How to avoid side effects when using flonase

Generic Name: fluticasone nasal

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on Aug 13, 2020.

Note: This document contains side effect information about fluticasone nasal. Some of the dosage forms listed on this page may not apply to the brand name Flonase.

In Summary

More frequent side effects include: asthma, nausea, vomiting, and epistaxis. See below for a comprehensive list of adverse effects.

For the Consumer

Applies to fluticasone nasal: nasal spray

Side effects requiring immediate medical attention

Along with its needed effects, fluticasone nasal (the active ingredient contained in Flonase) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking fluticasone nasal:

More common

  • Bloody nose
  • cough
  • fever
  • headache
  • muscle aches
  • pain or tenderness around the eyes and cheekbones
  • sore throat
  • stuffy or runny nose
  • tightness of the chest
  • troubled breathing
  • unusual tiredness or weakness

Less common

  • Blurred vision
  • change in vision
  • loss of vision

Incidence not known

  • Difficulty with swallowing
  • dizziness
  • fast heartbeat
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, or sex organs
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips, or tongue
  • redness of the skin
  • skin rash, itching, hives or welts

Side effects not requiring immediate medical attention

Some side effects of fluticasone nasal may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects.

Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

Less common

  • Back pain
  • dizziness
  • pain in the mouth and nose
  • stomach discomfort
  • toothache
  • weight increased

For Healthcare Professionals

Applies to fluticasone nasal: nasal spray

Endocrine

Frequency not reported: Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis effects (including growth reduction) [Ref]

Nervous system

Common (1% to 10%): Headache, unpleasant taste, unpleasant smell [Ref]

Gastrointestinal

Common (1% to 10%): Toothache, nausea, diarrhea, abdominal distension, vomiting, gastrointestinal gaseous symptoms

Frequency not reported: Gum signs and symptoms [Ref]

Hypersensitivity

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Hypersensitivity reactions (including anaphylaxis, angioedema, rash, urticaria, bronchospasm) [Ref]

Ocular

Very rare (less than 0.01%): Cataracts, glaucoma, raised intraocular pressure

Frequency not reported: Transient ocular changes [Ref]

Immunologic

Frequency not reported: Candida albicans infection, immunosuppression [Ref]

Respiratory

Very common (10% or more): Nasopharyngitis (26%), epistaxis (20%)

Common (1% to 10%): Pharyngolaryngeal pain, nasal ulceration, cough, pharyngitis, bronchitis, nasal dryness, throat irritation, throat dryness, blood in nasal mucosa, nasal irritation

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Rhinalgia, nasal discomfort (including nasal burning, nasal soreness)

Postmarketing reports: Nasal septal perforation [Ref]

General

The most commonly reported side effects were nasopharyngitis, epistaxis, and pyrexia. [Ref]

Musculoskeletal

Common (1% to 10%): Back pain [Ref]

Other

Very common (10% or more): Pyrexia

Frequency not reported: Impaired wound healing [Ref]

References

1. Cerner Multum, Inc. “Australian Product Information.” O 0

2. Cerner Multum, Inc. “UK Summary of Product Characteristics.” O 0

3. “Product Information. Flonase (fluticasone).” Glaxo Wellcome, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Frequently asked questions

  • Flonase vs Nasacort: What is the difference?
  • Flonase vs Nasonex: What’s the difference?
  • Is Flonase Sensimist the same as Veramyst?
  • What’s the difference between Xhance and Flonase Allergy Relief?

More about Flonase (fluticasone nasal)

  • During Pregnancy
  • Dosage Information
  • Patient Tips
  • Drug Interactions
  • Compare Alternatives
  • Support Group
  • Pricing & Coupons
  • En Español
  • 120 Reviews
  • Drug class: nasal steroids
  • FDA Alerts (1)

Consumer resources

  • Patient Information
  • Flonase Nasal (Advanced Reading)

Other brands Xhance, Veramyst

Professional resources

  • Prescribing Information
  • . +1 more

Related treatment guides

  • Allergic Rhinitis
  • Rhinitis

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Some side effects may not be reported. You may report them to the FDA.

Nasal steroid allergy sprays like FLONASE are different from other types of nasal sprays, like Afrin®, which is only a decongestant. Not only do nasal steroid allergy sprays reduce the swelling in nasal passages, making it easier to breathe through your nose, 1 but they also treat other symptoms, like itchy, watery eyes, sneezing, and runny nose. And before you think a nasal allergy spray will bulk up your nostrils, you can rest easy. FLONASE contains a glucocorticoid—a substance produced naturally by your body to help fight inflammation. A glucocorticoid is a kind of steroid that is different from the anabolic (muscle-building) steroids sometimes misused by athletes.

