How to apply elastomeric paint

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Last Updated on January 20, 2021

Are you in need of a perfect way to protect your roof and beautify them simultaneously?

Then, you need an elastomeric roof coating. Roof shingles are properly secured when you use a good roof coating, and you also achieve a nice color tone and vibe for your roof.

Let’s talk about the things you need and how to go about it.

Tools & Supplies You’ll Need

If you are a technician, painter, or technical person, the things needed may look pretty basic. The equipment required is nothing out of the norm. Your choice of elastomeric roof coating should be based on adhesive quality and efficiency. You may need some waterproof sealant, too; we’ll discuss that later on.

The tools required include –

  1. a paintbrush,
  2. broom (or a leaf blower), and
  3. a paint roller.

Quite simple, right? You are allowed to improvise if there is a need. A long handle painter roller will be more convenient for applying a coat, especially if the roof is very big.

Steps For Applying The Elastomeric Roof Coating

After knowing all these and choosing the elastomeric roof coating product to use, here are the steps you need to take to apply the product and get excellent results:

Fix up your roof

It is essential to fix whatever is wrong with the roof before using elastomeric coats. A bad roof will consume more products while achieving lesser results.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

Fixing your roof includes replacing shingles that are damaged or missing. Remove any tar that is on the roof to avoid poor adherence. Do a general check on the roof to make sure everything is set, and you are good to go.

Before you start the project make sure to check the quality of the ladder for safety. Plus, we recommend wearing safety harnesses as well to protect yourself from accidents.

Apply roof sealant beneath the shingles

The is probably the most hectic part of the job. It requires you to bend most of the time, towards the surface of the roof. You have to lift the individual wraps of shingle and apply the elastomeric coat beneath them.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

From experience, it is not as hard as it seems. After applying the coat under the shingles, it is good to pin them down with a stapler.

Seal the joints and available cracks

This is where you will need a waterproof sealant. This step may not be necessary for you if your roof doesn’t have any cracks and the joints are intact.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

Regardless, I strongly recommend reinforcing the joints with a suitable sealant, even if they are in good shape.

Clear off the debris and scattered leafs

A leaf blower, that’s the trick, but a broom can serve the purpose too. Move around the roof and get every particle, leaf, litter, mildew, lichen, fungus, and debris off the roof.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

The preparatory cleaning done before is not enough. The wind might have blown particles on the roof, and those particles will hinder the next step. With a leaf blower, the job is fascinating.

You can use reversed vacuum cleaner as well to get rid of the loose dust on the roof.

Apply product to edges

You need to properly apply the product to the edges available, the edges of vents, edges of chimney escape, and any other edges available on the roof.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

You won’t want to go back to this after your job is done. Small paintbrushes are very effective in getting those corners adequately worked with accuracy.

Apply products to the surface

Here comes the major stroke. You need to get the elastomeric roof coating all over the surface of the roof, and you don’t want to be stingy about it.

Using the extra product is better than using less. This is what about the color toning magic. Apply sufficient product using a paint roller, preferably a roller with a long handle.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

A roller with a short handle will have you bending over again, something you have already done before, and you can avoid it. Use the roller horizontally to fit the shingles’ pattern and take around five shingles with a stroke.

You will surely want to get this done well once and for all. A roof coating can be slippery, and you don’t want to keep stepping on the coated surface to rework poorly coated parts.

Wait and reapply roof coating

Under preferable weather conditions with temperatures between 15 degrees Celsius and 25 degrees Celsius, most elastomeric roof coats will take between 12 hours to 24 hours to totally dry.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

After the product is properly dry, apply the elastomeric coating again to wrap up the process. Let the new coat dry off and watch your roof properly toned and protected.

If you notice some parts were not evenly taken care of, you can always reapply the coat till you are satisfied. Generally, applying the coat twice never fails if your product is authentic.

Roof Coating Application Tips

To cover around 350 square feet, you need about 15 liters of a roof coat (Well, coverage depends mostly on the product you choose). If the roof is very clear, it might cover well over 400 square feet. Coverage expectations can be altered by shingle conditions, age of the roof, smoothness of surface, and the preparation process as well. Older roofs generally consume more products than relatively new roofs.

