How to apply plumber’s putty

How to apply plumber's putty

Related Articles

  • How to Install a Bathroom Faucet Drain Stopper
  • How to Install a Drain in a New Sink
  • How to Replace a Kitchen Sink Drain
  • How to Replace a Sink Ball Rod
  • How to Fix a Shower Drain Without Taking Out the Pan

Plumber’s putty is product that’s used to seal drain bodies to tub surfaces. The putty typically comes in small containers or tubs and is sold at home improvement stores. The durable putty will not stain, crack, crumble or shrink. It should be used only in nonpressurized plumbing situations, such as draining, and never for water-supply lines.

Take a portion of plumber’s putty the size of a large marble — about 1 inch to 1 1/4 inches in diameter — from the container. Place it on a flat, clean work surface such as a countertop.

Roll the ball of putty back and forth to form a rope shape, using the palm of your hand.

Roll your hand over the rope until it is about 1/4 inch to 1/2 inch in diameter and about 8 inches long.

Turn the shower drain body upside down to expose its underside. Gently take the rope of putty and string it around this lip until the ends meet and form a circle.

Press the putty joint together and work it until there is no visible seam. Press the remaining putty gently against the underside of the drain body so it stays in place.

Place the drain body into the tub opening with the thread side facing downward. Gently turn it clockwise to thread it into place. Insert the drain-body tool into the opening so that the prongs slip around the cross section of the drain body. Continue tightening by hand until the face of the drain body is flush with the tub surface.

Wipe away any plumber’s putty that was forced out the sides of the drain body, using a rag.

  • The Home Depot: Lavatory Faucets Installation Guide
  • Kohler: Lavatory Drain Installation Instructions
  • If you removed an old drain body to replace the putty, clean the surfaces of both the tub and the drain body with a bristled brush to ensure that the new putty adheres correctly.
  • Seams in putty are weak points and cause leaks in the future.
  • Don’t use plumber’s putty on plastic, marble, granite or any other dimensional stone. Use tile caulk or silicone sealant on these surfaces instead.

Josh Arnold has been a residential and commercial carpenter for 15 years and likes to share his knowledge and experience through writing. He is a certified journeyman carpenter and took college-accredited courses through the Southwest Regional Council of Carpenters training center. As a Los Angeles-based union carpenter, Arnold builds everything from highrises to bridges, parking structures and homes.

How to apply plumber's putty

Related Articles

  • How to Replace a Leaking Kitchen Sink
  • How to Loosen a Sink Fastened With Silicone
  • How to Cut Circles in a Corian Kitchen Top for a Faucet
  • How to Install a Composite Kitchen Sink
  • How to Replace a Chipped Bathroom Sink Bowl

When you’re installing a new basin sink, you must properly seal the edge of the sink where it rests on the countertop. This seal prevents water from leaking and causing damage to the countertop and the area beneath your sink. Silicone caulk is sometimes used to seal around sink basins, but plumber’s putty is another option that is easier to use and it provides a watertight seal that is durable and long-lasting.

Measure and mark the center of your cabinet on the countertop.

Center the sink template, which typically comes with a new sink, on the sink cabinet using your mark as a guide.

Check that the template is at least 1 1/2 inches back from the countertop’s front edge. If your countertop is deeper than 2 feet, you can place it slightly farther back from the front edge.

Tape the template to secure it in place and outline it with a marker.

Remove the template and drill a hole about 3/8-inch in diameter into each corner of the template, keeping the hole just inside the edge of the marker line. These holes mark your start line for the cuts.

Apply masking tape just outside the outside of your template lines to make sure the jigsaw doesn’t damage your countertop when you cut.

Place a scrap piece of wood that is a couple of inches longer than the depth of the cut-out over the counter. Drill a couple of screws into each end to hold it in place. Place the screws into the countertop area that will be removed. This prevents the cut-out from snapping off or falling as you cut.

Cut along the inside of the template lines with a jigsaw. Begin at one corner hole and cut to the opposite hole. Continue until you’ve cut along the entire template.

Lift the cut-out piece from the countertop and set it aside. Place the sink into the opening to check the fit.

Trim the edges if necessary, and then mark the holes required for the faucet using the holes in your sink as a guide.

Cut out the holes for the faucet using a 1-1/4-inch hole saw. The size of hole saw you’ll need may vary if you’re installing a non-standard or custom basin. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for the proper size.

Turn the sink upside down and insert the faucet tailpieces through the proper holes in the basin. Connect the washers and mounting nuts provided with the faucet.

