How to balance hormones

How to balance hormones

I’m going to show you EXACTLY how to balance your hormones to lose weight.

Do you ever find yourself saying this?

  • No matter how much I exercise or eat right, I can’t lose this excess weight .
  • As I’ve been getting older, my metabolism has slowed and I keep gaining weight.
  • Once I lose the weight, the fat comes right back to me.

If you can relate to the above, you may be suffering from a hormonal imbalance.

As a Nurse Practitioner, and a Doctor (PhD) with experience in weight management and bioidentical hormone therapy, I can tell you firsthand that your weight affects your hormones and, on the flipside, your hormones affect your weight. So, which came first? The chicken or the egg? It’s kind of hard to tell, but there are things you can do to help both at the same time and lead to a leaner body and put your hormones back into balance. Even if you’re going through menopause, you can help relieve hot flashes, weight gain, and other symptoms of menopause by changing your diet.

First, it’s helpful to know what hormones are, what role(s) they have in the body, and what the major players are.

So, what are hormones? And how to balance your hormones to lose weight? Hormones are chemical messengers that are made in the body and are responsible for almost every bodily function. We can’t survive without them! Without hormones, we would never experience hunger and may possibly starve to death. Without hormones, we wouldn’t be able to make babies and mankind would end. Crazy, isn’t it?

How to balance hormones

What’s happening to your hormones? As you age, your hormones change. And it can be hard to balance your hormones to lose weight. Men mainly lose testosterone and women lose progesterone and estrogen over the years. This a natural process of aging, however, there are other factors that can speed up this process, mainly lifestyle. Stress, improper nutrition, excess weight…. These all disrupt the delicate balance of hormones needed to maintain good health.

When it comes to your weight, there are many hormones that can affect your metabolism, which will either slow down or speed up how quickly your body uses up energy (calories).

I am sure you have heard that an underactive thyroid or too much cortisol can slow down your metabolism and lead to weight gain. However, there are many other important hormones that can cause you to pack on the pounds when you’re trying your very hardest to lose them.

HOW TO BALANCE YOUR HORMONES TO LOSE WEIGHT

The top hormones that can affect your weight when imbalanced are:

Estrogen

Estrogen is produced by the ovaries, adrenal gland, and fat cells. It is a hormone responsible for the growth and development of female sexual characteristics, reproduction, and bone formation.

PROBLEM : If there is too much estrogen in the body (i.e. estrogen dominance), which can occur even during menopause, it can cause you to gain extra weight especially around the waist, hips, and thighs.

SOLUTION : Eating lots of fiber can help the body get rid of excess estrogen through digestion. The more fiber you eat, the better your body can digest foods. Avoid foods that can cause estrogen levels to rise, such as soy, excess sugar, and non-organic meat and dairy. Don’t use Teflon pans and never heat food in plastic containers, since the chemicals can seep into your food and raise your estrogen levels. Learn more about how to cut down on sugar here.

Progesterone

Progesterone is a hormone produced in the ovaries, placenta (when pregnant), and adrenal glands. It is responsible for fertility and menstruation and also helps balance estrogen.

PROBLEM : Not having enough progesterone can cause weight gain. Less than optimal progesterone levels can lead to excess estrogen in the body, which can turn more calories into fat.

SOLUTION : Progesterone prevents excessive estrogen in the body, helps your thyroid hormones function better, lowers your insulin levels, helps you sleep, and reduces fluid retention, which all help you lose weight. Having not enough progesterone is more common than having too much. You can increase your levels of progesterone naturally by avoiding foods that cause estrogen levels to rise, such as soy foods, excess sugar, and non-organic meat and dairy. You can also add more fiber to your diet and eat more foods that are high in:

  • Magnesium – Spinach, Pumpkin, Squash, Okra, Nuts & Seeds, Plantains
  • Vitamin B6 – Sunflower Seeds, Walnuts, Red Meat and Poultry, Bananas, Spinach, Seafood
  • Vitamin C – Yellow Peppers, Dark Green Leafy Vegetables (Kale), Kiwi, Broccoli, Oranges
  • Vitamin E – Almonds, Sunflower Seeds, Olive Oil, Shellfish (Shrimp)
  • Zinc – Red Meat, Shellfish (Oysters), Dark Chocolate, Pumpkin
  • L-Arginine – Turkey, Chicken, Pumpkin Seeds

You can also improve progesterone levels by lowering stress. When you are stressed over an extended period of time, the adrenal glands convert progesterone to cortisol (stress hormone). Practice yoga, swimming, meditation, or whatever you find useful for quieting your mind to reduce stress and cortisol, to boost progesterone.

