How to avoid getting shot by a police officer

  • Polls
  • Election 2014
  • Election 2016
  • Video
  • Changing Lanes
  • Writers
  • Cartoons
  • Links
  • Events
  • More
  • Newsletters
  • Photos
  • Twitter
  • Policy
  • Markets
  • World
  • Defense
  • Science
  • Tech
  • History
  • Religion
  • Sports
  • Education
  • Energy
  • Books
  • Latest Polls
  • Obama Job Approval
  • Senate 2014
  • Governors 2014
  • 2014 Generic Ballot
  • Health Care Law
  • Election 2016
  • Dem Nomination
  • GOP Nomination
  • RCP Election 2014
  • Battle for Congress
  • Senate Map
  • House Map
  • Governor Map
  • Campaign Ads
  • Election Calendar
  • Latest 2014 Polls
  • RCP Election 2016
  • Latest 2016 Polls
  • Democratic Nomination
  • Republican Nomination
  • Early Primary State Polls
  • General Election Match-Ups
  • Tom Bevan
  • Carl M. Cannon
  • Lou Cannon
  • Scott Conroy
  • Caitlin Huey-Burns
  • Adam O’Neal
  • Mark Salter
  • Alexis Simendinger
  • Sean Trende
  • Heather Wilhelm
  • Cathy Young
  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Columnists & Blogs
  • Electronic Media
  • Twitter
  • Newsletters
  • Photos

It’s Easy to Avoid Getting Shot by the Police

By Sunil Dutta, Washington Post – August 20, 2014

How to avoid getting shot by a police officer

A teenager is fatally shot by a police officer; the police are accused of being bloodthirsty, trigger-happy murderers; riots erupt. This, we are led to believe, is the way of things in America.

How to avoid getting shot by a police officer

We all know there are numerous ways in life to be arrested, however, by using common sense and removing yourself from compromising situations you can easily avoid the hassle of being arrested. AboutBail provides a list of ten simple ways to avoid arrest.

By simply following the list below, you could avoid arrest. Additionally, you could be spared paying legal fees to attorneys or bail bond agents, the loss of time on your job, or even loss of your job. Here are 10 ways to avoid arrest:

  1. Driving: Never drink and drive. By getting a cab or a designated driver at the end of the night, you will never have to risk being pulled over and receiving a DUI, or worse getting into an accident and possibly taking some one’s life. Also, don’t leave any illegal items in your car in case of being pulled over and having your car impounded; this can be costly and also rack up multiple charges in your name.
  2. Stay at Home: If you know ahead of time that there may be a disturbance or volatile situation at a location you are thinking of going – don’t. By staying at home, there is more than a good chance that you will not be arrested. If there is suspicion that something bad may occur, just simply stay and enjoy a nice relaxing evening at home. In the morning, you might thank yourself for making the right decision.
  3. Weapons: Avoid being arrested by knowing what laws your state has in place for possessing a weapon. Make sure you register all guns and weapons in your name while following the proper procedures. Also, make sure you understand the laws in your state regarding carrying a weapon. Many states have different definitions of what constitutes a weapon, and researching laws and regulations for specific weapons can save you some time in the court room.
  4. Warrants: Make sure you pay all fines and show up to any court dates associated with a ticket issued in your name. Once you have been charged with a crime or offense, make sure to follow through with the appropriate steps required of you. By avoiding or ignoring a ticket or payment towards an offense, a warrant for your arrest may be issued. Never ignore these, they won’t ever go away and they will always get worse with time.
  5. Drinking: When drinking publicly, make sure you are in control of the situation. The police hate to deal with sloppy, obnoxious drunks who are causing a disturbance. If you have been drinking and are in a public place, do not get involved with any disturbance or argument around you. Being unruly while drunk will only get you a quick trip to the drunk tank for the night, or a charge for a crime that could have easily been avoided in the first place.
  6. Drugs: Keep all prescription drugs in the proper container they were dispensed in. Do not mix or consolidate different medications within one container; by doing this it will only create more suspicion on the police officer’s part, and cause you a bigger headache. Next, traffic violations with drugs involved is never a good idea. Make sure you know what is being held in your car at all times, because even a passenger carrying substances can result in multiple fines and trouble with the law.
  7. Resisting Arrest: Never get physical with a police officer! This will always get you in trouble and more than likely multiple offenses that were not necessary in the first place. By resisting arrest, police are only going to make the process more difficult for you to get through. If you are arrested and don’t agree with the terms of your arrest, always go through the proper channels at the police station to file a complaint against an officer.
  8. Speeding/Minor Traffic Infractions: By simply going the speed limit and following traffic laws, a large majority of crimes and infractions can be avoided. Many police will find crimes being committed only because they were pulled over for running a red light or stop sign. To avoid being arrested or gaining more charges, just follow traffic laws.
  9. Don’t Steal: Shoplifting is a surefire way to be put behind bars. Today, many stores and businesses have advanced security measures in order to prevent merchandise loss. If you cannot afford a specific item at a particular time, stop and think about if you really need it or if you are putting yourself and your life at risk. Stealing even the smallest item in a store can cost you time and money that you didn’t have in the first place.
  10. Use Common Sense: If you are ever in a situation where you feel something is not right, or something wrong is taking place, walk away. By simply removing yourself from these situations, you can save yourself money, pride, time and embarrassment. Always be respectful to police and others that have control of the law. You never know when these situations will happen, but when they do make sure you are in control and know how to react in an appropriate way.