SIDE EFFECTS OF NASAL STEROIDS

It’s important to know that nasal steroids sprays are safe to use for all adults. However, for children, make sure that you use one that’s approved for children age 2 or over.

Some common short-term and long-term side effects that may occur when using intranasal steroid sprays like FLONASE allergy relief nasal sprays, include:

  • Burning
  • Dryness
  • Crusting
  • Other irritation inside the nose

Other possible side effects of FLONASE include:

  • Occasional nosebleeds
  • Nasal whistling
  • Headaches

Make sure you (or your child) uses the spray exactly as prescribed to avoid side effects.

If you experience symptoms while using our family of FLONASE products that resemble an allergic reaction such as rash, swelling of the face or tongue, wheezing, or feeling faint, stop using FLONASE and see a doctor. If you have questions or concerns about symptoms or trouble using the medication, it is best to call your doctor.

PRECAUTIONS

To help prevent local side effects from FLONASE allergy relief nasal sprays, it’s best to spray only the recommended number of sprays in each nostril and aim the nozzle toward the outer wall of the nostril. Be sure to blow your nose to clear the passageway and wash your hands before using FLONASE. To learn how you can get the most from your FLONASE products, refer to our How to Use guide to ensure you achieve the allergy relief you need.

Learn which FLONASE® product is right for you:

Medication May Also Improve Snoring, Sleep Apnea

  • facebook
  • twitter

Robert Sadaty, MD, is board-certified in internal medicine who specializes in obesity and wound care. He practices in Naples, Florida.

Flonase is a prescription nasal spray, sold under the generic name of fluticasone propionate nasal, that is used most often for the treatment of allergies. It is a topical steroid spray that is available over-the-counter and can help to improve nasal congestion and may be useful to reduce snoring and as an adjunctive treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

How to avoid side effects when using flonase

Flonase is a prescription medication that can be used to treat conditions such as allergic and non-allergic rhinitis. These often lead to nasal congestion, a runny nose, and difficulty breathing through the nose. These difficulties breathing during sleep may result in snoring, upper airway resistance syndrome, or even obstructive sleep apnea. In addition, Flonase can be used to decrease the size of nasal polyps or enlarged turbinates.  

How It Works

Flonase is a corticosteroid nasal spray. It is applied as a squirt into the nostril and the solution helps to decrease inflammation in the tissues of the nose. It is unknown how precisely it works. In general, it acts to reduce chemicals in the body called cytokines. Cytokines are important to the immune system and they may be present and cause inflammation as a result of allergen exposure.  

Who Should Not Use It

Flonase should not be used if you have an open sore, wound, or ulcer within your nose. It may affect the ability of this would to naturally heal. The safety of the medication in pregnancy and lactation is unknown. If you are pregnant or nursing, you should discuss the safety and risks versus benefits with your physician.

There are certain conditions where Flonase should be used with caution or not at all. If you have had recent treatment with other corticosteroid medications, you may not want to use it. In addition, certain eye conditions such as increased intraocular pressure, glaucoma, or cataracts may be a contraindication. If you have an untreated infection, especially with tuberculosis, Flonase should be used with caution. In addition, children should be followed carefully if long-term use occurs.

Flonase has the potential to interact with other medications, so you should review all drugs that you are taking with your doctor if you are using or plan to use Flonase.  

Side Effects

As with any drug, there is the potential for harmful side effects with the use of Flonase. Although you would not be expected to experience most side effects—and would likely not experience any of them—some of the more common that can occur with the use of Flonase include:  

  • Headache
  • Upper respiratory symptoms (like the common cold)
  • Nosebleeds (epistaxis)
  • Nasal burning or irritation
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Cough
  • Diarrhea
  • Stomach pain
  • Bronchitis
  • Dizziness
  • Infection with candida (yeast) in the nose or mouth
  • Nasal septal perforation (a hole in the cartilage separating each side of the nose)
  • Nasal ulcer or sore

Potential Serious Reactions

A severe allergic reaction with difficulty breathing called anaphylaxis may occur with the use of Flonase. With the long-term use of the medication, these more serious side effects may occur more rarely:  

  • Glaucoma
  • Cataracts
  • Suppression of the immune system
  • High cortisol levels
  • Adrenal suppression
  • Growth suppression (in children)

Other Considerations

There are people who should use Flonase with caution or not at all, as noted above. In particular, you should not use Flonase if you have an open sore in your nose. If you are pregnant or nursing, you should discuss the safety and risks versus benefits with your physician.

It is recommended that you have a routine examination of your nose if you use the medicine for more than 2 months.   Children and adolescents should have their growth monitored in long-term use. If you have a history of eye problems, you should have routine eye examinations to ensure no complications develop.

