How to bathe a schnauzer

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  • How to Bathe Your Mini Schnauzer Puppy

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Bathing Your Puppy

    Bathing Your Toy, Teacup or Miniature Schnauzer Puppy Between Groomings

    Your miniature schnauzer puppy should be free of matts and tangles, so get those out before the bath. If you don’t, the matts will become tighter and more difficult to remove. You should be brushing your puppy at least two to three times per week.

    Bathing more than once a week can strip the coat of its natural oils that keep it shiny.

    If you have a teacup or toy sized schnauzer, you can bathe in the kitchen sink and just use your sink sprayer. There is a product you can use, like a short leash attached to a suction cup. This is helpful and will protect your dog/puppy from jumping out and possibly getting hurt.

    Never, ever turn your back – not for one second – if you have your puppy/dog in the sink. Have your shampoo/conditioner, towel and all necessary items to get the job done before you start . A non slip matt is good to have to keep slipping from occurring.

    There are special shampoos for dark colored schnauzers – like Black, black/silver, Liver, etc. There are also products that whiten the lighter colored Schnauzers – like parti, white and Salt/Pepper colors. For puppies, I prefer the oatmeal shampoos.

    At this point, you will have already chosen the products you’ll need to bathe your miniature schnauzer puppy.

    IMPORTANT NOTE – If you are using a topical flea product monthly, avoid dips or flea shampoos.

    You will want to place cotton balls in your dogs ears, to keep water from going down in the ear canal.

    To bathe your miniature schnauzer puppy, start at the head and soak the dog’s coat with warm water, not hot or cold, moving toward the tail. You will need a lot of water pressure to get down to the skin and thoroughly wet the coat, especially with supercoated schnauzer puppies .

    Once thoroughly soaked, start at the head with shampoo. Work up in a good lather, being certain to avoid ears and eyes.

    If your schnauzer puppy/dog has fleas, they will migrate to the head region once the coat is wet, so start at the head and work your way back to the puppies back and tail. Follow the directions on the bottle and add a little water if needed to work up a good lather. Flea medications will have to stay on longer, so again, follow what the product directions tell you to do.

    Once you’ve worked the lather all the way to the tails and back legs, starting at the head again , thoroughly rinse until no more shampoo washes out and the water runs clear. If you leave the shampoo in the coat, it will cause dullness and skin irritation. So it is important that you rinse thoroughly!

    When the shampoo is out of your dogs coat, take the cotton balls out of the ears and towel dry your puppies coat.

    Now you will need to blow dry your puppy’s coat. Be sure that the dryer is not too hot or too close to your puppy’s skin. Your Schnauzer puppy will most likely be used to the dryer already, from having previous groomings/baths.

    Now you can brush/comb through the coat once more and apply some doggie cologne.

    Most schnauzer puppies are just fine taking a bath and are usually exceptionally happy afterward. They feel good and they know that they are most beautiful puppy in the world.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Do you have a Schnauzer at home, or are you planning to get one? This is an excellent choice, because they’re loyal, loving, an excellent guard dogs, as one of their most typical behavioral characteristics is their high level of alertness.

    The different sizes of Schnauzer dogs make them a very adaptable breed that for a wide range of environments and open spaces. However, providing them with sufficient space is not enough; you also need to know what basic care is required for this wonderful dog. In this AnimalWised article we will talk specifically about caring for a Schnauzer’s coat.

    1. What is a Schnauzer’s coat like?
    2. Brushing a Schnauzer’s coat
    3. Bathing a Schnauzer
    4. Haircuts for a Schnauzer
    5. Other tips for caring for a Schnauzer’s coat

    What is a Schnauzer’s coat like?

    Schnauzers, from Miniature to Giant, require special care to keep their coat in good condition. Even though they molt much less frequently than other dogs, and their hair is hypoallergenic, their fur still consists of two layers:

    • The outer layer acts as a protective barrier and has a tough, wiry texture.
    • The inner layer has a softer consistency, similar to the texture of cotton.

    Another important aspect that needs to be mentioned about a Schnauzer’s fur is that it doesn’t fall out unless it has a disease. This feature also means that this coat requires regular care and attention.

    Coat care doesn’t simply refer to aesthetics or style: A dog with a healthy coat is a dog with good internal health.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Brushing a Schnauzer’s coat

    A Schnauzer’s coat is prone to developing knots, and the best way to prevent this is by brushing it regularly, preferably by using a soft bristled brush.