Lastly, you can supplement with chasteberry, an herb scientifically proven to improve progesterone production. It’s also used for PMS, irregular menses, and support of early pregnancy when there is a history of potential progesterone imbalance. It works by stimulating the pituitary gland to produce more luteinizing hormone, which, in turn, signals the ovaries to produce more progesterone.

Testosterone

Testosterone is produced by the testes in men and primarly by the ovaries in women. It is responsible for male characteristics in men but also plays an important role in women. It helps increase muscle mass, bone density, and libido.

PROBLEM : Low testosterone levels in either men or women can lead to a loss of muscle mass, which can lead to weight gain since muscle cells use more energy than fat cells and metabolism is slowed.

Leptin

Also called the “fat hormone” or “fullness hormone,” leptin is made by fat cells and is responsible for telling your brain that you have enough energy stored as fat so that your body can burn energy at a normal rate, eat a normal amount, and exercise at a normal rate. The lower your leptin levels are, the lower your metabolism and the hungrier you become. Leptin is often responsible for weight loss plateaus, when you can’t seem to lose any more weight when dieting.

PROBLEM : Leptin levels are cut in half after 2 weeks of dieting. When you diet, you eat less and your fat cells lose some fat, which then decreases the amount of leptin produced. Your brain begins to sense starvation, which then slows your metabolism, makes you want to eat more, and exercise at a slower rate. This leads to weight gain.

SOLUTION : Having a cheat meal can boost your metabolism is by increasing levels of leptin. Throwing a calorie-rich cheat meal tricks your system into thinking food is plentiful and that it’s OK to burn through fat stores. In the context of strict dieting, cheat meals can aid weight loss by temporarily boosting leptin. But if you’ve been lax with your meal plan, the leptin argument is a moot point. In other words, you have to be nice before you can afford to be naughty.

How to Balance Your Hormones Naturally

How to balance hormones

When women feels so out of whack or out of sort, there is a very good reason for it and wanting to know “how to balance hormones” are so important.

75% of women have no idea hormone imbalance is the root cause of many problems.

One of the things I would often hear from friends, “My hormones must be out of whack.” Is it though?

The problem is, they didn’t know exactly what was “out of balance”, which may be the case for you too.

This Breakthrough Hormone Guide that I follow for 2 months now, reveals how my “optimal balance” has boost my metabolism as well as giving me energy and just an great overall feeling.

And can you believe this all WITHOUT Crazy Diets Or Exercise Plans.

1 in 3 Women Suffer From Hormone Imbalance At Some Point In Their Lives

This blog will tell you How to Even Out Your Hormones Naturally.

How to balance hormonesA healthy brain and a healthy body require balanced hormones.

When hormone levels are out of whack, you can experience fatigue, memory problems, mood swings, sleep disturbances, and a host of other symptoms.

Addressing hormonal imbalances can help you feel like yourself again . Then why doesn’t doctors talk about it…

Because hormone imbalance, for the most part, is not considered “life threatening”, so doctors very rarely test for it, and even fewer treat it…

How to balance hormones

Since the age of 14 everything has been a bit of a battle. I struggled with my weight, the constant fatigue, as well as dealing with the feelings of self-worth and anxiety.

I had to find a reason for why I felt so awful… and what I discovered changed the way I understood my symptoms. Knowing this has helped me take control and get my health & life back!

When it comes to weight gain, blame it on the hormones. These chemicals do a lot of good in our body, but health issues and stress can throw them off balance and cause problems.

I visited doctor after doctor, and they left me disappointed and frustrated. But understanding how female hormones work helped me figure out my situation.

Started to Balance My Hormones Naturally

And it started to make sense! I learned how to listen to my body. I realized my symptoms were not a product of me being lazy or unhealthy. (Or at least most of the time it wasn’t!) The fatigue, the weight gain and low mood were clues my hormones were out of balance.

Now that my hormones are in balance I feel great, plus the boost in energy is pretty awesome!

  1. weight gain.
  2. fatigue.
  3. increased sensitivity to cold or heat.
  4. constipation or more frequent bowel movements.
  5. dry skin.
  6. puffy face.
  7. unexplained weight loss (sometimes sudden)
  8. increased or decreased heart rate.

If you feel or see any of these above symptoms, do not chalk it up to “Oh it’s just my age” or “it’s just a normal part of being a busy mom”. It means something is off and you need to address it. I started to read Ange’s book and her struggle, mine would not as half as bad as her. Ange shares her story so you can see the TRUTH about this life changing approach to treating her hormone imbalance…

1 in 4 women suffer from hormone imbalance at some point of their lives. Symptoms range from the annoying to the debilitating.

How to balance hormones

Click Here to Learn More about “The Power of Hormones”

How to Balance Your Hormones Naturally and What are the Common Symptoms

The most common symptoms are weight gain, brain fog, extreme or constant fatigue and just an overall feeling of being run down and a little under the weather.