Roof coating products usually take around 12 hours to dry up after use. Serious rain or excessive dew can destroy the effectiveness of the product. If the atmospheric temperature is less than 15 degrees Celsius, you might have to wait for a whole day before the coat dry properly.

Harsh weather conditions where the temperature is below 5 degrees Celsius or over 35 degrees Celsius is not appropriate for applying elastomeric roof coating.

Conclusion

If the product is good and you follow the steps properly, you will be satisfied with the result. You can test the coat with 4 square feet to confirm the expected outcome before using the coat to the whole roof.

Before applying the coat, stir the product well to make sure distribution is even. Most warranty clauses are valid if you apply one liter to about 12 square feet.

Make sure your roof is dry, warm to touch, and clean before working. The whole process is fun when you get it right.

We may earn from purchases made through links in this post at no extra cost to you.

Last Updated on January 20, 2021

Are you in need of a perfect way to protect your roof and beautify them simultaneously?

Then, you need an elastomeric roof coating. Roof shingles are properly secured when you use a good roof coating, and you also achieve a nice color tone and vibe for your roof.

Let’s talk about the things you need and how to go about it.

Tools & Supplies You’ll Need

If you are a technician, painter, or technical person, the things needed may look pretty basic. The equipment required is nothing out of the norm. Your choice of elastomeric roof coating should be based on adhesive quality and efficiency. You may need some waterproof sealant, too; we’ll discuss that later on.

The tools required include –

  1. a paintbrush,
  2. broom (or a leaf blower), and
  3. a paint roller.

Quite simple, right? You are allowed to improvise if there is a need. A long handle painter roller will be more convenient for applying a coat, especially if the roof is very big.

Steps For Applying The Elastomeric Roof Coating

After knowing all these and choosing the elastomeric roof coating product to use, here are the steps you need to take to apply the product and get excellent results:

Fix up your roof

It is essential to fix whatever is wrong with the roof before using elastomeric coats. A bad roof will consume more products while achieving lesser results.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

Fixing your roof includes replacing shingles that are damaged or missing. Remove any tar that is on the roof to avoid poor adherence. Do a general check on the roof to make sure everything is set, and you are good to go.

Before you start the project make sure to check the quality of the ladder for safety. Plus, we recommend wearing safety harnesses as well to protect yourself from accidents.

Apply roof sealant beneath the shingles

The is probably the most hectic part of the job. It requires you to bend most of the time, towards the surface of the roof. You have to lift the individual wraps of shingle and apply the elastomeric coat beneath them.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

From experience, it is not as hard as it seems. After applying the coat under the shingles, it is good to pin them down with a stapler.

Seal the joints and available cracks

This is where you will need a waterproof sealant. This step may not be necessary for you if your roof doesn’t have any cracks and the joints are intact.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

Regardless, I strongly recommend reinforcing the joints with a suitable sealant, even if they are in good shape.

Clear off the debris and scattered leafs

A leaf blower, that’s the trick, but a broom can serve the purpose too. Move around the roof and get every particle, leaf, litter, mildew, lichen, fungus, and debris off the roof.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

The preparatory cleaning done before is not enough. The wind might have blown particles on the roof, and those particles will hinder the next step. With a leaf blower, the job is fascinating.

You can use reversed vacuum cleaner as well to get rid of the loose dust on the roof.

Apply product to edges

You need to properly apply the product to the edges available, the edges of vents, edges of chimney escape, and any other edges available on the roof.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

You won’t want to go back to this after your job is done. Small paintbrushes are very effective in getting those corners adequately worked with accuracy.

Apply products to the surface

Here comes the major stroke. You need to get the elastomeric roof coating all over the surface of the roof, and you don’t want to be stingy about it.

Using the extra product is better than using less. This is what about the color toning magic. Apply sufficient product using a paint roller, preferably a roller with a long handle.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

A roller with a short handle will have you bending over again, something you have already done before, and you can avoid it. Use the roller horizontally to fit the shingles’ pattern and take around five shingles with a stroke.

