How to analyze a scene in a film

How to analyze a scene in a film

Films are made up of scenes. If you are a film student, you may have to analyse many scenes of certain movies to get the proper understanding about filmmaking. Analysing a scene in a film involves a lot of effort as you have to keep a lot of things in your mind while doing that. If you are looking forward to analyse any scene in a film, you can take help from the given steps.

Things required:

– Movie of your choosing (VHS, DVD, or Blu-ray)
– Writing utensil
– A VCR, a DVD/Blu-ray player, or a computer with a media player
– Paper

Others are Reading

  • Accattone Cinema Paris Overview
  • How to Renovate a Movie Theater

Instructions

    font-size: 13px !important;color: #474747;text-align: justify;line-height: 21px;” >

First of all, you have to study and understand all the characters which are involved in the scene. Knowledge about the characters is the most important things to take into account while analysing any particular scene. You cannot analyse a scene correctly if you don’t understand the characters. In addition, you also have to identify the strong and the weak characters in the scene. Keep your eye on every single person who is appearing on the screen in the scene and don’t draw your attention towards any particular person. In this way, you will be able to create a thorough understanding about the scene.

After analysing the characters, you have to understand the social setup of the scene. You cannot create a sound understanding any filmmaker’s work until you know the social setup of the scene. The social setup can be political, social, economical or religious.

You must pay special attention to the dialogues in the scene. Sometimes, dialogues are not enough as you also have to note down the expressions of the characters to create a firm understanding about everything.

It is extremely important for you to take the essential notes about the characters, social setup, dialogues and expressions which have been shown in the screen. You can note down the things on simple piece of paper by using a pen. You can also draw images or diagram to correlate and study the pattern of things in the scene.

Some scenes are really difficult to analyse as they are being portrayed in a different manner. If you can’t understand anything in the scene, you can take help from your instructor or any other filmmaker.

Why use precious class time to watch clips when we are supposed to be reading? Doesn’t film dumb students down when teachers should be raising rigor? These are common objections to using film in the classroom; however, there’s a huge difference between popping a movie in to catch up on grading and skillfully using film to instruct. Film can be a great lead-in for complex texts providing a common shared experience in the classroom. With film being a student-friendly medium, barriers to teaching critical thinking skills are often removed building student confidence in analysis.

Before using film in the classroom, you should address a few questions. Should I use a film clip or a full film? What is the purpose of the film? Is it teaching a skill, helping students with characterization, or making a thematic connection? What standards does the film meet? How will I assess my learning objectives? Once these questions have been answered, try out some of the following ideas for using film in your classroom.

Anatomy of a Scene — This is a fantastic tool because much it allows the viewer to hear the director’s thoughts while watching and hearing the scene. A slider allows you to adjust the balance between the director’s commentary and the movie scene. I generally play the movie scene without commentary the first time and give students the opportunity to discuss what they think the director is thinking. We watch the clip a second time listening to the director. This activity helps students think about author’s choice of detail, character development, method of narration, and structure of a piece.

Literary Analysis — Thanks to Sylvia Spruill for introducing me to these clips and the use of film in the classroom in a summer workshop where I got the following ideas. The Fast and the Furious 2001 race scene can be used to teach several concepts. We watch the scene once and discuss what we notice then we watch the scene again taking notes. Depending on the level of the class, I may prompt the class to take notes on character development, how the director manipulates time, or how selection of detail is important and helps the viewer form an opinion. From this activity, we can easily bridge to a close reading of a passage from a novel using the same skills. The Carl and Ellie’s love story from Up is a great clip for discussing exposition and/or characterization. Other clips I often use frequently are the girl in the red coat from Schlinder’s List to teach mood vs. tone and “What a Wonderful World” from Good Morning, Vietnam to teach irony.

Teach Point of View — Point of view is important in teaching characterization, selection of detail, and method of narration; all of these change based on the point of view. When we are studying the importance of point of view in short stories, I show my students a clip usually from Remember the Titans but almost any clip can work. First, have students identify the point of view and write a summary of it.