Find a Trusted Bail Agent

If you need to hire a bail agent, you can search throughout the United States for a pre-screened bail agent with AboutBail’s trusted network.

How Bail Works

How to avoid getting shot by a police officer

Watch our video above for an explanation of the bail bond process. Learn more about how bail works.

entertainment that informs

How to avoid getting shot by a police officer

Video of a black man shot by police is once again going viral.

However, this time the man lived to tell his own story and it demonstrates how difficult it can be to avoid being shot by police.

Police were called to a Miami street about a man threatening suicide. NPR reports that when they arrived they found Kinsey, a special needs worker, who was attempting to care for the man. The cellphone video of the incident starts with Kinsey, who is black, on the ground next to the autistic man.

How to avoid getting shot by a police officerHilton Napoleon – facebook.com

Kinsey identifies himself, and tells the police “all he has is a toy truck in his hand,” seemingly to prevent the police from thinking his client has a weapon.

Off camera, Kinsey is shot three times by police in the leg, and when the video starts again he is on the ground handcuffed. Kinsey was unarmed.

How to avoid getting shot by a police officerHilton Napoleon – facebook.com

The witness shooting the video can be heard questioning why the police would shoot Kinsey.

“He’s like ‘please don’t shoot me,'” said the witness. “But why they shot the black boy and not the fat boy?”

Kinsey is recovering from non-life threatening injuries. In the hospital, Kinsey told Miami fox affiliate WSVN that the officer told him he didn’t know why he fired.

“It was so surprising,” Kinsey said told WSVN. “It was like a mosquito bite, and when it hit me, I’m like, ‘I still got my hands in the air, and I said, ‘No, I just got shot! And I’m saying, ‘Sir, why did you shoot me?’ and his words to me, he said, ‘I don’t know.’”

ATTN: asked a retired Lt. Commander Diane Goldstein, a 20-year-veteran of the Redondo Beach Police Department, what Kinsey could have done to avoid being shot.

Based on the video, Goldstein says the answer is nothing.

“You know what I don’t have an answer,” she said. “This guy identified himself and had his hands up. I don’t know.”

Initially Goldstein thought that it could have been an accidental shooting, but after learning Kinsey was shot three times in the leg she asserted “there’s no way in hell this is an accident.”

Goldstein said there’s some important questions that should be asked.

“How much time this officer had? Was he adequately trained?” she said. “Lack of training, lack of deescalation tactics and this horrific fear that is pervading law enforcement right now could be a factor.”

