How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada

Social / Search

This section contains detailed information for people interested in traveling to the United States.

In Canada, the U.S. Government issues visas from its Embassy and six consulates located throughout the country. Canadians typically do not require visas to enter the United States, although there are some exceptions. Citizens of certain other countries also do not require entry visas to visit the United States. For more information, please visit the Visa Waiver section of the State Department website.

For more information on applying for a U.S. visa, please select a link on the right for further details.

The purpose of your intended travel and other facts will determine what type of visa is required under U.S. immigration law. As a visa applicant, you will need to establish that you meet all requirements to receive the category of visa for which you are applying. See our Directory of Visa Categories to determine which visa category might be appropriate for your purpose of travel to the United States.

Information for Canadians

  • Do I Need A Visa?
  • First Nations and Native Americans
  • Passport Requirements
  • Canadian Students

Nonimmigrant Visas

  • Categories and Requirements
  • Diplomatic, Official, and International Organization Visas
  • Treaty Trader and Investor Visas
  • Click here to start your non-immigrant visa application

Immigrant Visas

  • Spouse of a U.S. Citizen
  • Fiancé(e) to marry U.S. Citizen & live in U.S.
  • Certain Family Members of U.S. Citizens
  • Diversity Immigrants
  • Click here to start your immigrant visa application

What is a Visa?

A citizen of a foreign country who seeks to enter the United States generally must first obtain a U.S. visa, which is placed in the traveler’s passport, a travel document issued by the traveler’s country of citizenship.

Certain international travelers may be eligible to travel to the United States without a visa if they meet the requirements for visa-free travel. The Visa section of this website is all about U.S. visas for foreign citizens to travel to the United States.

(Note: U.S. citizens don’t need a U.S. visa for travel, but when planning travel abroad may need a visa issued by the embassy of the country they wish to visit.).

Customer Service Statement

The Department of State manages the visa process strictly but fairly in order to best protect the United States. We are committed to the essential openness for which the United States has always been known. Travel to the United States is welcomed and encouraged.

We promise to you, the visa applicant, that:

  • We will treat you with dignity and respect, even if we are unable to grant you a visa.
  • We will treat you as an individual and your case as unique.
  • We will remember that, to you, a visa interview may be a new or intimidating experience and that you may be nervous.
  • We will use the limited time available for the interview to get as full a picture as possible of your travel plans and intentions.
  • We will use our available resources to fairly assist all applicants to get appointments to allow travel in time for business, study, and other important obligations.
  • We will post detailed and accurate information on visa requirements and application procedures on every Embassy and Consulate website.
  • We will provide information on non-immigrant appointment waiting times at every Embassy and Consulate posted on http://travel.state.gov.
  • We will explain the reason for any visa denial to you.

Furthermore, if you are a:

  • Student, we will make every effort to ensure that you get an appointment and, if qualified, a visa in time to start classes.
  • Medical and humanitarian emergency traveler, we will expedite processing for those dealing with life threatening emergencies.
  • Business traveler, we will establish appropriate mechanisms to facilitate business travel and expedite cases of particular concern to American business.

At the same time, we expect you, the visa applicant, to:

  • Plan your travel and visa application as far in advance as possible.
  • Complete your application fully and accurately.
  • Be forthcoming about your purpose and plans.
  • Prepare for your interview by being able to clearly and concisely describe your intentions.

Learn about the most common types of visas for business, student or travel you may need when coming to or traveling through the United States, plus review what other documents you need to enter the U.S. Also, find information on how to apply for an immigrant visa.

On This Page

  • Apply For a Visa
  • Procedures for Entering the United States
  • Apply for an Immigrant Visa
  • Refugees and Asylum

Apply For a Visa

The U.S. Department of State issues visas U.S. Visa: a document issued by a U.S. embassy or consulate to a non-U.S. citizen. It’s placed in their passport to allow them to seek entry to the U.S. for a specific purpose. to foreign nationals Foreign National: a person who is not a citizen of the country they’re visiting, studying or working in. traveling to the United States through its embassies or consulates Consulate: a smaller version of an embassy, located outside a nation’s capital. An embassy is the place in a nation’s capital where the diplomatic staff of another country work. . However, you do not need a visa for your business meeting or for vacation if you are a citizen of any of the 39 countries participating in the Visa Waiver Program.

