How to avoid bad company

From,
____________ (Name),
____________ (Address)

Date: __ /__ / ____ (Date)

Dear __________ (Name),

I hope this letter finds you in good health. I am really good here. I hope everything is fine with you.

I am writing this letter to you because I am about to advise you about something really important. This might sound silly to you because you are at your teenage and you might not see this very important. But you must understand that this step is really important in life building and if you take this step very seriously, this will help you in building your paths for a long time.

I understand your need to make friends and to have a fun life but make sure you understand what is right and wrong. You must also know how to choose between the right company and bad company. Always remember this, the bad company might give you name, fame and even independence but all the pleasures will be temporary. At the same time, the bad company will even lead you to deep holes and pits of life, from where you will never be able to come out. You might have to pay a huge cost for the same.

So, being an elder brother/sister, it is my absolute duty to guide you. I am always here, near you to clear and discuss whatever you need to know. But please, always think twice before choosing a bad company, and most importantly avoid them as much as you can. You have to go a long way in order to achieve your dreams but keep in mind how are you going to choose your paths.

Rest, you are smart and intelligent. You yourself know how to choose people. Take care and all the best for your future.

Yours _________ (Loving/Truly),
___________ (Name)

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  • write a letter to your younger brother advising him to avoid bad company and to keep good company
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How to avoid bad company

In the age of technology, we see cutting-edge technology everywhere. In your home, at the store, and in your workplace. What we don’t often think about is who are the people behind the technology? Sure you could say that the brand is behind the technology but who is actually managing its upkeep?

In the business world, words like servers, routers, MSPs, and “the cloud” can all sound intimidating and to tell you the truth, they can be! That’s where your IT support company comes in. They can upgrade your systems to make them more efficient, service your technology, and even perform damage control. They make sense of all the technology lingo so that you don’t have to.

I’ll stop you before you say “I don’t think I need an IT company’s help” because odds are that you could benefit from external IT support. If you are concerned about whether or not you need an IT support company for your business, check out our article here for more information.

Picking your IT support company can be a daunting task with so many different companies to choose from. Knowing what’s best for your business needs is a great place to start. The next step is finding providers who can fulfill those needs. The final step involves deciding which IT company to work with.

Here at IT Support Specialists, we believe that we are an excellent IT company but business owners often associate excellence with another “ex-” word. Expensive. We understand that people like a nice middle of the road price for their services, but the bills you’ll receive from excellent IT companies can really begin to rack up.

On the other end of the scale, bad IT can be cheap and quick. This sharp price cut can come with some consequences like cheaper hardware that requires more servicing by the IT company. What does more servicing lead to? Kissing more of your precious business funds goodbye. Hopefully you’re not just using another employee in your firm to handle “minor” technology issues. Unless you’re leaving that to the professionals, then you have bad IT.

We’re here to tell you that there’s a great middle ground between bad and excellent IT. The idea is that an IT company can deploy great service and products to you without breaking your bank. By providing high-quality devices to your company at a middle price, we avoid the expensiveness that “excellent” IT can generate. Here at ITSS, we take this great IT support notion in stride. We assess your business’ technology needs and then deploy a recipe that we believe will work best in your environment.

The goal of IT support is to dismantle your technological obstacles. We believe that you shouldn’t have to shell out massive amounts of cash in order to get great service.

How to avoid bad company

The people you spend your time with can influence your mood, how you spend your time, and your perspective on the world. They can even change your view of yourself. That’s why it’s so important to be aware of the company you keep.

The friends and colleagues who want you to do great things are the ones who empower you and push you to be better. They inspire you to raise your standards and to believe in yourself. When you spend time with them, you leave better than you were before.

But there may be another type of person in your life: always complaining and making excuses, looking at everything through a negative lens. Even if you don’t participate in their poor choices, they can create problems for you. In short, they’re bad company.

Here are 12 types of bad company to avoid:

1. The parasite.

This seemingly admiring person stays close beside you at every opportunity, weaving their way into your network, trying to take over your course instead of charting their own. They’ll leave you feeling drained and depleted, and they can cause significant harm along the way.

2. The selfish one.

This person makes time for you only when it’s convenient for them, wants to talk only when they need someone to listen, and reaches out only when they want something. A relationship should never be one-sided, and you shouldn’t waste your time with opportunists.

