How to bake an angel food cake

How do you cook angel food cake in a pan?

Preheat oven to 325 degrees, with rack in lower third but not on bottom shelf. Prepare a 10-inch angel – food – cake pan: Using the pan as your guide, cut a circle from a piece of parchment paper; use it to line bottom of pan. Using a sieve, sift flour and 1/2 cup sugar onto another piece of parchment.

How do you tell an angel food cake is done?

When the surface is golden and springs back when you touch it lightly, the cake is done. Don’t use the toothpick test: it can fool you on an angel food cake. The toothpick can slip right through the porous batter and come out clean even if the cake hasn’t finished baking.

How do you make box angel food cake taste better?

Though quite tasty alone, the cake would be even better topped with fresh berries, a drizzle of chocolate or lemon syrup, or a spoonful of citrus sauce made from orange segments simmered with marmalade and a bit of water. Angel food cake may never knock your socks off, but it also won’t pop your pants button.

Can you cook angel food cake in a regular cake pan?

Use an ungreased 9×5 loaf pan. Instead of a tube pan, I used a standard 9×5 loaf pan. In order for angel food cake to bake properly, you need it to stick to the pan. This ensures the cake rises and won’t fall out of the pan when cooling upside-down.

Can you bake angel food cake in a 9×13 pan?

Angel food cake is traditionally made in a tube pan, but can be made in other pan shapes as well. To bake an angel food cake in a 9×13 pan, be sure to leave the pan completely un-greased. Fill the pan 2/3rds of the way full and bake for about 40 minutes until the crust appears dry and cracked on top.

Why does my angel food cake fall?

A low volume can result from baking at too low of a temperature, too short of cooking time, too little cream of tartar, or the egg whites are not beaten to a stiff peak. An angel food cake may fall out of the pan for several reasons: The oven could be at the wrong temperature or just not baked long enough.

Why does my angel food cake stick to the pan?

Why does angel food cake rise? Angel food cake rises because the batter is able to cling to the pan and climb as it bakes. It is important that any pan you use to bake your angel food cake remain un-greased to allow for this climbing to occur. Do not over beat your egg whites which will cause them to deflate.

How long do you leave angel food cake upside down?

Immediately turn pan upside down onto a heatproof bottle or funnel. Let hang about 2 hours or until cake is completely cool.

Is angel food cake supposed to be sticky?

SARAH SAYS: The outcome of a meringue based recipe, such as an Angel Food Cake made with beaten egg whites and sugar, is dependent on the weather. When you bake the recipe on a dry day the top will be dry and crisp (my favorite part!), but on a humid day it will stay soft and even a little sticky.

Is it healthy to eat angel food cake?

But some desserts, such as angel food cake, are naturally less deadly on the calorie and fat scales, so a full-size portion on occasion won’t wreak havoc on an otherwise healthy diet. Angel food cake gets its lift from beaten egg whites. No egg yolks and no butter mean the cake contains no fat.

Can you make angel food cake without a bundt pan?

Problem is, you really can ‘t make angel food cake without one. But whatever you do, don’t try baking angel food cake in a bundt pan. A bundt pan’s design is usually too intricate for angel food cakes, which must be cut away from the simple tube pans they’re baked in once the cake has cooled.

What is good with angel food cake?

16 Angel Food Cake Toppings Strawberries and Cream. Chocolate Ganache. Lemon Curd and Meringue. Bananas. Fresh Berries. Mocha Ganache. Caramel Macchiato. Cheesecake.

What kind of pan do you use for angel food cake?

Turns out, yes. The standard version is called a Tube Pan, most often found in a 9″ diameter size. Angel food cake is very light, with only beaten egg whites to form the cake structure and hold up the heaviness of the suspended flour.

  • Level: Intermediate
  • Total: 55 min
  • Prep: 20 min
  • Cook: 35 min
  • Yield: 10 to 12 servings
  • Nutrition Info

    Ingredients

    1 3/4 cups sugar

    1/4 teaspoon salt

    1 cup cake flour, sifted

    12 egg whites (the closer to room temperature the better)

    1/3 cup warm water

    1 teaspoon orange extract, or extract of your choice

    1 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar

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    Directions

    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
    2. In a food processor spin sugar about 2 minutes until it is superfine. Sift half of the sugar with the salt the cake flour, setting the remaining sugar aside.
    3. In a large bowl, use a balloon whisk to thoroughly combine egg whites, water, orange extract, and cream of tartar. After 2 minutes, switch to a hand mixer. Slowly sift the reserved sugar, beating continuously at medium speed. Once you have achieved medium peaks, sift enough of the flour mixture in to dust the top of the foam. Using a spatula fold in gently. Continue until all of the flour mixture is incorporated.
    4. Carefully spoon mixture into an ungreased tube pan. Bake for 35 minutes before checking for doneness with a wooden skewer. (When inserted halfway between the inner and outer wall, the skewer should come out dry).
    5. Cool upside down on cooling rack for at least an hour before removing from pan.