    Between 12 and 15 months of age, the young Schnauzer should be brushed on a daily basis, since it is growing its final adult coat. This prevents any dead puppy hair from tangling with newly growing fur.

    Once it surpasses 15 months of age, the adult Schnauzer doesn’t need to be brushed on a daily basis. However, it should be done periodically a few times a week.

    Obviously, you must also brush the beard and leg fur. Remember that brushing is not only necessary for a healthy coat, but it is also a habit that can healthily discipline your dog and will eventually become enjoyable for your pet, although at first it may be a little worried.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Bathing a Schnauzer

    The frequency with which you should bath a Schnauzer will obviously vary according to its size. A Miniature Schnauzer requires a bath roughly once every 10 days. However, Giant or Standard Schnauzers will need bathing around once a month.

    However, in any case, it is always essential to use a shampoo that’s specifically for pets, as human shampoo can be harmful and does not suit a Schnauzer’s kind of hair and dermis at all. Here you can discover natural products to bathe your dog.

    It is not advisable to let the fur air dry. The best option is to use a hairdryer to at least remove most of the moisture from both layers of the coat.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Haircuts for a Schnauzer

    You can start to trim your Schnauzer’s fur from 15 months old. Obviously, just like any other breed, your Schnauzer dog this will need regular cutting to keep its coat in top condition.

    However, cutting a Schnauzer’s fur is not as simple as it may seem. With these dogs, it is recommended to use a technique called trimming or stripping which consists of removing or plucking the dead hair, rather than cutting the wiry outer coat. These practices are mainly used on show dogs. Many owners opt for more conventional techniques, because stripping by plucking can be painful for the dog.

    Being a wire-haired dog, shaving a Schnauzer’s fur would cause it to lose its characteristic texture, giving its hair a fine, cotton-like appearance.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Other tips for caring for a Schnauzer’s coat

    If you want your Schnauzer to always have a healthy coat, pay close attention to the following tips:

    • Food is essential. It is recommended to give your dog a boiled egg yolk once a week.
    • During the molt, you should go to your vet for advice on vitamin complexes or nutritional supplements which are based on essential fatty acids.
    • During the summer, your dog shouldn’t be exposed to the sun in the middle of the day, as this could dehydrate and dry out its coat.
    • If you observe any sign of injury to your dog’s skin it is essential to go to the vet.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    If you want to read similar articles to Caring for a Schnauzer’s Coat, we recommend you visit our Fur care category.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Contents of Article

    The Schnauzer has a distinct beard and thick, wiry double coat. We’ve put together a list of some of the best shampoos for schnauzers for 2021. If you’re on the hunt for a dog shampoo that’s going to meet your pet’s specific needs, you’ve come to the right place.

    30% Off at Chewy.com

    Pure-bred schnauzers can come in either standard, miniature, or giant sizes. The most popular of these is the miniature schnauzer. Although these dogs are diminutive, they’re sturdy, highly observant, and attuned to their environment. They make excellent watchdogs, and you can usually find them sporting an all black, gray, or salt-and-pepper coat.

    Have you recently brought one of these tiny alarm systems back to your home? Our article will show you how to keep your schnauzer’s coat clean and healthy, how to bathe your schnauzer puppy, and what types of dog shampoos are best to use on a schnauzer.

    What is the Best Shampoo for a Schnauzer?

    1. Buddy Wash Original Lavender and Mint Dog Shampoo and Conditioner
    2. 4-legger Organic, Hypo-allergenic, Lemongrass, and Aloe Shampoo
    3. Nature’s Miracle Supreme Odor Control Natural Puppy Shampoo and Conditioner
    4. Jax n Daisy Antifungal and Antibacterial Dog Shampoo
    5. Paws and Pals Oatmeal, Shea Butter, and Aloe Vera Shampoo

    What are the different types of schnauzer shampoos?

    Picking a shampoo that’s going to work for your hairstyle and hair texture can be a difficult task, and the same can be said for choosing a decent dog shampoo. There are hundreds of dog breeds, and each one will have certain grooming needs that their owners will need to be aware of. When picking a high-quality shampoo for your schnauzer, you’ll need to know the different types of dog shampoos so you can select the right one for your dog.

    Sensitive Skin

    Dogs can have sensitive skin just like humans. If you’ve bathed your schnauzer and noticed him scratching after a bath, it could be the shampoo is to blame. Low-quality shampoos are often full of synthetic chemicals that can be harsh on dogs with sensitive skin. If you haven’t bathed your schnauzer puppy yet, it’s a good idea to choose a high-quality shampoo brand for your dog, so you don’t risk giving him an allergic reaction. Choose a formula that is free of synthetic soaps and chemicals, and includes oatmeal or coconut oil base.

