How to apply for unemployment compensation in florida

by Kailey Hagen | March 31, 2020

The Ascent is reader-supported: we may earn a commission from offers on this page. It’s how we make money. But our editorial integrity ensures our experts’ opinions aren’t influenced by compensation.

Unemployment can provide some of the financial support you need in these challenging times.

Thousands of Florida workers are now spending their days sheltering in place as the nation works to slow the spread of COVID-19. But this can create some financial challenges for those who depend on a weekly paycheck. Unemployment won’t replace your paychecks entirely, but it can help you get through the next few difficult months.

Here’s everything you need to know about Florida unemployment benefits, including eligibility requirements and how to apply.

How to apply for unemployment compensation in florida

Image source: Getty Images

Do I qualify for unemployment benefits?

Florida residents must meet the following requirements to claim unemployment benefits:

  1. You’ve lost your income or your hours have been reduced against your will so you’re earning $275 or less in gross income per week.
  2. You must be actively seeking work (see note below).
  3. Your past earnings must fulfill certain requirements.

Due to public health concerns, Florida workers do not have to fulfill the work-search requirement during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Florida evaluates your past earnings during a base period. This is the first four of the last five complete quarters before you applied for unemployment. So if you apply in March, your base period is October 2018 to September 2019, and if you apply in April, it’s January to December 2019.

You must have earned wages in at least two quarters during your base period and have earned at least $3,400 during your base period. Your total base period earnings must also be 1.5 times your earnings during your highest-earning quarter. So if you earned $2,000 in your highest-earning quarter, you must have earned at least $3,500 during your base period to qualify.

How do I apply for unemployment benefits?

You can apply for unemployment benefits on the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity website. Have this information ready:

  • Social Security Number or Alien Registration Number
  • Driver’s license or state ID number
  • Employment history for the last 18 months, including employer name, address, phone number, dates of work, gross earnings, and Federal Employer ID number (FEIN) found on your tax return, if available
  • Bank account information for direct deposit

Once your account is set up, you must log in every two weeks to request your next benefit payments, even while your claim is still pending review.

How much money will I receive in unemployment benefits?

Your weekly benefit amount (WBA) is the lower of:

  • Your income during the highest-earning quarter of your base period, divided by 26, or
  • $275

So for example, if you earned $2,000 during your highest-earning quarter, you’d get $77 per week.

How long can I collect unemployment benefits?

You can claim Florida unemployment benefits until you hit the lower of these limits:

  • Your total base period earnings divided by 4, or
  • 12 weeks

However, the CARES Act extends that period by 13 weeks, allowing you to collect unemployment benefits for up to 25 weeks.

Remember, you must also stop claiming unemployment if you find new employment.

What if my unemployment claim is denied?

You must make an appeal request within 20 calendar days of receiving your claim denial. You can submit your request online or via email, fax, or mail.

Florida unemployment benefits probably won’t be a full substitute for your previous paychecks, but they can give you some income during these uncertain times. Apply now if you believe you qualify.

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About the Author

How to apply for unemployment compensation in florida

Kailey is an industry specialist covering bank accounts, credit cards, and all things personal finance. Her work has appeared on USA Today, CNN Money, Fox Business, and MSN Money.

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Learn how to apply for unemployment benefits, workers’ compensation, welfare or temporary assistance, and other programs and services that can help if you lose your job.

On This Page

  • COVD-19 Unemployment Benefits
  • Apply for Unemployment Benefits
  • Continuation of Health Coverage: COBRA
  • Short-Term and Long-Term Disability Insurance
  • Workers’ Compensation for Illness or Injury on the Job
  • Wrongful Discharge/Termination of Employment
  • Welfare or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

COVD-19 Unemployment Benefits

The federal government has allowed states to change their laws to provide COVID-19 unemployment benefits for people whose jobs have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic.

