How to avoid home break ins thefts

Warmer
summer months correlate with increased crime rates nationally and in Somerville.
Residential breaking and enterings are generally elevated from June to October,
as residents leave their windows open during warmer days, place air
conditioning units that can be removed in windows or go on vacation. Meanwhile,
almost half of all bike thefts in Somerville occur from June through August and
almost 70 percent occur from June through September.

This
year, about 85 percent of residential breaking and enterings in Somerville
occur between the afternoon from noon to 6 p.m. and the early evening from 6
p.m. to midnight, evenly split between those two time frames. Ninety percent of
afternoon breaking and enterings occur during a weekday while 55 percent occur
during the weekend, usually on Saturdays. This departs from past trends, as breaking and
enterings historically tend to be afternoon and weekday oriented.

Windows
(46 percent) are currently slightly more popular than doors (40 percent) as an
entry method for home break-ins. Approximately 64 percent of windows and 48
percent of doors were definitively described as “forced” in incident reports.
In the case of windows, this also includes when a screen is cut or pried open
to grant access to an unlocked window; in the case of doors, this includes any
door forced open, including common doors to multi-unit homes that could then
grant access to an unlocked apartment door.

You don’t need to pay a company to protect you from criminals who put their names on your home title. You can protect yourself for free with these steps.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Question: I keep seeing ads for services claiming to protect people from home title fraud or deed theft. Is this even a prevalent problem? Is there an easy way for me to confirm that my title is clean rather than paying for a service?

Answer: In 2008, the FBI identified “house stealing” as the “latest scam on the block.” Since then, it has popped up periodically in cities such as Chicago, Dallas, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York City and Philadelphia. Is it a growing problem? That’s hard to know because the FBI doesn’t break it out separately in its crime statistics. The American Land Title Association doesn’t have data on the problem, either. “I suspect that companies that offer title-monitoring service use that [the claim] as a marketing strategy,” says Jeremy Yohe, vice president of communications at the association.

The scheme works like this: Fraudsters pick out a house—often a second home, rental, vacation home or vacant house—to “steal.” Using personal information gleaned from the internet or elsewhere, they assume your identity or claim to represent you. Armed with forged signatures and fake IDs, they file paperwork with the county’s register of deeds to transfer ownership of your property to themselves or a third party. They then sell the home or borrow against it, stealing your equity. When they fail to make payments on a loan secured by your property, you could end up in foreclosure or be unable to sell, refinance or pass the home on to heirs.

Home Title Lock is one of the services that says it will monitor your home’s deed 24/7 to prevent title fraud; it costs $15 a month ($150 annually, two years for $298). But you can protect yourself—for free—by periodically checking your property record on the website of your county’s register of deeds. Look for deeds that you or your attorney didn’t prepare or sign, or loans you didn’t take out, as well as liens of contractors, subcontractors, real estate brokers or attorneys whose services you didn’t hire, or court filings, says the Cook County (Chicago) recorder of deeds.

Even better, many counties now provide a consumer notification service. Register for free, and you’ll quickly receive an e-mail or text any time a document is recorded on your property.

The New York City department of finance advises homeowners to make sure the appropriate authorities have the correct mailing address for you or the person who should receive notices about your property. In your absence from your home, have mail forwarded or ask someone you trust to pick up mail or visit your home. Visit a vacant house periodically to ensure that no one has taken up residence illegally.

You may get clues when title fraud occurs: You stop receiving your water bill or property tax assessment or bill, for example. Utility bills on a vacant property rise suddenly, or you find people living there. You stop receiving your tenants’ rent payments and learn that they’ve been making the payments to another person and location. You receive payment books or other information from a lender with whom you haven’t done business. Or you find yourself in default on a loan or notified of foreclosure proceedings.

If you experience or find something amiss, notify the register of deeds and local law enforcement. In New York City, for example, homeowners who think they are victims of deed fraud are urged to act quickly to report fraud to the city’s sheriff, get a certified copy of the fraudulent document from the city register’s office, report the crime to the district attorney’s office in the borough where the property is located, and consult an attorney to help confirm ownership of the property. (Legal action known as “quieting the title” may be required to resolve any questions about your ownership of the property.)