Your reason for travel will determine the type of visa you need to enter the U.S. Some of the most commonly requested visas are:

  • Immigrant visa for permanent residency Permanent Residency: the U.S. immigration status that allows non-U.S. citizens to live and work permanently in the United States.
  • Visitor visas for tourism or business
  • FiancГ©(e) visa to marry your U.S. citizen fiancГ©(e), and live, in the U.S.
  • Visas for students
  • Business or professional visas for citizens of Canada and Mexico
  • Transit visa for traveling through the U.S. on your way to visit another country

Procedures for Entering the United States

When you arrive in the United States, you must show valid travel documents as part of the entry process. The documents you need and whether your passport needs to be valid for six months after your travel dates depend on the country you are arriving from and your citizenship or status.

Arrival From Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda

The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative covers travel by land, sea, or air from Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda:

American citizens entering the U.S. must show a valid passport, U.S. passport card, a Trusted Traveler Program card (NEXUS, SENTRI, Global Entry or FAST), or an enhanced driver’s license. If you have any questions, contact your carrier to find out if they require a specific document.

Lawful permanent residents of the U.S. need to show a Permanent Resident Card (Green card). A passport is not required.

Citizens of Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Bermuda can find the necessary travel documents from the Department of Homeland Security under “land and sea entry.”

Arrival From Other Countries

All travelers entering the United States from all other countries need a passport upon arrival (regardless of their country of citizenship).

Permanent residents and foreign nationals may also need a U.S. visa. You must apply for a visa before you start your trip.

Entry Denials

Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers conduct arrival inspections using the same criteria for all foreign nationals visiting the U.S. They decide your admission to the United States, even if all your travel documents, including your visa, are in order.

Note: While there are no rules prohibiting pregnant visitors from entering the United States, doing so to give birth is prohibited. A CBP officer will consider your pregnancy when deciding on your admission.

Apply for an Immigrant Visa

About a million people a year receive Green Cards, designating them as new permanent residents of the United States. Many of those people arrive in the U.S. through an immigrant visa.

Top Types of Immigrant Visas

Most people who come to the U.S. using an immigrant visa receive one of the following types:

Family-based visa, for those with a family member who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident

Employment-based visa, which generally requires a job offer from a U.S. employer

Key Steps for Obtaining an Immigrant Visa

In most cases, someone must “sponsor” you, or file an immigrant petition for you.

Once the petition is approved, and there is a visa available in your category, you apply for an immigrant visa. You do this through a U.S. consulate abroad. Find one in your country in this directory of U.S. consulates.

Get a medical examination.

Go to an interview.

You’ll then receive a decision on your application.

Another way to seek an immigrant visa is through the Diversity Visa Lottery program. This program lets people from countries with low U.S. immigration rates take part in an annual drawing for an immigrant visa.

After You Get Your Immigrant Visa

Once you get your immigrant visa, you’ll have to pay a USCIS immigrant fee before you’ll receive your Green Card. The best time to pay the fee is after you pick up your immigrant visa from the U.S. consulate, before you leave for the United States.

When you receive your immigrant visa, you’ll get a sealed packet of documents to give officials at the U.S. port of entry. If you pass inspection, you’ll be admitted to the U.S. as a permanent resident, and will receive your Green Card in the mail.

Don’t Apply for an Immigrant Visa If You’re in the United States

If you’re already in the U.S., you do not have to apply for an immigrant visa to become a permanent resident. Instead, you can apply for a Green Card through an adjustment of status. This way, you won’t have to return to your home country to complete visa processing. You’ll still have to go through key steps like those required for an immigrant visa application:

Someone must “sponsor” you, or file an immigrant petition for you.

Once the petition is approved, and there is a visa available in your category, you apply for a Green Card from within the U.S.

Get a medical examination.

Go to an interview.

Wait for a decision on your application.

Refugees and Asylum

Refugees

Refugees are people who fled their homes for a variety of reasons, including persecution (or the fear of persecution) and war, to find protection elsewhere.

If you believe you need protection as a refugee, contact the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) or another international nonprofit volunteer agency. If these organizations are unavailable to you, contact the nearest U.S. Embassy or consulate.

