas are all that is needed to find coccyx pain relief and get you back to your normal life. Simply apply to the affected area several times a day for a couple of days. (Apply carefully with a cotton ball and make sure to keep the formula from entering the anus or genital area.)

    If the bone is severely bruised, some people may need to apply the Ancestors Advanced formula to really support the bone recovery in a stronger way. This is applied the same way as the Bruise formulas and with the same care and caution.

    Give these a try today so you can stop carrying a seat cushion around with you everywhere you go and get back to the things you love!

    Multiple different types of injections are done to decrease tailbone pain.

    3 of the most common types of tailbone injections:
    1. Steroid injection: a steroid is an anti-inflammatory medication that can be placed at a site of inflammation, to decrease the inflammation and pain at that location.
    2. Sympathetic nerve block: Sometimes in addition to the musculoskeletal pain and inflammation there is a component of nerve pain. Performing an nerve block is when the doctor places a local anesthetic (such as lidocaine) onto specific nerves in order to temporarily shut them off. After a few hours when the nerves “wake up” again, the nerves may not be so hyper-sensitive and hyper-irritable. So the nerve pain can be dramatically decreased or even completely resolved.
    3. Nerve ablation (destruction): if none of the other injections are helping, then one option is to intentionally destroy/kill/deaden the nerves that are carrying pain from a specific site. If the nerves can not carry pain signals from your tailbone, then the pain signals will never be sent to your brain and your quality of life may be dramatically improved.
    Sequence of Injections
    • Steroid injection: I typically start with a local steroid injection, ideally targeting the specific area that matches the individual patient’s diagnosis. For example, if the pain seems to mainly be coming from a distal coccyx bone spur, then I would target that spot. If the pain seems to be coming mainly from a dislocated or unstable (hyper-mobile) joint then I would target that specific area. (This is why it is so important to have an accurate diagnosis firstrather than just injecting without knowing where the pain is coming from.)
    • Sympathetic nerve block: Depending on the response to a local corticosteroid injection, I would consider a ganglion Impar sympathetic nerve block. Sometimes I will combine the steroid injection and the ganglion Impar sympathetic nerve block (the steroid helps treat the musculoskeletal pain/inflammation while the nerve block helps treat the nerve pain).
    • Nerve ablation (destruction): Most patients will get good relief from either the steroid injection or the sympathetic nerve block. For those who don’t, I consider nerve ablation.
    • Repeating injections: If any given injection gives great relief (in terms of the amount of relief and the duration of relief) then that same injection could be repeated if the pain comes back many months or years later.
    Fluoroscopic guidance:
    • Improved relief: In general, these injections can be done under fluoroscopic guidance so that the physician can make sure the medication is placed in the location that is most likely to relieve your tailbone pain.
    • Decreased risks: Fluoroscopy also helps the physician to make sure that they do not accidentally inject the medication into an area that would cause complications or side effects.

    There are also other types of injections done for tailbone pain, but the 3 noted above are the most common.

    Please post below any thoughts, questions, or comments you have about tailbone injections for tailbone pain.

    • Author
    • Recent Posts

    Dr. Foye is an expert at treating tailbone pain (coccyx pain).

    His personable, private-practice office is located on a modern, renowned, academic medical school campus, at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School.

    For an appointment, call 973-972-2802.

    • Free Book on Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain, Coccydynia, April 1, 2021 – April 1, 2021
    • Long COVID is now called PASC… a ridiculous name change – March 19, 2021
    • Free Book on Tailbone Pain, Coccyx Pain, Coccydynia, March 1, 2021 – March 1, 2021

    4 comments to 3 Different Injections for Tailbone Pain

    Hi Dr Foye,
    My name is Margaret,

    I have suffered for years with coccyx pain due to being born with spina bifida occulta.

    I had my coccyx bone removed 4 years ago,I now feel that the last bone in my sacrum spine area is moving as seems 2B rubbing on the inside of my scar which is making a weak spot and my scar had opened 4 times since the operation I was just wondering if you had come across this before.

    I also have scoliosis, I have had 1/7 thorasic fusid with bone from my hip, my last operation was march of this year ,I had a cervical fusion 4/5 5/6 6/7 using carbon fiber discs ,titanium mesh, a steel plate, and 6 screws.