You will surely want to get this done well once and for all. A roof coating can be slippery, and you don’t want to keep stepping on the coated surface to rework poorly coated parts.

Wait and reapply roof coating

Under preferable weather conditions with temperatures between 15 degrees Celsius and 25 degrees Celsius, most elastomeric roof coats will take between 12 hours to 24 hours to totally dry.

How to apply elastomeric paintSource: Techniseal

After the product is properly dry, apply the elastomeric coating again to wrap up the process. Let the new coat dry off and watch your roof properly toned and protected.

If you notice some parts were not evenly taken care of, you can always reapply the coat till you are satisfied. Generally, applying the coat twice never fails if your product is authentic.

Roof Coating Application Tips

To cover around 350 square feet, you need about 15 liters of a roof coat (Well, coverage depends mostly on the product you choose). If the roof is very clear, it might cover well over 400 square feet. Coverage expectations can be altered by shingle conditions, age of the roof, smoothness of surface, and the preparation process as well. Older roofs generally consume more products than relatively new roofs.

Roof coating products usually take around 12 hours to dry up after use. Serious rain or excessive dew can destroy the effectiveness of the product. If the atmospheric temperature is less than 15 degrees Celsius, you might have to wait for a whole day before the coat dry properly.

Harsh weather conditions where the temperature is below 5 degrees Celsius or over 35 degrees Celsius is not appropriate for applying elastomeric roof coating.

Conclusion

If the product is good and you follow the steps properly, you will be satisfied with the result. You can test the coat with 4 square feet to confirm the expected outcome before using the coat to the whole roof.

Before applying the coat, stir the product well to make sure distribution is even. Most warranty clauses are valid if you apply one liter to about 12 square feet.

Make sure your roof is dry, warm to touch, and clean before working. The whole process is fun when you get it right.

The Sherwin williams guy told me that elastomeric paint is only good if its applied right. I am assuming applied right means putting on the correct wet/dry film thickness and covering all areas without gap. I am first time painter and trying to DIY the painting job.

1) I don’t have a spray painter. Can I just roll the elastomeric paint instead ? If no, is there a cheap sprayer that would work for this job ?

2)How do you control the film thickness as you roll ? How do you know if you will need a third coat of paint because you applied too little with elastomeric paint?

3) What kind of roller should I use ?

4) Is there a special technique in painting elastomeric paint ?

You can only spray elastromeric paint with the heavy duty type airless and even then you might have to remove the filters in order for the airless to pump it. Even if you did have an airless stout enough to pump elastormeric, you’d still have to back roll in order to work the paint into the substrate.

Applying the paint uniformly is pretty much the same no matter what material you use. What do you intend to apply the elastomeric too? I normally only apply 1 coat of elastomeric over primed or prepainted masonry. I’ll pretty much slop it on and then as the roller dries out, back roll to even it out. What size roller cover to use depends mostly on the texture of the substrate. 3/4″ is ok for smooth sand finish stucco but rough stucco might require up to an 1.5″ nap.

Thanks for the quick reply. The home is a 1965 build ranch home. All exterior is stucco. There were in total about 15 cracks all around the house. House is on a 7000 sq ft lot. Its located in Santa Barbara approx. 1 mile from the beach.

The stucco condition is decently good. Here are some of the pictures

As you can see I will also need to hide the new stucco around the patio doors and windows.

I couldn’t view the pics

I normally caulk all but the minor cracks [assuming none are big enough to need mortar] Elastomeric paint will span minor cracks but not always the bigger ones. If the current paint is chalky [and it won’t wash off], I’d use a latex primer with 25% Flood’s Emulsa Bond added for the 1st coat. That will bind up the chalk [paint won’t adhere well to chalky surfaces] Then you can apply the elastomeric.

Thanks Shadie! I thought I had give them enough time but I guess I gave up a second or two too soon

I remember those pics from a previous thread Obviously you’ll need to prime all the new stucco, I’d consider priming all the stucco. I’d probably use a 1″ nap roller cover. I’ve always been partial to the lambswool covers but they are more expensive. Most younger painters seem to prefer the synthetic covers. I’d expect a coat of primer followed by one coat of elastomeric to last 10 yrs, maybe longer providing everything is prepped correctly.