For years it felt like I was battling with doctors. I was frequently told I had depression and that these symptoms were just part of life.

This was simply not true. My hormone imbalance caused me unnecessary and debilitating symptoms. Let’s spread the awareness of hormone imbalance in women. Check out our new website to find out more.

The number 1 symptom that drove me crazy and sent me on my mission on how to treat hormone imbalance was… Extreme Fatigue.

I was so tired that my bones ached. I’d sleep 12 hours a day and still feel shattered.

At the time my doctor was sympathetic and requested blood tests but they all came back normal so I was sent off with a script for anti depressants.

I knew there was more to it so I set off on a journey to uncover the truth about hormones and how optimal hormones mean better health, more energy and better quality of life. To find out more or to read more visit power of hormones.

Balancing your Hormones as you age

It all started when all of a sudden I noticed that I was having a lot of days where I was tired… moody… bloated… depressed, and just ‘not in the mood’…

So I went to the doctors…

Only to have them turn around and say there’s nothing wrong or that they don’t know what is wrong so here take …some tablets…?

Or worse they feed me that old line of eat less and exercise more.I even convinced a doctor to do a blood test, only for it to come back ‘normal’, when deep down I knew that how I felt wasn’t ‘normal’ at all!…

One day, I finally reached breaking point, and decided it was time I took CONTROL of my own health… …and with a lot of trial and error.

I discovered a way to shed the excess weight, while also having all the energy I needed to actually enjoy life! It’s all about balancing your hormones…

How to balance hormonesThis is Ange

Thank you for visiting my blog on Improving your Hormones and getting the best out of life.

Menopause and weight gain often go together thanks to a combination of hormonal disharmony, slower metabolism and lifestyle factors.

To achieve hormone harmony, it takes more than simply focusing on one hormone. In fact, I will eventually introduce you to the 4 hormones that could be sabotaging your weight loss efforts.

Today, we will discuss Estrogen and how it can impact your ability to lose weight after 50.

Estrogen is not a single hormone but a class of hormones. There are three major Estrogens that women produce – estriol, estradiol and osteon.

Estrogen is one of the major female sex hormones. Men also produce it, albeit in smaller amounts. In fact, falling levels of estrogen contribute to men’s expanding waistlines just as they do in women, in later years.

Naturally higher in women, Estrogen is responsible for shaping a woman’s unique figure. With age, however, the Estrogen levels decrease, leading to women taking on a more masculine figure.

Estrogen is also the hormone that could be causing you the most trouble in the fat department. When Estrogen levels are out of balance, they can turn you into a fat producing machine, sometimes at a rapid pace, that leaves many women despondent and frustrated.

Estrogen works in tandem with progesterone. Progesterone belongs to a group of steroid hormones called progestogens. Progesterone levels also decrease in your later years. Low levels of progesterone can cause symptoms such as breast swelling and tenderness, mood swings, irritability, trouble sleeping and water retention.

Estrogen’s responsible for increasing fat storage at the hips and thighs, providing the hour-glass shape. Progesterone, when working in unison with Estrogen, normally halts the storage of fat around the waist, but factors can come into play that interfere with this harmonious partnership.

Stress can have a negative impact on progesterone’s action. It leads to weight gain around the belly that is very difficult to shift due to your progesterone levels being significantly lower than your Estrogen levels.

High levels of stress have been shown to negatively impact progesterone. Therefore, if you find fat accumulating around your waist, you may want to work at reducing any stress in your life and help keep progesterone levels in check.

Since Estrogen levels decline in a woman’s later years, which leads to the negative effects associated with menopause – such as hot flushes and night sweats – many of my clients think that, surely, having an excess of Estrogen is a good thing.

Unfortunately, this is not the case. If you would like to know more about the delicate balance of Estrogen and progesterone here is a good article.

When you are Estrogen dominant, the positive effects that progesterone has on the body are blocked. This happens because Estrogen overstimulates both the brain and the body.

Effects such as calmness and easing fluid retention are the two major, wonderful benefits of progesterone that are sadly missed by any Estrogen dominant, high-strung, bloated, stressed woman.

Confusion arises when you are low in Estrogen but are still Estrogen dominant. Estrogen dominance occurs when your ratio of Estrogen to progesterone is higher than normal. You need progesterone to keep Estrogen’s erratic ways in check.

  • Weight gain, particularly around the abdomen and hips
  • Difficulty in losing weight
  • Bloating
  • Water retention
  • Breast swelling and tenderness
  • Headaches
  • Mood swings
  • Irritability
  • Sluggish metabolism
  • Foggy thinking, memory loss
  • Fatigue
  • Trouble sleeping/insomnia

There is not a simple test for Estrogen dominance. If you have severe symptoms such as bloating, mood swings and weight gain that does not respond to dietary changes or medication, you may have higher than normal levels of Estrogen.