If you have any difficulties with the use of Flonase, you should be in close contact with your prescribing health provider. As it is now available over-the-counter, you may also discuss its use with your pharmacist.

Generic Name(S): fluticasone propionate

View Free Coupon

  • Uses
  • Side Effects
  • Precautions
  • Interactions
  • Overdose
  • Images
  • Reviews (269)

Fluticasone is used to relieve seasonal and year-round allergic and non-allergic nasal symptoms, such as stuffy/runny nose, itching, and sneezing. It can also help relieve allergy eye symptoms such as itchy, watery eyes. This medication belongs to a class of drugs known as corticosteroids. It works in your nose to block the effects of substances that cause allergies (such as pollen, pet dander, dust mites, mold) and to reduce swelling.

How to use Flonase Spray, Suspension

If you are using the over-the-counter product to self-treat, read and follow all directions on the product package before using this medication. If your doctor has prescribed this medication, read the Patient Information Leaflet before you start using fluticasone and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Use this medication in the nose as directed by your doctor or the product package, usually once or twice a day. Do not spray in your eyes.

Gently blow your nose before using this drug. Shake the container gently before each use. Follow the instructions on how to properly prime the bottle if you are using it for the first time or if you have not used it for a week or longer.

The dosage is based on your age, medical condition, and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose or use this drug more often or for longer than directed. Your condition will not improve any faster, and your risk of side effects will increase. You may be directed to start with a higher dose of this drug for the first several days until you have begun to feel better, then decrease your dose. Children may need to use this drug for a shorter amount of time to lower the risk of side effects. If a child is using the over-the-counter product, read the package information to see how long he/she should use it and when you should check with the doctor.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, use it at the same time(s) each day.

Clean the applicator regularly. Keep track of the number of sprays used from the container. Discard the container after you have used the number of sprays on the package label.

This medication does not work right away. You may feel an effect as soon as 12 hours after starting treatment, but it may take several days before you get the full benefit. If your condition does not improve after 1 week, or if it worsens, stop using this medication and consult your doctor or pharmacist. If you think you may have a serious medical problem, get medical help right away.

When it comes to using a nasal spray, doctors say getting comfortable is essential in order to treat your allergies regularly—and effectively. 1,2 One study shows that people who use their spray regularly and correctly are better off during pollen season. 3 Research also shows that when you practice consistently, in time a new behavior can become a routine part of your life. 4

Try the tips below to help make using a nasal spray more comfortable. And take a minute to learn how FLONASE Allergy Relief can provide relief from nasal congestion, plus sneezing, itchy, watery eyes, and runny nose.

How you position your head is important. When your mom gave you nose drops she probably told you to lean your head backwards. Instead, when using FLONASE Allergy Relief, keep your head upright and sniff gently. Leaning back makes the medicine run down your throat—where it can’t do you as much good and may feel uncomfortable. 5

Keep the opposite nostril closed. Gently holding down the nostril you’re not spraying can help you draw the spray into your upper nose more easily. 5

Breathe in easily. As you spray, just inhale gently—that’s all you need to do.

Aim the nozzle away from the middle of the nose. Direct the spray away from the septum—the cartilage dividing the two sides of your nose—and toward the side of your nostril. 5

Breathe out gently through your mouth after each spray. And make sure to spray correctly in both nostrils.

Practice these steps and keep it up for a while, and soon you and your nose will be
on the way to an easier allergy season.

Generic Name(s) : fluticasone propionate

COMMON side effects

If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression i

Sorry, we have no data available. Please contact your doctor or pharmacist.

If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression i

  • throat irritation
  • dryness of the nose
  • nasal passage irritation
  • headache
  • nosebleed

INFREQUENT side effects

If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression i

  • a lesion inside the nose
  • bronchitis
  • hives
  • dizziness

If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression i

  • a sore throat
  • inflammation of the tissue lining the sinuses
  • stuffy nose
  • crusting inside the nose
  • nose pain
  • dry mouth
  • fever
  • taste impairment
  • sneezing
  • cough
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • runny nose

RARE side effects

If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression i

  • a nasal fungal infection due to Candida
  • a throat infection due to Candida fungus
  • a hormone disorder where the body produces high levels of cortisol called Cushing’s syndrome
  • decreased function of the adrenal gland
  • a reduction in the body’s resistance to infection
  • glaucoma, an increased pressure in the eye
  • clouding of the lens of the eye called cataracts
  • perforation of the wall that divides the nose
  • contact dermatitis, a type of skin rash that occurs from contact with an offending substance
  • a skin rash
  • wheezing
  • impaired wound healing
  • a significant type of allergic reaction called anaphylaxis
  • a type of allergic reaction called angioedema

If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression i

  • blurred vision
  • pink eye
  • dry eye
  • flu-like symptoms
  • diarrhea
  • stomach cramps

Free RX Coupon

Save up to 80% on your prescriptions.