The American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 authorizes:

An extension through September 6, 2021 for people already receiving unemployment benefits

Automatic, additional payments of $300 per week until September 6, 2021 to everyone qualified for unemployment benefits

Extension of the Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program for self-employed or gig workers

Apply for Unemployment Benefits

There are a variety of benefit and aid programs to help you if you lose your job. CareerOneStop.org is a good place to start. It can help with unemployment insurance benefits, job training, and finding a job.

Unemployment Insurance

Am I eligible?

Unemployment insurance programs pay you money if you lose your job through no fault of your own. You must meet your state’s eligibility requirements.

How do I apply?

Each state runs its own program. Select your state from this map to find out how to apply. You may be able to file online, by phone, or in person.

Is there anything else I need to know?

Some states provide extended benefits when there’s high unemployment. Extended unemployment insurance benefits last for 13 weeks. You can apply for extended benefits only once you’ve run out of regular benefits. Check with your state; not everyone qualifies.

Other Types of Benefits and Programs for the Unemployed

Educational Help

Federal agencies offer many unemployment education and training programs. They are generally free or low cost to the unemployed.

Self-Employment Help

Self-employment assistance programs help unemployed workers start their own small businesses. Delaware, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New York, and Oregon offer this program.

Continuation of Health Coverage: COBRA

Learn how you can continue your health care coverage through COBRA.

What is COBRA?

COBRA is the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act. COBRA lets workers and their families remain in the employee’s group health insurance plan for a limited time after a change in eligibility.

Eligibility

There are three basic requirements that must be met for you to elect COBRA continuation coverage:

Your group health plan must be covered by COBRA

A qualifying event must occur. This could be voluntary or involuntary job loss, reduction in the hours worked, transition between jobs, death, or divorce.

You must be a qualified beneficiary for that event

If you are entitled to COBRA continuation coverage, you must be given at least 60 days to decide whether to elect it.

How to Get COBRA

Group health plans must give covered employees and their families a notice explaining their COBRA rights. Plans must have rules for how COBRA coverage is offered, how beneficiaries may choose to get it and when they can stop coverage. For more COBRA information, see An Employee’s Guide to Health Benefits under COBRA.

Get More Information or File a Complaint

For questions or complaints about your COBRA coverage, contact your plan administrator or the Employee Benefits Security Administration. Note: In some cases, you can change from COBRA coverage to Marketplace health insurance coverage.

Short-Term and Long-Term Disability Insurance

If you can’t work because you get sick or injured, disability insurance will pay part of your income. You may be able to get insurance through your employer. You can also buy your own policy.

Types of Disability Policies

There are two types of disability policies.

Short-term policies may pay for up to two years. Most last for a few months to a year.

Long-term policies may pay benefits for a few years or until the disability ends.

Employers who offer coverage may provide short-term coverage, long-term coverage, or both.

If you plan to buy your own policy, shop around and ask:

How is disability defined?

When do benefits begin?

How long do benefits last?

How much money will the policy pay?

Federal Disability Programs

Two Social Security Administration programs pay benefits to people with disabilities. Learn about Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI).

Workers’ Compensation for Illness or Injury on the Job

Workers’ compensation laws protect employees who get hurt on the job or sick from it. The laws establish workers’ comp, a form of insurance that employers pay for. These laws vary from state to state and for federal employees.

Benefits Provided by Workers’ Compensation

In general, workers’ comp provides:

Coverage for workers’ medical expenses

Compensation for lost wages while a worker is out recovering

Benefits for dependents of workers who died from job-related hazards

Private Sector and State or Local Government Employees

If you get hurt working for a private company or state or local government, seek help through your state. Your state workers’ compensation program can help you file a claim. If your claim is denied, you can appeal.

Longshore and Harbor Workers, Coal Miners, Nuclear Weapons Workers, and Federal Employees

Federal laws protect longshore and harbor workers, coal miners, nuclear weapons workers employed by the Department of Energy (DOE) or a DOE contractor, and federal employees. Contact the workers’ compensation program that applies to you for help filing a claim.

Wrongful Discharge/Termination of Employment

If you feel that you have been wrongfully fired from a job or let go from an employment situation, you may wish to learn more about your state’s wrongful discharge laws.