If You Don’t Want Police To Shoot You, Don’t Resist Arrest

It saddens me that what little is left of the black civil rights movement is spent defending thugs, hustlers, drug dealers, and troublemakers such as Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Freddie Gray, Alton Sterling, and Philando Castile. Can you believe we’ve gone from honorable causes like fighting for the right of black people to attend college to defending black criminals who foolishly mouth off against, run away from, and fight with the police; police who are putting their lives on the line to protect us from criminals?

Can’t the protestors at least defend young black men of honor, quiet heroes going against the grain by wearing their pants around their waist; refusing thuggery, weed-smoking, and hustling; those who marry one woman, have all their kids with that one woman, proactively raise those kids to be successful, productive citizens, and love only their wife and no other woman; those who work an honest job with integrity, intensity, and discipline, no matter how menial the work? (Note: selling illegal cigarettes on the street or bootleg CDs on the corner doesn’t count as honest work!)

If a protest were held against the oppression of such young black men, I’d be the first to join in. Yet every time I hear of a black man being killed by the cops, he’s not the man I just described. He’s almost always a criminal thug I have no desire to defend. Hardly our best, and hardly what Dr. King died for.

It’s Easier to Blame Everyone But Yourself

You see, unlike those men recently shot, I do not fear for my life from the police. Quite the contrary, my life is made safer by the police who stand between me and people like Sterling, who is much more likely to break into my car or stick me up at night compared to any harm that might come to me from a police officer. The fact is, the police are not shooting black men like me. Why? Because I am not a criminal, and when the police stop me, I politely do what they say, and they leave me alone. I do not run away, fight back, or mouth off. It’s really pretty simple.

Why is no one asking how these men’s families and communities failed them so badly that they became criminals or thugs? If you look up “tough” in the dictionary, my grandmother’s picture will come up. If you were raised under her and acted up, after she got done with you you’d wish the police had gotten to you first. I’m glad my father was raised in such an environment. Discipline happens in the home, and it starts early. When it doesn’t, the police are left to clean up the mess of deeply broken human beings who were already doomed before their first interaction with the law. It’s totally unfair to ask the police to treat hardened criminals with kid gloves.

How did we get here? The Welfare Industrial Complex has produced generational government dependence that has devastated black families and communities and created the criminal underclass of black thugs the police are killing today. I wonder what Black Lives Matter has to say about that? Will they unequivocally call for an end to the welfare, food stamps, and government subsidized housing that have replaced the black father, and thus return the role of family provider to the black man where it belongs, not the government?

Will they call for a complete end to illegal immigration and to burdensome regulations and taxes that make hiring Americans too expensive? After all, these things reduce wages, increase unemployment, and harm the ability of young black men to get jobs that provide for a family. My guess: don’t hold your breath. It’s just so much easier to blame the police, white privilege, and institutionalized racism.

Yet amid all the hype, let us not lose sight of reality: No matter how much the media attempts to stir up racial strife, the fact is about 70 black people are killed by other black folks for every one killed by a white police officer. White police killings of black people are simply a non-issue compared to what black people do to each other, unfortunately.

So no, despite the prevailing atmosphere of hysteria, I’m not afraid of being killed by the police. Quite the contrary: sadly, the data shows I’m much more likely to be victimized by a fellow black man than by a white police officer. So may the police remain sharp, aggressive, and strike fear into criminals so the good people don’t become victims.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

Dale Carson is a defense attorney in Jacksonville, Florida, as well as an alumnus of the Miami-Dade Police Department and the FBI. So he knows a thing or two about how cops determine who to hassle, and what all of us can do to not be one of those people. Carson has distilled his tips into a book titled Arrest-Proof Yourself, now in its second edition. It is a legitimately scary book—369 pages of insight on the many ways police officers profile and harass the people on their beat in an effort to rack up as many arrests as possible.

“Law enforcement officers now are part of the revenue gathering system,” Carson tells me in a phone interview. “The ranks of cops are young and competitive, they’re in competition with one another and intra-departmentally. It becomes a game. Policing isn’t about keeping streets safe, it’s about statistical success. The question for them is, Who can put the most people in jail?”

