How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

Though stress, spicy foods, alcohol, and smoking don’t cause ulcers, they can keep them from healing quickly or make your pain worse. Talk to your doctor about ways to manage your stress, improve your diet, and, if you smoke, how you can get help to quit.

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on December 7, 2020

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: “Peptic Ulcer Disease and H. Pylori.”

National Cancer Institute: “Helicobacter pylori and Cancer.”

KidsHealth: “Infections: Helicobacter Pylori.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “The Burden of Digestive Diseases: Peptic Ulcer Disease.”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Peptic Ulcer Disease.”

UpToDate. “Helicobacter pylori infection and treatment.”

American Cancer Society: “How is stomach cancer diagnosed?” “How is stomach cancer treated?” and “Signs and symptoms of stomach cancer.”

National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse: “Peptic Ulcer Disease and H. Pylori.”

National Cancer Institute: “Helicobacter pylori and Cancer.”

KidsHealth: “Infections: Helicobacter Pylori.”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “The Burden of Digestive Diseases: Peptic Ulcer Disease.”

American College of Gastroenterology: “Peptic Ulcer Disease.”

UpToDate. “Helicobacter pylori infection and treatment.”

American Cancer Society: “How is stomach cancer diagnosed?” “How is stomach cancer treated?” and “Signs and symptoms of stomach cancer.”

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How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

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  • Is Eating Smoked Foods Healthy?
  • Foods to Avoid Eating Before Bedtime
  • What Foods Should Be Avoided While Recuperating From Food Poisoning?
  • Healthy Food to Curb Nausea While Pregnant

H. pylori is a bacteria that causes more than half of peptic ulcers, which are open sores in the lining of your stomach, esophagus or the first part of your small intestine. Symptoms may include a burning or dull pain in your stomach between meals or during the night, appetite loss, bloating, belching, nausea and vomiting. Avoiding certain foods may help prevent or minimize your symptoms.

Low-Fiber Grains

Eating a fiber-rich diet can help reduce your risk of developing an ulcer, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center, and accelerate recovery once you have one. While whole grains provide valuable amounts of fiber, refined grains such as white flour do not. To make sure you’re getting plenty of fiber, replace refined-grain products in your diet, such as instant rice, pretzels and egg noodles, with whole-grain equivalents, such as brown rice, oatmeal and popcorn.

Spicy Foods

While foods affect people with peptic ulcers differently, spicy foods may worsen your symptoms. Particularly spicy foods worth limiting or avoiding once an H. pylori infection sets in include jalapeño and cayenne peppers, salsa, Asian curries, miso paste and spicy mustard. Replace hot peppers with fruits and vegetables such as apples, celery, onions, garlic and cranberries, which may help slow the growth of H. pylori.

Coffee, Caffeine and Carbonated Drinks

Coffee, with or without caffeine, can increase stomach acid production, raising your risk for ulcer symptoms. Carbonated beverages such as soft drinks and mineral water can have similar effects. Choose flat water and less-acidic beverages such as low-fat milk and herbal teas instead. Caffeine can also worsen ulcer symptoms, so avoid caffeine-containing foods such as chocolate and coffee-flavored ice cream and candies.

Pickled Foods

Dealing with an H. pylori infection is already uncomfortable enough — and you should avoid picked foods if you don’t want to make it worse. Since pickling involves preserving foods in vinegar, pickled foods are generally very acidic, and eating large amounts of acidic foods may irritate your stomach lining further. If you’re prone to H. pylori infections, limit your intake of pickled foods, such as pickles, herring and kimchi. Amp up your fresh vegetable intake instead.

How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) are bacteria that infect the lining of the stomach. These bacteria can cause peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcers. While natural treatments may not eradicate the bacteria, they might help maintain the bacteria at low levels.

Gastric inflammation caused by H. pylori can lead to superficial gastritis, ulcers, and even gastric cancer. H. pylori infections typically require triple therapy with two antibiotics and a proton pump inhibitor.

Antibiotics can cause side effects. Using natural treatments might be helpful in preventing these side effects, protecting the stomach, helping the body to better fight infection, and promoting overall good health.

As natural treatments are unlikely to eradicate H. pylori entirely, people might choose to use them alongside conventional therapy.

Researchers have conducted a range of studies on natural approaches to treating H. pylori infections. Eight potential natural treatments include:

1. Honey

How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

Share on Pinterest People with H. pylori infections may find some natural treatments beneficial.

Honey is known for its antibacterial properties, and people have used it as a medicine since ancient times.

One study showed that Manuka honey suppressed the growth of H. pylori in gastric epithelial cells.