Roll some plumber’s putty between your hands to soften it and then press it around the underside of the sink strainer lip.

Place the strainer into the opening in the bottom of the basin and secure it in place by installing the washer and gasket provided with the strainer.

Slip the lock nut onto the bottom of the sink strainer and tighten with a wrench. Remove excess putty from around the strainer inside the basin with a damp cloth.

Roll another ball of plumber’s putty between your hands and press it around the edge of the cut-out in the countertop.

Insert the sink into the opening but avoid disturbing the putty. If your basin is heavy, get a helper to hold one side while you hold the other to set it in place.

Press down firmly along the lip of the sink basin. Tighten the mounting clips using a screwdriver. Most sinks use mounting clips to pull them down tight to the countertop. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installation and spacing of these clips, which may vary depending on the brand and size of your sink.

Wipe away excess putty from around the edges of the basin lip with a damp cloth.

How to apply plumber's putty

Related Articles

  • How to Install a Pullout Kitchen Faucet
  • How to Putty a Shower Drain
  • How to Take Apart a Sink Drain
  • How to Attach a Faucet to a Rain Barrel
  • How to Replace Seats & Springs in a Bathroom Faucet

Most faucet assemblies come with the proper nuts and connections to ensure water won’t leak from the supply lines or from the taps, but the base of the faucet must also be sealed to prevent water from getting under the faucet deck. While silicone is ideal for creating a watertight seal, it’s messy and can be difficult to work with. An easier material for creating a watertight seal around your kitchen faucet is plumber’s putty.

Make sure the water is turned off at the shutoff valve beneath the sink. Clean out the area beneath the sink so you have room to work.

Wipe the mounting area with rubbing alcohol to remove any residues left by the old faucet.

Connect a flex water line to each of the faucet tailpieces and hand-tighten the connections. While you can use pliers to further tighten the connections, avoid over-tightening. This can cause the lines to leak.

Roll a golf ball-sized piece of plumber’s putty between your hands to soften it and shape it into a rope that is about 1/4 inch in diameter.

Apply the putty to the bottom of the faucet deck plate. Press it all the way around the perimeter of the plate. If your faucet assembly includes a putty plate, place the putty into the groove of this plate and then install this on the deck plate.

Insert the flexible water lines into the appropriate holes from above the sink. Position the faucet base so that it sits straight and press it into place.

Wipe any excess putty from the faucet deck plate with a damp cloth.

Move under the sink and slide the friction washers provided with your faucet assembly up to the top of each faucet tailpiece. Follow these with the mounting nuts.

Hand-tighten the mounting nuts and double-check that the faucet is straight before tightening with slip-nut pliers.

Attach the flexible supply lines beneath the sink to the shut-off valves and hand-tighten the connection. Hold the valve with a wrench and use another wrench to give each nut another quarter-turn to tighten.

Turn the water supply on again to check for leaks. If you see water leaking from the connections, turn the water off and tighten each connection slightly.

Do you want to seal that leaking drain pipe? Ugh, the water dripping sound can be irritating, especially in situations like these. What do you do then? Simple, get a plumber’s putty.

What you need is a plumber’s putty. Well, this could be a solution to many more problems. If you want to know how long does plumbers putty take to dry, then do read this post until the end to know it all.

Table of Contents

What is Plumber’s Putty?

In simple words, plumber’s putty is a sealant used for plumbing purposes. It is used extensively for treating as well as for installing valves, sinks, and drain pipes.

It is very easy to use and you don’t need to be a professional to use it.

How to apply plumber's putty

Moreover, it is a basic component that can be found in a plumber’s kit.

Isn’t that interesting? You can get them in varieties of composition to suit the application.

For example, you can get in epoxy, clay, fish oil, linseed, RTV silicone, and caulk forms.

This makes the job of a plumber effortless, for sealing leaking drain pipes, valves and more.

What is Plumber’s Putty Used For?

This putty can be used for different kinds of jobs. The most important one is that rendered by plumbers. Hence, you can think of:

  • It is used to seal sink fixtures
  • Use it along with faucets
  • Utilized for leaked sanitary pipes and drainage
  • Can be applied on sink side strainers
  • Smear it on pop-up drain fittings, like the ones used in bathtubs and sinks
  • Now, have ever thought of utilizing this plumber’s putty for sealing fuel tanks
  • They can also aid fixing boats
  • Yes, can be employed in water tanks (especially the portable ones)
  • Can be put on ceramic, composite, fiberglass, plastic, and even PVC

How Long Does Plumbers Putty Take To Dry?