Next have students rewrite the same scene using a different point of view. Assign different points of view to different students and share the results with the class. This activity can also be used to introduce and discuss narrator reliability. Movie clips and Wing Clips are two great sites to search for clips or YouTube always works.

Rhetorical Devices — The American Rhetoric website has an entire bank of movie speeches just waiting for teachers to use. After reviewing rhetorical devices, Aristotle’s argumentative appeals, and general principles of persuasion, I send my students to this website for a virtual scavenger hunt for examples. I show and model this example before they begin:

Independence Day speech – to teach repetition, rule of three, contrast, parallel structure, pathos).

Film is a student-friendly platform for teaching difficult literary concepts and themes, and if used correctly can help students grasp these ideas quickly. If you’re not using film to teach, what better time than Oscar week to start?

Screenwriting is a visual medium that requires a writer to create words on a page that can be transformed into images on the big screen. Writing for a script that will be visualized into a film is very different from writing for a novel. It’s a common beginner’s curve to break. We have seen many scripts that tend to focus too much on prose and unnecessary fluff. Generally, what a scriptwriter needs to understand is that their script is going to be analyzed by dozens if not hundreds of people in production, people who do not have time to interpret any vague ideas. That is why it’s important to be as descriptive as possible, as succinctly as possible. As NYFA Screenwriting Program Chair Melanie Williams Oram notes, “ I always tell my students you cannot write what you do not see.”

How to analyze a scene in a film

So in order to successfully write a scene for a screenplay, it’s important to remember that less is more. By that, we don’t mean less description is more. We mean that less wording in your description is more.

For example, let’s try describing a scene in which a character enters a hotel room. You may be tempted to describe it as vividly as possible. When writing a script, it’s helpful to also imagine which crew members will be reading the script and what information they will need to bring the script to life.

Susie, a 42 year old neurosurgeon from Connecticut, enters her hotel room, which entraps a blue hue that spreads from a ethereal neon glow just two yards from outside the window. She is contemplating the death of her brother, someone she will never see again. Susie says to herself, “I’m driving to Kansas tomorrow.”

This sounds like a pretty descriptive text. You can picture it in your mind, right? The actor, director, and camera and lighting crew have a lot to work with here. But if you were the costume designer, what clothes would you use for this scene? If you were the set designer, what sort of objects would be in the room? How much do they have to work with?

Let’s break it down and format all these details like a script.

How to analyze a scene in a film

INT. HOTEL ROOM – NIGHT.

SUSIE (42), a Connecticut neurosurgeon, enters a mostly bare HOTEL ROOM. Bible on the dresser. Notepad on the desk. Empty boxes in the corner.

Broken, she is dressed in black. When Susie enters the room she places a funeral program down on the table.

Outside the window is a NEON BLUE sign.

I’m driving to Kansas tomorrow.

Writing your scripts like this gives ample descriptions that everybody in production can work with and properly sets the tone for the remainder of the scene. We won’t know unless we’ve seen Susie previously that the funeral program belongs to her brother. But that’s okay. We can learn that later. From here, the director, director of photography, actor, costume designer, art director, and set designer have enough to work with in order to bring the scene to life.

Saying more with less is a skill that can take time and practice to master. If you’re interested in learning more about how to write and break down a script for production, visit the Screenwriting Program at York Film Academy.

Learn the lines and don’t bump into the furniture. We’ve all heard the quote, and we all know how untrue it is. Saying the lines without any motivation behind them leads to uninspired work and a lack of storytelling. In this article we are going to look at how to break down a scene and how to get the most out of a scene whether it’s for a showreel, TV show, film or theatre production.

Why Scene Analysis is Important to your Acting?

How is it that some movies can fly by in a heartbeat, but have run for 2 hours? But that tacky ensemble rom-com you watched was a torturous marathon while in reality, it had a brisk running time of 90 minutes?