    Cook’s Note

    Since they’re easier to separate use the freshest eggs you can get.

    You’re going to feel like MacGyver.

    When the angel food cake cravings hit and there’s not an appropriate pan in sight, you have to get creative. Thankfully, our friends at Epicurious have figured out a way to bake angel food cake without a tube pan (really!) by putting to the test a tip bestowed by the inimitable Mary Berry on an episode of The Great British Baking Show Masterclass. Curious?

    If you want to bake a delicate angel food cake but don’t have one of those signature tube pans, follow the steps below and you’ll be enjoying a slice of heavenly cake in no time at all.

    To put this trick into action, you’ll need a tall, empty aluminum can (think the taller and skinnier 16 oz., not the classic 12 oz.), parchment paper, double-stick tape, dry rice, and a spring-form cake pan.

    First, you’ll need to wrap the parchment paper around the empty can, securing it with a piece of tape. Fill the can half full with the rice, which acts as a weight to keep the can in place in the pan. Place the can in the center of the pan (be sure that it’s not a non-stick pan!). Then cut the parchment paper into a round shape that fits into your pan. Cut into the center of the parchment round, creating a starburst shaped opening that will fit over the aluminum can. Assemble your pan: With the can in the center, place the parchment round into the pan, and slide the starburst-shaped opening over the can. Fill with batter, bake your cake, and voila!

    Head over to Epicurious for the full instructions (and photos!), and you’ll be baking your way to an improvised tube pan in no time.

    WATCH: The Pantry Pound Cake

    How do you bake your angel food cake? Have you ever found yourself with a bowl full of batter and no tube pan in sight?

    Angel food cake is light and airy and deliciously sweet. The perfect angel food cake recipe is also easier to make than you might think for the perfect sponge cake, every time.

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    Angel food cake is light and airy and deliciously sweet. The perfect angel food cake recipe is also easier to make than you might think for the perfect sponge cake, every time.

    How to bake an angel food cake

    Can you make angel food cake in a regular pan?

    Angel food cake is traditionally made in a tube pan, but can be made in other pan shapes as well. To make an angel food cake loaf, use a loaf pan, but only fill the pan 2/3rds of the way full. Also be sure that you leave the pan un-greased. You will still need to cool the cake upside down so find something that will allow you to rest the edges of the pan on to keep the pan upside down.

    How do you bake angel food cake in a 9×13 pan?

    To bake an angel food cake in a 9×13 pan, be sure to leave the pan completely un-greased. Fill the pan 2/3rds of the way full and bake for about 40 minutes until the crust appears dry and cracked on top. Cool the cake upside down by resting the 4 corners of the pan on something of equal heights.

    What is the difference between a sponge cake and angel food cake?

    Angel food cake is a type of sponge cake that uses egg whites only. The combination of egg whites and sugar make for a chewy, sponge-like cake. Other types of sponge cake include Genoise, Biscuit, and Chiffon.

    How to bake an angel food cake

    Why does angel food cake rise?

    Angel food cake rises because the batter is able to cling to the pan and climb as it bakes. It is important that any pan you use to bake your angel food cake remain un-greased to allow for this climbing to occur. Do not over beat your egg whites which will cause them to deflate. You want to beat your egg whites just until stiff peaks form.

    Why do you have to cool angel food cake upside down?

    Angel food cake MUST be cooled inverted, or upside down. Otherwise, the cake will collapse on itself. Tube pans can be balanced on bottles or you can rest the edges against something raised (like books or cutting boards of equal heights). It is important that the cake is inverted immediately after removing from the oven and remain inverted until the cake is completely cooled which will take approximately 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

    If you like this recipe, you may be interested in these other cake recipes:

    Watch the video below where Rachel will walk you through every step of this recipe. Sometimes it helps to have a visual, and we’ve always got you covered with our cooking show. You can find the complete collection of recipes on YouTube, Facebook Watch, or our Facebook Page, or right here on our website with their corresponding recipes.

    You’re going to feel like MacGyver.

    When the angel food cake cravings hit and there’s not an appropriate pan in sight, you have to get creative. Thankfully, our friends at Epicurious have figured out a way to bake angel food cake without a tube pan (really!) by putting to the test a tip bestowed by the inimitable Mary Berry on an episode of The Great British Baking Show Masterclass. Curious?

    If you want to bake a delicate angel food cake but don’t have one of those signature tube pans, follow the steps below and you’ll be enjoying a slice of heavenly cake in no time at all.