If you think you may be Estrogen dominant, here is a quick and simple quiz that you can fill out online and receive your results immediately.

Here are three tips for reducing estrogen dominance:

Concentrate on foods rich in fiber and essential nutrients that help to regulate bowel function thus aiding the body in releasing used (no longer needed) Estrogen. Here is a delicious recipe to help you increase your leafy green intake.

Having less stress will help keep progesterone levels at their optimal. When you are stressed though, your body produces a stress hormone known as cortisol to help you cope with a situation and to respond to it.

Unfortunately, cortisol is made from the same ingredients as progesterone, and the body prioritizes defense from stress over everything else. In short, cortisol production competes with progesterone production.

Foods that contain Vitamin B6 can help maintain the estrogen-progesterone balance in your body. These include walnuts, pistachio nuts, cooked tuna and turkey.

Your hormones dictate what your body does with the fuel you feed it. Fixing your hormones is easier than you think. The first step is knowing which hormone needs the most attention, how to nurture it and achieve hormonal harmony. Your body will thank you for it.

Are you happy with your weight? Do you think that you might be Estrogen dominant? How is Estrogen dominance affecting your health? How did you do on the quiz? Please leave your questions and comments below.

Testosterone, growth hormone, and cortisol levels all have a profound impact on men’s health. Here’s how you can help keep these hormone levels in balance.

How to balance hormones

Looking more fit and feeling younger may be a matter of getting certain hormones in balance.

Although a number of hormones can affect your health, three of the most crucial ones for men are testosterone, growth hormone, and cortisol, according to John Romaniello, co-author of Man 2.0 Engineering the Alpha: A Real World Guide to an Unreal Life.

Let’s start with testosterone, well known for its association with, well, manliness.

“Testosterone is responsible for men’s confidence, drive, and desire for sex,” Romaniello explained. Testosterone levels in men dip by about 1 percent every year after age 30, he added.

Testosterone also naturally drops after a man gets married (or begins to live with a partner) and after having kids.

However, he and his co-author Adam Bornstein discovered in their research and interviews with more than 320 people that men aren’t experiencing low T just because of aging anymore.

“Low testosterone is no longer just the province of middle age,” said Romaniello. Today’s ultrafast pace of life and unhealthy habits are affecting testosterone declines.

For example, lack of sleep can lower your testosterone level. Men who get less sleep for even just 2 weeks can see their testosterone level decrease by 15 percent, he explained.

Today’s modern — and often unhealthy — diet can also affect your testosterone.

Eating too many carbohydrates can cause spikes in insulin, which then has a negative impact on both testosterone and growth hormone levels, Romaniello said. At the same time, not eating enough of the right kind of fat or not getting enough healthy cholesterol will also keep your testosterone lower than it could be.

Because of these lifestyle factors, the authors found men as young as college age are experiencing low T.

When you have low testosterone, there can be a domino effect on your health. Your sex drive may fade. You may have a harder time getting in shape, even if you’re exercising. You may also feel less energetic.

There’s also an interesting evolutionary reaction from women, who may feel less attracted to their male partners with low T levels. They may even have a harder time conceiving as their partner with low T experiences a drop in sperm count.

Problems with low testosterone also affect men during exercise. “You can have two guys who are eating the same thing and doing the same kind of exercise, and the guy with the naturally higher testosterone level will gain more muscle and lose more fat,” Romaniello noted.

Low T has also been linked to more serious health consequences, such as a higher risk for obesity, heart trouble, osteoporosis, obstructive sleep apnea, and other chronic diseases, according to a 2013 report published in the Journal of Sex Medicine.

How Growth Hormone Affects Men’s Health

As you may guess by its name, growth hormone is responsible for physical growth — the more you have of this hormone prior to completing puberty, the taller you’ll be. Like testosterone, growth hormone drops with age and can affect body composition in a number of ways. Athletes use growth hormone to help them recover from workouts and the rigors of practices and game day, said Romaniello.

Growth hormone also acts as a supercharger for testosterone, Romaniello added. Men who undergo treatment for low growth hormone levels will likely find that their testosterone increases. There are side effects associated with too much growth hormone, however, including increased blood pressure and spikes in blood sugar as well.

How Cortisol Affects Men’s Health

Your growth hormone level is inversely related to your level of cortisol, often thought of as the stress hormone — if you’re working long hours, worrying about personal issues, and not following healthy habits, you might have high cortisol levels.

