How to arrange flower pots

There are no rules set in stone when it comes to designing good-looking landscaping with potted plants. The most amazing outdoors spaces are created using imagination, not just following a set of rules. It’s what’s different that captures attention, not what looks the same as everything else. That doesn’t mean there are no rules when it comes to adding potted plants to your landscaping.

It’s hard to go wrong with great looking planters full of blooming flowers. Still, things can start to look awkward if you don’t follow a few key landscape design rules. Pairing the basics with your own creativity and eye for design will help your potted plants fit in with the rest of your landscape. Allow us to help guide your pursuit of planter perfection by providing the top 7 tips and tricks for potted plant display.

1. Think of Potted Plant Arrangements As A Sculpture

If you have a cluster of potted plants, how do you know if they all fit well together? Potted plants might not remind you of a sculpture, but that’s exactly how you can think of them to help decide if your collection of potted plants works or not.

In order to view your cluster of potted plants as a sculpture, imagine if they were all attached, would the design still work or would it appear awkward? While all plants and planters can vary, overall they need to flow into one cohesive form when arranged together.

2. Give Planters A Purpose

Planters that serve a purpose help ensure that your planters don’t look awkward or out of place. A walkway or set of stairs is a great way to utilize potted plants so that they serve a purpose and look great. You can frame stairs with planters on either side. Even flat paths can be accented with planters, as this can create the border you need to break up landscaping appropriately.

Parallel rows of potted plants make a scenic walkway and can include different types of flowers, including various sized planters. Just make sure there is some sort of pattern to ensure it flows well. When arranging potted plants on stairs you can use even more diversity because the stairs help hold it all together.

3. Planters Need Patterns

You don’t need to keep all of you potted plants the same; after all, diversity is what makes landscaping unique. Container gardening can include a mix of plants and planters, so long as there is an underlying theme. Without a consistent pattern throughout, your garden display might seem confusing or poorly put together. For instance, an underlying theme could be white roses. These should be planted throughout the garden, breaking up the other diverse plants throughout. Having a common flower pattern in a display is refreshing and helps the eye notice all of the distinctive differences instead of feeling overwhelmed.

4. Potted Plants Must Match

By match we don’t mean to keep all of your planters and plants the same. We encourage color and size variations, just make sure you pick the right pot for the right flower in order to create a look that works. If a plant is too small, too big, or too vibrant for a certain planter it won’t look right. Also, if the main colors of a flower don’t go well with the shade of the planter, it can take away from the natural beauty.

So how do you make sure that your plants and planters match? For starters, take note of the surrounding colors, either already in the garden or on nearby structures. You can use these colors as a base, finding ways to highlight them throughout your landscape design.

To ensure your plants match the planters, you should first purchase (or at least plan for) the plants you want to use that work well in your environment. Then you should look into buying the appropriate planters. Not only for your plants to flourish in, but that will help accentuate the colors present in your foliage.

5. Tall, Short, Fat, & Thin—Make Planter Diversity A Priority

If your entire garden is all one height you are at risk for creating a look that no one notices. If your plants are displayed at different levels, more details will be noticeable.

Planters come in a wide variety of sizes, from very small to very large. It’s common for people to get overwhelmed by very large planters, but be careful that you don’t end up with only small planters. Oversize planters can make a grand statement to your overall landscape design.

While some potted plants offer more leverage than others in terms of height, none can lift your plants that high off the ground. In order to give certain planters more leverage, stack your planters on top of bricks, stones, or any sort of platform.

Another way to add height is by adding potted plants that grow into vines, which can then attach to nearby walls or other supporting surfaces.

6. Sometimes You Have To Think Small

When planning an entire landscaping project, the little details often get lost in the rush to make everything look good. Every corner of your garden can tell a different tale, in other words you can spread miniature themes throughout for a look that still comes together.

Use a porch or shady corner to add a table of potted plants, all of which grow different spices. Or, create a cluster of cactus plants potted in diverse pots. Just because you have a small section of spices or cactus plants doesn’t mean you have to add them throughout the rest of your landscaping. Instead, little details can be exclusive and offer a great conversation piece. So long as one space is not overstated, the rest of your landscaping should retain a cohesive appearance.