The refugees’ entry process into the U.S. involves many government agencies as part of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program, which explains the resettlement and a refugee’s arrival.

Asylum

Asylum is a form of protection available to refugees. You must meet certain conditions to request asylum in the United States. After getting asylum in the U.S., you:

Do you have a question?

Ask a real person any government-related question for free. They’ll get you the answer or let you know where to find it.

Last Updated: March 16, 2021

Sign Up to Receive Email Updates

USAGov is the Official Guide to Government Information and Services

Social / Search

Photo Requirements

To qualify for a non-immigrant visa, each applicant must present a color photo at the interview. Each photo must have been taken within the last 6 months and must satisfy State Department requirements. If the presented photos do not meet State Department requirements, the application process will be suspended until the applicant has presented a compliant photo.

Security Procedures

All visitors must be screened prior to entering the U.S. Embassy or Consulate and are subject to inspection via walk-through metal detector and a hand-held metal detector. All personal items will undergo full inspection by use of x-ray and other detection equipment.

Any visitor refusing to submit to security screening shall be prohibited from entering.

Prohibited Items (Items Not to Bring to the Embassy/Consulate)

The following items are prohibited inside the U.S. Embassy and Consulate and we have no storage facilities for them, so please leave them at your home, your hotel, or in your vehicle:

  • Backpacks, bags, luggage, or large purses (purses 12 x 10 x 6 in. and smaller will be permitted)
  • Food and beverages
  • Weapons, including mace or pepper spray
  • Tools, including any sharp or bladed objects
  • Any oils, aerosols or pump sprays, liquids, lotions and powders
  • Any type of fire starter
  • Electronic or recording equipment of any kind, including, but not limited to:
    • Cameras
    • Laptop computers
    • Mobile phones
    • MP3, CD, or cassette players
    • Pagers
    • Keyless remotes
  • Helmets of any type
  • Strollers will be determined on a case by case basis

This list is not all-inclusive. The U.S. Embassy or Consulate reserves the right to deny entry of any items deemed suspicious.

Consular-Related Visitors

Access to the Consulate is limited and generally only applicants are permitted to enter and be present during visa interviews. On a case-by-case basis, applicants may be accompanied by ONE non-applicant to during the visa application process. Please note: The Consulate has the right to refuse entry to any persons.

Special Needs Visitors: Applicants may bring one person to assist them if they are over 80 years of age, are a minor child, or are disabled and require assistance to complete the application process.

Interpreter: Applicants may bring one interpreter if they do not speak English well enough to participate in an interview, and consulate staff cannot interview them in their native language. A final decision as to whether or not an interpreter is needed will be made by consular staff on the day of the interview.

Due to waiting room size, the large volume of applicants, and the time required to screen consular clients, persons not meeting the criteria above will not be permitted to accompany an applicant. Drivers, friends, and extra relatives, including the relatives of interpreters, must wait outside or return to meet the applicant after the interview has been completed.

Fees for State Department services occasionally change. For the most up-to-date information, please consult the schedule of fees for visa services. Additionally, nationals of some countries will be required to pay a supplementary fee for visa issuance. Please consult the State Department reciprocity table to determine whether your visa will require an additional fee and, if so, of what amount.

Social / Search

In certain circumstances, individuals who have been found ineligible for an immigrant visa under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) may be eligible to apply for a waiver of the ineligibility. At the time of the immigrant visa interview, the consular officer will make a determination as to whether an applicant is waiver eligible. If the consular officer finds an applicant ineligible for a visa, but eligible to apply for a waiver, the officer will give the applicant a refusal worksheet with instructions on how to apply for the waiver.

Ineligible/Ineligibility

Immigration law says that certain conditions and actions prevent a person from receiving a U.S. visa. These conditions and activities are called ineligibilities. Examples are: overstaying your visa, selling drugs, active tuberculosis, being a terrorist, using fraud to get a visa, etc. Your period of ineligibility may be temporary or permanent depending on your situation.

Important: The waiver procedures can be followed only after the Consular Officer has determined the ineligibility on the day of the immigrant visa interview at the U.S. Consulate General in Montreal.

Individuals who have applied for visas and been found ineligible by a U.S. Consular Officer can mail requests to waive certain grounds of inadmissibility directly to a U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Lockbox facility. This change affects where waiver applications must be sent. Learn more about waiver processing at USCIS.