“The higher your cortisol is, the lower your growth hormone levels will be,” Romaniello explained. High cortisol levels can make you gain weight in the wrong places. “You’ll have guys not living their life in a healthy way, and they’ll have too much stress hormone, which results in a lot of belly fat.” Belly fat is among the unhealthiest kinds of fat in the body because it is linked to heart disease, diabetes, and certain cancers.

In addition to other lifestyle habits, how much sleep you get can affect your cortisol and growth hormone levels as well as testosterone levels. “The less sleep you get, the higher your cortisol will be; the more sleep you get, the lower your cortisol will be,” said Romaniello.

Men need to be aggressive about getting enough sleep to keep hormones in balance and get quality REM sleep (rapid eye movement sleep — the kind of sleep when you dream), during which your body secretes more growth hormone, Romaniello advised.

Menopause and weight gain often go together thanks to a combination of hormonal disharmony, slower metabolism and lifestyle factors.

To achieve hormone harmony, it takes more than simply focusing on one hormone. In fact, I will eventually introduce you to the 4 hormones that could be sabotaging your weight loss efforts.

Today, we will discuss Estrogen and how it can impact your ability to lose weight after 50.

Estrogen is not a single hormone but a class of hormones. There are three major Estrogens that women produce – estriol, estradiol and osteon.

Estrogen is one of the major female sex hormones. Men also produce it, albeit in smaller amounts. In fact, falling levels of estrogen contribute to men’s expanding waistlines just as they do in women, in later years.

Naturally higher in women, Estrogen is responsible for shaping a woman’s unique figure. With age, however, the Estrogen levels decrease, leading to women taking on a more masculine figure.

Estrogen is also the hormone that could be causing you the most trouble in the fat department. When Estrogen levels are out of balance, they can turn you into a fat producing machine, sometimes at a rapid pace, that leaves many women despondent and frustrated.

Estrogen works in tandem with progesterone. Progesterone belongs to a group of steroid hormones called progestogens. Progesterone levels also decrease in your later years. Low levels of progesterone can cause symptoms such as breast swelling and tenderness, mood swings, irritability, trouble sleeping and water retention.

Estrogen’s responsible for increasing fat storage at the hips and thighs, providing the hour-glass shape. Progesterone, when working in unison with Estrogen, normally halts the storage of fat around the waist, but factors can come into play that interfere with this harmonious partnership.

Stress can have a negative impact on progesterone’s action. It leads to weight gain around the belly that is very difficult to shift due to your progesterone levels being significantly lower than your Estrogen levels.

High levels of stress have been shown to negatively impact progesterone. Therefore, if you find fat accumulating around your waist, you may want to work at reducing any stress in your life and help keep progesterone levels in check.

Since Estrogen levels decline in a woman’s later years, which leads to the negative effects associated with menopause – such as hot flushes and night sweats – many of my clients think that, surely, having an excess of Estrogen is a good thing.

Unfortunately, this is not the case. If you would like to know more about the delicate balance of Estrogen and progesterone here is a good article.

When you are Estrogen dominant, the positive effects that progesterone has on the body are blocked. This happens because Estrogen overstimulates both the brain and the body.

Effects such as calmness and easing fluid retention are the two major, wonderful benefits of progesterone that are sadly missed by any Estrogen dominant, high-strung, bloated, stressed woman.

Confusion arises when you are low in Estrogen but are still Estrogen dominant. Estrogen dominance occurs when your ratio of Estrogen to progesterone is higher than normal. You need progesterone to keep Estrogen’s erratic ways in check.

  • Weight gain, particularly around the abdomen and hips
  • Difficulty in losing weight
  • Bloating
  • Water retention
  • Breast swelling and tenderness
  • Headaches
  • Mood swings
  • Irritability
  • Sluggish metabolism
  • Foggy thinking, memory loss
  • Fatigue
  • Trouble sleeping/insomnia

There is not a simple test for Estrogen dominance. If you have severe symptoms such as bloating, mood swings and weight gain that does not respond to dietary changes or medication, you may have higher than normal levels of Estrogen.

If you think you may be Estrogen dominant, here is a quick and simple quiz that you can fill out online and receive your results immediately.

Here are three tips for reducing estrogen dominance:

Concentrate on foods rich in fiber and essential nutrients that help to regulate bowel function thus aiding the body in releasing used (no longer needed) Estrogen. Here is a delicious recipe to help you increase your leafy green intake.

Having less stress will help keep progesterone levels at their optimal. When you are stressed though, your body produces a stress hormone known as cortisol to help you cope with a situation and to respond to it.

Unfortunately, cortisol is made from the same ingredients as progesterone, and the body prioritizes defense from stress over everything else. In short, cortisol production competes with progesterone production.

Foods that contain Vitamin B6 can help maintain the estrogen-progesterone balance in your body. These include walnuts, pistachio nuts, cooked tuna and turkey.