  • Wrongful termination or wrongful discharge laws vary from state to state.
  • Some states are “employment-at-will” states, which means that if there is no employment contract (or collective bargaining agreement), an employer can let an employee go for any reason, or no reason, with or without notice, as long as the discharge does not violate a law.

If you feel you have been wrongfully discharged or terminated from employment, you may:

  • Contact your State Labor Office for more information on wrongful termination laws in your state.
  • Seek legal counsel if your employer terminated you for any reason not covered under state or federal law.
  • You may also be eligible for unemployment compensation and extension of your health care benefits.

Employers

If you are an employer seeking information about legal termination of employees, you may wish to contact both the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and your State Labor Office to ensure you do not violate any federal or state labor laws. You may wish to consult with a licensed attorney.

Welfare or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF)

Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) is a federally funded, state-run benefits program. Also known as welfare, TANF helps families achieve independence after experiencing temporary difficulties.

Find Florida Unemployment Application Information

Former workers who are wondering where to register for unemployment benefits in Florida can file for an unemployment claim through the state Department of Economic Opportunity. However, prior to undergoing the FL unemployment registration procedure, you must meet the state’s unemployment insurance requirements, which follow the Department of Labor’s federal guidelines. Though, unlike the standard duration of 26 weeks in other U.S. states, Florida only offers 12 to 23 weeks of benefits. To file for unemployment in Florida, you may submit an online application for unemployment through the DEO website. In certain cases, workers can also submit their UI claims via alternative methods. If your claim is successful, you will receive benefits for as long as you meet Florida’s Reemployment Assistance (RA) requirements.

Read the below sections for information on topics such as how to apply for unemployment online and where to sign up for unemployment in Florida:

  • How can I sign up for unemployment in Florida?
  • What do I need to provide during the FL unemployment registration process?

Find Florida Unemployment Resources

How to Claim Benefits

How Extensions Work

Find Out How to Appeal Denied Benefits

What is wrongful termination?

Note that if you were denied unemployment benefits in Florida, you are within your rights to appeal the department’s decision by submitting an unemployment denial appeal. The prospects of winning your appeal depend on several factors. For instance, if your FL unemployment claim was denied due to valid reasons, such as not meeting the wage requirements, the department will not reconsider its decision. However, if you were fired as a result of wrongful termination, you can submit solid evidence to strengthen your appeal.

During times of high unemployment, you may also be able to apply for an unemployment benefits extension in Florida if you have expended your entire amount of standard unemployment benefits. The Florida unemployment compensation extension program, when active, generally provides the same amount of UI benefits, although for a shorter duration than standard benefits.

How can I sign up for unemployment in Florida?

To apply for unemployment benefits in Florida, you can submit an online application for unemployment through the department’s CONNECT website, which was specifically designed for managing UI claims. However, prior to using the CONNECT internet services, you must create a new claimant account and obtain your PIN number.

Then, you can sign in to your profile and follow these straightforward steps to submit your unemployment EDD application in Florida:

  1. Access the “Apply for Reemployment Assistance Benefits” menu.
  2. Answer the DEO questions regarding your UI benefits.
  3. Supply the necessary information and documents.
  4. Enter your contact information, such as your mailing address and your phone number.
  5. Provide detailed information about your employment history.
  6. Answer questions regarding your eligibility for UI benefits.
  7. Review your claim and confirm your submission.

When completing your CONNECT unemployment registration application, you can save your progress and finalize the procedure at a later time. After submitting your claim, you can access it again (by entering your PIN and Social Security Number) in order to enter any new data that may affect your UI benefits application.

Note: Applications may only be filed via telephone if you are computer illiterate or disabled. Claimants who cannot use the CONNECT application due to insufficient knowledge of the English language can also contact the DEO via phone.

What do I need to provide during the FL unemployment registration process?