Yes Mark you are right. I posted the same pics earlier but at that time I was considering doing a fog coat but soon enough I realized the house has been painted( I chipped off the paint when I accidentally pointed the power washer at the stucco).

Ok so my takeaways till now are door trim needs to go, prime whole house or the unprimed surfaces. I don’t see any chalking in the stucco for now.

Regarding the mismatched repairs. that is the most problematic part. How do I hide them. I was hoping to just smoothen them with a sandpaper and then paint over them. Especially this patch at front of the house is a problem.

Also, we decided to use a smaller patio door so there is about a 3ft wall that has been restucco’d next to the door whose texture doesn’t match the rest of wall. Even after I sand it the wall will have smooth texture while the rest of the wall has those trowel marks.

My main confusion is will sanding, priming and painting hide these issues ? What would you do in similar situation ?

How to apply elastomeric paint

What is an Elastomeric Roof Coating?

Most types of elastomeric roof coating are classified as having both weatherproof and waterproof properties. Elastomeric roof sealers are typically polymeric products, which create a seal when they are applied to a roof. They are effective in sealing roof leaks and preventing existing damage from worsening. Since they are durable and versatile in their abilities, they can be applied to the roof during any season. The components form a strong bond, which means that the finished product forms a type of membrane across the roof. Since roofs usually have drains, pipes or other protruding pieces, it is important to spray around them. When the coating goes around these objects, it becomes one surface for maximum durability and water resistance.

As the name implies, elastomeric coating has elastic properties. Since it can flex, it does not crack easily. Some forms have special properties and can stretch as much as 600%. Other types of coatings for roofing may crack or chip when the weather changes. Some types of coatings have added benefits. For example, there is a type of elastomeric coating that is supposed to help buildings stay cooler. Many people like this form of coating and can paint over it if they wish. According to some experts, elastomeric coatings can last a long time or a lifetime with proper maintenance. This includes reapplying a coating every 15 to 20 years and sealing any damaged areas as necessary.

There are four main types of elastomeric coating.

Butyl

This substance is ideal for low-sloping roofs and flat roofs. It is a good vapor barrier, and it has the ability to withstand strong water force.

Acrylic

This is one of the most long-lasting materials for a roof coating. It is more environmentally efficient than some coatings. Acrylic is best for roofs with high and multiple slopes.

Polyurethane

For those who have EPDM rubber roofs, this is the ideal choice for waterproofing and sealing leaks. Since it does not require special PH rinses and is versatile, it is a good choice for single-ply roofs.

Silicone

For polyurethane foam roofs, this is the best coating component. It can repair some types of weathering, and it can easily be reapplied over prior coats of silicone.

How to Apply Elastomeric Roof Coating

The easy application adds to the long list of benefits for this coating. Many types of products can be applied with a sprayer or a roller. These are the steps on how to apply elastomeric roof coating.

  1. Clean the roof thoroughly. Discard any large pieces of debris. Use a broom or blower to move the rest of the dirt and debris off the roof. After this, use a power washer to clean the roof. Wait until it dries to proceed.
  2. Make any necessary repairs. There may be spots on the roof that need patching. Look for blisters, cracks and other problem areas to repair. An acrylic roof sealant is a good solution for this step. For better results, use a trowel or roof brush to apply patching compound.
  3. Apply the elastomeric roof coating. First, carefully read the directions on the coating product. Make sure that it is ideal for the roof’s material and slope. There are two ways to apply coating, and it is important to choose a product that fits individual needs. Some products can be rolled onto the roof. Others are applied with a spraying device. In some home improvement stores, it may be possible to rent a sprayer instead of paying full price to buy one. A roller is usually a cheaper option.

Before applying elastomeric roof coating, watch some DIY videos online. It is always better to watch several videos to gain extra insights and to thoroughly understand how to apply elastomeric roof coating. When using a roller, be sure to maintain a wet edge at all times. Work from one side of the outer part of the roof, inward and toward the other side. Use the same pattern with a sprayer. Be sure to carefully seal any pipe edges or other roof fixtures.