7. All in One Planter—Full Looking Planters Are A Must

Make sure that your plants fill out their planters, for most plants you don’t want the soil to be visible from a distance. Instead you want pots that are bursting full of foliage, which might take more than one plant to obtain. Not all plants have to be the same type either, as long as they require the same amount of sun and water, diverse plant breeds can grow well together. Just like in a garden bed, you can layer plants in a planter so that bursts of color sneak out of bright green pockets of grasses or ferns.

8. Create Cohesive Cluster Planters

Groups of planters can look incredible paired together, just so long as they fit well together. If you are struggling to make a group of potted planters look good grouped together, try this simple trick. Place one large pot at the center and then add smaller plants around the outside to adorn and decorate. This will draw the eye to the focal point, but also offer a lot of beauty in the surrounding pots as well.

For a more informal look you can add an odd number of pots into a cluster group. If you use an even number of pots this gives a more formal look.

Fail Proof Trick To Make Container Plants Fit In With Your Landscaping

Even with all of these trips and tricks for potted planters, are you still concerned if your display looks good or not? The easiest way to design a symmetrical look with planters (and landscaping in general) is to start with 2 different types of plants. Then, select a third plant, which will be your focal point. Your focal plant should be your brightest and most diverse display, used less frequently than your other 2 plants (see here).

For planters that look great year after year, check out our high quality selection at TerraCast Planters.

Related To:

How to arrange flower pots

Container Flower Garden with Variety

Gardens can be quite interesting if they’re designed in a series of distinct spaces made to feel like a little collection of rooms. An easy way to create these garden rooms is by using pots. Container gardener Steve Silk offers tips on how to design and arrange containers to add beauty to the landscape.

Use pots to define garden spaces. Cluster small- to large-sized containers to enclose a garden space or frame a view. Create “hallways” through a space by placing pots with different shapes and sizes to provide a sense of enclosure; place pots on risers to make plants look taller. When creating any kind of garden space, whether it’s a room or a hallway, start with a corner. “As long as you have strong corners, it feels much more like a room,” says Steve. “Then you can easily connect the dots between the corners and enclose your room.”

Add architectural interest with variety in your potted collections. Mix it up with a variety of sculptural plants with strong shapes to draw attention. For example, elephant ear, which is a tropical, has much different needs than agave, which is a succulent. By planting them in individual containers, each plant gets the ideal soil, fertilizer and watering regimen to suit its needs, and you can play around with the various textures, shapes and colors of these plants.

Take advantage of containers as a forgiving (and movable) form of garden design. If you don’t like the way the pots look together, simply move one out and another one in until you get something you like.

Use containers as a means of traffic control. If you want to get people to slow down, group as many pots together as possible to form a nice, tight passageway. This naturally causes garden visitors to slow down as they make their way through the space.

Place fragrant plants near walkways for a sensory-enhanced stroll. It’s almost impossible to walk right through a space without detecting the fragrance of pineapple sage, scented geraniums, rosemary, lavender and other herbs.

Combine containers with annuals, perennials and other plants in complementary colors. Enhance the look of a colorful pot with matching or contrasting seasonal flowers and foliage.

Even empty pots can be useful in the garden. “Find a pot with a nice sculptural form or beautiful color, and it becomes an art object all on its own,” says Steve. Place an interesting pot as a focal point or to anchor a seating area.

How to arrange flower pots

Related Articles

  • Can You Plant Annuals in Flower Pots?
  • Trough Planter Ideas
  • Cute Ideas for Potted Herb Gardens
  • How to Arrange a Perennial Flower Bed
  • How to Plant a Planter Box

Outdoor planters are popular because of their versatility. Place them anywhere, and then move them. Home gardeners with small or even no yards can still garden in containers. Not only do they add beauty to any space, but they are convenient — put a planter full of herbs near your grill for when you are cooking or keep a sweet-smelling plant in a pot near the front door to welcome guests.