Updated Mar 2, 2020

8 Burglary Deterrents to Protect Yourself from Burglars

If crime prevention is at the top of your to-do list, you’re not alone. By deterring burglars, you’re ensuring you don’t have to live through the sense of violation and the financial losses a theft can cause. Getting started is easier than you might think.

1. Home security system

Do you know what most of these items have in common? They can be included in a comprehensive home security system that will keep your home safe and secure. By combining some or all of these security measures, you’ll give yourself the perfect, custom home security system to suit your safety needs. Home security systems provide around-the-clock protection, and they connect your home with experts who can step in when something unexpected happens. Alarms can also be exceptional crime-deterrent tools, so they may make a criminal pass right by your home.

2. Get a dog

There’s much debate as to whether or not a dog can deter a burglar, but we’re of the mindset that they can, especially if they are loud. A barking dog is often enough to scare away a potential burglar.

3. Have your neighbors check on things while you’re away

If you live in a tight-knit community and you know your neighbors well, they can be part of your security team. Unfortunately, there are signs burglars look for to see if you’re away. When you’re asleep or out of town, they might notice suspicious activity around your home and notify the authorities. To help stifle this opportunity, it’s a good idea to have your neighbors keep a watchful eye while you’re gone. You should also have them grab your mail.

4. Secure your windows

Windows are almost as popular as doors when it comes to burglary entry points. The harder it is for someone to get their hands on your things, the more likely it is that the burglary will stop. There are numerous things you can do to make it harder for someone to get inside. Make sure yours are locked down and consider adding break proof laminate or motion sensors on your windows as well.

5. Motion lights

Motion lights will alert anyone in your home, and even neighbors, to the presence of a burglar. The last thing a burglar wants is attention, so motion lights may be enough to make them change their mind and run away, especially since motion lights are often a sign that further security measures lie within or that someone is home.

6. Smart locks

Smart locks go a step further than the traditional deadbolt, as they allow you to manage your lock remotely through a smartphone app. This ensures that you’re never left wondering whether you locked the door and also will alert you whenever someone enters with your code.

7. Doorbell camera

A video doorbell camera is even a step beyond a smart lock, as it allows you to see who is at your front door through a tiny camera mounted in your doorbell. You will be able to view the video from anywhere. These doorbells alert you when there is motion, suspicious activity and even scheduled items such as the dog walker arriving or your kids getting home from school.

8. Put in a front gate

Something as simple as having a front gate on your property makes it more difficult for a burglar to get close enough to scope things out or gain entry. Since time is of the essence during a burglary, they may skip a house with a gate.

5 Burglary Deterrents to Avoid

While the measures above have been proven to work, here are some fairly common methods that aren’t as reliable.

1. Using an outdated alarm system

Although we love the reliability of the tried-and-tested alarm systems of the past, the technological advancements behind modern alarm systems are simply astounding. Rather than warn you when a crime is already happening, these high-tech solutions stop most crimes from ever taking place.

2. Owning a gun

Having a gun surprisingly does not deter burglars. It may help you feel safe, but a burglar is usually unaware that you own one. This means that your house remains a target.

3. Holding your mail

Some burglars are often familiar with you and your routine, so they will notice if the mail stops being delivered. While it is wise to not let it pile up, it’s a much better option to have a neighbor or housesitter grab it for you.

4. Landscaping and tall shrubs near your windows

Although these have become a fixture of “home security,” many burglars have stated that tall shrubs in front of windows help them more than they keep them away. These shrubs often serve as a place for burglars to hide, allowing them more time to break in.

5. Having a fence in your yard

Likewise, a traditional picket fence often will protect the burglars from view rather than keep them out. You might love a fence for aesthetics or to keep your dog or children in your yard, but do not think of it as an effective security measure. Chain link fences, however, are a better option to deter burglars since they offer more visibility into your yard. There you have it! Eight do’s and five don’ts of home security. As you can see, installing a home security system offers you the best security against an intruder. Make sure you do your homework and find the one that’s best for you.