It’s all in the way each individual scene breaks down.

There is an unwritten rule of script writing that a scene must always earn it’s spot in the plot. Unless it is absolutely necessary, then it needs to be cut. What makes a scene necessary is one of three things:

Character progression.
Plot progression.
Exposition.

If you are choosing material to perform as a stand alone scene, or for your showreel, then you need to focus on number one.

What NOT to look for:

It’s not advisable to choose a scene from a sketch show, even if they work without context. The reasoning here is that a sketch show is a very specific kind of genre, like improv. The success of a scene relies on the audience to be onboard with this absurd, abstract style of short form comedy. Sometimes the humour is coming from the edit, or the contrast between the sketch before it. Maybe it doesn’t appeal to the casting director’s sense of humour.

What to look for:

Character Journey. Let’s say it again: Character JOURNEY.

The key to making a scene work for you is having your character begin in one state, and end in a different state.

Popular ways of doing this, are having the character learn a new piece of information, realise a personal flaw, or solve a problem. This is why break up scenes are so popular. Family secrets, detective cases that have a eureka moment, proposals, anything that drags your character between dizzying emotional highs and crushing emotional lows.

Make your shortlist of scenes and for each one, identify the emotional change of state; for example, from frustrated —> euphoric, from triumphant —> hopeless. Then identify the source of conflict; for example, Jim wants to marry Liz/Liz wants to travel the world alone for two years. The detective needs to solve the case/the only known witness has turned up dead. If you can identify a verifiable source of conflict and an emotional shift, then you know your scene is a winner.

Plot Progression

Awareness of plot progression is an essential skill for every actor. When hired for a role, you may only receive your own sides, or be a featured extra, but you still have an awareness of where your character begins, and where they end up. As actors, it is natural to assume responsibility for more than our role. Sure, the look, the feel, and the direction of the scene relies on an actor’s performance, but at the end of the day, the writers might cut your scene, or shuffle something in the edit that changes the whole story. With this in mind, one way to improve your scenes is to let go of your responsibility to the plot. Let go of end gaming your story, and focus on your short term objectives.

Take out a copy of your scene and break it down into beats. For each beat, identify the practical actions. Don’t use actioning, intentions or justifications at this point. Explain what happens in the least creative way possible. Once you have the plot, you can step back and see how your character reacts to these external forces. More often than not, the most entertaining choices come when an actor allows the plot to happen around their performance, rather than intentionally driving the plot.

Take out another copy of your scene, and action it in every possible way you can that fights against the actions you found in the previous exercise. Chances are, unless you used a different script, your character will end up in the same place no matter what you do. You might even find some meatier choices along the way.

All this means is that you need to understand that the plot is seperate to your inner life. While, for example, you may die at the end of the script, don’t let this affect anything about your performance up until that point. Don’t imbue your actions with heroism or martyrdom, assuming that this will make your death ultimately more satisfying. Most of the time, the opposite is true. It’s almost always more powerful to watch someone hold back their tears than it is to see them weep. Don’t try to show all of your homework in your performance. Ever heard of an actor who keeps a character trait secret to themselves? This is another tool to maintain depth and distance between the inner life of the character and the plot.

The bottom line? The plot is a dry and emotionless beast, and it will happen inevitably whether you focus on it or not. Affect your fellow actors, and let the plot fall into place.

How to analyze a scene in a film

Exposition

Now we’ll cover the difficult task of delivering an exposition scene. Often dramatically barren, with on-the-nose dialogue, exposition scenes are those which bring the audience up to speed with background information. More often than not, if you are dealing with an exposition scene, it is necessary to the project and not to your reel. Avoid exposition scenes for your reel or showcase, as they rarely offer an ideal dramatic scenario.