    This will probably sound mad but I feel like my spine is pulling down or even dropped down, I am in pain 24/7

    Have you any idea what I could do to try help this pain ..

    First of all, I am very sorry to hear about the pain that you have been suffering with despite the coccygectomy (surgical removal of the tailbone).

    Here is a specific blog post that I wrote recently on exactly the topic of tailbone pain that persists despite coccygectomy:
    https://tailbonedoctor.com/tailbone-pain-despite-surgery-coccygectomy/

    Hi James,It’s not the first time I’ve heard someone ask, Does iscruanne cover spinal decompression? It’s a coin toss as to whether or not iscruanne companies cover spinal decompression. (BUT to be honest, most every time if you call heads, the coin comes up tails).A typical patient who chooses to undergo this type of care (spinal decompression) usually does just that chooses. Depending on the nature of your condition, the severity of the symptoms, the chronicity etc, it is usually several thousand dollars for the decompression part of the care. I, often times, incorporate other modalities into the treatment plan (again, based upon the uniqueness of each case). Some of these services may be covered by iscruanne and some not- each and every iscruanne policy is different. I may use the K-Laser, the ATM2, or sometimes it’s Functional Physical Medicine, or occasionally chiropractic. Due to the high success rate and low risk of non-surgical spinal decompression, it would seem logical to approve’ this type of care prior to even letting someone undergo back surgery, right? Meaning, if it works, the iscruanne company is out four figures vs sometimes six figures for some of the extensive back surgeries. But (illogically) that’s not how it works.This care type of care is for someone who truly wants to exhaust all the conservative therapies prior to succumbing to back surgery. So for most, it’s the principle. Its for people who understand the risk of invasive procedures. Regarding costs: I’m empathetic and understanding of the out-of-pocket costs. But I also know the priceless value it can provide if successful. So, at our policy is that if someone wants the care and needs it they can get it now. And due to the nature of the cash-out-of-pocket, well, we let the patient choose a payment plan that doesn’t stretch them too far or stress them too much. They get the care now and make payments that suit them over time or they can pay for the care up front.

    […] Please see my separate article on Three Different Injections for Tailbone Pain […]

    Many studies find that non-surgical treatments are successful in approximately 90% of coccydynia cases. 1 Treatments for coccydynia are usually noninvasive and include activity modification.

    The first line of treatment typically includes self-care that can be done without the assistance of a medical professional, such as some of the following:

    • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Common NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen (Aleve), or COX-2 inhibitors (Celebrex), help reduce the inflammation around the coccyx that is usually a cause of the pain.
    • Ice or cold pack. Applying ice or a cold pack to the area several times a day for the first few days after pain starts can help reduce inflammation, which typically occurs after injury and adds to pain.
    • Heat or heating pad. Applying heat to the bottom of the spine after the first few days of pain may help relieve muscle tension, which may accompany or exacerbate coccyx pain. Common heat sources include a hot water bottle, chemical heat pack, long-lasting adhesive heat strip, or hot bath (as long as weight is kept off the tailbone in the bathtub).
    • Activity modification. Alterations to everyday activities can help take cumulative pressure off of the tailbone and alleviate pain. These activity modifications may include using a standing desk to avoid prolonged sitting, using a pillow to take the weight off the coccyx, or adjusting posture so weight is taken off the tailbone when sitting.
    • Supportive pillows. A custom pillow that takes pressure off the coccyx when sitting may be used. Pillows for alleviating coccydynia may include U- or V-shaped pillows, or wedge-shaped pillows with a cutout or hole where the tailbone is. Any type of pillow or sitting arrangement that keeps pressure off the coccyx is ideal and largely a matter of personal preference. A supportive cushion can be useful in the car, as well as in an office, classroom, or at home.

    Dietary changes. If tailbone pain is caused by or worsened with bowel movements or constipation, increased fiber and water intake, as well as stool softeners, is recommended.

    If the above treatments do not help manage or alleviate coccyx pain, additional treatments administered by a doctor, chiropractor, or other medical professional may be necessary.