    Antibacterial and Antifungal Shampoos

    Dogs can get yeast infections on the surface of their skin. Hot and humid climates, low immunity, and feeding your dog low-quality foods that have sugars and grains in them can raise his risk of contracting a skin infection. Fortunately, there are antibacterial and antifungal shampoos you can use to treat an infection or lower the risk of one occurring. Always speak to your dog’s vet if you suspect your schnauzer may have a skin infection. Excessive licking, scratching, and rubbing are symptoms of yeast overgrowth.

    Shedding Control

    All dogs are different, and some breeds will shed more than others. For schnauzer owners, they’ve lucked out. The schnauzer’s wiry coat texture prevents a lot of his loose fur from falling out and getting all over your clothes and furniture. Instead, the schnauzer undercoat traps the loose fur. It’s crucial that you remove the loose fur with a brush, but overall, schnauzer’s hardly shed. If you notice your schnauzer losing a lot of fur, take him to vet to rule out a serious condition. But, there are shedding control shampoos you can use on dogs that shed excessively, which should cut down on some of the mess.

    Dandruff Control

    Dogs can get dandruff just like humans can. Many things cause doggy dandruff, such as dry air, overbathing, or a benign genetic condition. Dandruff is common and usually isn’t a sign of something serious, but it isn’t “normal.” If your schnauzer starts getting oily or dry dead skin flakes all over his fur, have the vet check him out. You may need to purchase extra-moisturizing dandruff control shampoo to decrease dog dandruff.

    Deodorizing Shampoo

    Does your schnauzer exhibit an odor, even after a bath? Some dogs just smell more than others. Their skin secretes natural oils to keep their coat clean and healthy. But sometimes, these oils emit a scent that is offensive to humans. You can purchase deodorizing shampoos that will eliminate the smell, without drying out your dog’s skin. The miniature schnauzer is prone to more oily skin than other breeds, so you may want to choose a shampoo with a deodorizing whey protein ingredient in the formula.

    Top 5 Tips for Keeping Your Schnauzer’s Coat Clean and Healthy

    For the most part, the schnauzer is pretty low maintenance when it comes to bathing and grooming. But there is no such thing as a dog breed that doesn’t require routine upkeep to keep them looking and feeling their best. If your Schnauzer has a white beard and facial fur, you may need to wipe his face down more frequently than darker-colored schnauzers to prevent staining.

    1. Clean your schnauzer’s beard at the end of the day.

    Before bedtime and after your schnauzer’s last meal of the day, clean his beard. The schnauzer’s characteristic beard will pick up dirt and food particles that can stain his fur and also emit unpleasant smells. You can use a wet, warm washcloth or a specially-formulated dog wipe to clean his face.

    1. Clean his ears to prevent infection and staining.

    All dogs tear up, but some are more prone to tearfulness than others. With the schnauzer, his tears can stain his coat and also create an environment for bacteria that can infect his eyes. If your schnauzers have white fur around his eyes that can stain, you may want to pick up some tear formula at the pet store to keep his fur white. Otherwise, you can use a clean and warm wet washcloth to clean out his eyes once per day.

    1. Trim your schnauzer’s facial fur every five to eight weeks.

    The fur around your Schnauzer’s eyes and ears will need to be trimmed about every two months. This fur can grow to excess and irritate your Schnauzer’s eyes and ears and cause an infection. Also, trimming excess fur can promote new, healthy hair growth.

    1. Feed your dog high-quality food.

    Dogs need protein, not sugars, corn, soy, or meat byproducts in their food. A healthy diet will do wonders for your Schnauzer’s appearance. Proper nutrition will make his fur shiny and soft, and also ensure that his skin is healthy. Monitoring the quality of his food and his food intake will also keep your dog at a healthy weight. You can also supplement his diet with salmon, sardines, and tuna, which will give your dog beneficial fatty acids. Fatty acids are ideal for keeping your dog’s coat and skin in tiptop shape.

    1. Only use high-quality dog shampoos on your schnauzer.

    Inferior shampoo brands can irritate your dog’s skin and give him an allergic reaction. The schnauzer breed is prone to oily skin, which can be a little bit smelly. For schnauzer owners, it’s crucial not to strip your dog’s coat of these beneficial oils. Doing so can cause the pores to secrete an abundance of oil if the skin gets dried out. Instead, opt for all-natural, moisturizing dog shampoos for Schnauzers that have gentle deodorizing ingredients in them. This will keep your dog smelling good while preserving the health and integrity of his skin and coat.