Your hormones dictate what your body does with the fuel you feed it. Fixing your hormones is easier than you think. The first step is knowing which hormone needs the most attention, how to nurture it and achieve hormonal harmony. Your body will thank you for it.

Are you happy with your weight? Do you think that you might be Estrogen dominant? How is Estrogen dominance affecting your health? How did you do on the quiz? Please leave your questions and comments below.

How to balance hormones

A woman’s hormonal health is delicate. Unhealthy eating habits, high stress, and a sedentary lifestyle can all wreak havoc on your hormones. However, even women who eat healthily and get proper exercise can struggle with hormonal issues.

Keep reading for a breakdown of symptoms of hormone imbalance and the key hormones women should track. Then learn about the best vitamins for hormonal imbalance, including vitamin D and vitamin B12. Plus: herbal supplements and tips for optimal hormonal health.

hormonal imbalance Symptoms

There are many signs and symptoms of hormonal imbalance, such as:

  • PMS
  • osteoporosis
  • weight gain
  • altered sex drive
  • allergies
  • urinary tract infections
  • skin conditions (too dry or too oily)
  • fatigue
  • anxiety
  • water retention
  • hair loss
  • facial hair growth
  • depression

By keeping hormones balanced, it’ll be easier to maintain healthy weight, keep a regular menstrual cycle, and have optimal energy levels.

key hormones to keep in check

Cortisol

Cortisol is your main stress hormone. When your body is under stress, your adrenal glands release cortisol. Many of us carry too much of this stress and don’t make time to switch it off.

When cortisol levels are high for too long, you may experience greater fatigue, mood swings, and stubborn belly fat.

Insulin

The pancreas secretes this fat-storing hormone that controls your body’s blood sugar levels.

When you have too many blood sugar surges and dips—usually from eating too much at once or not eating enough at other times—insulin can keep you in fat-storing mode.

Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (Tsh)

Thyroid hormones regulate both your body’s energy use and metabolism. Our bodies produce TSH in the pituitary gland.

If you often feel tired or sluggish, or if you witness changes in your metabolism, your thyroid might not function properly.

Estrogen

Estrogen is the female sex hormone that gives you female characteristics. It’s vital for your mood, weight, bones, brain, and energy.

After age 35, estrogen levels can start to decline. Ensuing issues can include night sweats, irregular periods, mood swings, and anxiety.

How to balance hormones

The Best Vitamins for hormonal imbalance

We know that bad foods can cause stress on your body, elevate blood sugar, and slow your metabolism. You can stave off hormonal imbalances with the following vitamins and nutrients:

Fish Oil

Omega-3 fish oil can positively affect hormones. Omega-3 fatty acids are necessary components of cell function and are vital in creating hormones.

Without a healthy supply of omega-3s, the body has difficulty producing the hormones it needs. Instead, it relies on lower-quality fats, which in turn puts females at higher risk for inflammation-related issues.

Additionally, a 2012 study found that greater consumption of omega-3s may diminish insulin resistance.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D plays a vital role in the production and activity of hormones including estrogen and progesterone. This vitamin helps prevent hormonal imbalances. It also aids insulin regulation and blood sugar balance.

Additionally, studies show there is a correlation between levels of vitamin D and bone mineral density.

The recommended dosage of vitamin D for most individuals is 600-800 IU per day.

If you suffer from leaky gut or are on birth control, you might have low zinc levels.

You need sufficient levels of zinc to balance your thyroid hormones. It’s also a necessary trace nutrient used to regulate the menstrual cycle and fertility.

Next, zinc is a natural antimicrobial that kills bacteria and opens pores, thereby helping reduce acne.

Even further, zinc can help support against period pain, which is symptomatic of hormonal imbalance.

The standard dose is typically eight milligrams per day. However, since zinc can affect copper and iron levels, it’s best to work with a health professional to determine what’s best for you.

Vitamin B12

Research reports a prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency in those with poorly functioning thyroids. Vitamin B12 is essential for proper nerve function. B12 is responsible for energy levels, memory, and learning and retaining information.

It’s mainly found in animal protein, so vegans and vegetarians are at higher risk for vitamin B12 deficiency. Low levels can make you feel fatigued and depleted.

Methylcobalamin—a form of the vitamin available in food and supplements like HUM’s B12 Turbo—is easier to absorb and retain than its counterpart, cyanocobalamin.

Herbal Supplements for Hormone Imbalance

Looking to go beyond vitamins for hormonal imbalance? There are also a number of herbs that can keep everything in check.

First, Dong Quai (found in HUM’s Moody Bird) is commonly used in Chinese medicine to balance hormonal excesses and deficits.