This is by far the most important segment of our discussion and we didn’t want to digress. We just integrated anything that we felt was vital to this part of our conversation. Okay, straight down to your question, without wasting any more time.

How to apply plumber's putty

To be honest, do you know how long does plumbers putty take to dry? It takes 10 to 15 years and we are dead serious!

This means if you want to dry it out, it will take like forever. However, this is not the case, and this is why people start using it right away. This means you can utilize the putty immediately as you prepare it. Nonetheless, we would suggest you follow these few steps to ensure it dries out completely:

  • If applied at the base of a faucet or something, then you can wait for a couple of hours before running it
  • This is to give it some time initially to start drying
  • You can keep an eye for a few hours on the plumber’s putty
  • If it looks like moist, then give it some more time to dry out
  • You may even re-apply some more putty in the meantime if you feel like it
  • If it is cured, it will hold the leak at once

Remember, once you undo a plumber’s putty box, you must use it within a month, or as per the manufacturer’s directions.

Otherwise, it will dry up and you may not be able to use it again.

How To Apply Plumber’s Putty?

The first thing that you need is to procure a plumber’s putty from a home supplies store or get it online. You may get a lot of options in the name of plumber’s putty while ordering online.

You can choose one according to your requirements, like the WM Harvey 043010 Putty, which is very popular among homeowners.

In case, you doubt, your handyman skills, then you can adhere to these actions to apply your putty:

  1. Open the container of the plumber’s putty
  2. Now, warm it in your hands by making a ball out of it
  3. Roll it out in the form of a snake and keep it aside
  4. Clean the area you want to spread over
  5. You may dismantle parts if required
  6. Then place the snake-like putty around the surface of the leak
  7. Replace all parts and let it dry
  8. If possible, clean the extra plumber’s putty that may be bulging out, as this will look neat

When Should We Not Use Plumber’s Putty?

Now that you know so much about plumber’s putty and how long does plumbers putty take to dry, you may be thinking of where you should not use it. Here is a solution.

The answer is pretty straightforward, any place that needs adhesive. That is right, you cannot use a sealant in a place that needs gum, isn’t it an uncomplicated thought? Adhesives can bond pieces together, whereas, sealants cure the spaces in surfaces.

Also, you must refrain from using plumber’s putty in spots that need watertight sealing too. The reason being it will not hold, like Loctite Clear Silicone. Simple!

How to apply plumber's putty

Related Articles

  • How to Replace a Leaking Kitchen Sink
  • How to Loosen a Sink Fastened With Silicone
  • How to Cut Circles in a Corian Kitchen Top for a Faucet
  • How to Install a Composite Kitchen Sink
  • How to Replace a Chipped Bathroom Sink Bowl

When you’re installing a new basin sink, you must properly seal the edge of the sink where it rests on the countertop. This seal prevents water from leaking and causing damage to the countertop and the area beneath your sink. Silicone caulk is sometimes used to seal around sink basins, but plumber’s putty is another option that is easier to use and it provides a watertight seal that is durable and long-lasting.

Measure and mark the center of your cabinet on the countertop.

Center the sink template, which typically comes with a new sink, on the sink cabinet using your mark as a guide.

Check that the template is at least 1 1/2 inches back from the countertop’s front edge. If your countertop is deeper than 2 feet, you can place it slightly farther back from the front edge.

Tape the template to secure it in place and outline it with a marker.

Remove the template and drill a hole about 3/8-inch in diameter into each corner of the template, keeping the hole just inside the edge of the marker line. These holes mark your start line for the cuts.

Apply masking tape just outside the outside of your template lines to make sure the jigsaw doesn’t damage your countertop when you cut.

Place a scrap piece of wood that is a couple of inches longer than the depth of the cut-out over the counter. Drill a couple of screws into each end to hold it in place. Place the screws into the countertop area that will be removed. This prevents the cut-out from snapping off or falling as you cut.

Cut along the inside of the template lines with a jigsaw. Begin at one corner hole and cut to the opposite hole. Continue until you’ve cut along the entire template.

Lift the cut-out piece from the countertop and set it aside. Place the sink into the opening to check the fit.

Trim the edges if necessary, and then mark the holes required for the faucet using the holes in your sink as a guide.

Cut out the holes for the faucet using a 1-1/4-inch hole saw. The size of hole saw you’ll need may vary if you’re installing a non-standard or custom basin. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for the proper size.

Turn the sink upside down and insert the faucet tailpieces through the proper holes in the basin. Connect the washers and mounting nuts provided with the faucet.