Protect your home and family with a full security system.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

The first national lockdown failed to prevent two-thirds of burglaries: Top tips to keep your house safe as restrictions ease

  • EXCLUSIVE: Two-thirds of residential burglaries still took place in lockdown
  • The stay at home order clearly did not deter many thieves
  • Overall, the average cost of stolen goods cost households £2,856 each

By Grace Gausden For This Is Money

Published: 07:52 BST, 3 April 2021 | Updated: 07:52 BST, 3 April 2021

Two-thirds of residential burglaries still took place in the first national lockdown in 2020, despite people being ordered to stay at home

Despite households spending significantly more time at home, this did not deterred burglars as much as might be expected with burglaries only reducing by a third compared to the same period in 2019, according to data from Compare the Market.

The average cost of stolen goods in home burglaries reached £2,856, the comparison site’s analysis of Office of National Statistics information shows.

There are now fears that even more burglaries will be committed this year as restrictions ease again.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Two-thirds of residential burglaries still took place in the first national lockdown in 2020

While homes were occupied for more of the time, it is likely a portion of the burglaries occurred in second homes or holiday lets that were left unoccupied for a length of time.

The research also found 69 per cent of car thefts and 76 per cent of bicycle thefts also still occurred when compared to the previous year.

When it comes to home security and preventative measures, only 25 per cent of UK households have a burglar alarm fitted in their home, while 18 per cent do not have any window locks fitted.

Typically, 35 per cent of households look to insure items worth £1,500 or more as part of their home insurance policy.

Chris King, head of home insurance, at Compare the Market said: ‘At a time when many of us are cooped up – it’s reasonable to assume that lockdown would significantly reduce the likelihood of being burgled.

‘However, the unfortunate reality is that the threat of burglary remains real in lockdown. These crimes are highly opportunistic, with independent data showing that even before lockdown, 60 per cent of burglaries took place when someone was at home.

‘Fortunately, there are some preventative steps that people can take. Alarms, security cameras and window locks can be installed. Even when at home, individuals should secure unoccupied rooms by closing windows and ensuring valuables are not on show to anyone walking by.’

Customers who do not have a home contents insurance policy costs are encouraged to purchase one, as the average cover costs just £68 a year and could give you the peace of mind that you are protected if the worst happens.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

35% of homes look to insure items worth £1,500 or more as part of their home insurance policy

How you can protect your home

This is Money and Compare the Market have compiled a list of top tips to help you secure your home.

These will be especially important as more people leave the house to travel to work or for leisure purposes.

1) Invest in a safe: The items most likely to be stolen in a burglary are wallets, purses, cash and cards are all things that fit in a safe. A safe could be a good investment, and far more secure than hiding possessions in predictable places like drawers.

2) Improve door and window locks: Make sure you have secure locks and consider which type of lock would be the best for your home. Consider adding hinge bolts to protect that side of the door from force too.

Contact the Master Locksmith Association for advice and be sure to let your insurance provider know if you do decide to change your locks.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

3) Secure sheds and garages: Think about what you have stored in your garage and ensure you’ve secured it properly. Items such as garden tools can be attractive to thieves – plus the Metropolitan Police warn that thieves will often go to your shed first to find tools to break into your home.

4) Install security cameras: If you want to add an extra level of security to your home, security cameras are a great way of monitoring activity, alerting you to any suspicious goings-on and even pre-empting break-ins.

5) Join a neighbourhood watch: Create or join a Neighbourhood Watch scheme with your neighbours. Around 2.3million households across the UK are already involved. Take turns to keep an eye on each other’s properties while on holiday.

Visit the Neighbourhood Watch Association to find a local scheme or for advice on setting up your own. Joining a scheme can not only help keep your home safe – it may reduce the cost of your home insurance.

6) Install a home alarm: Invest in a security system. Unmonitored alarms act as an alert rather than being connected to call centres.

They react when tripped and can alert people in the local area of suspicious activity – which is especially useful if you’re in a Neighbourhood Watch scheme.

7) Install outside lights: Consider adding some security lights outside for when it gets dark in the evenings or early mornings. Movement-sensitive lights will help deter thieves but won’t disturb neighbours unduly.

Compare home insurance, car insurance and travel insurance

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Beat the renewal blues and compare the best deals for home insurance, car insurance, travel insurance as well as pet, motorbike and van insurance with This is Money’s partner, Compare the Market.

Could you save hundreds of pounds a year? Use the tool to check.