3. The one who holds grudges.

This person is all but unable to forget and forgive. They hold on to their resentments and grievances, seemingly unable to focus on the positive and move ahead. Unless you never make mistakes, you can’t afford a grudge-holder in your life.

4. The promise breaker.

This person is constantly making promises–and then constantly breaking them. They try to appease you by telling you what you want to hear and then they do what they want anyway. It’s impossible to build a healthy relationship with someone you can’t trust.

5. The judge.

A judgmental person has an opinion about everyone and everything. They consider themselves to be excellent at reading the character of others, but their opinions usually tell more about them than about the person they’re demeaning. In time, they’ll turn on you and begin telling others about all the fault they see in you.

6. The liar.

Someone who repeatedly lies to you violates your trust and disrespects your relationship. Whether they lie out of self-preservation or just habit, you can’t count on their integrity or even their ability to recount something close to the truth.

7. The negative one.

We all have the occasional complaint, but when someone is constantly complaining, criticizing, and blaming, it’s easy for their negativity to rub off on you. Nothing good ever came from nonstop negativity.

8. The jealous one.

This person is constantly envious of what you have, what you do, and who you are. There is a big difference between admiration and envy. They can make you feel guilty instead of happy about your own positive experiences. Jealousy is one of the worst forms of toxic behavior.

9. The manipulator.

Some people are shrewd in their ability to get others to do what they want. They may be kind to you only when they need something–and if you ever fail to come through, they make you feel so guilty that they end up getting their way. If you’re consistently doing things you don’t want to do for someone, you’re likely being manipulated.

10. The one who holds your past against you.

The people in your life should be willing to give you a break and be understanding when you take a wrong step, not remind you again and again of every mistake you’ve ever made. No one needs to hear a constant loop reminding them of their failures.

11. The bad influence.

This person pushes you to make choices you may feel uneasy about or draws you into unhealthy situations. Don’t confuse them with the person who tries new things and helps you grow. The difference lies in whether or not you feel embarrassed, anxious, restless, or edgy.

12. The unsupportive one.

The people in your life should support you just as you are. They should care about your goals and be happy for you when you succeed. Unsupportive people don’t seem to care about your achievements or support you when you need them most. Stick with those who encourage you to keep doing great things.

Remember, you’re only going to be as good as the people you surround yourself with, so be brave enough to let go of those who are weighing you down.

How to Avoid Getting Hired by a Bad Company

How to avoid bad company

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A disorganized interview process. Unhappy-looking employees. A hiring manager who acts like your mortal enemy instead of a negotiating partner during the salary negotiation phase.

There are all kinds of signs that indicate the job you’re applying for might be a nightmare. Of course, even the best employers have bad days.

Don’t assume that one rescheduled interview means that the calendar is always in turmoil, or that a single harried recruiter means that you won’t connect with your potential boss.

But do listen when your gut tells you that something’s off – and do dig in to find out whether your instincts are indicating that there are real problems at the company, before you accept a job offer.

Signs That You’re Interviewing With a Bad Company

Even if you need a job badly, you shouldn’t have to take a job you’re not comfortable with. These signs should give you pause.

No Attention to Detail

As a job seeker, you do your best to make sure that your application materials are perfect. You check, double-check, even triple-check your resumes and cover letters to ensure that they’re targeted to the job and free of typos and errors.

The employer should show similar care on their end of the process. If they don’t, it could be a sign that you’re not dealing with a professional organization.

Here’s an example. A reader named Sonya wrote to say, “I sent my resume, portfolio URL, and cover letter to a company last week; addressed to a Vice President as indicated in the advertisement. Several days later I got back a letter that was grammatically incorrect and unprofessional. I guess you could say at least I got a reply.”

She went on: “Sometimes you just get a little put off when you try so hard to do things correctly, and you either don’t get a response or you get a really bad one from someone who has the title of Vice President.”

When things like that happen you wonder whether you would want to work for a company that was that unprofessional.

Rudeness or Aggressive Behavior

Hiring managers who don’t show up for interviews without rescheduling in advance are a red flag. One job seeker reported that he spent over an hour getting to the interview site, only to be told by a secretary that he needed to come back at a later date.

Overselling the Job

Whenever a recruiter or hiring manager says that you absolutely can’t pass up this opportunity and you have to send your resume, drop everything and interview, etc. right now, you should wonder what the sense of urgency is. Perhaps it’s a legitimate opportunity that needs to be filled immediately, or maybe it’s just an overzealous recruiter or manager trying to meet a hiring quota.