Please follow the USCIS filing tips to prepare and submit your I-601 or I-212 waiver application.

During the entire visa application and interview process you must tell the truth and provide complete and accurate information. If you do not, your visa will be delayed or you may be found ineligible for a visa.

TN NAFTA Professionals

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) created special economic and trade relationships for the United States, Canada and Mexico. The TN nonimmigrant classification permits qualified Canadian and Mexican citizens to seek temporary entry into the United States to engage in business activities at a professional level.

Among the types of professionals who are eligible to seek admission as TN nonimmigrants are accountants, engineers, lawyers, pharmacists, scientists, and teachers. You may be eligible for TN nonimmigrant status, if:

  • You are a citizen of Canada or Mexico;
  • Your profession qualifies under the regulations;
  • The position in the United States requires a NAFTA professional;
  • You have a prearranged full-time or part-time job with a U.S. employer (but not self-employment – see documentation required below); and
  • You have the qualifications to practice in the profession in question.

Eligibility Criteria

Unlike Mexican citizens, Canadian citizens are generally eligible for admission as nonimmigrants without a visa. The TN category, a nonimmigrant classification, simply reflects this general exemption from the visa requirement. NAFTA governs which evidence is required to prove whether a Canadian or Mexican citizen is a professional in a qualifying profession.

Canadian Citizens

If you are a Canadian citizen, then you are not required to apply for a TN visa at a U.S. consulate.

You may establish eligibility for TN classification at the time you seek admission to the United States by presenting required documentation to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer at certain CBP-designated U.S. ports of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station. You must provide the following documentation to the CBP officer:

  • Proof of Canadian citizenship;
  • Letter from your prospective employer detailing items such as the professional capacity in which you will work in the United States, the purpose of your employment, your length of stay, and your educational qualifications; and
  • Credentials evaluation (if applicable), together with any applicable fees.

Please refer to CBP’s website for additional information and requirements for applying for admission to the United States. If a CBP officer finds you eligible for admission, you will be admitted as a TN nonimmigrant.

Alternatively, a prospective TN employer may choose to file on behalf of a Canadian citizen who is outside the United States by submitting Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker to USCIS. Premium Processing Service is available.

If USCIS approves Form I-129, you, the prospective worker, may then apply to CBP for admission to the United States as a TN nonimmigrant by providing the following documentation to a CBP Officer at certain CBP-designated U.S. ports of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station:

  • Proof of Canadian citizenship; and
  • Approval Notice from USCIS for Form I-129.

In addition, when applying for admission, you should have in your possession a copy of the Form I-129, and all supporting documentation that was submitted to USCIS, to respond to questions about your eligibility. You should also be prepared to pay any applicable inspection fees at the time you seek admission. If a CBP officer finds you eligible for admission, you will be admitted as a TN nonimmigrant.

Mexican Citizens

If you are a Mexican citizen, then you are required to obtain a visa to enter the United States as a TN nonimmigrant. You should apply for a TN visa directly at a U.S. embassy or consulate in Mexico. See the U.S. Department of State webpage, “Mexican and Canadian NAFTA Professional Worker.”

Once you are approved for a TN visa, you may apply for admission at certain CBP-designated U.S. ports of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station. Please refer to CBP’s website for additional information and requirements for applying for admission to the United States. If a CBP officer finds you eligible for admission, then you will be admitted as a TN nonimmigrant.

Period of Stay/Extension of Stay

Initial Period of Stay

If you wish to remain in the United States beyond your initial period of stay without first departing from the United States, you must seek an extension of stay. If you are in the United States, your employer may file Form I-129 on your behalf.

Alternatively, you may depart from the United States before the date your status expires, and then, once abroad, you may apply at a CBP-designated U.S. port of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station using the same application and documentation procedures required at the time of your initial application for admission as a TN nonimmigrant.

Dependents of TN Nonimmigrants

Any accompanying or “following to join” spouse and children under the age of 21 may be eligible for TD nonimmigrant status. Spouses and children are:

  • Not permitted to work while in the United States, but they are permitted to study.
  • Granted TD status for no longer than the period of time granted to the principal TN nonimmigrant.