Available coupons

Save up to 80% on your prescription with WebMDRx

You Might Also Like

Related Links

  • Who should not take Flonase nasal?
  • Does Flonase nasal interact with other medications?
  • Should I avoid certain foods while taking Flonase nasal?
  • What should I know regarding pregnancy, nursing and administering Flonase nasal to children or the elderly?
  • What conditions does Flonase nasal treat?
  • Common Searches
  • Adderall
  • Celexa
  • Cipro
  • Cymbalta
  • Flexeril
  • Hydrocodone
  • Prilosec
  • Prozac
  • Seroquel
  • Synthroid
  • Tramadol
  • Trazodone
  • Lexapro
  • Lisinopril
  • Mobic
  • Naproxen
  • Neurontin
  • Pradaxa
  • Prednisone
  • Vicodin
  • Warfarin
  • Wellbutrin
  • Xanax
  • Zocor
  • Zoloft

Select a condition to view a list of medication options

Are you currently using Flonase nasal?

This survey is being conducted by the WebMD marketing sciences department.

CONDITIONS OF USE: The information in this database is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of healthcare professionals. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate or effective for you or anyone else. A healthcare professional should be consulted before taking any drug, changing any diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment.

Today on WebMD

Medications That Make You Tired

Common culprits and what you can do.

Pharmacy and Medication Tips

Things to remember when you fill your prescription.

When it comes to using a nasal spray, doctors say getting comfortable is essential in order to treat your allergies regularly—and effectively. 1,2 One study shows that people who use their spray regularly and correctly are better off during pollen season. 3 Research also shows that when you practice consistently, in time a new behavior can become a routine part of your life. 4

Try the tips below to help make using a nasal spray more comfortable. And take a minute to learn how FLONASE Allergy Relief can provide relief from nasal congestion, plus sneezing, itchy, watery eyes, and runny nose.

How you position your head is important. When your mom gave you nose drops she probably told you to lean your head backwards. Instead, when using FLONASE Allergy Relief, keep your head upright and sniff gently. Leaning back makes the medicine run down your throat—where it can’t do you as much good and may feel uncomfortable. 5

Keep the opposite nostril closed. Gently holding down the nostril you’re not spraying can help you draw the spray into your upper nose more easily. 5

Breathe in easily. As you spray, just inhale gently—that’s all you need to do.

Aim the nozzle away from the middle of the nose. Direct the spray away from the septum—the cartilage dividing the two sides of your nose—and toward the side of your nostril. 5

Breathe out gently through your mouth after each spray. And make sure to spray correctly in both nostrils.

Practice these steps and keep it up for a while, and soon you and your nose will be
on the way to an easier allergy season.

home drugs a-z list Claritin(Loratadine) side effects drug center

Find Lowest Prices on Alavert

What Is Claritin?

Claritin (loratadine) is an antihistamine used to treat allergy symptoms. Claritin blocks the action of histamine, a substance in the body that initiates allergic symptoms like itching, sneezing, runny nose, and allergic skin rashes. Claritin is available as a generic drug.

What Are Side Effects of Claritin?

Common side effects of Claritin include:

  • headache,
  • sleepiness,
  • feeling tired,
  • drowsiness,
  • fatigue,
  • nervousness,
  • stomach pain,
  • diarrhea,
  • dry mouth,
  • sore throat,
  • hoarseness,
  • eye redness,
  • blurred vision,
  • nosebleed, or
  • skin rash.

Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Claritin including fast or uneven heart rate, feeling like you might pass out, jaundice (yellowing of your skin or eyes), or seizures (convulsions).

Dosage for Claritin

Claritin is available as a 10 mg tablet, a 5 or 10 mg rapidly-disintegrating tablet, a 10 mg chewable tablet, and a syrup (5 mg per 5 ml). Claritin is taken once a day.

What Drugs, Substances, or Supplements Interact with Claritin?

Drug interactions may occur with certain antibiotics, antifungal medications, and acid-reducing drugs. Warnings may apply to individuals who have asthma, kidney disease, or liver disease. People who have phenylketonuria (PKU) should avoid certain brands of orally disintegrating tablets that may contain aspartame.

Claritin During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Claritin is generally avoided during pregnancy and nursing. Pregnant women may take Claritin only if it is clearly needed. Nursing mothers should consult their doctor before breastfeeding. Claritin should not be used in children younger than 6 years of age unless directed by a doctor. Chewable tablets should not be used in children younger than 2 years of age unless directed by a pediatric doctor.

Additional Information

Our Claritin Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.