Location is Key

Just like in real estate, location is the most important consideration when it comes to organizing your outdoor planters. Consider the purpose of the planters and whether people will be congregating in the area. If you’re planning on arranging your planters on a covered porch to enhance curb appeal and welcome visitors, for example, you need to select plants that can tolerate a bit of shade and that won’t make your guests sneeze or dodge bees as they come to your front door. On the other hand, planters near your property boundary might be chosen and arranged to help create privacy.

Size and Scale

Consider size and scale when organizing planters. A shallow container with a low-profile plant can be easily overlooked unless it’s placed at eye level. A tall container with a tall plant might block the view of flowers behind it. Clusters of containers usually look better when grouped in odd numbers, such as three planters — two behind and one smaller pot in front — sitting on the corner of a patio. Identical planters look good when arranged to flank a garden bench or front door. Finally, consider the size of the plants. It’s best to place taller plants in the middle of a planter, surrounded by shorter and trailing plants.

Colors and Textures

Organize planters and their contents according to color and texture, choosing similar themes. For example, create cheer by planting containers with flowers that all bloom in bright colors, or choose shades of red, white and blue for a summery feel. Alternately, a pastel arrangement set off with creamy white flowers is beautiful for early spring. Too many contrasting colors and textures can be overwhelming and chaotic instead of soothing and attractive. Think about leaf shape and the way the plants move as well. Opposites can attract as long as you don’t crowd too many competing plants into one planter. Soften the straight lines of an ornamental grass with a trailing, flowering vine, for example.

Practical Matters

It doesn’t matter how you organize your planters in your landscape if the planters themselves aren’t organized properly. This is to say that the plant’s light, soil and water needs must be taken into account, as well as the construction of the planter. Porous materials such as clay absorb water more quickly from the soil — and soil in containers tends to dry out more quickly anyway — so choose plastic if you want to water less frequently. Containers also need to have drainage holes in the base. If water is not allowed to drain out, the soil will become waterlogged and the roots may rot or develop fungal diseases. Finally, consider the light needs of the plant. Arranging smaller planters around the base of larger ones is pleasing to the eye — but isn’t so great for sun-loving plants if the larger container casts them in shade.

Related To:

How to arrange flower pots

Container Flower Garden with Variety

Gardens can be quite interesting if they’re designed in a series of distinct spaces made to feel like a little collection of rooms. An easy way to create these garden rooms is by using pots. Container gardener Steve Silk offers tips on how to design and arrange containers to add beauty to the landscape.

Use pots to define garden spaces. Cluster small- to large-sized containers to enclose a garden space or frame a view. Create “hallways” through a space by placing pots with different shapes and sizes to provide a sense of enclosure; place pots on risers to make plants look taller. When creating any kind of garden space, whether it’s a room or a hallway, start with a corner. “As long as you have strong corners, it feels much more like a room,” says Steve. “Then you can easily connect the dots between the corners and enclose your room.”

Add architectural interest with variety in your potted collections. Mix it up with a variety of sculptural plants with strong shapes to draw attention. For example, elephant ear, which is a tropical, has much different needs than agave, which is a succulent. By planting them in individual containers, each plant gets the ideal soil, fertilizer and watering regimen to suit its needs, and you can play around with the various textures, shapes and colors of these plants.

Take advantage of containers as a forgiving (and movable) form of garden design. If you don’t like the way the pots look together, simply move one out and another one in until you get something you like.

Use containers as a means of traffic control. If you want to get people to slow down, group as many pots together as possible to form a nice, tight passageway. This naturally causes garden visitors to slow down as they make their way through the space.

Place fragrant plants near walkways for a sensory-enhanced stroll. It’s almost impossible to walk right through a space without detecting the fragrance of pineapple sage, scented geraniums, rosemary, lavender and other herbs.

Combine containers with annuals, perennials and other plants in complementary colors. Enhance the look of a colorful pot with matching or contrasting seasonal flowers and foliage.