See the table below for specific information on how to apply for TD nonimmigrant status.

Application Information for Dependents or Spouses of TN nonimmigrants

Spouse or Dependents

Need a Visa?

Must Show

Where to apply for admission to the U.S.

Not citizens of Canada or Mexico

Check with the U.S. Department of State to determine whether a visa is required and if so, to learn how to apply for a visa.

At a CBP- designated U.S. port of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station.

No visa required

  • Proof of Canadian citizenship;
  • Proof of relationship to the TN nonimmigrant, such as a marriage certificate or birth certificate;
  • Photocopies of the TN nonimmigrant’s admission documents; and
  • Proof the TN nonimmigrant is maintaining his or her TN nonimmigrant status.

At a CBP-designated U.S. port of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station.

Yes, must apply for a TD nonimmigrant visa at an American embassy or consulate

Proof the TN nonimmigrant is maintaining his or her TN nonimmigrant status.

At a CBP-designated U.S. port of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station.

Extending Your TD Nonimmigrant Stay

If a Canadian or Mexican TN nonimmigrant applies for an extension of stay in the United States at the end of his or her period of admission or authorization as a TN, any eligible TD family member may also apply to extend their status without the need to travel abroad.

At this website, you can learn about obtaining a visa, as well as apply for your visa.
Here you will learn:
  • How to apply for your nonimmigrant visa for travel to the United States
  • What documents, photos and information you need to apply for your visa
  • How to access visa application forms and instructions
  • How to pay your visa application fee
  • Schedule your interview at a U.S. Embassy or Consulate General
  • Find important information about U.S. Embassies and Consulates General

Choose your specific location by clicking on the map below.

How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada

How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada

How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada

How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada

How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada

How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada

© CGI Federal Inc.

Rescission of Presidential Proclamation 10014

President Biden rescinded Presidential Proclamation (PP) 10014, entitled “Proclamation Suspending Entry of Immigrants Who Present Risk to the U.S. Labor Market During the Economic Recovery Following the COVID-19 Outbreak,” on February 24, 2021. Immigrant visa applicants who had been affected by this proclamation should review the instructions here.

Presidential Proclamation 10052

Presidential Proclamation 10052, which temporarily suspended the entry of certain H-1B, H-2B, J (for certain categories within the Exchange Visitor Program), and L nonimmigrants, expired on March 31, 2021.

Visa applicants who have not yet been interviewed or scheduled for an interview will have their applications prioritized and processed in accordance with existing phased resumption of visa services guidance. Visa applicants who were previously refused visas due to the restrictions of Presidential Proclamation 10052 may reapply by submitting a new application including a new fee.

Presidential Proclamations on Novel Coronavirus

Entry of foreign nationals who were physically present within the following list of countries within 14 days prior to their entry or attempted entry into the United States is suspended, per Presidential Proclamations 9984, 9992, 9993, 9996, and 10041, the Presidential Proclamation issued on January 25:

-The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, excluding overseas territories outside of Europe;

-The Republic of Ireland;

-The 26 countries that comprise the Schengen Area (Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland)

-The Islamic Republic of Iran; and

-The People’s Republic of China, not including the Special Administrative Regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

There are certain exceptions to the suspension of entry, including exceptions for U.S. lawful permanent residents and certain family members of U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents, among other exceptions listed in the proclamations. If you reside in, have traveled recently to, or intend to transit or travel to the above list of countries prior to your planned trip to the United States, we recommend you postpone your visa interview appointment until 14 days subsequent to your departure from the subject country(ries). Additionally, if you are experiencing flu-like symptoms, or believe you may have been exposed to the novel coronavirus, you are strongly encouraged to postpone your appointment by at least 14 days.

Rescission of Presidential Proclamations 9645 and 9983

On January 20, 2021, President Biden signed a Presidential Proclamation titled “Ending Discriminatory Bans on Entry to the United States.” This proclamation ends the travel restrictions under Presidential Proclamations 9645 and 9983 that had suspended entry into the United States of certain nationals, based on visa type, from Burma, Eritrea, Iran, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Nigeria, North Korea, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, Tanzania, Venezuela, and Yemen. Click here for additional information.