Which would make the question for you and me, how can we stay out of jail? Carson’s book does a pretty good job of explaining—in frank language—how to beat a system that’s increasingly predatory.

Be Invisible to Police

Carson has four golden rules, the first of which is, “If police can’t see you, they can’t arrest you.” The simplest application of this concept is that if you plan on doing something illegal, you should do it in the privacy of your home. Yes, you can be arrested while at home, but you can’t be profiled sitting in your living room, and profiling is what you’re trying to avoid.

The rule extends to activities that are perfectly legal. “In 21st century America,” he writes, “as long as you’re not committing a crime, you should be able to wear the wildest clothes you want, roam the streets when you feel like it, and lean on a light post or hang out at some wild club if it amuses you.” “Should” is the key word. In reality, cops love hassling people who stand out, even though it’s not illegal to, say, have a Buckeyes bumper sticker that looks like a pot leaf. If you drive a sports car or a lowrider, you’re more likely to attract a cop’s attention than if you drive, say, a gray Honda Civic. Same goes for clothes, hairstyles, tone and volume of voice. Be boring.

So try to blend in. Beat cops who patrol the same routes day after day are “incredibly attuned to incongruity.” But don’t be too reactive when you see cops. “Police are visual predators,” Carson writes. “Any sudden change in motion, speed, direction or behavior immediately attracts their attention.” That means even if you’re doing something you think might attract a cop’s attention, quickly doing something else will attract even more attention. “Don’t alter the pattern,” Carson advises. “Keep on keeping on.”

Also, if you can help it, don’t go out after dark.

What if I can’t be invisible to police?

If police want to hassle you, they’re going to, even if you’re following the above tips as closely as possible. What then? Every interaction with a police officer entails two contests: One for “psychological dominance” and one for “custody of your body.” Carson advises giving in on the first contest in order to win the second. Is that belittling? Of course. “Being questioned by police is insulting,” Carson writes. “It is, however, less insulting than being arrested. What I’m advising you to do when questioned by police is pocket the insult. This is difficult and emotionally painful.”

Winning the psychological battle requires you to be honest with cops, polite, respectful, and resistant to incitement. “If cops lean into your space and blast you with coffee-and-stale-donut breath, ignore it,” Carson writes. Same goes for if they poke you in the chest or use racial slurs. “If you react, you’ll get busted.” Make eye contact, but don’t smile. “Cops don’t like smiles.” Always tell the truth. “Lying is complicated, telling the truth is simple.”

How to avoid getting shot by a police officer

November 29, 2014

So, I read the grand jury testimony of Dorian Johnson, the buddy of Ferguson’s Michael Brown, and in the spirit of Chris Rock (video NSFW), I discerned from it some lessons that might be useful to people who don’t want to risk being shot by police.

1. Don’t be a lawbreaker or hang out with lawbreakers. “Nobody should ever want to go to jail,” says former jailbird Dorian Johnson (p. 92). Who, despite this, begins his days by smoking pot like other people drink coffee. Smoking pot is illegal in Missouri. He testifies on page 24 that he starts every morning by smoking pot — and later testifies that he and Big Mike (Brown) were headed to the convenience store to buy cigarillos so they could smoke pot together. On pages 174-76, Johnson testifies about his (minor) criminal past, and how he got blamed for being with other kids who stole a package. He doesn’t seem to connect this to the fact that he remained with Big Mike after watching Big Mike steal cigarillos. Trouble follows troublemakers. Stay away from them.

2. When you go to the Kwikee Mart to buy the cigarillos with which to roll your morning blunt, don’t reach across the counter to take what you want. In the normal world of law and order, people don’t have the right to trespass in that way in a store. It is called theft. And don’t use the fact that you are 6’4″ and 300 pounds to bully the much smaller store clerk. (On pp. 84-86, Johnson admits that “Big Mike” stole the cigarillos, and pushed the clerk around, trying to be macho.) Do not be a thief, a thug, or a neighborhood bully, and you dramatically reduce your chances of having a fatal encounter with a police officer.