Tips for Applying Elastomeric Roof Coating

Keeping the previous steps in mind, these are some helpful tips to make the application process go smoothly:

  • If possible, apply the elastomeric roof coating on a sunny day.
  • Pick a day that is nice but not too hot.
  • When using a roller, use a brush for finer details and around roof fixtures.
  • If the roof is severely damaged, hire a professional to patch it first.

Lastly, be sure to stay off the roof until the elastomeric roof coating is cured. It should dry within a day or so. However, it may take up to a week to be fully cured in perfect weather. If it rains a few days after the coating is applied, the moisture will not ruin it. Continuously wet weather could slow the curing process for up to a few weeks. To be safe, plan on staying off the roof for a month.

The SANI-TRED Solution

SANI-TRED is a permanent waterproof roof coating that can be applied as an elastomeric product because it bonds to plywood, concrete, metal, and more. SANI-TRED provides excellent performance with 590% permanent elongation. Learn more about using SANI-TRED for your Roof coating or repair project.

How to apply elastomeric paint

When you want a finished look for an outdoor project, paint is usually the go-to covering. If the surface you’re covering is a water-bearing surface, or if it tends to flex a bit due to stress from winds, foot traffic or snow load, then elastomeric paint is ideal. Elastomeric is a word for a substance that will return to its original shape and size after being stressed, stretched, or compressed. Elastomeric paints are often chosen over traditional oil or latex paints because of their durability and waterproofing qualities.

Knowing how to apply elastomeric paint is no trade secret, although it should be applied by a professional. It does not take special brushes or rollers, just experience and good working knowledge about the basics of applying this coating. Here are some tips on how to apply elastomeric paint.

Preparation

As with any other painting project, preparing the surface to accept and bond with the elastomeric coating is a crucial part of the application process. The areas you intend to coat should be cleaned with a quality detergent that will not leave a film or cause the surface you’re covering to peel. If needed, the old paint should be scraped off or pressure washed before coating. Oxidized or badly peeling surfaces will not hold up well after being painted, no matter how good your elastomeric coating is. Likewise, a badly prepared surface will show through in the end.

Small hairline cracks in stucco or masonry are easily covered up with elastomeric coatings, but anything larger than 1/16″ should be filled with a compatible substance, like mortar or patching cement. Larger cracks that are not expected to spread should be bridged with fiber-reinforced tape.

Priming

Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations as to whether you need a primer. Unpainted block or stucco surfaces will need to be prepared differently than bare wood or previously painted surfaces. Make sure the elastomeric coating you choose is designed for the surface you’re painting. There are different formulations for different surfaces. Elastomeric coatings do not penetrate far below the surface of what you are painting, which makes the application of a good primer coat important.

Application

Again, reading and following the manufacturer’s instructions on application is critical to the outcome of the job. Wet film thickness and dry film thickness are usually a good indicator of the quality of your work. The recommended values of each should be followed, as this can affect the performance and lifespan of the product. Multiple coats are preferred over one thick coat to ensure even coverage. Thick coats tend to sag and look lumpy.

Get to areas around pipes, windows, and electrical boxes with a brush. Use a thick nap roller in an overlapping ‘V’ pattern in the ‘field’ or large flat surfaces. Airless sprayers can be used, but require a lot more equipment, special size spray tips and more training than most DIY homeowners have.

Professional Painting Services

For professional assistance in applying elastomeric paint, contact us. At Ameriside, our experienced professionals can help with all of your elastomeric painting needs and more. Contact us today to get started!

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How to apply elastomeric paint

How to apply elastomeric paint

There seems to be a lot of confusion about Elastomeric Coatings in the market place. Most of our customers are convinced that Elastomeric Coatings can not be applied on wood substrates such as wood siding. I am hoping to shed some light on the discrepancies that exist between contractors and home-owners.

My background is in both paint manufacturing and contracting and we have been involved with both on some level since 1987.

I’ll start with the basic function of an elastomeric coating, what types are available for home owner use and the facts of elastomeric coatings as they relate to wood.