Effective January 26, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will require all air passengers entering the United States to present a negative COVID-19 test (a viral detection test for SARS-CoV- 2 approved or authorized by the relevant national authority), taken within 72 hours of departure. Airlines must confirm the negative test result for all passengers before boarding. Airlines must deny boarding of passengers if they do not provide documentation of a negative test or recovery. This requirement is separate from the visa application process. All Presidential Proclamations restricting travel due to COVID-19 remain in place, and continue to apply to subject potential travelers regardless of their test results or vaccination status. Travelers holding a National Interest Exception also remain subject to all applicable pre-departure testing requirements.

How to apply for a u. s. visa from canada

Instant Fuel Savings at Petro-Canada

Link your eligible RBC credit and debit cards to your Petro-Points card to save on fuel and earn points faster + .

How Do You Want To Get Started?

How Do You Want To Get Started?

Let us help you find the right credit card in 30 seconds or less.

Compare up to 3 cards with our easy to use Comparison Tool.

Get convenient access to everything you need to manage your credit card.

Credit Card Categories

Popular Credit Cards

RBC Avion Visa Infinite
WestJet RBC World Elite Mastercard
RBC Rewards + Visa
RBC Cash Back Preferred World Elite Mastercard
RBCВ AvionВ VisaВ Business

More Ways to Use Your Card

Insurance Coverage For Your Credit Card Balance

Simple and affordable protection when you need it most.

Instant Fuel Savings at Petro-Canada

Link your eligible RBC credit and debit cards to your Petro-Points card to save on fuel and earn points faster + .

Make Contactless Purchases

Make purchases up to $250 without having to touch a payment terminal.

Top Credit Card Questions

If your card has been stolen or permanently lost, call our 24-hour toll-free number 1-800-769-2512 . We’ll block the card from future use and issue you a new card.

You can easily lock and unlock your card through RBC Online Banking or the RBC Mobile app by selecting the card you want to lock and switching the toggle forВ Lock Card.

If you’re ever a victim of credit card fraud, take a deep breath–you’re ok. CallВ 1-800-769-2512 В and we’ll be happy to help you. Provided you’ve take reasonable precautions to protect your PIN and your card, you’re covered for any fraudulent charges both online and in-store. For more information, view the Zero Liability policies byВ VisaВ andВ Mastercard.

Credit cards are important for things like making hotel reservations, car rentals, or online purchases. They’re convenient and secure, and help give you the freedom to manage your finances, cover unexpected emergencies and also take advantage of rewards and special insurances. They’re also an easy way to establish a credit history! Use ourВ credit card selectorВ to find a card that’s right for you and apply online in just a few easy steps.

That depends on the card you choose. Some of our cards offer more benefits with an annual fee, while others have no annual fee at all. Browse ourВ no annual fee cardsВ or use ourВ card selectorВ to help narrow down the benefits that are most important to you.

If you collect RBC Rewards points, you can easily redeem them for travel, merchandise, gift cards and more atВ rbcrewards.com. If you earn WestJet dollars, Avios or Asia Miles, you can redeem directly with the airline loyalty program connected to your card.

You can make a payment through any of the methods below:

  • RBC Online Banking
  • RBC Mobile app
  • automated payments (so you’ll never need to worry about making your payment on time)
  • by phone
  • by mail
  • in person at an RBC branch
  • at an RBC Royal Bank ATM

TN NAFTA Professionals

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) created special economic and trade relationships for the United States, Canada and Mexico. The TN nonimmigrant classification permits qualified Canadian and Mexican citizens to seek temporary entry into the United States to engage in business activities at a professional level.

Among the types of professionals who are eligible to seek admission as TN nonimmigrants are accountants, engineers, lawyers, pharmacists, scientists, and teachers. You may be eligible for TN nonimmigrant status, if:

  • You are a citizen of Canada or Mexico;
  • Your profession qualifies under the regulations;
  • The position in the United States requires a NAFTA professional;
  • You have a prearranged full-time or part-time job with a U.S. employer (but not self-employment – see documentation required below); and
  • You have the qualifications to practice in the profession in question.

Eligibility Criteria

Unlike Mexican citizens, Canadian citizens are generally eligible for admission as nonimmigrants without a visa. The TN category, a nonimmigrant classification, simply reflects this general exemption from the visa requirement. NAFTA governs which evidence is required to prove whether a Canadian or Mexican citizen is a professional in a qualifying profession.