    There was a lot to figure out about bathing once Fig grew too large for the kitchen sink. I can’t seem to get things perfect, so that Fig loves bathing, we are near perfect now. Bathing Fig is crucial at home because I have allergies. Most people with dog allergies are reacting to dog saliva that is dried on fur from licking or wrestling. After Fig plays with other dogs, he must be rinsed when brought indoors for my health. Today have bathed him in so many setups that I am probably a dog-bathing expert.

    HANDHELD SHOWER ARM

    The easiest way to get Fig done quickly and painlessly is with a handheld showerhead. I can wet him down, pause the water (which calms him unless he is cold), soap him, and then rinse all sides quickly. I use water that is the same temperature and pressure that I use personally when bathing. When I used lukewarm water, he shivers if the water is not actively running on him when he is wet. As a general rule, when I am wearing a sweater in the house I drag in a portable heater and preheat the bathroom, so he is not freezing when he is standing wet in the tub. Before I added the extra heater Fig was like a shaking leaf. Bathing was always a pitiful event. Now he tolerates bath time with mild displeasure. This is a major improvement.

    BATH

    I gave him a bath in a filled bathtub once, but Fig is on the tall side (14.5” tall) and the amount water required to get it deep enough is ridiculous. Far too water wasteful. Completely stupid idea. I guess you could reuse your own bathwater for a dog, but it will probably have soap in it that would make your dog itch.

    The second time I tried a deep Rubbermaid plastic tub filled with water in the tub, but the water was so heavy that the Rubbermaid container was not able to hold a lid afterwards due to permanent stretching under heavy water weight.

    Ultimately, I didn’t get enough soap out of his fur using bathwater. With my allergies, I easily noticed the difference in cleanliness. He still made me sneeze after an hour in the same room. I figure salvia allergens were evenly redistributed on his body and not rinsed entirely. When Fig is really clean, I have zero allergic response.

    On the upside, I definitely got more mud out of his feet and it was supper easy to free up clumps. I reserve the bucket method for flea shampooing only now. Mid-flea-season, even with his top spot flea treatment, Fig picked up too many adult fleas on an outing that were not dead and I didn’t want then hopping off in the house. The bucket method and flea shampoo (water down shampoo and put on dry, let dog stand 5 minute with soap on then rinse in bucket) works when you want to get all the adults off and dead in under 15 minutes.

    SHOWER

    I have also washed him under a normal running shower. I had to turn the water on high to get enough pressure for a rinse. I get rinsed myself in the process. When I use this method I plan to take a shower myself after washing him. I don’t wear much clothing and don’t worry about getting wet. Unfortunately Fig now panics if you take your pants off in front of him. We joke about dropping our pants at a party to get a rise out of friends. You can pull them up and he comes running back to you, drop them again and he bolts…it’s sickly hilarious.

    SPIGOT

    I used a running bathtub spout and nearly drowned Fig by shoving his head under the running water. Fig took in a nose full and choked because he struggled and looked up into the rushing water. It was traumatic and he tried to flee for his life the next few times.

    Why did I put his head under heavy gushing water? Because when shampoo is not completely rinsed, Fig itches uncontrollably once dried. This forces me to rinse him a 2nd and sometimes 3rd time. Heavy water pressure rinses soap completely in a couple seconds, while water from a cup or wet rag does not do the job as well. When you don’t get soap out completely, it is easy to confuse simple soap irritation with seasonal skin or food allergies.

    Today I can easily rinse Fig with a running spout holding his head down by the nose, I don’t get his underside soap-free easily, so I just give him a rinse with warm water this way. If soap is required, I only do his shoulders and back (where he is covered in dog saliva from wrestling). Fig has a hard time standing under the spigot because of the curved walls of the tub. WARNING: Dogs can scratch enamel and plastic coatings on tubs, so be forewarned. If they are slipping in a tub get a mat for them to stand on. Towels don’t stay put.

    A spigot is the #1 method in some situations. We have a shower stall with a foot spigot higher than the tub’s. Fig can stand straight and tall. He doesn’t have to curl around the the bathtub walls, fearful of slipping. This setup is my husband’s favorite because of the sheer speed. Water pours like a high pressure wash and you can get a miniature schnauzer washed in 1 minute: 3 seconds soaking Fig tail to head, water turned off, 30 seconds soaping and scrubbing from tail to head, 10 seconds rinsing from head to tail, water turned off, 5 seconds squeezing body to drain water, 2 second towel dry, WALA! You have to get in the shower stall and close the doors to use this method, so plan to shower yourself afterwards, because you will be truly soaked from the back splash.