Other studies have demonstrated that honey has other anti-H. pylori properties, but more animal studies and clinical trials are needed to assess honey’s efficiency as a complementary or alternative treatment.

2. Aloe vera

Aloe vera is an herbal remedy used to treat a variety of illnesses, including:

  • constipation
  • detoxification
  • digestive health
  • wound-healing

In one study, the gel from inside the leaves of an aloe vera plant was effective in both inhibiting growth of and killing H. pylori strains, even those that were drug-resistant in a laboratory environment.

This suggests that aloe vera could be effective against H. pylori infection when used in combination with antibiotics.

3. Broccoli sprout

Sulforaphane, a compound found abundantly in broccoli sprout, has been shown to kill H. pylori.

Studies performed both in test tubes and on animal and human subjects have demonstrated the favorable effects of sulforaphane against H. pylori bacteria. Broccoli sprout also decreased gastric inflammation in H. pylori-infected mice.

4. Milk

Lactoferrin, a glycoprotein found in both human and cow’s milk, has shown inhibitory activity against H. pylori. One study used a combination of antibiotics and lactoferrin from cow’s milk, which resulted in a 100 percent eradication rate of H. pylori in 150 affected people.

Also, a compound called melanoidin appears to inhibit the growth of H. pylori bacteria. Melanoidin is a compound formed by a chemical reaction between the sugar lactose and a protein called casein in milk and dairy products. Research has shown that melanoidin suppresses H. pylori colonization in both mice and humans.

5. Lemongrass oil

People must not ingest essential oils. Instead, they can inhale them and use them as part of an aromatherapy approach. According to studies carried out on humans and animals, lemongrass essential oil inhibits the growth of H. pylori.

In a study on mice , the density of H. pylori colonization in the stomach was significantly reduced compared to mice not treated with lemongrass oil.

6. Green tea

Green tea is one of the healthiest and most widely consumed beverages in the world. It contains many antioxidants and nutrients.

In an animal study, green tea decreased both the number of bacteria and the inflammation score of H. pylori-infected mice. However, researchers found that mice that received green tea before infection achieved better results.

7. Probiotics

According to the Food and Agriculture Organization , probiotics are live microorganisms that offer health benefits to people. Interest in probiotics as a treatment for H. pylori is increasing.

There are numerous types of probiotics. Many people use Bifidobacterium, which is found in dairy and fermented products, to prevent gastrointestinal infection.

Research has shown that Bifidobacterium exerts its effect against H. pylori by competing with the bacteria to stick to the mucous lining of the stomach.

8. Phototherapy

Research suggests that H. pylori bacteria are sensitive to ultraviolet light. During phototherapy, an ultraviolet light source illuminates the whole stomach.

Phototherapy has been shown to reduce the number of bacteria in the stomach significantly. However, the bacteria will repopulate a few days after illumination.

While phototherapy is not a complete fix, it may have the potential to become an effective treatment against H. pylori, particularly for people who cannot take antibiotics.

How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

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What foods should I eat to get rid of H. pylori?

How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

Eating a diet that’s high in foods that make the stomach less habitable for Helicobacter pylori is a good strategy for success against this nasty infection.

NOTE to the Reader: This is one article in a series about Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial infection that can cause a wide variety of symptoms throughout the body. About half of the population of the world is infected with H. pylori, but how this infection is expressed varies from person to person. Some people have transient symptoms. They may have motion sickness, sea sickness, hyperemesis gravidarum (sever morning sickness), a chronic rash (Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria) that seems to be due to allergies. Or they may have chronic migraine headaches. Many of these problems can be resolved with high-dose vitamin C treatment combined with an alkaline diet and alkaline treatment strategies. It is possible to cure H. pylori infection using powerful at-home treatment strategies in combination with a proper diet.

Below are foods that have an anti-Helicobacter pylori effect on the digestive system:

  • Cabbage – high in isothiocyanates and S-Methylmethionine/Vitamin U to cure stomach ulcers, get rid of gastritis, help prevent stomach cancer and kill H. pylori ; juice up to ¼ of a cabbage per day for 4 to 8 weeks
  • Broccoli – high in isothiocyanates and sulphoraphane to help prevent cancer and kill H. pylori; 70 grams of broccoli per day is advised for 4 to 8 weeks for best results; eat broccoli sprouts or take a broccoli sprouts supplement daily to reduce stomach inflammation
  • Cauliflower – high in isothiocyanates to help prevent cancer and kill H. pylori
  • Raw Garlic (Allium sativa)
  • Green tea – raises the stomach pH to make it more alkaline and less habitable for H. pylori. Green tea also has anti-bacterial properties. Drinking as much as you can!
  • Thyme
  • Ginger – Ginger can reduce stomach upsets and gastritis, hastening the emptying of the stomach, while exerting antibacterial effects against H. pylori at the same time. (A great remedy for motion sickness and morning sickness).
  • Honey
  • Fish oil – high in omega 3’s and omega 6’s to reduce stomach inflammation
  • Olive oil – high in omega 3’s and omega 6’s to reduce stomach inflammation
  • Carrot seeds – high in omega 3’s and omega 6’s to reduce stomach inflammation
  • Grapefruit seed oil – high in omega 3’s and omega 6’s to reduce stomach inflammation
  • Cranberries – high in vitamin C and anti-adhesive properties that work to repair the stomach lining to make it impenetrable by this corkscrew-shaped bacteria while making it much more difficult for it to hold onto the gastric mucosa.
  • Blueberries – high in vitamin C
  • Blackberries – high in vitamin C
  • Strawberries – high in vitamin C
  • Raspberries – high in vitamin C
  • Coconut oil – contains 50% lauric acid by weight to support bacterial elimination of H. pylori as well as Candida albicans ; though Monolaurin supplements are more powerful than coconut oil, it doesn’t hurt to include plenty of coconut products in your diet when trying to cure H. pylori
  • Coconut milk
  • Coconut cream
  • Cow’s Milk – the glycoprotein lactoferrin and a compound known as melanoidin inhibits H. pylori.
  • Pea protein (Pisum sativum) – two peptides (S3 and S5) in pea protein have demonstrated anti-adhesion effects against H. pylori . They interfere with adhesin BabA, an H. pylori membrane protein that makes it possible for the bacteria to adhere to the stomach wall.
  • Tomato – Tomato definsins have a broad antibacterial effect in the gut.
  • Red Wine – The resveratrol in red wine has inhibits the urease activity of H. pylori. It can diminish the symptoms associated with an H. pylori infection but won’t cure the infection.

How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

Related Articles

  • How to Avoid Stomach Acid
  • Is Eating Smoked Foods Healthy?
  • Foods to Avoid Eating Before Bedtime
  • What Foods Should Be Avoided While Recuperating From Food Poisoning?
  • Healthy Food to Curb Nausea While Pregnant

H. pylori is a bacteria that causes more than half of peptic ulcers, which are open sores in the lining of your stomach, esophagus or the first part of your small intestine. Symptoms may include a burning or dull pain in your stomach between meals or during the night, appetite loss, bloating, belching, nausea and vomiting. Avoiding certain foods may help prevent or minimize your symptoms.

Low-Fiber Grains

Eating a fiber-rich diet can help reduce your risk of developing an ulcer, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center, and accelerate recovery once you have one. While whole grains provide valuable amounts of fiber, refined grains such as white flour do not. To make sure you’re getting plenty of fiber, replace refined-grain products in your diet, such as instant rice, pretzels and egg noodles, with whole-grain equivalents, such as brown rice, oatmeal and popcorn.

Spicy Foods

While foods affect people with peptic ulcers differently, spicy foods may worsen your symptoms. Particularly spicy foods worth limiting or avoiding once an H. pylori infection sets in include jalapeño and cayenne peppers, salsa, Asian curries, miso paste and spicy mustard. Replace hot peppers with fruits and vegetables such as apples, celery, onions, garlic and cranberries, which may help slow the growth of H. pylori.

Coffee, Caffeine and Carbonated Drinks

Coffee, with or without caffeine, can increase stomach acid production, raising your risk for ulcer symptoms. Carbonated beverages such as soft drinks and mineral water can have similar effects. Choose flat water and less-acidic beverages such as low-fat milk and herbal teas instead. Caffeine can also worsen ulcer symptoms, so avoid caffeine-containing foods such as chocolate and coffee-flavored ice cream and candies.

Pickled Foods

Dealing with an H. pylori infection is already uncomfortable enough — and you should avoid picked foods if you don’t want to make it worse. Since pickling involves preserving foods in vinegar, pickled foods are generally very acidic, and eating large amounts of acidic foods may irritate your stomach lining further. If you’re prone to H. pylori infections, limit your intake of pickled foods, such as pickles, herring and kimchi. Amp up your fresh vegetable intake instead.