>> Check to see if you can start saving money now

Share or comment on this article:

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.

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How to avoid home break ins thefts

Your home is your shelter and that is why is it so important to secure your home from intruders.

After all, when one thinks of what a shelter is, a safe and secure place comes to mind.

If there is a storm raging outside, we take cover at home.

If there is a hurricane approaching, we may hole up inside our house and try to ride it out.

Whatever the case may be, your home is supposed to be a safe place.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Secure Your Home From Intruders Before You Need To

While it is true that intruders might break into your home for any number of reasons, a crisis situation is an ideal time for criminals to strike.

Law enforcement will be have their hands full dealing with a large number of emergencies and criminals will take advantage of this.

Whenever law enforcement is short-handed, criminals see an opportune time to rob or even harm people.

It is up to you to secure your home and make it extremely difficult to break into.

Types Of Crisis Situations That Make Securing Your Home Necessary

There are many different types of crises.

Not every crisis is due to a natural disaster.

Terrorist attacks, heat waves, riots, pandemics, air pollution, blackouts and other threats while not as devastating as tornadoes are crisis situations where crime can thrive.

In fact, criminals will be more brazen during these times, especially if they believe there is no risk of them being blown away by strong winds, getting struck by lightning or getting caught.

How To Secure Your Home From Intruders

Just implementing these tips will help secure your home from intruders.

  • Keep all doors locked.
  • Have window bars installed so that intruders cannot get in.
  • You might wish to install burglarproof windows with unbreakable glass.
  • If you have a ladder outside your house, store it in the garage or use brackets and a lock to secure it to the wall.
  • Do not hide a spare key under your welcome mat or flower pot (affiliate link) . This is the first place intruders look.
  • If you have a dog flap in your door, board it up with a plank of wood and nails or screws. Better yet, remove it and put a new steel door on your home.
  • When you are not at home at night, always leave a lamp on in one or two rooms. Use a timer to turn it on and off. This will make potential intruders think that there are people at home.
  • Try not to have a lot of plants or shrubs around your home. This provides cover for criminals. There could always be someone hiding close-by waiting for you to return home so that they can force their way into your house when you open the door to enter.
  • If you are all alone at home and you see people around outside that don’t belong there or are acting suspicious, immediately check to see if all doors and windows are locked. Turn on the TV as loud as you can. This will draw attention from the neighbors and thieves will not want to be near such a noisy house.
  • Install an alarm system for your house. In case, intruders do manage to break in, the police will be alerted.
  • A video doorbell, such as the Ring Doorbell (affiliate link) is a great option.
  • Having motion sensors which trigger floodlights (affiliate link) outside your home is a great idea. Anybody sneaking around in the middle of the night will get a rude surprise when they have more floodlights (affiliate link) on them than a Broadway musical. It will send them running for cover. Many flood lights these days also have cameras on them that send the videos they record to the cloud or a device. Choose one these types of floodlights (affiliate link) if possible.
  • Do not hang your keys on a key rack in open view of everyone. Anyone who peeps into your window will be able to see it and start their devious plans.
  • Last but not least, have a firearm like a 12-gauge shotgun or a Glock that you can use in an emergency. Just the sound of you racking a shotgun might make the potential intruders think twice about breaking in. They are usually looking for easy pickings and they don’t want to get shot.
  • Should they do break in, assess the situation and your safety immediately. If there is more than one intruder, fire a shot at one of them and the rest should run for their lives.
  • Do not hesitate too long or try to talk things over. You will just be giving them time to get organized or gang up on you. Fire fast and accurately. Decisiveness is everything when it comes to surviving a potentially threatening or even deadly situation.
  • Replace the screws in your exterior door hinges with ones that are at least three inches long. This makes it harder for someone to break in.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Keeping Your Home Safe Is Necessary

Follow the tips in this article and keep you home as safe as possible at all times.

Never be complacent or think that it won’t happen to you.

Remember that while securing your home to prevent break-ins is essential for everyday safety.

You never know when a serious situation might happen in your area, with no warning.

A riot is a great example of this.

As a prepper, you have to be ready for anything.