When performing in an exposition scene, keep in mind that the information is more important than the drama. Find a reason why your character wants to divulge this information. It can be tempting to act out the story you are telling rather than acting the reasons your character has for telling it. Action the script accordingly, and rather than inserting emotional responses in, really ask how your character feels about the current moment. Keep in mind that you wouldn’t cry when telling a story about someone else crying.

Regardless of the fact that we are letting our dramatic ego take a backseat, still find those moments of character progression: emotional state change, and source of conflict. Always ask yourself why you are motivated to explain this information. Most of the scripts on Home and Away and Neighbours are filled with exposition, due to the large cast of characters and fast moving plots. The audience needs to be able to catch onto the action even if they tune in halfway through an episode. Learning how to deliver exposition with purpose is an invaluable skill that will earn your character their moment to dramatically shine.

How to analyze a scene in a film

How to analyze a scene in a film

You’ve found an egg! Use the code saturdayegg21 for a free place on Saturday Film School. Hurry there’s just ten spots available!

Writing a film analysis essay should be fun, right? You have a chance to watch a movie and then to write your impressions. Seems easy-peasy!

But, after watching a movie, you find yourself in front of a blank sheet of paper, without knowing where to start, how to organise your essay and what are the essential points you need to cover and analyse.

Knowing how to organise your film analysis essay is half the battle. Therefore, just follow this structure and you’ll be able to start writing without a hitch right away.

1.Introduction

The introductory part of a film analysis essay contains some fundamental information about the movie, like the film title, release date, and director’s name. In other words, the reader should get familiar with some background information about the film. It would be good to research the filmmaker because it can reveal significant insights related to the movie which you can use in your analysis.

Also, you should point out the central theme or ideas in the movie, explaining the reason why it was made. Don’t hesitate to say what do you think; it’s quite desirable to express your point of view.

The last thing your introduction should include is your thesis statement and basically, explain what will be your focus.

2.Summary

After presenting the main facts about the film, it’s time to go deeper into analysis and summarise it.

The trick to making it more powerful is always to assume that your professor hasn’t seen the movie. In that way, you won’t leave out some important information. The best way to make sure you’ve covered everything in your summary is to answer great five Ws – who, what, when, where, why, and how, as well.

Likewise, you can discuss anything related to your opinion, structure or style. Just remember that you need to support anything you say with examples or quotes from the film itself. Otherwise, it wouldn’t be a viable comment.

3.Analysis

This is the core of your essay that involves your critical analysis of the film and impressions about it but supported by claims from the movie or any other relevant material.

Also, films are complex artwork that include many creative elements which are all connected and have their reason of existence. That’s why you should pay attention closely to these elements and analyze them too.

A good script has a logical sequence of events, completion of scenes, characters development, and dialogs. So, these are the elements you should analyze when it comes to the scenario.

After watching the film, try to reproduce the plot mentally and see if you understood the logic of events and the motives of the actors. If it’s difficult to explain or find reasons for some scene, then it isn’t such a great scenario.

The director is responsible for every aspect of the movie process, such as scenario execution, selection of the plans, and even tasks for actors.

In this part of the analysis, you can focus on the fact how the director realized the script or compare this film to his other films. It will help you understand better his way of directing and come up to some conclusions relevant to your thesis and analysis.

Casting is another significant element to take into consideration in your film analysis essay. Actors bring the script and director’s idea into reality.

Therefore, after watching the movie, think if the actors are realistic and if they portray the role of their character effectively? More importantly, consider how their acting corresponds to the main idea of the film and your thesis statement.

This represents an important element of every movie. It sets the mood and enhances some actions or sceneries of the film.

That’s why you should try to evaluate how music reflects the mood of the film or the impact it has on what is happening on the screen. Is it supportive or distracting?

Visual elements, like special effects, costumes, and make-up, also have a considerable role in the overall movie impact. They need to reflect the atmosphere of the film. It is especially important for historical movies because visual elements need to evoke a specific era.

Therefore, pay attention to costumes and special effects and analyse their impact on the film.