    OUTDOOR HOSE

    It’s too cold for washing a little dog outside most of the year where I live. This is not true for large dogs. This is a surface area to body weight issue. Small dogs are like hummingbirds and they struggle to maintain internal body temperature when hit with cold water. With a longhaired dog (we keep him fuzzier than typical mini schnauzers) washing him outside is harder because if he escapes he dashes for grass and rolls. Untangling grass and seeds from wet longhaired legs is really hard. We can bring him inside to towel off and dry indoors, but the hassle of holding him in place with a leash while hosing is not worth it. The bathtub or shower stall holds him like a pen for the first bit of toweling off. Mini Schnauzers don’t really shed so it is easy enough to clean up a bathroom afterwards.

    CONCLUSION

    Fig is always a crazy happy dog afterwards – even when traumatized in the process. We love to let him run off this energy. Fig excitedly looks forward to Towel Time (swaddled like a baby to dry his longhaired legs and running like a wild bull into a dry towel repeatedly to get his back and head dry.

    So, if you are not a master bather yet – no worries, just work on doing things quickly and you will be fine. Your dog will love you again instantly once it is over.

    The Miniature Schnauzer grooming chart below shows the basic steps for grooming your Miniature Schnauzer pet. I want to emphasize the word pet because, although the cut may appear to be show quality, it is not.

    *** Show quality Schnauzers require hand stripping of the coat.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Click on the image above if you would like to download The Miniature Schnauzer Grooming Chart, by Schnauzers-Rule.com to use as a handy reference.

    How to Groom Your Mini Schnauzer

    1. Start by brushing your Miniature Schnauzer out thoroughly. You will want to make sure your dog is free of mats and tangles before beginning to clip or cut the hair.
    2. Using #8 or #10 blade begin moving clippers downward from the base of the skull to the tail.
    3. Follow the pattern in the diagram above, clipping downward on either sides of your Schnauzer’s body to just about an inch above the hocks.
    4. When clipping the top of the skull, cheeks, and throat, gently move the clippers against the grain being careful not to apply to much pressure.
    5. Continue clipping downward on the chest area stopping just at the shoulder blades.
    6. Using scissors, shape legs, underbody furnishings, and tail, as above.
    7. When trimming the Schnauzer eyebrows and shaping the beard, face your dog and comb hair forward. Cut a straight line to the outer corner of the eye. Don’t remove too much of the beard but do trim it up a bit also.
    8. Don’t forget to pluck out the excess ear hair (See Dog Ear Cleaning)
    9. And also Trim up those nails! (See Cutting Your Dog’s Nails)
    10. Follow our complete Miniature Schnauzer Grooming Series and you will learn how to groom your Miniature Schnauzer at home for those in between dog grooming visits or all the time!

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Schnauzer Grooming Tips

    Here are just a few more points to keep in mind when grooming your Schnauzer:

    First, while there are definitely differences between fleas and ticks, these pests can be equally annoying for both your pet and you. Fleas are the most common external parasites that you may discover on your dog. Regardless, both fleas and ticks when left untreated, can create chronic infestations and make your pet miserable. And you too can get flea or tick bites that are both annoying and sometimes a health risk.

    Let’s first look at how to identify whether or not your dog has a flea or tick problem.

    Both adult fleas and ticks can be seen with the naked eye. Fleas are wingless insects that have six legs, while ticks are more round in shape, and have eight legs. Fleas prefer warmer temperatures while ticks can survive close to freezing climates. If either of these pests are left untreated, subsequent infection and disease can occur. Being vigilant about signs and symptoms of flea or tick infestations allows you to quickly provide treatment for, and save your pet.

    How to know if your dog has fleas

    Fleas depend upon the host’s blood for survival and many dogs are allergic to the protein in a flea’s saliva causing them to scratch. Next, look for any red bumps appearing on your dog’s groin, belly or under their legs around their tail area.

    Make a habit out of looking at your dog’s brush at grooming time and visually check your dog. You will be able to see the small brown fleas and they will look like dirt, but they scurry when you have your dog lies on their side or back.

    How to know if your dog has ticks

    Ticks are credited with being the worst parasites that any person or dog may have to deal with since they carry diseases that are dangerous to all of us. Like fleas, adult ticks are visible to the naked eye and are even more easily seen after they are full of blood. There are many different types of ticks but they are mostly reddish-brown or grayish-white and about 3/4-inch in size. Many breeds, including all types of schnauzers can suffer from notable loss of appetite, lethargy and fever for about a day when affected.