Now that you know how and where to apply for unemployment in Florida, you must collect the information and documents necessary to file for unemployment benefits. Note that even if you are unable to provide all of the required items during your initial application, you can still apply for unemployment benefits in FL and supply the remaining data later. In general, you have to provide the following paperwork and information:

  • Your Social Security Number and your FL driver’s license number or state ID number
  • Your personal information, such as your full name, date of birth, gender, race and level of education
  • Extensive information about the jobs you have held in the last 18 months, such as:
  • Your employers’ names and their contact information
  • The start and end dates of your past jobs
  • Your untaxed gross earnings
  • The reason(s) for your dismissal from work
  • Data about any pensions, retirement claims and worker’s compensation

Note: Former members of the military, federal employees, self-employed workers and non-U.S. citizens will be required to submit additional data and documentation.

What do I do after I apply for unemployment benefits in Florida?

After you submit your online application for unemployment in Florida, you must complete several additional procedures in order to finalize the entire unemployment registration process. For instance, you must register with the state workforce agency (Employ Florida Marketplace), as you must be actively seeking employment in order to qualify for UI benefits. If you fail to complete this step, your unemployment benefits application will be denied.

When you file for unemployment in Florida, the department will promptly provide you with an estimate of your future benefits by mailing you the Wage Transcript and Determination notice. If you do not agree with the DEO calculations, you will be able to request a reconsideration of the department’s monetary determination within 20 days from the date of the notice.

Also, you may be informed by the DEO, either by phone, online or via standard mail, that you are required to submit additional documents and information to process your claim. Therefore, you must regularly visit your CONNECT profile or check for mail-in notices. A DEO adjudicator will review your application once you complete it and will determine whether you are eligible for UI benefits in Florida.

If you are not required to provide any further items and your unemployment EDD application was accepted, you will be able to request your first benefit payment through the CONNECT internet service. You will be scheduled to claim your first UI paycheck within two to three weeks.

The current situation forces companies to shut down, and many businesses go bankrupt. Millions of Americans lost their jobs and have to depend on unemployment insurance. Here is all the information you want to know about this policy.

What’s Unemployment Compensation?

Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) is an emergency program used to increase unemployment benefits for millions of Americans who are out of work due to the current situation. FPUC was built by the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act. The $2 trillion emergency stimulus package was signed into law by President Trump on March 27, 2020. The CARES Act extends unemployment benefits through three initiatives: Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) program, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program, and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program.

Who Can Get Help? How Much Can They Get?

FPUC is a flat amount given to people who are receiving unemployment insurance, including those who get a partial unemployment benefit check. It provides a federal benefit of $600 each week. Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program extends benefits to self-employed, freelancers, and independent contractors. The Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program extends benefits for an extra 13 weeks after regular unemployment compensation benefits are exhausted.

The FPUC program applies to people who are available for the new Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program, and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program.

How To Apply For Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation?

To apply for Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation, you need to file a claim for regular benefits with the UI program in the state where you worked. Most states recommend filing online. To successfully file a claim, you must provide your Social Security number, contact information, and details about your former employment. You can check your state’s unemployment insurance program to find out the rules in your state.

Most states are still waiting for the Department of Labor to implement the program. Once states begin to offer the extra payment, eligible people will receive refunds. All states have executed agreements with the Department of Labor as of March 28, 2020. Unless the program is extended, FPUC benefit payments will end after July 31, 2020.

What Are The Special Considerations?

Federal law permits the states’ flexibility in amending their laws to offer unemployment insurance benefits in several situations such as:

Employees can’t work because employers temporarily close due to the current situation.

People stop working because of a risk of infection, to care for a family member, or to homeschool their children.

People are in isolation and anticipate going back to work after the isolation is over.

If you’re unemployed you may be able to get an affordable health insurance plan through the Marketplace, with savings based on your income and household size. You may also qualify for free or low-cost coverage through Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).

Your household size and income, not your employment status, determine what health coverage you’re eligible for and how much help you’ll get paying for coverage.

If you have just left your job for any reason and lost your job-based health coverage, you qualify for a Special Enrollment Period. This means you can enroll in a Marketplace insurance plan any time of year. You usually have 60 days from the day you lose your coverage to enroll. Learn how to apply for a Special Enrollment Period.