Roll some plumber’s putty between your hands to soften it and then press it around the underside of the sink strainer lip.

Place the strainer into the opening in the bottom of the basin and secure it in place by installing the washer and gasket provided with the strainer.

Slip the lock nut onto the bottom of the sink strainer and tighten with a wrench. Remove excess putty from around the strainer inside the basin with a damp cloth.

Roll another ball of plumber’s putty between your hands and press it around the edge of the cut-out in the countertop.

Insert the sink into the opening but avoid disturbing the putty. If your basin is heavy, get a helper to hold one side while you hold the other to set it in place.

Press down firmly along the lip of the sink basin. Tighten the mounting clips using a screwdriver. Most sinks use mounting clips to pull them down tight to the countertop. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installation and spacing of these clips, which may vary depending on the brand and size of your sink.

Wipe away excess putty from around the edges of the basin lip with a damp cloth.

How to apply plumber's putty

Related Articles

  • How to Replace Shower Hot & Cold Controls
  • How to Take Off a Chrome Faucet Bonnet
  • How to Seam the Solid Surface in a Shower So It Won’t Leak
  • How to Install a Grab Bar in an Existing Shower
  • How to Fix a Leaky One-Handle Bathroom Faucet

The shower wall may seem like a leak-proof area, but one location can allow water to leak into the wall and out to other portions of the home: the shower escutcheon. This part is merely the shower knob’s extension cover; it extends outward from the knob for a pleasing aesthetic and may also have notations for hot and cold water choices, depending on the model. Water from the shower head can leak between the wall and the top of the escutcheon. Spreading plumber’s putty inside the escutcheon is a practical and inexpensive way to ensure a leak-free shower.

Turn the water off at the shower’s valve. If your shower does not have an individual shower valve nearby, you may need to turn off the home’s main water valve. These valves are commonly in the garage, basement or other protected area of the house, such as an enclosed patio.

Place a rag on the shower floor so that it covers the drain. This rag will prevent any small items from falling down into the plumbing.

Remove the protective cover from the shower knob with a flat-head screwdriver.

Remove the exposed screw with the right screwdriver. Each shower knob has a different fastener type; verify the fastener type before attempting to remove it. Do not remove the fastener with an improper tool. Pull the shower knob from the wall.

Remove the screws on the escutcheon with a screwdriver. Depending on the shower knob manufacturer, there may be two to four screws that hold the escutcheon to the shower wall. Place the screws aside.

Pull the escutcheon from the wall. Remove any gaskets from the underside of the escutcheon.

Rub plumber’s putty between your hands to create an 8-inch-long tube.

Place the tube into the inside orifice of the escutcheon so that it has the shape of an upside down “U” when the escutcheon is pressed back against the shower wall. The putty should not cover the escutcheon’s weep hole at its base; it should fill the remainder of the inside orifice to prevent water leakage.

Push the escutcheon back against the shower wall. You will see putty squeeze out from the escutcheon’s sides.

Reverse Step 5 to reattach the escutcheon’s screws.

Hand-pull the excess putty that is visible around the escutcheon away from the wall and discard.

Reverse Steps 3 and 4 to reattach the shower knob and cover.

Turn the water back on at the valve. Turn the shower head on. Observe the shower wall. No water should seep down between the escutcheon and wall.

Writing professionally since 2010, Amy Rodriguez cultivates successful cacti, succulents, bulbs, carnivorous plants and orchids at home. With an electronics degree and more than 10 years of experience, she applies her love of gadgets to the gardening world as she continues her education through college classes and gardening activities.

Do you need plumbers’ putty to install a new faucet or not, well it is completely a plumber’s choice to decide whether it is a good choice to use plumbers’ putty during a faucet installation. Although it is the most suitable choice in most cases but still, it is not a universal additive to use while installing a new faucet.

Plumber’s putty is made up of a pliable substance and it is used as a sealant in plumbing. The main purpose of this putty is to provide watertight seals around faucets and drains and especially when installing new faucets to protect any kind of leakage that may cause rusting.

How to apply plumber's putty

Plumbers’ putty is one of the most simple and handy components present in a plumber’s tool bag. So, do you need plumbers’ putty to install a new faucet, and to answer this question it is still the plumber’s right to select tools that are necessary in their plumbing work. A plumber’s putty provides a very thin layer that is required for maintaining a watertight seal and it is also not very dense. So, during the installation process, it is not recommended to use this putty for filling wide gaps.