Discover your home’s vulnerable spots before you go away on vacation, and learn how to prevent burglaries for less than $250

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Where Break-Ins Happen

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Illustration by Sean McCabe

Before you head out for that hard-earned trip to the shore or mountains, take a moment to batten down the hatches at home. Summertime is peak season for house thefts, according to the Burglary Prevention Council, which keeps statistics

on where intruders break in. The good news: You don’t need an expensive high-tech alarm system. A few well-placed (and well-priced) locks and security devices will do the trick.

Front Door: 34% of Break-Ins

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Illustration by Sean McCabe

Most break-ins occur here, so invest in a solid, pick-resistant deadbolt lock (and remember to lock it!). An added step: Keep your outdoor entry light on a timer so it illuminates your house at night.

First-Floor Windows: 23% of Break-Ins

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Illustration by Sean McCabe

You’ll need sash locks, of course, but easy-to-reach windows

should get double protection. This wireless alarm system sounds off every time a window is opened to scare away would-be intruders.

GE Wireless Alarm System kit with 3 battery-operated alarms, $30; Jasco Products

Side Entry: 22% of Break-Ins

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Illustration by Sean McCabe

If you have sliding

glass doors, install a solid metal jammer that folds

up when not in use to keep them from being lifted off their tracks.

Adjustable Security Bar,

Garage: 9% of Break-Ins

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Illustration by Sean McCabe

A side-mounted indoor lock may be a tad inconvenient, but it offers extra security in case a burglar bypasses your elec­tronic garage-door opener.

Basement: 4% of Break-Ins

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Illustration by Sean McCabe

Motion-activated security lights near grade-level windows or entrances give prowlers nowhere to hide.

GE Wireless SmartHome Outdoor Motion Sensor Kit, $35; Jasco Products

Second Floor: 2% of Break-Ins

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Illustration by Sean McCabe

It’s easy to overlook areas that are high off the ground. Make sure all your windows have sash locks, which come in many different styles.

Cast Iron Sash Window Lock, $12; House of Antique Hardware

How Home Security Signs Can Help Prevent Break-Ins

You can pay thousands of dollars a year for a pricey home alarm system, but protecting your family from burglars can be simpler than you think with security signs.

How to avoid home break ins theftsEvery 90 seconds, a residential break-in takes place somewhere in Canada. More than 80 per cent of break-ins occur during daylight hours but most burglaries are a crime of opportunity. Thieves and vandals look for easy targets to make a quick buck.

Security signs
If you can create the perception of security, it can increase your home’s overall security.

  • Visual signs of security, such a video surveillance, alarm systems in a home, or an anti-theft system in a car, can send a strong message to potential thieves and vandals.
  • A simple security sign will go a long way to deter a break-in.
  • When burglars see the security sign out front or in your car, it reduces the odds they’ll choose your house to rob. Instead, they’ll find an easier target.
  • Even if a thief does break in, if they think your house has a security system in place, they will often steal less and leave your property faster.

So the easiest way to reduce your home’s risk of a break-in — place security signs or stickers by any entrances to your home, in your car, and post security signs in your front and back gardens.

Here are some of the most common types of security signs you can use.

  1. Property monitored by a video camera – No burglar or vandal wants to be captured on film.
  2. Security system sign – It doesn’t matter which home security company you choose, if their security sign is posted by your front door, your chances of getting robbed are greatly reduced.
  3. Guard dog – The last thing a burglar wants to run into is an angry dog ready to defend his home.
  4. Alarm system sign – Many burglars will be deterred by the prospect of a loud sound calling attention to your home.
  5. Your home’s safety – Simply hanging a security sign in the window of your home or car is an effective way to reduce your risk of a break-in or damage to your property, but it is not a substitute for a real security system.

If you are worried about your home’s safety, talk to a security specialist about which system could be the best fit for your family’s needs and budget.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

The first national lockdown failed to prevent two-thirds of burglaries: Top tips to keep your house safe as restrictions ease

  • EXCLUSIVE: Two-thirds of residential burglaries still took place in lockdown
  • The stay at home order clearly did not deter many thieves
  • Overall, the average cost of stolen goods cost households £2,856 each

By Grace Gausden For This Is Money

Published: 07:52 BST, 3 April 2021 | Updated: 07:52 BST, 3 April 2021

Two-thirds of residential burglaries still took place in the first national lockdown in 2020, despite people being ordered to stay at home

Despite households spending significantly more time at home, this did not deterred burglars as much as might be expected with burglaries only reducing by a third compared to the same period in 2019, according to data from Compare the Market.