However, make sure you analyse only the elements that are related to your thesis statement, that can support it or help you make your point. Otherwise, you risk drifting away from the main argument.

4.Conclusion

In the end, re-state your thesis and offer a summary of the previously mentioned concepts in a new and more decisive way, making a case for your analysis.

Besides, you can recommend to your reader to watch this film or to avoid it completely.

Final words

Writing essays about films should be exciting and easy activity. Just follow these guidelines on how to structure it, details you need to pay attention to, and what should be the essence of your essay, so you’ll definitely look forward to writing your next film analysis essay and enjoy in the whole process.

How to analyze a scene in a film

About Jacob Dillon

Jacob Dillon is a professional writer and distinctive journalist from Sydney. Being passionate about what he does, Jacob likes to discuss stirring events as well as express his opinion about technological advancements and evolution of society. Find Jacob on Twitter and Facebook.

Learn the lines and don’t bump into the furniture. We’ve all heard the quote, and we all know how untrue it is. Saying the lines without any motivation behind them leads to uninspired work and a lack of storytelling. In this article we are going to look at how to break down a scene and how to get the most out of a scene whether it’s for a showreel, TV show, film or theatre production.

Why Scene Analysis is Important to your Acting?

How is it that some movies can fly by in a heartbeat, but have run for 2 hours? But that tacky ensemble rom-com you watched was a torturous marathon while in reality, it had a brisk running time of 90 minutes?

It’s all in the way each individual scene breaks down.

There is an unwritten rule of script writing that a scene must always earn it’s spot in the plot. Unless it is absolutely necessary, then it needs to be cut. What makes a scene necessary is one of three things:

Character progression.
Plot progression.
Exposition.

If you are choosing material to perform as a stand alone scene, or for your showreel, then you need to focus on number one.

What NOT to look for:

It’s not advisable to choose a scene from a sketch show, even if they work without context. The reasoning here is that a sketch show is a very specific kind of genre, like improv. The success of a scene relies on the audience to be onboard with this absurd, abstract style of short form comedy. Sometimes the humour is coming from the edit, or the contrast between the sketch before it. Maybe it doesn’t appeal to the casting director’s sense of humour.

What to look for:

Character Journey. Let’s say it again: Character JOURNEY.

The key to making a scene work for you is having your character begin in one state, and end in a different state.

Popular ways of doing this, are having the character learn a new piece of information, realise a personal flaw, or solve a problem. This is why break up scenes are so popular. Family secrets, detective cases that have a eureka moment, proposals, anything that drags your character between dizzying emotional highs and crushing emotional lows.

Make your shortlist of scenes and for each one, identify the emotional change of state; for example, from frustrated —> euphoric, from triumphant —> hopeless. Then identify the source of conflict; for example, Jim wants to marry Liz/Liz wants to travel the world alone for two years. The detective needs to solve the case/the only known witness has turned up dead. If you can identify a verifiable source of conflict and an emotional shift, then you know your scene is a winner.

Plot Progression

Awareness of plot progression is an essential skill for every actor. When hired for a role, you may only receive your own sides, or be a featured extra, but you still have an awareness of where your character begins, and where they end up. As actors, it is natural to assume responsibility for more than our role. Sure, the look, the feel, and the direction of the scene relies on an actor’s performance, but at the end of the day, the writers might cut your scene, or shuffle something in the edit that changes the whole story. With this in mind, one way to improve your scenes is to let go of your responsibility to the plot. Let go of end gaming your story, and focus on your short term objectives.

Take out a copy of your scene and break it down into beats. For each beat, identify the practical actions. Don’t use actioning, intentions or justifications at this point. Explain what happens in the least creative way possible. Once you have the plot, you can step back and see how your character reacts to these external forces. More often than not, the most entertaining choices come when an actor allows the plot to happen around their performance, rather than intentionally driving the plot.