Next, studies show the many benefits of rhodiola rosea, an adaptogenic herb included in HUM’s Uber Energy and Big Chill. Rhodiola aids thyroid function, improves immune function, and helps the body adapt to stress—all of which factor into hormonal balance.

Finally, ashwagandha has the unique ability to encourage hormonal health at a cellular level, aiding your resilience to stress.

How to balance hormones

Lifestyle tips to Balance Your Hormones

While vitamins and herbal remedies can certainly help, your lifestyle also plays a pivotal role in combatting hormonal imbalances. Adapt the following tips to foster optimal hormonal health:

Watch Your Stress Levels

Winding down is crucial. Many women lead hectic lifestyles, allowing their bodies little time to readjust from life’s demands. Ensuing stress can disrupt women’s natural hormone cycles. Find small ways to reset and relax, such as through meditation and other self-care rituals.

Catch Adequate ZZZ’s

Sleep allows the body to recover from any duress it may have suffered throughout the day. A lack of sleep means less recovery time, thus swinging hormones into overdrive. Try to get at least seven or eight hours of sleep each night to stave off hormonal imbalances.

Enrich Your diet for Healthy, Well-Rounded Nutrition

Incorporate more fresh, organic fruits and vegetables plus an abundance of raw nuts and seeds into your diet. Refined carbohydrates, fried foods, soft drinks, processed vegetable oil, and trans fats may all alter hormone balance.

Sweat It Out

Get moving for 45-to-60 minutes at least three times a week. Form a routine that you enjoy and can stick to on a consistent basis.

Get Some Sunshine

Giving your body a healthy helping of full-spectrum sunlight can help stabilize hormones. Go outside and take a walk around the block a couple of times a week. It’ll help get you the movement you need plus the feel-good sunshine your body craves.

Turn off the weight-gain hormones that are holding you back.

How to balance hormones

Here’s a mind-bender: Being overweight often has nothing to do with calories or exercise. For a huge number of us, the problem is misfiring hormones. Research is still catching up with this paradigm shift, which has yet to be comprehensively studied. But seeing how this revelation has helped my patients and I slim down and feel better gives me confidence that it’s true for most women who are trying to lose weight and can’t. You already know about some weight-affecting hormone issues, like thyroid and insulin imbalances. But more subtle ones could also be keeping you from the body you want. Here are some other ways your hormones might be causing weight gain.

How to balance hormones

You’re consuming too much sugar.

I think of leptin as the hormone that says, “Darling, put down the fork.” Under normal circumstances, it’s released from your fat cells and travels in the blood to your brain, where it signals that you’re full. But leptin’s noble cause has been impeded by our consumption of a type of sugar called fructose, which is found in fruit and processed foods alike.

How to balance hormones

When you eat small amounts of fructose, you’re OK. But if you eat more than the recommended five daily servings of fruit (which in recent decades has been bred to contain more fructose than it used to)—plus processed foods with added sugar—your liver can’t deal with the fructose fast enough to use it as fuel. Instead, your body starts converting it into fats, sending them off into the bloodstream as triglycerides and depositing them in the liver and elsewhere in your belly.

As more fructose is converted to fat, your levels of leptin increase (because fat produces leptin). And when you have too much of any hormone circulating in your system, your body becomes resistant to its message. With leptin, that means your brain starts to miss the signal that you’re full. You continue to eat, and you keep gaining weight.

?If you eat more than the recommended five daily servings of fruit, plus processed foods with added sugar, your liver can’t deal with the fructose fast enough to use it as fuel. ?

You’re super stressed.

The so-called stress hormone cortisol can create all kinds of trouble for women who want to shed weight. When cortisol rises, it encourages the conversion of blood sugar into fat for long-term storage. Hoarding body fat in this way was a useful survival adaptation for our ancestors when they faced stressful famines. But not so much today. Obviously, reducing stress in your life will help rein in this fat-storing hormone, but there’s another very common source of the problem: daily coffee, which elevates cortisol levels dramatically, causing your body to hoard fat when you least need to.

Your high estrogen levels are expanding your fat cells.

Although estrogen is responsible for making women uniquely women, it’s also the hormone that can be the most troublesome in the fat department. At normal levels, estrogen actually helps keep you lean by goosing the production of insulin, a hormone that manages blood sugar. When estrogen gets thrown off, though, it turns you into a weight-gain machine.

Here’s how: When you eat, your blood sugar rises. Like a bodyguard, insulin lowers it by escorting glucose into three different places in your body. When insulin is in good working form—not too high and not too low—it sends a small amount of glucose to your liver, a large amount to your muscles to use as fuel, and little to none for fat storage.

If you’re healthy and in good shape, your pancreas produces exactly the right amount of insulin to have your blood sugar softly rise and fall within a narrow range (fasting levels of 70 to 85 mg/dl). But when your estrogen levels climb, the cells that produce insulin become strained, and you can become insulin resistant.