The average cost of stolen goods in home burglaries reached £2,856, the comparison site’s analysis of Office of National Statistics information shows.

There are now fears that even more burglaries will be committed this year as restrictions ease again.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Two-thirds of residential burglaries still took place in the first national lockdown in 2020

While homes were occupied for more of the time, it is likely a portion of the burglaries occurred in second homes or holiday lets that were left unoccupied for a length of time.

The research also found 69 per cent of car thefts and 76 per cent of bicycle thefts also still occurred when compared to the previous year.

When it comes to home security and preventative measures, only 25 per cent of UK households have a burglar alarm fitted in their home, while 18 per cent do not have any window locks fitted.

Typically, 35 per cent of households look to insure items worth £1,500 or more as part of their home insurance policy.

Chris King, head of home insurance, at Compare the Market said: ‘At a time when many of us are cooped up – it’s reasonable to assume that lockdown would significantly reduce the likelihood of being burgled.

‘However, the unfortunate reality is that the threat of burglary remains real in lockdown. These crimes are highly opportunistic, with independent data showing that even before lockdown, 60 per cent of burglaries took place when someone was at home.

‘Fortunately, there are some preventative steps that people can take. Alarms, security cameras and window locks can be installed. Even when at home, individuals should secure unoccupied rooms by closing windows and ensuring valuables are not on show to anyone walking by.’

Customers who do not have a home contents insurance policy costs are encouraged to purchase one, as the average cover costs just £68 a year and could give you the peace of mind that you are protected if the worst happens.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

35% of homes look to insure items worth £1,500 or more as part of their home insurance policy

How you can protect your home

This is Money and Compare the Market have compiled a list of top tips to help you secure your home.

These will be especially important as more people leave the house to travel to work or for leisure purposes.

1) Invest in a safe: The items most likely to be stolen in a burglary are wallets, purses, cash and cards are all things that fit in a safe. A safe could be a good investment, and far more secure than hiding possessions in predictable places like drawers.

2) Improve door and window locks: Make sure you have secure locks and consider which type of lock would be the best for your home. Consider adding hinge bolts to protect that side of the door from force too.

Contact the Master Locksmith Association for advice and be sure to let your insurance provider know if you do decide to change your locks.

How to avoid home break ins thefts

3) Secure sheds and garages: Think about what you have stored in your garage and ensure you’ve secured it properly. Items such as garden tools can be attractive to thieves – plus the Metropolitan Police warn that thieves will often go to your shed first to find tools to break into your home.

4) Install security cameras: If you want to add an extra level of security to your home, security cameras are a great way of monitoring activity, alerting you to any suspicious goings-on and even pre-empting break-ins.

5) Join a neighbourhood watch: Create or join a Neighbourhood Watch scheme with your neighbours. Around 2.3million households across the UK are already involved. Take turns to keep an eye on each other’s properties while on holiday.

Visit the Neighbourhood Watch Association to find a local scheme or for advice on setting up your own. Joining a scheme can not only help keep your home safe – it may reduce the cost of your home insurance.

6) Install a home alarm: Invest in a security system. Unmonitored alarms act as an alert rather than being connected to call centres.

They react when tripped and can alert people in the local area of suspicious activity – which is especially useful if you’re in a Neighbourhood Watch scheme.

7) Install outside lights: Consider adding some security lights outside for when it gets dark in the evenings or early mornings. Movement-sensitive lights will help deter thieves but won’t disturb neighbours unduly.

Compare home insurance, car insurance and travel insurance

How to avoid home break ins thefts

Beat the renewal blues and compare the best deals for home insurance, car insurance, travel insurance as well as pet, motorbike and van insurance with This is Money’s partner, Compare the Market.

Could you save hundreds of pounds a year? Use the tool to check.

>> Check to see if you can start saving money now

Share or comment on this article:

Some links in this article may be affiliate links. If you click on them we may earn a small commission. That helps us fund This Is Money, and keep it free to use. We do not write articles to promote products. We do not allow any commercial relationship to affect our editorial independence.