Affiliation

  • 1 Department of Gastroenterology, Chios General Hospital Skylitsion, Helenas Venizalou 2, 82100 Chios, Greece. [email protected]
  • PMID: 19879118
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2009.09.010
  • Search in PubMed
  • Search in NLM Catalog
  • Add to Search

Authors

Affiliation

  • 1 Department of Gastroenterology, Chios General Hospital Skylitsion, Helenas Venizalou 2, 82100 Chios, Greece. [email protected]
  • PMID: 19879118
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2009.09.010

Abstract

Our aim was to study the effect of pure mastic gum on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) eradication in patients suffering from an H. pylori infection Fifty two patients were randomized to receive either 350mg three times a day (tid) of pure mastic gum for 14 days (Group A), or 1,05g tid of pure mastic gum (Group B) for 14 days, or pantoprazole 20mg twice a day (bd) plus pure mastic gum 350mg tid for 14 days (Group C) or pantoprazole 20mg bd plus amoxicillin 1g bd plus clarithromycin 500mg bd for 10 days (Group D). All patients harboured H. pylori before entering the study and that was confirmed by a (13)C urea breath test (UBT). H. pylori eradication was tested by a UBT 5 weeks after completion of the eradication regime. Eradication of H. pylori was confirmed in 4/13 patients in Group A and in 5/13 in Grour B. No patient in Group C achieved eradication whereas 10/13 patients in Group D had a negative UBT. There were no statistically significant differences in mean UBT values in Groups A, B, C although there was a trend in Group A (p=0.08) and in Group B (p=0.064). The difference was significant in Group D (p=0.01). All patients tolerated mastic gum well and no serious adverse events were reported. Mastic gum has bactericidal activity on H. pylori in vivo.

How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

Last year I was suffering from unexplained weight gain, fatigue, and digestive distressed. I ended up working with a holistic nutritionalist to figure out what was wrong with me. One of the tests I took revealed that I had H. Pylori. I had H. Pylori in the past and went through an antibiotic treatment to get rid of it, but was never tested again to make sure it was completely gone. This time I decided to take a more natural approach to getting rid of the h. pylori.

As people’s eating habits became worse and worse through the decades, our immune systems only grew weaker. This has left us vulnerable to many diseases we had previously been able to fight off, primarily infections from harmful bacteria like H. Pylori. This harmful gut bacteria is spreading through the population faster than ever. Here’s how you can protect yourself and your family from it.

What is H. Pylori?

H. Pylori is a bacteria that actively suppresses the production of stomach acid. It has two cell walls, which makes it twice as difficult for the body to fight off. It’s also a parasite, and is easily passed from person to person via saliva. Not good news for families, or people who use the same set of dishes!

The Dangers of H. Pylori

H Pylori infections lead to many larger health problems. It’s tied to serious health hazards such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), chronic heartburn, gastritus, and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It also raises the risk of stomach cancer by a small but significant amount.

But in general, H. Pylori infections are dangerous because this little bacterium essentially neutralizes everything useful about stomach acid. Most people actually don’t actually have enough stomach acid in their bodies, and H. Pylori actually attacks the acid that works to process essential materials and digest protein. The effects of being without these essential materials creates effects throughout the entire body.

Symptoms of H. Pylori

  • Abdominal pain
  • Bloating and fullness
  • Indigestion
  • Feeling very hungry 1 to 3 hours after eating
  • Nausea (may be relieved by vomiting)
  • Constipation and diarrhea
  • Unexplanable weight gain.

How To Test for H. Pylori

This annoying bacteria is very sneaky. You can have absolutely no symptoms and still be infected. If you’re suspecting that you may be suffering from an H. Pylori infection, you should go directly to your current medical doctor and request a test.

The most effective diagnosing method for this infection is a stool test, primarily because H. Pylori attacks the systems that produce healthy amounts of stomach acid. After that, the second most effective is a blood test, then a breath test (looking heightened amounts of carbon dioxide, a sign of the H. Pylori infection at work). If you’re concerned that your infection may be causing stomach and intestinal damage, you may want to ask about an endoscopy. But it’s not the usual recommended option, for obvious reasons!

How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

How I Got Rid of it

Not only did I have H. Pylori, but I also had a parasite that I needed to get rid of. I wanted to make sure I got rid of both of them so I did a 6 week herb program for the H. Pylori and then another 6 weeks for the parasite. After the herbs, I needed to replenish my good bacteria and heal my gut so I did another 6 week gut healing program. The typical treatment for H. Pylori is antibiotics, but that can wreak havoc on your gut and I’ve been trying heal my gut in last year with a Paleo diet. I decided to work with a holistic nutritionalist and use an herbal program to get rid of both the h. pylori and the parasite. Since I’m not a medical professional I haven’t listed amounts below. You should contact a holistic nutritionalist, naturopath, or medical professional before starting an herbal supplement program.