Elastomerics Coatings were originally developed as a water-proof coating or membrane designed to keep water (rain) from penetrating concrete warehouses in areas that were prone to wind driven rains. The idea was to keep moisture from damaging the contents of the warehouse or building. They were typically very thick coatings applied in two separate coats, the second designed to be pin-hole free to prevent water intrusion. The final dry-film thickness would be 16-20 mils (8-10 times thicker than house paint). The coating was designed to very flexible or elastic to compensate for movement or settling and to bridge any cracks from reappearing.

As time progressed painting contractors began experimenting on combining elastomeric coatings with house paint for several reasons, the first being the need for a coating the could create a higher film build to fill in the cracking and checking on weathered wood siding. Painting contractors were aware of the benefits of using elastomeric coatings on concrete and stucco substrates to fill and bridge cracking and the fact that elastomeric coatings were a thick, high viscosity, high film build coating, they were also aware that the cost was thirty to fifty percent higher than the typical house paint not to mention the fact the spread rate – coverage was 50-75 square feet per gallon compared to 300-400 square feet coverage of a quality house paint.

Contractors realized that by combining an elastomeric coating with house paint that the spread rate would increase and the combined products would fill the cracks in wood siding. As a result of using this combination contractors were delivering a finished product that was truly impressive compared to the contractors that were using the conventional house paint.

Manufacturers had serious concerns with painting contractors altering products in the field with no quality control systems in place, no formal testing, and no known outcome on performance or coating failures and were reluctant to endorse or develop a product that would meet the demand and needs of their customers.

In 1997 while I was employed as the Vice President of Sales for a small paint manufacturer in Sacramento I decided to contact several key resin manufacturers about the possibility of developing a resin / elastomeric system for wood that did not trap moisture, pick-up dirt or need to be mixed on the job-site. As a result of the meetings we were able to produce a resin system that could achieve the film build we were looking for that included a perm rating (Water entrapment) similar to traditional house paints with better dirt resistance, color retention and life expectancy of traditional coatings already in place.

Since the formulation of the original batch in 1997 there have been thousands of homes (Both wood & stucco;) that have been painted with these new hybrid elastomeric coatings. Nearly every manufacturer has included this type of elastomeric in their product line. After researching the brand name manufacturers such as Vista Paint, Sherwin Williams, Dunn Edwards and others, I have confirmed that they do in fact recommend elastomeric coatings such as Weather-Master 1900, for wood siding and other wood substrates.

I hope that this article has been helpful to you in answering some of the questions that surround elastomeric coatings. There are several web-sites and articles that have been published by industry experts that may be helpful in answering any remaining questions that you may have.

About Author:
Trico Painting is the whole package! We offer premium service and exceptional quality in house painting for homeowners and HOA’s. We proudly serve the following areas: Roseville, Rockin, Lincoln, Loomis, Granite Bay, Orangevale, Folsom and El Dorado Hills.

Working with Elastomeric Coatings

How to apply elastomeric paint

When it comes to working with vertical exterior surfaces using the best elastomeric coating available is vital to a successful job. Ideal for use on these types of substrates — such as stucco, concrete and concrete blocks — are the Dunn-Edwards lines of ultra-premium ENDURALASTIC™, which are 100% acrylic elastomeric wall coatings that provide exceptional flexibility, chalking and dirt pick-up resistance, bridge hairline cracks, as well as outstanding waterproofing protection against wind-driven rain. The ENDURALASTIC lines also provides excellent adhesion and outstanding alkali and efflorescence resistance on properly prepared masonry, making your job easier and your clients happier with the long-lasting results.

But what, really, are the differences between Elastomeric Wall Coatings (EWCs) and conventional paints?

First of all, due to EWCs’ performance properties, they are designed to apply at much heavier wet and dry film thickness compared to conventional paints, roughly about six to eight times thicker than regular paints. This is significant when it comes to durability. For example, EWCs usually cover about 50 to 90 square feet/gallon compared to 200 to 400 square feet/gallon for regular paints (can vary depending on surface and application method). This difference in thickness can be directly correlated to the performance properties of EWCs, which provide crack-bridging (up to 1/16”) and waterproofing protection against wind-driven rain.