Even empty pots can be useful in the garden. “Find a pot with a nice sculptural form or beautiful color, and it becomes an art object all on its own,” says Steve. Place an interesting pot as a focal point or to anchor a seating area.

How to arrange flower pots

Everybody has that one friend or family member that seems to grow the most beautifully potted flower arrangements, year after year. Their planters are brimming with tall, colorful flowers, all of which are planted just right to look gorgeous and full from every angle. How do they do it?

The secret is knowing which flowers to start with, how to arrange them, and of course, how to care for them. Most great flower baskets start with upright flowers, balanced with a mix of broad and trailing plants. Every flower plays a role, so be sure to mix and match shapes, heights, and colors. To get started, let’s talk about preparing your planter.

STEP 1: PREPARING YOUR FLOWER BASKETS

When planning your baskets and planters, choose plants that best fit your environment. Pick the right colors for you, whether they’re bold, exciting combinations or colors complementary to your home and landscape. Also consider the growing conditions. Will the basket or planter be sitting in the sun or shade? And, how much moisture will your new plants require? Develop a plan with each of these details in mind and build around it.

Fill your containers with a potting mix rather than garden soil. Potting mixes drain better, and garden soil may contain weed seeds and pests you don’t want in your containers. IFA Premium Potting Soil and Black Gold All Purpose Potting Mix are both formulated with the finest blended ingredients, and provide good moisture retention and drainage.

When filling your containers, dampen the soil and allow some space between the top of the basket or planter and the surface of the soil. This will allow water to soak into the soil as opposed to running out of the container.

How to arrange flower pots

STEP 2: CHOOSING THE BEST FLOWERS FOR YOUR PLANTERS

Mixing shapes, heights, colors, and plants is the key to creating a beautiful potted flower arrangement. Consider a basic recipe that includes a combination of the following types of plants:

1. Thrillers: Make a Statement

Thrillers are tall, upright plants. They’re the attention-getting star and make the perfect centerpiece for your flower baskets and planters.
Great thrillers: Cordyline, Dracaena Spikes (Green Cordyline), Carex (Ice Cream Grass), Juncus, Pennisetum Rubrum (Purple Fountain Grass), and Geraniums (upright).

2. Fillers: Grow Bold

Fillers are colorful and tend to add volume by growing up and out. They’re naturally the most flowery and stunning in any container.
Great fillers: Petunia (upright), Osteospermum (African Daisy), Phlox Intensia, Geranium, and Lobelia.

3. Accents: Contrast Naturally

Accents weave through the thrillers and fillers, and add much-needed foliar texture. While accents usually lack the bold color associated with fillers, they provide great shape and visual contrast.
Great accents: Ipomoea (Sweet Potato Vine), Lysimachia, Plectranthus, Lotus, Coleus, and Vinca.

4. Trailers: Cascade Beautifully

Trailers cascade over the sides of the container, softening its edges. They unify the composition by climbing through the arrangement, or simply, adding a complementary color, shape or texture.
Great trailers: Petunia (trailing), Verbena (trailing), Calibrachoa (Million Bells Petunia), Bidens, Bacopa, and Lobularia.

How to arrange flower pots

STEP 3: HOW TO PLANT YOUR FLOWERS

Now that you’ve chosen your flowers and your hanging basket or planter is ready, let’s start planting.

1. DIG HOLES FOR EACH PLANT

Dig your holes where you want to place each plant. Make sure the holes are deep and wide enough to hold the plant’s root system. To make sure it’s the right size, place the pot itself inside the hole.

2. CAREFULLY REMOVE EACH PLANT

Carefully remove each plant from its pot. Hold the pot with one hand and place your other hand around the base of the plant. Tip the pot to the side and allow the plant and soil to slide out.

3. LOOSEN THE ROOT BALL

Loosen the root ball, especially if the roots are heavily entwined or match the shape of the container. To make sure the roots grow outward into the surrounding soil, gently tease or pull on the roots with your hands.