There is no limited enrollment period for Medicaid or CHIP. If you qualify, you can enroll in these programs any time of year. You’ll find out if you qualify when you fill out your Marketplace application.

Your options depend on your household income

When you apply for Marketplace coverage you’ll estimate your income for the current calendar year.

It’s hard to predict your annual income if you’re unemployed. Still, it’s important to make your best estimate based on all current or expected sources of income for the year.

Types of income to include on your application:

  • Unemployment compensation, including unemployment compensation as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emergency. Note: If you’re receiving federal pandemic unemployment compensation, include the additional $300 you get each week in your estimate. Learn more from the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • All household members’ income (not just yours)
  • Additional types of income, including interest income, capital gains, cash support, and alimony
  • Most withdrawals from traditional IRAs and 401ks. (But see IRS Form 8606 instructions (PDF) for information on non-deductible contributions, and IRS Publication 590-B (PDF) for information on Roth accounts.)

Note: It’s very important to immediately update your income information with the Marketplace if your income changes during the year. This will ensure you get the right amount of savings based on your new annual income estimate.

Medicaid, CHIP, and insurance plans through the Marketplace

When you fill out a Marketplace application, you’ll find out if you qualify for any of these types of coverage:

  • A Marketplace insurance plan. You may qualify for premium tax credits and savings on deductibles, copayments, and other out-of-pocket costs based on your household size and income. Some people with low incomes may wind up paying very small premiums. Learn about getting lower costs on a Marketplace insurance plan.
  • Medicaid. Medicaid provides coverage to millions of Americans with limited incomes or disabilities. Many states have expanded Medicaid to cover all people below certain income levels. Learn more about Medicaid and how to apply.
  • Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). CHIP provides coverage for children, and in some states pregnant women, in families with incomes too high for Medicaid but too low to afford private insurance. Learn more about CHIP.

After you finish your Marketplace application, you’ll get an eligibility determination that tells you what kind of coverage you and others in your household qualify for.

More answers

Yes. You’ll need to report your expected unemployment compensation when applying for health coverage through the Marketplace.

When you complete a Marketplace application, you’ll need to predict your income for the coverage year the best you can. The application will help you make this estimate. Learn about how to estimate your income.

It depends on the kind of account you’re withdrawing from. Generally, the amount of your income from a retirement account distribution depends on the type of retirement account, how much you contributed to it, and whether you were already taxed on the amount you contributed.

Withdrawals from a traditional IRA or SEP-IRA generally count as income. (If you made only tax-deductible contributions, all of it is considered income. If you made non-deductible contributions, see IRS Form 8606 (PDF). Roth IRAs are different. Qualified withdrawals from a Roth IRA are not considered income. For more information, see IRS Publication 590. Withdrawals from a 401k plan are generally counted as income (your pre-tax contributions, an employer’s matching contributions, as well as earnings, are included in income). But qualified distributions from a designated Roth account in a 401(k) plan are not considered income. For more information, see IRS Publication 575.

Like other Americans, you must have qualifying health coverage or pay a fee for plan years 2018 and earlier. This is true regardless of your employment status.

There are several exemptions from the fee that may apply to people who have no income or very low incomes. See the full list of exemptions for 2018. If you have an exemption, you don’t need to pay the fee for being uncovered when you file 2018 taxes in the spring. Note: Starting with the 2019 plan year (for which you’ll file taxes in April 2020), the fee no longer applies. You won’t need an exemption for 2019 and beyond.

If you’re eligible for coverage under a family member’s job-based plan, even if you don’t enroll in it, you may not be able to get lower costs on Marketplace coverage based on your income. This will depend on whether the job-based insurance that’s offered to you is considered affordable and meets certain minimum value standards.

You can learn whether the plan is considered affordable and meets minimum standards by asking the employer to fill out an Employer Coverage Tool (PDF). Use information from this completed form to fill out your application. If your family member’s job-based coverage isn’t offered to spouses or dependents, you can qualify for lower costs on a Marketplace plan. If this is the case, only the person with the job-based coverage won’t qualify for lower costs. Note: Having access to job-based coverage doesn’t affect your eligibility for Medicaid.