    What to do if you find a flea or tick on your pet

    If you in fact, discover either fleas or ticks on your schnauzer, remember to proceed thoughtfully. While it may be your first inclination to use a popular spot-on treatment available on the market, you must beware. These treatments contain pesticides the FDA is studying because of their harmful effects on dogs, smaller breeds in particular.

    These harmful chemicals can cause illness, vomiting and even seizures in dogs. They can themselves also cause health problems in people who are sensitive to environmental chemicals like pesticides. These products are basically nerve poisons.

    Some of the toxic chemical names to avoid found in the active ingredients of the conventional medicines and treatments include:

    •Imidacloprid, a systemic insecticide which acts as an insect neurotoxin and affects the central nervous system.

    •Fipronil, a slow acting and highly dangerous poison

    •Permethrin, a chemical known to rapidly harm most mammals and birds

    •Methoprene, that does not kill adult insects but rather affects the growth hormone indicator; and

    •Pyriproxyfen, a chemical used to kill pests on crops and in yards.

    Loving pet owners who use these treatments have trust in them and falsely believe that they are applying a medication to help their pet, when in reality they are exposing their dog and themselves to potent pesticide chemicals.

    Options safe, effective and natural treatments

    Fortunately, there are many safe and effective treatment options including home-remedy sprays and topical liquids that will eliminate fleas, ticks and their eggs. Fleas typically live for about 100 days, while a single tick can live for up to three years. Yet, the biggest concern about fleas and ticks are their eggs.

    Fleas lay 20 to 40 eggs per day for weeks, and a tick will detach from their host and then lay thousands of eggs at one time before they die. Tick larvae, nymphs and adults all feed so it is critical to kill them as effectively as possible.

    Also, when a dog has fleas, they act like a “pepper shaker” because the eggs shed wherever the pet roams and the eggs fall off onto bedding, carpets, and everywhere your dog spends time.

    Fortunately, vacuuming can remove up to 90% of flea eggs from your carpet alone along with larvae and any food source. Make certain to throw away your vacuum bag promptly so that the fleas do not continue to live there. Keep in mind that some pet owners find that hardwood or tile floors are a better choice to help control hidden pests like fleas and ticks.

    Non-carpeted floors are easier to vacuum and keep eggs from lurking in the home. You can use throw rugs, but those are easier to put into a washer and wash in hot water, just like the dog’s bedding.

    With fleas, the first thing you will want to do is wash all of your pet bedding. Put it into the washing machine and use very hot water and a long cycle. This goes for throws in your home and even area rugs. Anything that is regularly used will be a home for fleas and you will want to wash it thoroughly. You may want to include some borax as a mold retardant and freshener. It probably helps clear off the flea eggs also.

    Only adult fleas feed, so bathing your dog will provide him with initial comfort and relief. Introducing 1/2 cup of fresh lemon juice to your normal mild-pet shampoo will also keep fleas away and kill any eggs left behind.

    Ticks are removed by wearing gloves and using tweezers to pinch the tick as close to the skin as possible. Next, slowly but firmly pull the tick off and flush it down the toilet immediately.

    Other remedies for natural repellent include: Rose Geranium Oil, which can be placed between your dogs shoulder blades and at the base of his tail to repel ticks; Lavender Oil on a bandanna makes a wonderful flea-collar; and 2-3 drops of Cedar Oil combined with a quart of water and a cup of distilled vinegar or apple cider vinegar makes excellent natural flea spray. Lastly, a thick layer of table salt over your carpet and furniture is a successful tactic for drying out tick eggs — and vacuum, vacuum, vacuum.

    Germany is the country of origin for the Schnauzer dogs. This kind of breed has three main types; you have the miniature, standard, and giant. The sizes vary as well. But, no matter how big or small your dog is, you want to know how to groom a schnauzer. This includes learning how to properly maintain this particular dog breed.

    You can easily distinguish a schnauzer because of its unique appearance. This breed comes with a mustache. If that is not enough, it also has a double coat; wire-like hair at the upper layer and soft ones at the underside. For dog owners especially the first-timers, grooming a schnauzer becomes a difficult task.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    It is not easy to groom a schnauzer so you need to be patient to do this job

    Don’t worry, you can learn how to groom a schnauzer easily as there are many ways to groom this breed. You can trim the hair, clip it, hand strip it, or simply leave it natural. A natural, shaggy look also acts as a protection for the canine. Besides, you can always change its hairstyle any time you like.