4. PLACE THE ROOTS IN THE SOIL

Place the roots in the soil. If the hole is too deep, fill it in slightly with a handful or two of loose dirt. Gently fill soil around the roots until the hole is filled, and pat the soil down to remove gaps and support the plant.

5. WATER, NURTURE & FEED

To help establish your plants, thoroughly water, and pinch off existing flowers so all of the energy is placed into developing a strong root system.

How to arrange flower pots

KEEP YOUR POTTED FLOWERS BEAUTIFUL

Your flowers are now planted and looking good. The main goal from this point on is to maintain healthy, colorful plants throughout the summer.

First, water your plants deeply and regularly to make sure it reaches the bottom roots. This encourages the roots to grow down toward the bottom of the basket or planter, and develops a stronger overall plant. They prefer water in the morning or evening and less in the mid-day sun. Also make sure to water the soil and not the leaves. Wet leaves can lead to fungus, mildew, disease, and in some cases, sunburn.

Check the moisture level before each watering by sticking a finger an inch or two below the surface. If it feels dry around your fingertip, your plants need water. Moisture levels can also change quickly on a hot summer day. A basket or planter that feels quite moist in the morning may be dry by mid-afternoon

Hanging baskets hold a small amount of soil and tend to dry out quickly. There’s also less room for roots to spread and grow. Give your hanging basket flowers a good, long drink of water four to five times each week, and possibly daily if weather conditions are extremely hot or windy. Add enough water so it runs out of the bottom of the basket, and make sure to hit the edges along with the center of the basket.

One last thing to remember: healthy plants produce new blossoms. To maintain your plants health and to stimulate growth, make sure to fertilize, prune, and routinely deadhead your flowers. When fertilizing, you have two types of options. Liquid feeds such as IFA Grand Champion All Purpose Fertilizer or Fertilome Blooming & Rooting Plant Food may be applied once per week (or every other week) when watering. As an alternative, long feeding pellets such as Fertilome Garden Cote 6 are a time release option that will feed your plants for the entire season with only one application. Snipping blooms that are past their prime improves the appearance of your plants and encourages them to produce more flowers. Remove any wilting or dead blossoms or plants with a pair of gardening shears.

There are many plant variations and even more combinations. Use this recipe as a guide and explore the possibilities. Be colorful and bold, but more importantly, choose a combination you’ll enjoy in your yard all year long.

Information for this article was provided by Kent Mickelsen, Utah Certified Nurseryman, IFA.

How to arrange flower pots

Sometimes less is more and sometimes more is more. While three pots can make a corner of a deck look fabulous, 33 can be stunning too. It depends on your space and budget. However, ​there are a few things to keep in mind when grouping pots (though the first thing to remember is that there are no rules except to do what pleases you).

Odd Numbers Look Right

When it comes to plants in pots or groups of pots try to go for an odd number. It just seems to look better.

Use Color

While these pots are different in color, they are similar in style and the colors compliment each other. Also, each pot is set on a wrought iron plant stand, which helps unify the arrangement. Using terracotta pots in different sizes a grouping is a sure-fire way to get a unified design. Keeping one variable the same is one way to think about it—either color, size or shape—can also help your design to be harmonious.

How to arrange flower pots

Mix Pot Sizes

This is a group of succulents on the staircase out my back door. I grouped the three small pots (two teacups and a clamshell) filled with succulents. I put them next to a medium-sized pot and then turned a tall narrow pot, upside down, and placed a pot with a draping plant on top of the inverted pot. This way your eye can travel from the lowest to the tallest. This group works because of the midsized pot. If the teacups were against the larger pot, it wouldn’t work as well.

Pots at Longwood Gardens

If you ever get the chance, the pots and combinations at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, are some of the most extraordinary we’ve ever seen. Notice how they used very different pots, and used plants in each pot that are a salmon color as well as a deep wine. The textures in all the pots are quite different, but the color echoes make them form a coherent design.