‘Helicobacter pylori’ is a common gut bacteria, and often the cause of painful stomach ulcers. If you are infected by this bacteria, then here is a list of the foods that should be avoided, and a few tips to stay healthy.

How to avoid an h. pylori bacterial infection

‘Helicobacter pylori’ is a common gut bacteria, and often the cause of painful stomach ulcers. If you are infected by this bacteria, then here is a list of the foods that should be avoided, and a few tips to stay healthy.

H. pylori is the only bacterium to be classified as a carcinogen, and is a major cause of gastric cancer, but as per the National Cancer Institute, it can also reduce the risk of certain cancers, such as esophageal adenocarcinoma.


H. pylori
is surprisingly common, found in every second person. Yes, in around 50% of the populace in the world. It is much more common in developing countries, and in people of lower socioeconomic regions. Adverse effects and acute infections are rare though, with only 20% of those infected showing any symptoms at all.

An infection entails either gastritis or a peptic ulcer. Experts estimate that about 80% of stomach ulcers are caused due to a Helicobacter pylori infection. The signs of gastritis and peptic ulcer are abdominal pain, nausea, bloating, acid reflux, and/or vomiting. A peptic ulcer is also accompanied by a burning sensation, vomiting blood, black stools, and weight loss. A Urea Breath Test is most likely to be used for diagnosing this infection, but other tests like endoscopy, blood test, stool test, etc., may also be resorted to. The infection is cured using antibiotics and medications to reduce stomach acid.

Would you like to write for us? Well, we’re looking for good writers who want to spread the word. Get in touch with us and we’ll talk.

If you are suffering from this infection, then you might benefit from omitting certain foods from your diet. These foods are said to increase the acidity of the stomach, and might cause discomfort and pain.

➤ Hot and spicy food, anything containing chili-peppers or rich in spices.
➤ Any form of fried foods, including French fries, fried chicken, onion rings, and fritters.
➤ Foods that are high in sugar, for example, brownies, chocolates, donuts, cakes, pastries, ice cream, etc.
➤ Meats high in fats, such as bacon, marbled beef, salami, etc.
➤ Citrus fruits, like oranges, lemons, limes, etc., and their juice.
➤ Tomatoes and tomato-containing products, like tomato juice, puree, and ketchup.
➤ Caffeinated drinks, like tea, hot chocolate, and coffee. Even decaffeinated coffee and green tea are said to alleviate acidity, so avoid them too.
➤ Alcohol and carbonated drinks
➤ Flavored and plain milk, it provides temporary relief from heartburn, but actually causes the stomach to produce more acid.
➤ Vinegar and food made with vinegar.
➤ Refined flour-based food, like pretzels, pizzas, pasta, white bread, and processed foods.
➤ Cabbage and dried beans.

Just taking medication and avoiding certain foods is not enough to recover from this infection. You also need to make sure that it does not recur and spread (H. pylori is contagious). Here are some small changes that are recommended.

➤ Quit smoking – smoking increases the risk of developing ulcers significantly. Additionally, it also takes longer for an ulcer to heal for those who smoke.
➤ Minimize the use of fever and pain medication, categorized as NSAIDs, as they are proven to cause stomach ulcers. These include ibuprofen, aspirin, naproxen, and ketoprofen.
➤ Eat plenty of high-fiber food, especially green, leafy vegetables. Avoid processed foods, as they are likely to be rich in fats and sugar.
➤ Wash your hands before eating, handling food, and after using the washroom. Try not to touch the door handles of washrooms, use a disposable tissue or towel instead.
➤ Eating fruits high in flavonoids – apples, cranberries, blue berries, strawberries, etc., are said to inhibit the bacteria, so try and include them in your diet.
➤ Make sure that the food you eat is hygienic and the water you drink is clean.
➤ Avoid staying in places that are poorly ventilated, for a long time.

The prevalence of this bacteria has led some scientists to speculate that it may actually be a part of normal gut flora, and even aid digestion somewhat. Nevertheless, in some cases, it can, and does damage the mucus lining of the stomach, resulting in gastritis, ulcers, and even certain cancers. Eating good, natural food, and following a healthy lifestyle, are the best ways to prevent this infection, and also essential to minimize the discomfort and avoid irritating the stomach once the infection sets in.

Disclaimer: This HealthHearty article is for informative purposes only. Consult your physician/dietitian before making any change to your diet, especially if you are suffering from any ailment.