    Additional Non-Surgical Treatments for Coccydynia

    If tailbone pain is persistent or severe, additional non-surgical treatment options for coccydynia may include:

    • Injection. An injection of a numbing agent (lidocaine) and steroid (to decrease inflammation) in the area surrounding the coccyx may provide pain relief. The physician uses imaging guidance to ensure that the injection is administered to the correct area. Pain relief can last from 1 week up to several years. If the first injection is effective, patients may receive up to 3 injections in a year.
    • Manual manipulation. Some patients find pain relief through manual manipulation of the coccyx. Through manual manipulation, the joint between the sacrum and the coccyx can be adjusted, potentially reducing pain caused by inadequate coccyx mobility.

    Massage. Coccydynia may be reduced or alleviated by massaging tense pelvic floor muscles that attach to the coccyx. Tense muscles in this region can place added strain on the ligaments and sacrococcygeal joint, limiting its mobility or pulling on the coccyx.

    Stretching. Gently stretching the ligaments attached to the coccyx can be helpful in reducing muscle tension in the coccygeal area. A physical therapist, chiropractor, physiatrist, or other appropriately trained healthcare practitioner can provide instruction on appropriate stretches for relieving coccyx pain.

  • TENS unit. Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator (TENS) units apply electric stimulation that interferes with the transmission of pain signals from the coccyx to the brain. These devices can be good option for patients who wish to keep their intake of medications to a minimum. There are many varieties of TENS units, with some using high-frequency stimulation that are worn for short periods of time, and others using low-frequency stimulation that may be worn longer.
  • After attaining sufficient pain relief so movement is better tolerated, daily low-impact aerobic activity is beneficial, as the increased blood flow brings nutrients to the area and encourages the body’s natural healing abilities. An additional benefit of aerobic activity is the release of endorphins, the body’s innate pain-relieving chemicals.

    If non-surgical treatments or pain management methods are effective, prolonged use of these methods is a reasonable treatment option. In rare cases, a patient’s pain does not respond to non-surgical treatments and surgery on the coccyx may be considered.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    Tailbone pain is pain in a section of the spine at the end known as the coccyx. The medical term for this is coccydynia. Sometimes coccyalgia is used instead.

    What Does the Tailbone Do?

    The coccyx extends beyond the pelvis and serves as an anchor for a number of ligaments and tendons. Many of these connect to bones and muscles in the legs and pelvic area. For this reason, the coccyx is necessary for the full range of motion people enjoy in their legs and pelvis.

    It also helps people with balance and stability while sitting. Weight is distributed between the coccyx and the two sides of the pelvis, providing a triangular base for support.

    What Causes Tailbone Pain?

    Tailbone pain can have a variety of causes, but most instances of it come from a couple rather straightforward sources. A backward fall, especially when landing on the buttocks, can result in a bruised tailbone.

    In serious cases, the tailbone may be broken or dislocated. Naturally, any blunt trauma to the area may cause pain, even if not caused by a fall.

    Women are far more likely to suffer from tailbone pain than men. This is partly due to the other common causes such as pregnancy. The ligaments and other tissues surrounding the tailbone loosen late in pregnancy to make additional room for the baby. Childbirth may also inflict trauma to the area. Another reason why women are more prone to coccyx pain is that women’s pelvises are broader than men’s and leave the coccyx bone more exposed.

    Tailbone injuries are more common in certain sports. Bicyclists, for example, are more likely to suffer from tailbone pain due to the repeated force and trauma inflicted on the coccyx from riding a bike. Rowers can develop the same due to the constant grinding of the coccyx area against their seat.

    The normal effects of aging can also cause such pain. Additionally, the coccyx may cause pain due to the development of bone spurs or pinched nerves. Coccyx pain may be caused by an injury elsewhere in the spinal column that radiates pain into the tailbone.

    Rarely, pain in the coccyx may be caused by some underlying medical issue, such as a disease. An examination performed by a physician may be necessary to determine whether the cause of pain is not accompanied by a relevant injury.

    How to Treat Coccyx Pain

    The most common way to treat tailbone pain is with pain medications. For less severe pain, over the counter medications such as ibuprofen may be sufficient.

    Anti-inflammatory pain medications are preferable over medicines like acetaminophen. For more severe pain, prescription pain medications may be necessary.