Limited Contact Information

Vague contact information (no contact person or company name) and phone numbers that don’t show up on Caller ID are another warning sign. You should be able to easily search Google and find the company and company information. Also, check LinkedIn and view the company page and who works there.

Jobs That Sound Too Good to Be True

That old mantra that if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is, still holds true. One person who was in the midst of a job search was told by a recruiter that an employer was hiring a high-level executive for a top-secret multimillion start-up company. When the job seeker inquired further, he found out that the start-up wasn’t funded, and that it had no existing products or even a marketing plan.

What a Job Seeker Can Do

Spotted a few of these red flags? You don’t have to back out of the interview process immediately. There are steps you can take before making up your mind.

Hit Pause. You can stop – or at least halt – the hiring process temporarily while you learn more about the company. There isn’t anything the matter with delaying sending your resume or scheduling an interview if you’re hesitant about whether you want to work for the company.

Do Your Homework. Research the company. Google the company name to find out what you can discover about it online. Check the company’s LinkedIn and social pages to see what information you can find. Check sites like Glassdoor and read company reviews which can help you decide whether to continue with the hiring process or not.

Use Your Connections. If you have a networking connection who will help you find inside information, use it. Do you know someone who works there? Ask them about the company. If you belong to a professional association, they may be able to help you network with people who can give you advice. Use online networking resources like LinkedIn, as well. You may be surprised at how much you can find out.

How to Say Politely No (Thank You)

It’s important to keep in mind that not all companies are “good” companies. They don’t all operate professionally, and you may not want to work for a company that doesn’t match your standards.

Key Takeaways

Listen to Your Gut: If your instincts tell you that something is off, pay attention.

Look for Specific Red Flags: These include a disorganized interview process, rude HR reps or hiring managers, or unprofessional communications.

Find Out More Information: Research the company and ask your networking connections for any insight they have to offer.

Need to Decline the Job? Be Professional: You may not want to work at this company, but you still need to conduct yourself with grace and professionalism.

How to avoid bad company

How to avoid bad company

Make a Good First Impression

A customer’s first contact with your company must be a positive experience, regardless of whether that contact occurs via the telephone, the internet, or in person. If clients generally call your company, make sure your receptionist interacts well with strangers and is knowledgeable about the business. And, whenever possible, avoid automated telephone recordings with confusing menus. If clients are likely to first encounter you via the internet, make sure your website is attractive, easy to navigate and, by all means, accurate. If you meet customers face-to-face, make sure they’re greeted with a smile and an immediate offer to provide assistance.

Shoot Straight

Although it may be uncomfortable delivering bad news, most clients appreciate getting honest, complete information upfront, free of sugar-coating or promises on which you can’t deliver. Misleading your customers or leaving them in the dark about important things will make you appear deceptive and untrustworthy.

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

Failure to show your clients the utmost level of respect could be detrimental to your professional relationship. For example, cancelling meetings at the last minute or appearing distracted when you talk to them could give the impression that you’re too busy and don’t respect them. Therefore, make sure to appear attentive to your customers’ needs and treat them how you would expect to be treated by someone else.

Return Messages Promptly

Whether you deal with customers in person, by phone, or via email, the cardinal rule of good customer service is to follow up when a customer contacts you. Delays in returning voicemails or neglected emails give the impression that the customer is not important to you.

Listen to Them and Hear What They Say

Just because you sit silently on the other line as clients discuss their concerns does not mean you’re a good listener. You must listen to what they say, but you must also take action if the circumstances demand it, and you should digest the information so you remember the conversation. If you fail to take the appropriate action in response to a conversation, or if you’ve totally forgotten what a client said the next time you speak, you’ll create the unfortunate impression that you don’t value their business.

Don’t Smother Them

While making customers know that you care is important, your attempts to convey that message should be tempered by professional courtesy. For example, phone calls should be kept to a reasonable level to avoid making clients feel harassed. Keep in mind that your clients are likely busy people and are paying you to take care of business. Don’t overburden them with details unless they specifically request it.