    To put this trick into action, you’ll need a tall, empty aluminum can (think the taller and skinnier 16 oz., not the classic 12 oz.), parchment paper, double-stick tape, dry rice, and a spring-form cake pan.

    First, you’ll need to wrap the parchment paper around the empty can, securing it with a piece of tape. Fill the can half full with the rice, which acts as a weight to keep the can in place in the pan. Place the can in the center of the pan (be sure that it’s not a non-stick pan!). Then cut the parchment paper into a round shape that fits into your pan. Cut into the center of the parchment round, creating a starburst shaped opening that will fit over the aluminum can. Assemble your pan: With the can in the center, place the parchment round into the pan, and slide the starburst-shaped opening over the can. Fill with batter, bake your cake, and voila!

    Head over to Epicurious for the full instructions (and photos!), and you’ll be baking your way to an improvised tube pan in no time.

    WATCH: The Pantry Pound Cake

    How do you bake your angel food cake? Have you ever found yourself with a bowl full of batter and no tube pan in sight?

    • Level: Intermediate
    • Total: 55 min
    • Prep: 20 min
    • Cook: 35 min
    • Yield: 10 to 12 servings
    • Nutrition Info

      Ingredients

      1 3/4 cups sugar

      1/4 teaspoon salt

      1 cup cake flour, sifted

      12 egg whites (the closer to room temperature the better)

      1/3 cup warm water

      1 teaspoon orange extract, or extract of your choice

      1 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar

      Add to Shopping List

      Directions

      1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
      2. In a food processor spin sugar about 2 minutes until it is superfine. Sift half of the sugar with the salt the cake flour, setting the remaining sugar aside.
      3. In a large bowl, use a balloon whisk to thoroughly combine egg whites, water, orange extract, and cream of tartar. After 2 minutes, switch to a hand mixer. Slowly sift the reserved sugar, beating continuously at medium speed. Once you have achieved medium peaks, sift enough of the flour mixture in to dust the top of the foam. Using a spatula fold in gently. Continue until all of the flour mixture is incorporated.
      4. Carefully spoon mixture into an ungreased tube pan. Bake for 35 minutes before checking for doneness with a wooden skewer. (When inserted halfway between the inner and outer wall, the skewer should come out dry).
      5. Cool upside down on cooling rack for at least an hour before removing from pan.

      Cook’s Note

      Since they’re easier to separate use the freshest eggs you can get.

      Hi there! I got a request over the weekend to make angel food cake as a baking project and here are the results! Thanks Matt for the suggestion. ? I wanted to make an easy angel food cake that didn’t require a angle food pan — or “>a tube pan — namely because I don’t own one nor do I want to buy one. ? Although if you do have one, this recipe will work just the same in a angel food cake pan. Thus was born this easy angel food cake — in a loaf pan!

      How to bake an angel food cake

      So I did a bit of research on what the best methodology would be to use here and I came across a few different recipes and ideas but the one that stuck with me the most is from Homemade in the Kitchen blog by Carla. Her directions were easy to follow and resulted in a cake that was light and airy — just as angel food should be. I’ve also rounded up some other links for you to take a look at if you’re wanting a different method than what I used:

      Basically the methodology in the actual cake making is the same: beat egg whites until soft peaks, fold in dry ingredients and following baking, allow to cool upside down. It’s more about the actual cake pan than anything.

      How to bake an angel food cake

      I decided to go with a loaf pan, as it is easy to manipulate and i didn’t want a crazy large cake anyway. #quarantine So i hope you enjoy this angel food cake rendition — and remember this cake is fat freeeee, so its totally acceptable to eat it all in one go!

      I hope that satisfies your craving for something light but sweet. See you soon!

      How to bake an angel food cake

      If you want to create pure baking magic, and have an air-raising experience, make an angel food cake. Air, and air alone raises it to cloud-like puffiness. How to manage that? Read on to find out!

      My granny’s magic with egg whites hooked me on angel food cake. As a young boy, I’d stare wide-eyed as she used a mere table fork to attack the gloppy mass in a large platter nestled on her lap. After a few minutes of vigorous beating, the whites turned fluffy and grew in volume. As she sprinkled in sugar and beat with even more vigor, the whites mounted higher and became so stiff that they didn’t budge. I still wonder at how Granny managed to perform her magic time and time again. The sweetness of her feathery light cakes lingered in my mouth then and in my memories now.

      My obsession with light and fluffy angel food cake has not abated with time, and I’ve experimented over and over again, striving to create the lightest, fluffiest cake possible. Now I’d like to share what I’ve discovered with you.