When your situation changes, update your Marketplace information immediately. Learn how to report household and income changes to the Marketplace.

Losing job-based coverage qualifies you for a Special Enrollment Period. This means you’ll be able to apply for coverage through the Marketplace outside the Open Enrollment Period.

If you’re eligible for your spouse’s job-based coverage, you may not be able to get lower costs on a Marketplace plan based on your income. This will depend on whether the job-based plan is considered affordable and meets certain minimum value standards. If you enroll in the job-based plan, you can’t get any savings on Marketplace insurance.

The health care law has expanded funding of community health centers, which provide primary care to millions of Americans on a sliding scale based on income. Learn about community health centers.

How to Apply for Florida Unemployment Benefits

In these doubtful times, being jobless is a fact of life that many people have to bear. In Florida, like the rest of the nation, many people have to file for jobless benefits for the first time in their lives. Fortunately for the recently unemployed of Florida, the process of filing for unemployment benefits is quite easy. However, you can look ahead to wait about 4 weeks until you collect your first check, so you will want to begin the process on your first day of unemployment.

This page has been created as a resource to help you in your filing for Florida unemployment compensation benefits. After reading the following, you will know if you meet the criteria for unemployment benefits, how to apply for benefits, as well as when to expect getting unemployment benefits.

Determine if You are Eligible

In order to open an unemployment claim to obtain benefits, you must first decide if you are entitled. To collect benefits in Florida, you must have worked lately.

You must have been worked all through 4 of the 5 immediate preceding quarters to your claim. Quarters begins in the following months: January, April, July and October. You must have been compensated during 2 of those 5 quarters.

You need to have earned $3400 during those 4 quarters.

Apart from being entitled from a monetary perspective, you also have to be eligible based on disconnection from your last job. You just have:

  • Been separated at no fault of your own (you were not let go for performance issues, for example)
  • You must not have give up on your own
  • You must be obtainable and willing to work. You must be keenly searching for new employment opportunities

Before filing your claim on-line, collect the following information to help you in completing the application:

  1. Your Social Security number;
  2. The names, addresses, and phone numbers of all your employers during the last 18 months;
  3. The dates you worked and total earnings from each employer;
  4. Gross earnings for this week since 12:01AM Sunday;
  5. Driver’s License, State Identification, voter registration number or other type of ID that could verify your identity;
  6. The name and local number of your labor union hall,
  7. if applicable;
  8. If you are not a U.S. citizen, your Alien Registration Number and work permit expiration date;
  9. Your DD-214 form (if you were in the military within the last 2 years);
  10. Form SF-50 or Form SF-8 and check stubs or W-2 proof of earnings (if you were a federal employee)

Filing a Claim

Make a decision how you want to file your claim. Individuals may use one of several formats to apply for unemployment compensation in Florida.

  • File a claim online by visiting the agency’s website at FloridaJobs.org
  • Call the agency 1-800-204-2418 during normal business hours, Monday through Friday. (The number to the unemployment office is often busy or unmanned, so filing online may be the best course of action).

Filing On-Line

The Internet application is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. If you do not have access to the Internet at your residence, you may need to use a public computer to file your reemployment claim. You may want to try a public library, college or university library or use a computer at your local One-Stop Career Center.

To File by Internet:

The One-Stop Career Center nearest you may have computer facilities that you can use to file your claim on the Internet. The One-Stop Career Center is also your best source for job placement services in your area.

To file your claim on-line

Go to the website and locate the Job Seekers box on the left side of the page and select File an Reemployment Assistance Claim.

This site permits Floridians and former Florida workers to file claims for reemployment assistance using Internet. The process takes 30 minutes to one hour from start to finish.

The date your application is finished will decide the date your benefits will commence.

Filing on Telephone

Claiming Unemployment in Florida can also be done by phone at 1-800-204-2418 (Monday – Friday 7:30am to 7PM and Saturdays 8am – 4pm). Claiming online is recommended as the wait times to speak to a call center agent can reach an hour because of increased volume of calls Florida State is handling.