Canadian Citizens

If you are a Canadian citizen, then you are not required to apply for a TN visa at a U.S. consulate.

You may establish eligibility for TN classification at the time you seek admission to the United States by presenting required documentation to a U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officer at certain CBP-designated U.S. ports of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station. You must provide the following documentation to the CBP officer:

  • Proof of Canadian citizenship;
  • Letter from your prospective employer detailing items such as the professional capacity in which you will work in the United States, the purpose of your employment, your length of stay, and your educational qualifications; and
  • Credentials evaluation (if applicable), together with any applicable fees.

Please refer to CBP’s website for additional information and requirements for applying for admission to the United States. If a CBP officer finds you eligible for admission, you will be admitted as a TN nonimmigrant.

Alternatively, a prospective TN employer may choose to file on behalf of a Canadian citizen who is outside the United States by submitting Form I-129, Petition for Nonimmigrant Worker to USCIS. Premium Processing Service is available.

If USCIS approves Form I-129, you, the prospective worker, may then apply to CBP for admission to the United States as a TN nonimmigrant by providing the following documentation to a CBP Officer at certain CBP-designated U.S. ports of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station:

  • Proof of Canadian citizenship; and
  • Approval Notice from USCIS for Form I-129.

In addition, when applying for admission, you should have in your possession a copy of the Form I-129, and all supporting documentation that was submitted to USCIS, to respond to questions about your eligibility. You should also be prepared to pay any applicable inspection fees at the time you seek admission. If a CBP officer finds you eligible for admission, you will be admitted as a TN nonimmigrant.

Mexican Citizens

If you are a Mexican citizen, then you are required to obtain a visa to enter the United States as a TN nonimmigrant. You should apply for a TN visa directly at a U.S. embassy or consulate in Mexico. See the U.S. Department of State webpage, “Mexican and Canadian NAFTA Professional Worker.”

Once you are approved for a TN visa, you may apply for admission at certain CBP-designated U.S. ports of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station. Please refer to CBP’s website for additional information and requirements for applying for admission to the United States. If a CBP officer finds you eligible for admission, then you will be admitted as a TN nonimmigrant.

Period of Stay/Extension of Stay

Initial Period of Stay

If you wish to remain in the United States beyond your initial period of stay without first departing from the United States, you must seek an extension of stay. If you are in the United States, your employer may file Form I-129 on your behalf.

Alternatively, you may depart from the United States before the date your status expires, and then, once abroad, you may apply at a CBP-designated U.S. port of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station using the same application and documentation procedures required at the time of your initial application for admission as a TN nonimmigrant.

Dependents of TN Nonimmigrants

Any accompanying or “following to join” spouse and children under the age of 21 may be eligible for TD nonimmigrant status. Spouses and children are:

  • Not permitted to work while in the United States, but they are permitted to study.
  • Granted TD status for no longer than the period of time granted to the principal TN nonimmigrant.

See the table below for specific information on how to apply for TD nonimmigrant status.

Application Information for Dependents or Spouses of TN nonimmigrants

Spouse or Dependents

Need a Visa?

Must Show

Where to apply for admission to the U.S.

Not citizens of Canada or Mexico

Check with the U.S. Department of State to determine whether a visa is required and if so, to learn how to apply for a visa.

At a CBP- designated U.S. port of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station.

No visa required

  • Proof of Canadian citizenship;
  • Proof of relationship to the TN nonimmigrant, such as a marriage certificate or birth certificate;
  • Photocopies of the TN nonimmigrant’s admission documents; and
  • Proof the TN nonimmigrant is maintaining his or her TN nonimmigrant status.

At a CBP-designated U.S. port of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station.

Yes, must apply for a TD nonimmigrant visa at an American embassy or consulate

Proof the TN nonimmigrant is maintaining his or her TN nonimmigrant status.

At a CBP-designated U.S. port of entry or at a designated pre-clearance/pre-flight inspection station.

Extending Your TD Nonimmigrant Stay

If a Canadian or Mexican TN nonimmigrant applies for an extension of stay in the United States at the end of his or her period of admission or authorization as a TN, any eligible TD family member may also apply to extend their status without the need to travel abroad.