    Here are some things to consider in helping you maintain and groom your schnauzer that is appropriate for its breed.

    Bathe When Needed

    Schnauzer dogs do not need bathing every day. Wash your pet occasionally and only when the schnauzer becomes dirty. Use a shampoo specifically made for dogs. Use lukewarm water and wet the whole body of the canine. Give extra care to the ears and eyes; keep these parts free from water and shampoo.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Schnauzer do not need bathing every day, wash him/her occasionally and only when the schnauzer becomes dirty

    Massage the body of the schnauzer as you apply shampoo on its hair and beard. Make sure to rinse thoroughly. Before your towel dry your pet, gently squeeze its coat to remove excess water. You can use a hair dryer to dry your pet schnauzer quickly and completely.

    Trim the Fur

    One of the most important things to remember when learning how to groom a schnauzer is to always trim its fur. An electric clipper will help you trim its coat neatly. Ideally, the hair on its head and body should be short, while the ones on its legs and underside should be a bit longer.

    The beard and eyebrows have to be slightly longer as well. But you can cut the ends from time to time in order to maintain neatness. When trimming, try to blend the coat evenly, and cut by positioning the clippers downward.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    An electric clipper will help you trim your Schnauzer’s coat neatly

    Brush Properly

    A Schnauzer needs daily brushing. A good bristle brush can help make this canine shiny and tangle-free. Buy a hair detangle spray and use it to loosen the tangles on the coat of your dog. It also gets rid of any mats before they get troublesome for you. Brushing or combing make trimming and styling easier. The process also removes dead hair in the dog’s undercoat.

    Clean the Ears

    If you want to learn how to groom a schnauzer efficiently, then you should know that it includes cleaning its ears. They need to be free from wax and dirt not just to maintain cleanliness, but also to prevent infections. Use cotton balls and ear cleaner for this grooming session.

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    Schnauzer’s ears need to be free from wax and dirt not just to maintain cleanliness, but also to prevent infections

    Schnauzers tend to grow some hair in their ears so you need to clean its ears all the time. With the use of tweezers, you need to pluck the hair inside the ears for health reasons. You do not want bacteria to invade the ears of your schnauzer and cause some medical diseases. This is a delicate task, so do not go too deep inside the ear, otherwise , you become the reason for your pet’s ear injury.

    Do Eye Check-up

    Just like your eyes, the eyes of your beloved schnauzer are also sensitive and prone to all sorts of elements. Always inspect the eyes of your pet. Remove any dirt that has accumulated around its eyes. Use a wet cotton ball or a clean cloth for this. While the eyebrows of schnauzers are typically longer, they should not cover the eyes. If there is an eye injury or a foreign object inside the eye, go to the vet at once.

    Mind the Teeth

    Maintain the dental health of your schnauzer. This means healthy teeth and gums. Preferably, tooth brushing is done daily. You need a toothbrush and toothpaste designed for dogs. Some dogs are uncomfortable when you put a toothbrush inside their mouths. If your schnauzer is like that, you may use one of your fingers first as an alternative to the toothbrush .

    How to bathe a schnauzer

    It’s very important to maintain to keep your schnauzer’s teeth healthy and clean

    Inspect the Feet

    When it comes to grooming your schnauzer, you need to check its feet at least once a week. Look for any indications of injury or crack on its pads and paws. There are also pieces of hair on its feet. Trim them to avoid matting. This also includes clipping its nails, which is done once a month.

    Conclusion

    You can do a variety of grooming styles for your pet schnauzer, depending on your preference. What’s more important is that you put the health and comfort of your pet as you learn how to groom a schnauzer accordingly.

    First, while there are definitely differences between fleas and ticks, these pests can be equally annoying for both your pet and you. Fleas are the most common external parasites that you may discover on your dog. Regardless, both fleas and ticks when left untreated, can create chronic infestations and make your pet miserable. And you too can get flea or tick bites that are both annoying and sometimes a health risk.

    Let’s first look at how to identify whether or not your dog has a flea or tick problem.

    Both adult fleas and ticks can be seen with the naked eye. Fleas are wingless insects that have six legs, while ticks are more round in shape, and have eight legs. Fleas prefer warmer temperatures while ticks can survive close to freezing climates. If either of these pests are left untreated, subsequent infection and disease can occur. Being vigilant about signs and symptoms of flea or tick infestations allows you to quickly provide treatment for, and save your pet.