Skills Review

Complete an Initial Skills Review. In order to receive benefits, you must complete a skills assessment review comprised of 3 modules designed to determine your job skill levels. This information will be used by Regional Workforce Board to develop a plan for workforce development in your region of the state.

You must complete all 3 parts within 17 days of your claim’s effective date or else payments will be delayed or denied.

What to Wait for after you File Your Unemployment Claim?

About a week after applying, you will obtain a letter stating if you are eligible and, if so, how much you will collect weekly as your benefit. In case you do not qualify for benefits, the letter will clarify why and tell you what you must do if you wish to appeal the verdict.

Once you have qualified to collect benefits, you must claim your weekly benefits every 2 weeks. The initial letter you obtain will give you a date on which you must call or go online and answer a few questions about your continued eligibility. Failure to reclaim your benefits every two weeks will hold up the payment of benefits to you.

Moreover, in the state of Florida, the first week of unemployment is not considered eligible for unemployment benefits. As such, your first date to claim your weekly benefits will be 3weeks after you initially claimed unemployment benefits, and then the benefits paid out will only be for 2 weeks.

The current situation forces companies to shut down, and many businesses go bankrupt. Millions of Americans lost their jobs and have to depend on unemployment insurance. Here is all the information you want to know about this policy.

What’s Unemployment Compensation?

Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) is an emergency program used to increase unemployment benefits for millions of Americans who are out of work due to the current situation. FPUC was built by the CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act. The $2 trillion emergency stimulus package was signed into law by President Trump on March 27, 2020. The CARES Act extends unemployment benefits through three initiatives: Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation (FPUC) program, Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program, and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program.

Who Can Get Help? How Much Can They Get?

FPUC is a flat amount given to people who are receiving unemployment insurance, including those who get a partial unemployment benefit check. It provides a federal benefit of $600 each week. Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program extends benefits to self-employed, freelancers, and independent contractors. The Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program extends benefits for an extra 13 weeks after regular unemployment compensation benefits are exhausted.

The FPUC program applies to people who are available for the new Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program, and the Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC) program.

How To Apply For Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation?

To apply for Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation, you need to file a claim for regular benefits with the UI program in the state where you worked. Most states recommend filing online. To successfully file a claim, you must provide your Social Security number, contact information, and details about your former employment. You can check your state’s unemployment insurance program to find out the rules in your state.

Most states are still waiting for the Department of Labor to implement the program. Once states begin to offer the extra payment, eligible people will receive refunds. All states have executed agreements with the Department of Labor as of March 28, 2020. Unless the program is extended, FPUC benefit payments will end after July 31, 2020.

What Are The Special Considerations?

Federal law permits the states’ flexibility in amending their laws to offer unemployment insurance benefits in several situations such as:

Employees can’t work because employers temporarily close due to the current situation.

People stop working because of a risk of infection, to care for a family member, or to homeschool their children.

People are in isolation and anticipate going back to work after the isolation is over.

Find Out How to Apply for Florida Unemployment

Florida employees who have lost their jobs can apply for unemployment insurance benefits in FL through the state’s Department of Economic Opportunity. The DEO uses the term “Reemployment Assistance” for the federal UI program. However, you will be able to claim unemployment benefits in Florida only after you meet the state’s requirements for unemployment. If your Florida unemployment benefits claim is accepted, you will have to meet eligibility for unemployment on a regular basis in order to maintain your FL unemployment insurance coverage.

State employees who are wondering how to apply for unemployment online can access the department’s CONNECT website to file for unemployment in Florida via the internet. The entire FL unemployment registration process also includes certain procedures that must be completed after you file for an unemployment claim. For example, you must sign up with the Employ Florida Marketplace agency in order to actively seek employment, which is one of Florida’s qualifications for unemployment.

However, before you file for EDD unemployment in FL, ensure that you meet the state’s unemployment insurance eligibility requirements, which reflect the Department of Labor’s general UI rules. In general, any former worker who qualifies for unemployment in Florida must follow several rules regarding eligibility for unemployment. For instance, you may qualify for benefits if you have lost your job through no fault of your own, and if you have earned a certain amount of wages within the last 18 months.