When it comes to application, the differences become even clearer, as EWCs are generally applied by paint sprayer (minimum of 2 gallons per minute, due to product viscosity). The recommended spray tip size is minimum of .021, but can be larger depending the EWC being applied.

Best practices recommend to spray 75 percent of the recommended film-thickness to the surface and then backroll (with a thick-nap roller cover) while the surface is still wet. Then apply the remaining 25 percent of the recommended film-thickness to the surface. This will help ensure an even and uniform appearance. During and after application, it’s a good idea to use a wet film gauge to measure whether or not the optimal wet film thickness has been achieved.

EWCs can be applied by roller and brush, but it becomes more difficult to achieve consistent film thickness (recommended: 1 ½-inch nap roller). Also, labor costs are increased, as it takes longer to achieve recommended mil thickness.

So, remember, when it comes to vertical exterior surfaces, be sure you’re using the best coating for the job. You’ll be happier with the results— and your client will be, too!

The Sherwin williams guy told me that elastomeric paint is only good if its applied right. I am assuming applied right means putting on the correct wet/dry film thickness and covering all areas without gap. I am first time painter and trying to DIY the painting job.

1) I don’t have a spray painter. Can I just roll the elastomeric paint instead ? If no, is there a cheap sprayer that would work for this job ?

2)How do you control the film thickness as you roll ? How do you know if you will need a third coat of paint because you applied too little with elastomeric paint?

3) What kind of roller should I use ?

4) Is there a special technique in painting elastomeric paint ?

You can only spray elastromeric paint with the heavy duty type airless and even then you might have to remove the filters in order for the airless to pump it. Even if you did have an airless stout enough to pump elastormeric, you’d still have to back roll in order to work the paint into the substrate.

Applying the paint uniformly is pretty much the same no matter what material you use. What do you intend to apply the elastomeric too? I normally only apply 1 coat of elastomeric over primed or prepainted masonry. I’ll pretty much slop it on and then as the roller dries out, back roll to even it out. What size roller cover to use depends mostly on the texture of the substrate. 3/4″ is ok for smooth sand finish stucco but rough stucco might require up to an 1.5″ nap.

Thanks for the quick reply. The home is a 1965 build ranch home. All exterior is stucco. There were in total about 15 cracks all around the house. House is on a 7000 sq ft lot. Its located in Santa Barbara approx. 1 mile from the beach.

The stucco condition is decently good. Here are some of the pictures

As you can see I will also need to hide the new stucco around the patio doors and windows.

I couldn’t view the pics

I normally caulk all but the minor cracks [assuming none are big enough to need mortar] Elastomeric paint will span minor cracks but not always the bigger ones. If the current paint is chalky [and it won’t wash off], I’d use a latex primer with 25% Flood’s Emulsa Bond added for the 1st coat. That will bind up the chalk [paint won’t adhere well to chalky surfaces] Then you can apply the elastomeric.

Thanks Shadie! I thought I had give them enough time but I guess I gave up a second or two too soon

I remember those pics from a previous thread Obviously you’ll need to prime all the new stucco, I’d consider priming all the stucco. I’d probably use a 1″ nap roller cover. I’ve always been partial to the lambswool covers but they are more expensive. Most younger painters seem to prefer the synthetic covers. I’d expect a coat of primer followed by one coat of elastomeric to last 10 yrs, maybe longer providing everything is prepped correctly.

Yes Mark you are right. I posted the same pics earlier but at that time I was considering doing a fog coat but soon enough I realized the house has been painted( I chipped off the paint when I accidentally pointed the power washer at the stucco).

Ok so my takeaways till now are door trim needs to go, prime whole house or the unprimed surfaces. I don’t see any chalking in the stucco for now.

Regarding the mismatched repairs. that is the most problematic part. How do I hide them. I was hoping to just smoothen them with a sandpaper and then paint over them. Especially this patch at front of the house is a problem.

Also, we decided to use a smaller patio door so there is about a 3ft wall that has been restucco’d next to the door whose texture doesn’t match the rest of wall. Even after I sand it the wall will have smooth texture while the rest of the wall has those trowel marks.

My main confusion is will sanding, priming and painting hide these issues ? What would you do in similar situation ?