      Angel food cake rises entirely by the air beaten into the whites. And for maximum volume, the eggs should be fresh. Frozen thawed whites or bottled refrigerated egg whites will work, but the height of the baked cake will be compromised. So, buy fresh eggs, preferably organic, and separate the whites from the yolks while the eggs are cold. That way there’s less chance that the yolks will break and contaminate the whites. The whites must be yolk-free or they won’t beat up properly because the fats in the yolk interfere with the formation of air cells by the proteins in the egg whites.

      Egg whites do not need to be at room temperature before beating. In fact, they’ll incorporate more air if they’re on the cool side, about 60 degrees F. Starting with cold eggs, the whites will warm up to this temperature in 30 minutes to an hour in your kitchen.

      How to bake an angel food cakeA stand mixer is a real plus when making angel food cake. But you can also make the whole cake by hand, and I show how to do just that in the following shots. But I’m not as brave as Granny, so I use flat whips instead of a fork. My Granny would have loved one of those!

      As the whites lose their chill in a large wide grease-free bowl—mine is stainless steel— sift and measure the flour, and resift the flour with the salt and half the sugar four or five times to aerate the dry ingredients well.

      Have the cake pan ready, a two-piece aluminum tube pan that is not greased. Do not use a nonstick pan. Mine has three little “feet” that rise upward from the pan. Some pans lack the feet but have an extra long tube. Either one is fine. Just make sure the pan is grease-free, too.

      How to bake an angel food cakeSet an oven rack in the lower third position but do not turn the oven on. I like to bake angel food cakes and other foam cakes in an unpreheated oven. I’ll explain why a bit later.

      Start whipping the whites with slow strokes to break them up. Beat a bit faster until the whites become frothy (Photo #1). The more you beat the whites the more air bubbles form. To make sure the stiffening whites will not collapse on you, add cream of tartar, a white acidic powder, at the frothy stage, before the whites become stiff. The acidity of the cream of tartar firms up the protein coating around the air bubbles and also helps the cake maintain its pure white color.

      Once the whites are beaten to the point where they hold a soft shape (Photo #2), you gradually beat in the remainder of the sugar until the whites form stiff peaks. Here the whites look like an escarpment—nice and thick with peaks that stay put (Photo #3).

      Now beat in the vanilla. At this point, you’re ready to fold in the dry ingredients.

      Sift one-fourth to one-fifth of the dry ingredients over the whites. Cut through the center of the whites with an edge of a large rubber spatula. Rotate the bowl as you go, sweep the spatula across the bottom of the bowl towards you, and bring the spatula up with a mound of whites.

      How to bake an angel food cake
      Work quickly but gently. Repeat with the remaining dry ingredients, folding until the batter looks smooth.

      When the batter is ready, spoon it into the pan and run a table knife in concentric circles to break any large bubbles. Smooth the top with a metal spatula and put the pan in a cold oven.

      Why a cold oven? Air bubbles expand with heat. If they’re exposed to a sudden jolt of heat, there’s a chance that the bubbles will expand too rapidly, before the protein network around them has had a chance to set; the result is that the bubbles might burst. By putting the cake into a cold oven and then turning on the heat, the bubbles will expand gradually and the protein network around them will set at about the same time as the bubbles attain their greatest volume. The result: A tall, light-textured cake.

      The cake is done when it’s nicely browned on top, shows a few moist cracks, and springs back when pressed gently between the tube and side of the pan.

      To cool the cake, hang it upside down on the neck of a wine bottle or inverted metal funnel. If your pan’s tube is taller than the rim, just turn the pan upside down and let it rest on the tube’s edge. If you cool the cake upright, its airy texture will be lost. Don’t worry about the cake falling out of the pan while your back is turned. If you’ve beaten the whites and sugar properly—to the stiff peak stage—the cake will stay put.

      How to bake an angel food cakeWhen completely cool, in about 3 hours, use a thin-bladed knife to release the cake from the side of the pan.

      Run the blade between the cake and the edge of the pan slowly to release the cake. Lift the cake out of the pan by the tube, turn the cake sideways, and tap the edge of the pan bottom on your countertop, rotating it as you go, to free the cake. If the cake sticks, which happens sometimes, use the same knife to release it from the pan bottom. Set the cake upright on a cake plate and it’s ready to serve. Cut into slices with a serrated knife. The cake is light and airy and full of tiny bubbles.

      How to bake an angel food cakeAngel food cake may be served plain or with whipped cream, some fruit, or ice cream. In the photo here, I’ve stirred a little lemon curd into plain yogurt and scattered some fresh strawberries and raspberries next to the cake. A sprig of mint adds color. Feel free to nibble on a leaf.

      Cover leftover cake tightly and keep at room temperature. The cake will stay fresh for 2 or 3 days.

      Making angel food cake is a real achievement, one you’ll be proud of. And the oohs and ahs you’ll receive will make you smile.