3. When a police officer tells you to stop walking down the middle of the road, do what he says. This is the most amazing part of Johnson’s testimony. He and Brown were both complete idiots. They were walking down the middle of a road, with traffic going by, and Officer Wilson told them to get back on the sidewalk. Johnson testified (see p. 65) that they told him they would get out of the road “in a minute.” One of the grand jurors asked Johnson why he and Brown didn’t simply obey the officer’s command, given that they were breaking the law by walking in the middle of the road. Johnson said (p. 69) that they did not take the cop seriously, and that they felt disrespected by him (“it was more like, ‘we’re not your kids…’”).

Seriously, they did this. A cop told these two dopes to get out of the road, and they figure that they will take their sweet time doing it, because they didn’t like his attitude.

Do not do this when a police officer gives you a lawful order.

Remember, Johnson was Brown’s friend, and is trying to make Brown look like a complete victim. Yet his testimony makes Mike Brown look like a very poor martyr to police brutality. In his testimony, Johnson says they told the cop that they would get out of the road “in a minute” because they were close to home, but he later says they said nothing to the cop. He says, repeatedly, that they were minding their own business and not doing anything wrong, but he concedes that a theft had just occurred down the street, and his friend Big Mike was the thief.

On pages 106-107, the grand jury is trying to nail down where Big Mike’s hand was when Wilson’s gun went off. Johnson testifies that Big Mike’s right hand (which was struck by the bullet) was out of the car. The physical evidence shows, however, that Big Mike’s arm was inside the car when he was shot in the hand. Johnson also testifies that Wilson shot Big Mike as Big Mike was running away, and hit him in the back. The autopsy showed no shots entering Big Mike from the rear. On pages 158-9, Johnson testifies that Big Mike, having been shot, was “walking towards the officer saying [that he did not have a gun] in an angry manner.”

Everything I’ve said so far is based solely on the grand jury testimony of Dorian Johnson. Ofc. Darren Wilson, in his grand jury testimony (p. 208), says that after Dorian Johnson declined to return to the sidewalk, saying that he and Brown were almost to their destination, he (Wilson) said, “What’s wrong with the sidewalk?” Brown replied, “F–k what you have to say.” It is not a good idea to speak to a police officer in this manner, if you wish to avoid an altercation with him. It is also not a good idea to curse the police officer a second time and slam the door on him as he’s trying to get out of his SUV, nor is it advisable to reach into the cop’s car and punch his face (p. 210). Do not grab the cop’s gun if he draws it, and do not taunt him by telling him he is too much of a pussy to shoot you (p. 214).

None of this means that Wilson was justified in using deadly force against Brown (though if Wilson’s testimony is true and accurate, it seems that way — and there’s nothing in Johnson’s testimony to counter it). And it doesn’t mean that there aren’t big problems with policing in Ferguson. I simply want to say here that the behavior of Brown and Johnson on that day is a good example of What Not To Do. Seriously, when a cop tells you to quit walking down the middle of the damn road, you do it. You don’t tell him, “In a minute,” and you certainly don’t curse him. What kind of knuckleheads think this is an appropriate way to respond to police authority? Maybe the deeper problem is a lack of respect for authority, for the law, and for the local community.

People like Dorian Johnson and Michael Brown make neighborhoods worse. Did you know that the convenience store that the Gentle Giant robbed was looted the other night by the same sort of people as Mike Brown? Here’s a clip of the owner standing in the ruins of his store:

about the author

How to avoid getting shot by a police officer

Rod Dreher is a senior editor at The American Conservative. A veteran of three decades of magazine and newspaper journalism, he has also written three New York Times bestsellers—Live Not By Lies, The Benedict Option, and The Little Way of Ruthie Leming— as well as Crunchy Cons and How Dante Can Save Your Life. Dreher lives in Baton Rouge, La.