Take out another copy of your scene, and action it in every possible way you can that fights against the actions you found in the previous exercise. Chances are, unless you used a different script, your character will end up in the same place no matter what you do. You might even find some meatier choices along the way.

All this means is that you need to understand that the plot is seperate to your inner life. While, for example, you may die at the end of the script, don’t let this affect anything about your performance up until that point. Don’t imbue your actions with heroism or martyrdom, assuming that this will make your death ultimately more satisfying. Most of the time, the opposite is true. It’s almost always more powerful to watch someone hold back their tears than it is to see them weep. Don’t try to show all of your homework in your performance. Ever heard of an actor who keeps a character trait secret to themselves? This is another tool to maintain depth and distance between the inner life of the character and the plot.

The bottom line? The plot is a dry and emotionless beast, and it will happen inevitably whether you focus on it or not. Affect your fellow actors, and let the plot fall into place.

How to analyze a scene in a film

Exposition

Now we’ll cover the difficult task of delivering an exposition scene. Often dramatically barren, with on-the-nose dialogue, exposition scenes are those which bring the audience up to speed with background information. More often than not, if you are dealing with an exposition scene, it is necessary to the project and not to your reel. Avoid exposition scenes for your reel or showcase, as they rarely offer an ideal dramatic scenario.

When performing in an exposition scene, keep in mind that the information is more important than the drama. Find a reason why your character wants to divulge this information. It can be tempting to act out the story you are telling rather than acting the reasons your character has for telling it. Action the script accordingly, and rather than inserting emotional responses in, really ask how your character feels about the current moment. Keep in mind that you wouldn’t cry when telling a story about someone else crying.

Regardless of the fact that we are letting our dramatic ego take a backseat, still find those moments of character progression: emotional state change, and source of conflict. Always ask yourself why you are motivated to explain this information. Most of the scripts on Home and Away and Neighbours are filled with exposition, due to the large cast of characters and fast moving plots. The audience needs to be able to catch onto the action even if they tune in halfway through an episode. Learning how to deliver exposition with purpose is an invaluable skill that will earn your character their moment to dramatically shine.

Why use precious class time to watch clips when we are supposed to be reading? Doesn’t film dumb students down when teachers should be raising rigor? These are common objections to using film in the classroom; however, there’s a huge difference between popping a movie in to catch up on grading and skillfully using film to instruct. Film can be a great lead-in for complex texts providing a common shared experience in the classroom. With film being a student-friendly medium, barriers to teaching critical thinking skills are often removed building student confidence in analysis.

Before using film in the classroom, you should address a few questions. Should I use a film clip or a full film? What is the purpose of the film? Is it teaching a skill, helping students with characterization, or making a thematic connection? What standards does the film meet? How will I assess my learning objectives? Once these questions have been answered, try out some of the following ideas for using film in your classroom.

Anatomy of a Scene — This is a fantastic tool because much it allows the viewer to hear the director’s thoughts while watching and hearing the scene. A slider allows you to adjust the balance between the director’s commentary and the movie scene. I generally play the movie scene without commentary the first time and give students the opportunity to discuss what they think the director is thinking. We watch the clip a second time listening to the director. This activity helps students think about author’s choice of detail, character development, method of narration, and structure of a piece.

Literary Analysis — Thanks to Sylvia Spruill for introducing me to these clips and the use of film in the classroom in a summer workshop where I got the following ideas. The Fast and the Furious 2001 race scene can be used to teach several concepts. We watch the scene once and discuss what we notice then we watch the scene again taking notes. Depending on the level of the class, I may prompt the class to take notes on character development, how the director manipulates time, or how selection of detail is important and helps the viewer form an opinion. From this activity, we can easily bridge to a close reading of a passage from a novel using the same skills. The Carl and Ellie’s love story from Up is a great clip for discussing exposition and/or characterization. Other clips I often use frequently are the girl in the red coat from Schlinder’s List to teach mood vs. tone and “What a Wonderful World” from Good Morning, Vietnam to teach irony.