How to arrange flower pots

Repeat Planters

Some of the most successful and formal groupings of planters are achieved by making identical planters and repeating them. The visual impact is great and depending on the planters and the plantings the effect can be very modern or more traditional. These ivy baskets are perfect for this building at Longwood Gardens. Also using repeating planters on staircases or walls or to line driveways or pathways can look amazing.

27+ How To Make Outdoor Flower Pot Arrangements Gif. I hope you enjoy and this. If no hole is present, then drill a hole in the.

How to arrange flower pots20 Easy And Amazing Diy Wooden Planter Box Ideas from www.anikasdiylife.com When the sun comes out, so should your garden pots! Like large, cottage and more. Ikebana is the japanese art of flower arrangement.

If you choose really hearty plants, all you need is two like sweet potato ivy and petunias, which makes a.

Learn how to arrange flowers and create a beautiful, colorful bouquet. If making a centerpiece, use three to five flower pots to be. Attach clay pots to a pallet with nails and stainless steel cable ties for a living art display that keeps your rosemary and basil at the ready. They came in a plastic pot, so i transferred.

How to arrange flower pots Source: i0.wp.com

If you choose really hearty plants, all you need is two like sweet potato ivy and petunias, which makes a.

The project uses everyday materials such as clay pots, paint the pot sizes that we recommend for this project are just suggestions.

How to arrange flower pots Source: smartmoneygreenplanet.com

Ikebana is the japanese art of flower arrangement.

How to arrange flower pots Source: thetarnishedjewelblog.com

A standard plastic or clay pot makes a suitable base for almost all of these diy flower pots.

How to arrange flower pots Source: www.gardeningknowhow.com

It’s time to pretty up those planters!

How to arrange flower pots Source: diy.sndimg.com

Check out littleredwindow to find out to make stenciled flower pots.

How to arrange flower pots Source: sustainmycrafthabit.com

Whether you have the space for an outdoor garden or not, a potted flower arrangement can be a great way to accent a house or yard.

How to arrange flower pots Source: www.woohome.com

To make sure the flowers stay in place.

How to arrange flower pots Source: www.anikasdiylife.com

Whether you want to decorate your terracotta flower pots or disguise disposable planters before giving herbs as a gift, we found dozens of adorable ideas that are also insanely easy.

How to arrange flower pots

Sometimes less is more and sometimes more is more. While three pots can make a corner of a deck look fabulous, 33 can be stunning too. It depends on your space and budget. However, ​there are a few things to keep in mind when grouping pots (though the first thing to remember is that there are no rules except to do what pleases you).

Odd Numbers Look Right

When it comes to plants in pots or groups of pots try to go for an odd number. It just seems to look better.

Use Color

While these pots are different in color, they are similar in style and the colors compliment each other. Also, each pot is set on a wrought iron plant stand, which helps unify the arrangement. Using terracotta pots in different sizes a grouping is a sure-fire way to get a unified design. Keeping one variable the same is one way to think about it—either color, size or shape—can also help your design to be harmonious.

How to arrange flower pots

Mix Pot Sizes

This is a group of succulents on the staircase out my back door. I grouped the three small pots (two teacups and a clamshell) filled with succulents. I put them next to a medium-sized pot and then turned a tall narrow pot, upside down, and placed a pot with a draping plant on top of the inverted pot. This way your eye can travel from the lowest to the tallest. This group works because of the midsized pot. If the teacups were against the larger pot, it wouldn’t work as well.

Pots at Longwood Gardens

If you ever get the chance, the pots and combinations at Longwood Gardens in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, are some of the most extraordinary we’ve ever seen. Notice how they used very different pots, and used plants in each pot that are a salmon color as well as a deep wine. The textures in all the pots are quite different, but the color echoes make them form a coherent design.

How to arrange flower pots

Repeat Planters

Some of the most successful and formal groupings of planters are achieved by making identical planters and repeating them. The visual impact is great and depending on the planters and the plantings the effect can be very modern or more traditional. These ivy baskets are perfect for this building at Longwood Gardens. Also using repeating planters on staircases or walls or to line driveways or pathways can look amazing.