Benefits of plumber’s putty

Plumber’s putty is an alternative for various types of caulks which provides the same type of effectiveness as most of these caulks do. Plumber’s putty is non-adhesive and a plumber needs not to wait for it to dry. Another advantage of plumber’s putty is that it is easy to remove and very helpful especially when you need to replace an old faucet with the new one. Caulks were made as a substitute and more effective component in plumbing work but still there are many situations in which a plumber’s putty is the best option then these caulks.

Plumbers putty is an inexpensive tool and is used to block the areas that are exposed to unpressurized water, thereby it prevents seepage and leakages. These are extremely important to make full waterproof sealings especially when installing new faucets. The reason behind this is that if plumber’s putty is not used while installing new faucets then leakages might occur which impacts the lifecycle of a faucet. It is highly recommended to use these putties so that to protect your faucets from any kind of leaks and seeps from the very beginning.

How to use it

The use of a plumber’s putty is very simple and these are mostly shaped by hands in the form of a circular ball. Before putting it on a faucet body. It is better to first clean and scoops it out with hands. After this roll the putty back and forth along a suitable diameter required by your pipe. Gently press then rope so that it would not be displaced and will provide a firm seal to the pipe. At last you simply put that part into its required position and the putty will be squeezed within that part. After tightening, if some portion of putty is bending from the edges, use cutter to dispatch that portion of putty.

Final words

Here you have everything you need to know about plumber’s putty. Well, might not be everything but certainly most of the things.

How to apply plumber's putty

Related Articles

  • How to Replace a Leaking Kitchen Sink
  • How to Loosen a Sink Fastened With Silicone
  • How to Cut Circles in a Corian Kitchen Top for a Faucet
  • How to Install a Composite Kitchen Sink
  • How to Replace a Chipped Bathroom Sink Bowl

When you’re installing a new basin sink, you must properly seal the edge of the sink where it rests on the countertop. This seal prevents water from leaking and causing damage to the countertop and the area beneath your sink. Silicone caulk is sometimes used to seal around sink basins, but plumber’s putty is another option that is easier to use and it provides a watertight seal that is durable and long-lasting.

Measure and mark the center of your cabinet on the countertop.

Center the sink template, which typically comes with a new sink, on the sink cabinet using your mark as a guide.

Check that the template is at least 1 1/2 inches back from the countertop’s front edge. If your countertop is deeper than 2 feet, you can place it slightly farther back from the front edge.

Tape the template to secure it in place and outline it with a marker.

Remove the template and drill a hole about 3/8-inch in diameter into each corner of the template, keeping the hole just inside the edge of the marker line. These holes mark your start line for the cuts.

Apply masking tape just outside the outside of your template lines to make sure the jigsaw doesn’t damage your countertop when you cut.

Place a scrap piece of wood that is a couple of inches longer than the depth of the cut-out over the counter. Drill a couple of screws into each end to hold it in place. Place the screws into the countertop area that will be removed. This prevents the cut-out from snapping off or falling as you cut.

Cut along the inside of the template lines with a jigsaw. Begin at one corner hole and cut to the opposite hole. Continue until you’ve cut along the entire template.

Lift the cut-out piece from the countertop and set it aside. Place the sink into the opening to check the fit.

Trim the edges if necessary, and then mark the holes required for the faucet using the holes in your sink as a guide.

Cut out the holes for the faucet using a 1-1/4-inch hole saw. The size of hole saw you’ll need may vary if you’re installing a non-standard or custom basin. Check the manufacturer’s instructions for the proper size.

Turn the sink upside down and insert the faucet tailpieces through the proper holes in the basin. Connect the washers and mounting nuts provided with the faucet.

Roll some plumber’s putty between your hands to soften it and then press it around the underside of the sink strainer lip.

Place the strainer into the opening in the bottom of the basin and secure it in place by installing the washer and gasket provided with the strainer.

Slip the lock nut onto the bottom of the sink strainer and tighten with a wrench. Remove excess putty from around the strainer inside the basin with a damp cloth.

Roll another ball of plumber’s putty between your hands and press it around the edge of the cut-out in the countertop.

Insert the sink into the opening but avoid disturbing the putty. If your basin is heavy, get a helper to hold one side while you hold the other to set it in place.

Press down firmly along the lip of the sink basin. Tighten the mounting clips using a screwdriver. Most sinks use mounting clips to pull them down tight to the countertop. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installation and spacing of these clips, which may vary depending on the brand and size of your sink.

Wipe away excess putty from around the edges of the basin lip with a damp cloth.