  • Polls
  • Election 2014
  • Election 2016
  • Video
  • Changing Lanes
  • Writers
  • Cartoons
  • Links
  • Events
  • More
  • Newsletters
  • Photos
  • Twitter
  • Policy
  • Markets
  • World
  • Defense
  • Science
  • Tech
  • History
  • Religion
  • Sports
  • Education
  • Energy
  • Books
  • Latest Polls
  • Obama Job Approval
  • Senate 2014
  • Governors 2014
  • 2014 Generic Ballot
  • Health Care Law
  • Election 2016
  • Dem Nomination
  • GOP Nomination
  • RCP Election 2014
  • Battle for Congress
  • Senate Map
  • House Map
  • Governor Map
  • Campaign Ads
  • Election Calendar
  • Latest 2014 Polls
  • RCP Election 2016
  • Latest 2016 Polls
  • Democratic Nomination
  • Republican Nomination
  • Early Primary State Polls
  • General Election Match-Ups
  • Tom Bevan
  • Carl M. Cannon
  • Lou Cannon
  • Scott Conroy
  • Caitlin Huey-Burns
  • Adam O’Neal
  • Mark Salter
  • Alexis Simendinger
  • Sean Trende
  • Heather Wilhelm
  • Cathy Young
  • Newspapers
  • Magazines
  • Columnists & Blogs
  • Electronic Media
  • Twitter
  • Newsletters
  • Photos

It’s Easy to Avoid Getting Shot by the Police

By Sunil Dutta, Washington Post – August 20, 2014

How to avoid getting shot by a police officer

A teenager is fatally shot by a police officer; the police are accused of being bloodthirsty, trigger-happy murderers; riots erupt. This, we are led to believe, is the way of things in America.

Slager was accused of killing Walter Scott, an unarmed black man, in 2015.

Ex-cop sentenced for shooting death of Walter Scott

— — Former South Carolina police officer Michael Slager was sentenced today to 20 years in prison for the deadly shooting of unarmed black man Walter Scott.

U.S. District Judge David Norton ruled that Slager committed second-degree murder and obstruction of justice, when he shot and killed 50-year-old Scott in 2015. The second-degree murder ruling came with a recommended 19 to 24 year sentence.

At one point during the sentencing Scott’s mother looked the former officer in the eye and told him she forgave him. Families on both sides of the court burst into tears.

One of Walter Scott’s brothers, Rodney Scott, told the court that the death of his brother the worst day of his life. Rodney Scott said he wants Slager to pay for his actions.

Slager’s father, mother, sister and wife also spoke to the judge, begging for a lighter sentence. They talked about how Slager led a life of service and how upset they were after the shooting. Michael Slager’s wife, Jamie Slager, told the judge, “He had to make a decision in a split second. I couldn’t imagine having to make a decision that fast.”

The judge’s decision comes after Michael Slager, who is white, pleaded guilty to a federal civil rights offense.

Michael Slager shot and killed Walter Scott on April 4, 2015, while Slager was an officer with the North Charleston Police Department. Michael Slager claimed self-defense, but witness cellphone video that surfaced shortly after the encounter showed the officer fatally shooting Walter Scott in the back as he ran away. He was fired from the force after the shooting.

Michael Slager was charged in South Carolina with murder and pleaded not guilty. During the state murder trial, Michael Slager’s attorney said his client shot Walter Scott because he was in fear for his life. In 2016, the case ended in a mistrial. The state retrial and federal trial were expected to take place this year, but instead, in May Michael Slager pleaded guilty to violating Walter Scott’s civil rights in federal court, ending the federal case against him and also resolving the state charges that were pending after the mistrial.

Before hearing his sentence in federal court, Michael Slager called each family member out by name and apologized, thanking them for forgiving him. “I wish this never would have happened,” he said. “I wish I could go back to the day and change the events, but I can’t.”

At a news conference after the sentencing, Rodney Scott said his family is “pleased.”

“We got justice,” he said.

He said his family is “thankful for the justice system that worked on our behalf,” but added that “a lot of work” still needs to be done in the justice system.

Another one of Walter Scott’s brothers, Anthony Scott, thanked Feiden Santana, the witness who filmed the shooting, for being “brave” enough to film what he saw.