    In the instance of falls or other traumatic injuries to the coccyx, ice can also help alleviate the pain. Alternatively, some find heat sources such as heating pads to be helpful.

    Patients may also be advised to avoid putting pressure on the tailbone area. This may mean that sitting with certain postures, if at all, may be difficult. Leaning forward while sitting may help as it reduces pressure from body weight on the coccyx. Avoid sitting on hard surfaces. Using pillows may help. There are even pillows specifically designed to take pressure off of the coccyx area. If all else fails, laying down may be the preferable method of resting.

    If coccyx pain makes bowel movements difficult or painful, patients may eat fiber or take stool softeners to reduce the discomfort.

    Doctors may directly inject medication at the site of the pain in order to relieve it. Options include anti-inflammatory drugs or numbing agents. Sometimes manual manipulation or the coccyx bones by a physician may help. Alternatively, massaging the area can also reduce pain.

    If pain is long term, physical therapy may be used to strengthen the pelvic muscles. This may provide relief in certain cases. Pain medications and avoiding pressure on the coccyx area are usually enough to treat coccyx pain. Most tailbone injuries should heal and the pain should subside within a few days.

    However, in instances of chronic tailbone pain, a doctor may elect to partially or fully amputate the tailbone. This procedure is called a coccygectomy. This operation is rarely performed and may require a long recovery period before the patient is able to feel any benefit.

    Preventing Tailbone Injuries

    Unfortunately, there isn’t much that can be done to prevent most tailbone injuries, considering that many of them come from accidental falls and similar mishaps. Tailbone pain caused by pregnancy is also not easily avoided.

    However, regarding certain sporting activities, there are a few things that can be done to prevent tailbone injuries. WebMD recommends using protective padding when engaged in sporting activities that may hurt or injure the coccyx area.

    People may exercise caution if engaged in an activity where an accident may easily occur, such as ice skating or roller blading. Ultimately, avoiding tailbone pain may simply be a matter of how accident-prone a person is.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    Are you sitting in a chair and developing a lot of tailbone pain?

    Let’s talk about it!

    We have started to explore COVID-related pains and tailbone pain has been a big one. I’ve had a lot of friends and patients reach out to me about the pain they’re having in their tailbone. A lot of these people tell me that they are working from home, sitting in hard flimsy chairs instead of their nice cushioned office chairs. They describe pain and soreness right in the tailbone. This tailbone pain is called coccygodynia or pain in the coccyx.

    The coccyx is a small bony point at the very bottom of the bony spine. Even though it is small, it plays a big role in the stability of your sitting and it has a lot of ligaments/tendons and muscles that run over it. Generally, the pain is caused by trauma directly to the tailbone, such as when someone falls straight down on their bottom. However, we are seeing an increased incidence of this pain with people working from home on non-supportive chairs.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    Essentially when you sit, you place pressure on three different pressure points, the pressure goes on the coccyx and your sitting bones called the ischial tuberosities. Prolonged sitting and especially leaning back in a chair can lead to increased pressure on the tailbone and thus pain.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    What are the symptoms of tailbone pain?

    Pain from an injured tailbone can result from mild to intense. The pain can get worse when sitting down, standing up from a chair, or when you leaning back while sitting in the chair. Standing or walking should relieve the pressure on your tailbone and ease the discomfort. The good news is that once you identify the source of the pain, such as an unsupportive chair, your pain will typically go away within a few weeks of avoiding that source.

    What can you do to make it better?

    Sitting on a heating pad or an ice pack or getting a massage may help. Correcting your posture can help because poor posture can lead to heavy pressure on your coccyx. Sit with your back against the chair and your feet flat on the ground to take the weight off your tailbone and lean forward when you sit down. Finally, you can also sit on a special donut-shaped pillow or wedge-shaped cushion to relieve the pressure on the sensitive area.

    How to alleviate tailbone pain

    Sometimes coccygodynia can be very stubborn and may need medical attention. If the pain doesn’t resolve within four to six weeks, see your doctor who may order some imaging and may give you some other options such as physical therapy, medication, and possibly injections.

    I hope you found this information helpful in alleviating your tailbone pain. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comment section of our YouTube video , and don’t forget to like and subscribe to our YouTube channel .