Exude Confidence

Have you ever met with a store clerk or spoken to a customer service representative on the phone and gotten the impression that they weren’t very familiar with their company’s products or services? That phenomenon occurs much more often than it should. To be fair, every employee in a company can’t be expected to have an immediate answer to every question about every product or service, but a simple “I don’t know” is never an acceptable answer when dealing with customers. Instead, the customer should be given an explanation of why the information isn’t readily available and a promise that you’ll get back to them promptly after a little research. The customer shouldn’t be left with the impression that employees are uninformed or that the company’s failure to train has created an insecure workforce. In all levels of a company, from lower level employees to the executives, all representatives of a company should exude confidence in every interaction with clients.


The Customer is Always Right…Even When He’s Not.

If you’ve ever worked in a customer service position, then you know the old adage that “the customer is always right” isn’t accurate. We all have customers who are difficult or clients that make unreasonable demands. While you shouldn’t feel obligated to give in to every outrageous request a customer proposes, you should make every effort to calmly deal with dissatisfied patrons and tactfully address their concerns. Telling a customer that he’s dead wrong or calling him out for lying is never acceptable.

Money, Money, Money

Some customers may be willing to tolerate an unreturned phone call here or there, an occasionally rude receptionist, or a cancelled meeting once in a while, but no one will stand for you taking advantage of them financially. If you’ve quoted a price or a fee, stick to it. Honoring your financial commitments will go a long way in convincing your customers that you have integrity and that they can trust you. In contrast, hidden fees or surprise invoices will make you appear unreliable.

Work with Your Clients, Not Against Them

Companies that implement policies intended to force the customer’s hand will invariably experience customer dissention. Long-term service contracts, for example, often contain hefty termination fees and other fine print provisions stacked against the consumer. If your routine policies make the customer feel like you’ve trapped them or positioned them so you can milk them for fees, they’ll assume you don’t want a working relationship and they’ll likely search for a better alternative.

Jai Satchitanand Friends,

“My classmates bring cellphones to school so I’ll also do that”, “What’s the harm in having late night parties?, My friends generally do that!”….. Is this what we say to our parents these days? Do you know that the company we keep influences us. In today’s fast forward world, one can easily fall into the trap of bad company (Kusang).

What does it mean to be in a bad company?

Whatever takes us on the wrong path is all considered Bad company or Kusang.

How to avoid bad company

What happens when you get into bad company-

• It takes you away from religion

• Bad company is like poison. It affects the mind, intellect, chit and ego and the body.

• The stickiness of bad company is worse than that of TB (tuberculosis). TB only ruins one lifetime, but bad company ruins endless lifetimes.

Precautions and measures to stay away from the bad company-

• Getting right understanding through spiritual books and magazines
• By attending spiritual ‘satsangs’ or kids camps.
• By chanting prayers and aarti which cleanses both the mind and chit.

How to avoid bad company

Friends, do you know that the effect of one year of bad company stays with us for twenty five long years. Therefore you should make sure that you always stay in the company of good people.

Related links-

Puppet Show– Beware of Kusang

Many brokerage houses come up with many researches on the stocks listed on the NSE or BSE that may give good returns in the long run but can you always rely on them ? I totally respect the researches done by the analyst of the brokerage houses as they have more resources and people with them and we should always respect the effort applied by them, but seriously you guys don’t even trust a new barber for cutting your hair, you always go for the same one then how can you invest your hard earned money because someone told you do so right. What I believe is we should read these researches but also do a research from our end to. I will tell you a fundamental parameter that you can look into a company to avoid investing into a fraud or false company.

Operating Cash Flow / Net Profit

When you start analyzing a company the first and foremost fundamental parameter you should always look for is the net profit written on their profit & loss statement and then compare it with operating cash flow. Now what is a operating cash flow?

Operating Cash Flow:-The amount of incoming cash into the company

Now why we should do so ? Why Is it Required ? Lets take a example to understand it.

Suppose a car showroom owner sells a car at Rs 500 to you. Now you as a customer writes a “cheque” to the car showroom owner and tell him to get it cash after 1 month [when your account is credited with your salary] . So what the car showroom owner does is he writes a profit of Rs 500 into his profit & loss statement but did he got the money ? No right !! He will get this profit after 1 month when he converts the cheque into cash but what if the cheque was bounced! or maybe you have done some fraud with company by just paying the down payment of Rs 50 and took a car of worth around Rs 500. This same scenario happens with company also! they will sell the product on credit but sometimes they wont get the cash on the product sold!