Find Florida Unemployment Resources

How to Claim Benefits

How Extensions Work

How to Appeal Denied Benefits

Note that if you were denied unemployment benefits in Florida, you are within your rights to appeal the department’s decision by submitting an unemployment denial appeal. The prospects of winning your appeal depend on several factors. For instance, if your FL unemployment claim was denied due to valid reasons, such as not meeting the wage requirements, the department will not reconsider its decision. However, if you were fired as a result of wrongful termination, you can submit solid evidence to strengthen your appeal.

During times of high unemployment, you may also be able to apply for an unemployment benefits extension in Florida if you have expended your entire amount of standard unemployment benefits. The Florida unemployment compensation extension program, when active, generally provides the same amount of UI benefits, although for a shorter duration than standard benefits.

How can I sign up for unemployment in Florida?

To apply for unemployment benefits in Florida, you can submit an online application for unemployment through the department’s CONNECT website, which was specifically designed for managing UI claims. However, prior to using the CONNECT internet services, you must create a new claimant account and obtain your PIN number.

Then, you can sign in to your profile and follow these straightforward steps to submit your unemployment EDD application in Florida:

  1. Access the “Apply for Reemployment Assistance Benefits” menu.
  2. Answer the DEO questions regarding your UI benefits.
  3. Supply the necessary information and documents.
  4. Enter your contact information, such as your mailing address and your phone number.
  5. Provide detailed information about your employment history.
  6. Answer questions regarding your eligibility for UI benefits.
  7. Review your claim and confirm your submission.

When completing your CONNECT unemployment registration application, you can save your progress and finalize the procedure at a later time. After submitting your claim, you can access it again (by entering your PIN and Social Security Number) in order to enter any new data that may affect your UI benefits application.

Note: Applications may only be filed via telephone if you are computer illiterate or disabled. Claimants who cannot use the CONNECT application due to insufficient knowledge of the English language can also contact the DEO via phone.

What do I need to provide during the Florida unemployment registration process?

Now that you know how and where to apply for unemployment in Florida, you must collect the information and documents necessary to file for unemployment benefits. Note that even if you are unable to provide all of the required items during your initial application, you can still apply for unemployment benefits in FL and supply the remaining data later. In general, you have to provide the following paperwork and information:

  • Your Social Security Number and your FL driver’s license number or state ID number
  • Your personal information, such as your full name, date of birth, gender, race and level of education
  • Extensive information about the jobs you have held in the last 18 months, such as:
  • Your employers’ names and their contact information
  • The start and end dates of your past jobs
  • Your untaxed gross earnings
  • The reason(s) for your dismissal from work
  • Data about any pensions, retirement claims and worker’s compensation

Note: Former members of the military, federal employees, self-employed workers and non-U.S. citizens will be required to submit additional data and documentation.

What do I do after I apply for unemployment benefits in Florida?

After you submit your online application for unemployment in Florida, you must complete several additional procedures in order to finalize the entire unemployment registration process. For instance, you must register with the state workforce agency (Employ Florida Marketplace), as you must be actively seeking employment in order to qualify for UI benefits. If you fail to complete this step, your unemployment benefits application will be denied.

When you file for unemployment in Florida, the department will promptly provide you with an estimate of your future benefits by mailing you the Wage Transcript and Determination notice. If you do not agree with the DEO calculations, you will be able to request a reconsideration of the department’s monetary determination within 20 days from the date of the notice.

Also, you may be informed by the DEO, either by phone, online or via standard mail, that you are required to submit additional documents and information to process your claim. Therefore, you must regularly visit your CONNECT profile or check for mail-in notices. A DEO adjudicator will review your application once you complete it and will determine whether you are eligible for UI benefits in Florida.

If you are not required to provide any further items and your unemployment EDD application was accepted, you will be able to request your first benefit payment through the CONNECT internet service. You will be scheduled to claim your first UI paycheck within two to three weeks.