How to balance hormones

Last month, we talked a lot about women’s hormones: what they are and how they function, what happens when they don’t play nice, and how to balance hormones naturally.

I continue to research ways to improve my own hormonal health, for a number of reasons, and I’m sure you can relate…

✓ Poor health in my teenage years
✓ Birth control for five years
✓ Four nearly back to back pregnancies
✓ Chronic stress

… need I go on. If any of these sound familiar, you’re not alone.

Us women battle so much that goes against the health of our hormones, and we have to take measures to keep our hormones happy or we end up with hormonal imbalances that lead to all sorts of problems.

What is a hormonal imbalance?

Hormones dictate nearly every cellular action from the time we’re conceived. So what happens when they aren’t functioning as they should?

It may surprise you to know that we often get a domino effect happening when there’s even a slight change in hormone function. What’s even more frustrating is that one hormonal imbalance can easily lead to an additional imbalance or other health issues because the branches of your endocrine system are so intertwined. (source)

While hormones naturally fluctuate based on the time of month or stage of life we’re in, they can become truly imbalanced due to a number of reasons.

We discuss those reasons more in depth here, where we also discuss how to balance hormones naturally.

The main causes of hormonal imbalances are endocrine-disrupting chemicals in our cleaning supplies, personal care and beauty products, and food, as well as poor lifestyle choices like lack of sleep and chronic stress.

How to balance hormones

As we’ve discussed a number of times, diet is paramount to balanced hormones.

Good fats are one of the best sources of healthy-hormone-building nutrients, which is why I created this DIY supplement with good fat from coconut milk.

The supplement also contains collagen, which is made up of amino acids- another building block of healthy hormones.

Other nutritious foods that support hormones:

  • Raw carrots
  • Grassfed cream (raw is best!)
  • Raw egg yolks
  • Fresh orange juice
  • Beets
  • Fresh greens

How to balance hormones: the magic juice recipe

I’ve told you about how I use juicing to help support liver health, but did you know with the right ingredients, juicing is also great for hormone health?

I’ve created a juice recipe that contains lots of great hormone-supporting nutrients.

Raw carrots- carrots help to detox estrogen, which, if you’ve read about estrogen dominance, you know many of us have too much of. Raw carrots contain a unique fiber that absorbs excess estrogen and helps sweep it out of the body. (source)

Fresh orange juice- your adrenal glands (which are a major player in the hormonal system of your body), both regulate and depend on hormones. They also use the highest concentration of vitamin C out of all your body functions.

Juicing oranges is a great way to support the adrenals, and your hormones, with a hit of fresh, bioavailable vitamin c.

Beets- beets are a nutritional powerhouse, best known for supporting the liver and cleansing the blood.

Beets are rich in iron, b vitamins, potassium, magnesium, and folate. Because they are such a good liver support, they help usher toxins (like excess estrogen!) out of the liver.

Greens- like beets, greens are rich in vitamins and minerals, namely folate and vitamins C and A. They also help to support and cleanse the liver and bowels, clearing excess toxins that interrupt hormones.

The recipe

To make this hormone-balancing juice, here’s what you’ll need:

  • 3-4 large carrots, washed and un-peeled
  • 1 orange, peeled
  • a handful of raw greens, washed
  • 1/4- 1/2 medium beet & greens, washed (I buy beets that are about the size of my fist and chop pieces away as I juice them.)
  • 1 small apple (optional- improves flavor and adds nutrition- good for the gallbladder.)

It’s best if your produce is organic, as the toxins found in pesticides used on conventional produce are hard on the liver and may be counterproductive to your goals.

Process each of these in a juicer (this is the one I have) and pour in a blender. Add the following:

Raw egg yolk- make sure it comes from pastured, healthy hens. This is incredibly helpful for the liver and a good source of good fat and other nutrients like selenium and choline, which are both excellent for brain and emotional health. A raw egg yolk a day keeps the doctor away!

2 tablespoons grassfed cream- it’s best if you can find raw cream fresh from a local farmer, but if you can’t, look for organic, grassfed cream. The ones I’ve found contain a gum thickener, and, until I can get my hands on raw cream again, I’m ok with that.

Cream is a rich source of good, hormone-supporting fats. To improve digestion and impart probiotic benefits, try turning your cream into creme fraiche.

Blend gently and drink right away, as the nutrients in juice begin to decline quickly.

Learn how to balance hormones

I love learning how to balance hormones through easy nutrition hacks like this juice. It’s a relatively inexpensive, simple way to flood my body with the nutrients my hormones crave.

I know for certain that I feel so much better when I commit to taking the time to juice every morning. I have better energy, better emotional health, and fewer episodes of pain and fatigue.