So what we understood by this example? We don’t want a company whose profits are only in books rather than actual cash,I mean what is the point in running a business where we don’t get the cash on the product sold! I will show how you can check this by a example.

How to avoid bad companyLets take a look at TATA CHEMICAL profit & loss statement

If you add the Net Profit(5 years) of Tata Chemical it will be around Rs 4,674 crore. Now lets check the operating cash flow of the company which tells us does Tata chemical is receiving this much of amount cash ?

How to avoid bad companyLets take a look on operating cash flow of Tata chemical

If you add these numbers this will be around Rs 5,529.44 crore which is more than the profit shown in the books which tells us that Tata Chemical is somewhat safe to invest in it but that doesn’t mean you should blindly invest in it.This is just a parameter to check whether we should start analyzing the company on fundamental grounds for investment .

Now lets take look on a bad company!

  • How to avoid bad companyLets take a look at LOVABLE LINGERIE profit & loss statement

If you add the numbers the net profit of the company is around Rs 54.22 crore.

How to avoid bad company Lets take a look on operating cash flow of LOVABLE LINGERIE

If you add the numbers, operating cash flow of the company is around Rs 21.25 crores .Is it good? No of course not !! Company is showing it is making a whopping profit of Rs 54.25 crores over the 5 year span of time but it is receiving only Rs 21.25 crores cash against it which is totally wrong. I hope you got my point

So this fundamental analysis on the company will actually save your time also because you won;t consider it further to analyze it.

Many brokerage houses come up with many researches on the stocks listed on the NSE or BSE that may give good returns in the long run but can you always rely on them ? I totally respect the researches done by the analyst of the brokerage houses as they have more resources and people with them and we should always respect the effort applied by them, but seriously you guys don’t even trust a new barber for cutting your hair, you always go for the same one then how can you invest your hard earned money because someone told you do so right. What I believe is we should read these researches but also do a research from our end to. I will tell you a fundamental parameter that you can look into a company to avoid investing into a fraud or false company.

Operating Cash Flow / Net Profit

When you start analyzing a company the first and foremost fundamental parameter you should always look for is the net profit written on their profit & loss statement and then compare it with operating cash flow. Now what is a operating cash flow?

Operating Cash Flow:-The amount of incoming cash into the company

Now why we should do so ? Why Is it Required ? Lets take a example to understand it.

Suppose a car showroom owner sells a car at Rs 500 to you. Now you as a customer writes a “cheque” to the car showroom owner and tell him to get it cash after 1 month [when your account is credited with your salary] . So what the car showroom owner does is he writes a profit of Rs 500 into his profit & loss statement but did he got the money ? No right !! He will get this profit after 1 month when he converts the cheque into cash but what if the cheque was bounced! or maybe you have done some fraud with company by just paying the down payment of Rs 50 and took a car of worth around Rs 500. This same scenario happens with company also! they will sell the product on credit but sometimes they wont get the cash on the product sold!

So what we understood by this example? We don’t want a company whose profits are only in books rather than actual cash,I mean what is the point in running a business where we don’t get the cash on the product sold! I will show how you can check this by a example.

How to avoid bad companyLets take a look at TATA CHEMICAL profit & loss statement

If you add the Net Profit(5 years) of Tata Chemical it will be around Rs 4,674 crore. Now lets check the operating cash flow of the company which tells us does Tata chemical is receiving this much of amount cash ?

How to avoid bad companyLets take a look on operating cash flow of Tata chemical

If you add these numbers this will be around Rs 5,529.44 crore which is more than the profit shown in the books which tells us that Tata Chemical is somewhat safe to invest in it but that doesn’t mean you should blindly invest in it.This is just a parameter to check whether we should start analyzing the company on fundamental grounds for investment .

Now lets take look on a bad company!

  • How to avoid bad companyLets take a look at LOVABLE LINGERIE profit & loss statement

If you add the numbers the net profit of the company is around Rs 54.22 crore.

How to avoid bad company Lets take a look on operating cash flow of LOVABLE LINGERIE

If you add the numbers, operating cash flow of the company is around Rs 21.25 crores .Is it good? No of course not !! Company is showing it is making a whopping profit of Rs 54.25 crores over the 5 year span of time but it is receiving only Rs 21.25 crores cash against it which is totally wrong. I hope you got my point

So this fundamental analysis on the company will actually save your time also because you won;t consider it further to analyze it.