    How to know if your dog has fleas

    Fleas depend upon the host’s blood for survival and many dogs are allergic to the protein in a flea’s saliva causing them to scratch. Next, look for any red bumps appearing on your dog’s groin, belly or under their legs around their tail area.

    Make a habit out of looking at your dog’s brush at grooming time and visually check your dog. You will be able to see the small brown fleas and they will look like dirt, but they scurry when you have your dog lies on their side or back.

    How to know if your dog has ticks

    Ticks are credited with being the worst parasites that any person or dog may have to deal with since they carry diseases that are dangerous to all of us. Like fleas, adult ticks are visible to the naked eye and are even more easily seen after they are full of blood. There are many different types of ticks but they are mostly reddish-brown or grayish-white and about 3/4-inch in size. Many breeds, including all types of schnauzers can suffer from notable loss of appetite, lethargy and fever for about a day when affected.

    What to do if you find a flea or tick on your pet

    If you in fact, discover either fleas or ticks on your schnauzer, remember to proceed thoughtfully. While it may be your first inclination to use a popular spot-on treatment available on the market, you must beware. These treatments contain pesticides the FDA is studying because of their harmful effects on dogs, smaller breeds in particular.

    These harmful chemicals can cause illness, vomiting and even seizures in dogs. They can themselves also cause health problems in people who are sensitive to environmental chemicals like pesticides. These products are basically nerve poisons.

    Some of the toxic chemical names to avoid found in the active ingredients of the conventional medicines and treatments include:

    •Imidacloprid, a systemic insecticide which acts as an insect neurotoxin and affects the central nervous system.

    •Fipronil, a slow acting and highly dangerous poison

    •Permethrin, a chemical known to rapidly harm most mammals and birds

    •Methoprene, that does not kill adult insects but rather affects the growth hormone indicator; and

    •Pyriproxyfen, a chemical used to kill pests on crops and in yards.

    Loving pet owners who use these treatments have trust in them and falsely believe that they are applying a medication to help their pet, when in reality they are exposing their dog and themselves to potent pesticide chemicals.

    Options safe, effective and natural treatments

    Fortunately, there are many safe and effective treatment options including home-remedy sprays and topical liquids that will eliminate fleas, ticks and their eggs. Fleas typically live for about 100 days, while a single tick can live for up to three years. Yet, the biggest concern about fleas and ticks are their eggs.

    Fleas lay 20 to 40 eggs per day for weeks, and a tick will detach from their host and then lay thousands of eggs at one time before they die. Tick larvae, nymphs and adults all feed so it is critical to kill them as effectively as possible.

    Also, when a dog has fleas, they act like a “pepper shaker” because the eggs shed wherever the pet roams and the eggs fall off onto bedding, carpets, and everywhere your dog spends time.

    Fortunately, vacuuming can remove up to 90% of flea eggs from your carpet alone along with larvae and any food source. Make certain to throw away your vacuum bag promptly so that the fleas do not continue to live there. Keep in mind that some pet owners find that hardwood or tile floors are a better choice to help control hidden pests like fleas and ticks.

    Non-carpeted floors are easier to vacuum and keep eggs from lurking in the home. You can use throw rugs, but those are easier to put into a washer and wash in hot water, just like the dog’s bedding.

    With fleas, the first thing you will want to do is wash all of your pet bedding. Put it into the washing machine and use very hot water and a long cycle. This goes for throws in your home and even area rugs. Anything that is regularly used will be a home for fleas and you will want to wash it thoroughly. You may want to include some borax as a mold retardant and freshener. It probably helps clear off the flea eggs also.

    Only adult fleas feed, so bathing your dog will provide him with initial comfort and relief. Introducing 1/2 cup of fresh lemon juice to your normal mild-pet shampoo will also keep fleas away and kill any eggs left behind.

    Ticks are removed by wearing gloves and using tweezers to pinch the tick as close to the skin as possible. Next, slowly but firmly pull the tick off and flush it down the toilet immediately.

    Other remedies for natural repellent include: Rose Geranium Oil, which can be placed between your dogs shoulder blades and at the base of his tail to repel ticks; Lavender Oil on a bandanna makes a wonderful flea-collar; and 2-3 drops of Cedar Oil combined with a quart of water and a cup of distilled vinegar or apple cider vinegar makes excellent natural flea spray. Lastly, a thick layer of table salt over your carpet and furniture is a successful tactic for drying out tick eggs — and vacuum, vacuum, vacuum.