Teach Point of View — Point of view is important in teaching characterization, selection of detail, and method of narration; all of these change based on the point of view. When we are studying the importance of point of view in short stories, I show my students a clip usually from Remember the Titans but almost any clip can work. First, have students identify the point of view and write a summary of it.

Next have students rewrite the same scene using a different point of view. Assign different points of view to different students and share the results with the class. This activity can also be used to introduce and discuss narrator reliability. Movie clips and Wing Clips are two great sites to search for clips or YouTube always works.

Rhetorical Devices — The American Rhetoric website has an entire bank of movie speeches just waiting for teachers to use. After reviewing rhetorical devices, Aristotle’s argumentative appeals, and general principles of persuasion, I send my students to this website for a virtual scavenger hunt for examples. I show and model this example before they begin:

Independence Day speech – to teach repetition, rule of three, contrast, parallel structure, pathos).

Film is a student-friendly platform for teaching difficult literary concepts and themes, and if used correctly can help students grasp these ideas quickly. If you’re not using film to teach, what better time than Oscar week to start?

Movies were made to tell stories, no matter how they are made. Over the years, it has become easier to tell these stories. However, when movies first came out, they did not have any sound but still told stories. Since they did not have sound, they were called silent movies. Telling a story would be hard in a silent movie, but they end up doing it. Silent movies can tell stories by the color of the film/transitions, by the acting, by the music, sets and the special effects.

Silent movies came out in 1920’s, and since they did not have the same technology we have today, it was hard to do transitions and night time and daytime scenes. In the silent film, A Trip to the Moon, the transitions are fade into each other. The other movie that does transitions well is the movie Nosferatu. In the movie, the transitions make it look it he is trying to memorize the person watching. Nosferatu also uses different lighting to show if the scene is light or if the scene takes place when it is dark.

Since there is no sound in silent movies, actors have to try really hard to show emotion. One scene that sticks out is from Nosferatu. In this scene, the main character arrives at the at an inn near the castle were Garf Orlok lives. Once he yells that he is going to the castle, everybody has a shocked face because they believe that the castle is cursed. As he gets ready for bed, the scene shifts back and forth between him sleeping and of the inn people being scared and coming together.

Silent movies were not always silent. In some movie theaters, there was a person who played the piano and the music would go along with the movie. Today, if you were to watch a silent movie, there is music that helps with the movie. The music can really add to the movie and helps with the story. A Trip to the Moon uses music to add to the story. At the end, the music is all happy and excited because they all came back from the moon. The music in Nosferatu makes Garf Orlok scarier. The music builds up tension when he walks up the stairs and how the music becomes quiet when he reaches into her bedroom.

Silent movies did not have any green scenes but some scenes look like they used green scenes. Nosferatu scene was mainly shot on location because the castle is real. A Trip to the Moon, on the other hand, had impressive backgrounds. From the start of the movie, they are standing in a building that looks like something does not exist. However, the truly great backgrounds come when they are on the moon. When they first discover the aliens, the background is filled weird plants, and the foreground is also covered with these plants.

Using special effects back then was hard because they did have the technology we have today, but some directors used what they could. A Trip to the Moon was revolutionary for its time. Not only was it the first science fiction movie, but it was the first animated movie. The scene that is animated is when the spaceship hits the moon in the eye. They also feature special effects. For example, they used smoke on the moon and also used to make the spaceship to look like it was falling. Nosferatu did not use many special effects. The only example is at the end is when he died at the end. Here is the scene.

Silent movies were great for their time, and they have paved the ways for movies today. Some of the movies were so revolutionary that some might think that they could not have done the film, such as A Trip to the Moon. Some of today’s directors became directors after they saw these films. These films brought new ideas to the table when it came to storytelling. They incorporated new ideas that movies today use, for example, a different color for night or day. The use of special effects and backgrounds made the story come to life. The era of silent movies is a staple in cinema history.