How to bbq brisket

How to bbq brisket

How to Smoke a BBQ Brisket Texas-Style

In this guide, we’ll teach you the Texas-style recipe on how to smoke a bbq brisket. Smoking a bbq brisket isn’t the simplest process, but it is worth it!

Warm weather anytime of year makes a great excuse to break out the BBQ and grill up something tasty. Head to any outdoor gathering and you’re sure to find some hamburgers, hotdogs, or BBQ chicken cooking happily above the flames.

People love these family favorites. But what if you want to step up your BBQ game and really blow everyone’s tastebuds out of the park?

You need to learn how to smoke a BBQ brisket. If you’ve never made brisket before, Texas-style smoked brisket is a great place to start!

Keep reading for an awesome BBQ brisket recipe along with some variations to spice it up.

Table of Contents

The Best Recipe for Texas-Style Smoked BBQ Brisket

Making barbeque brisket takes a little longer than opening a package of hotdogs and throwing them on the grill. But the melt-in-your-mouth tenderness and smoky taste of brisket makes the process entirely worth it.

Take the time to read the complete recipe before you start so you understand the timing exactly. No one wants to wait for hours to eat once they smell the grill fired up.

Advanced Prep Work

You need to prepare a few things to ensure brisket greatness before the big day. Expect around 6 hours of actual cooking time for your BBQ brisket. So start marinating your meat the night before your party.

You also need to soak the mesquite, hickory, oak, or other wood chips or chunks you choose in cold water. Soak them for at least 1 hour before you start grilling.

Ingredients

  • Quality beef brisket (around 5-6 pounds)
  • 1 tablespoon coarse salt (sea salt or kosher)
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder

Optional Seasonings:

  • 2 teaspoons sugar (granulated white, brown, etc.)
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper (up to 1 teaspoon depending on your preferred spice level)

Texas-style BBQ Brisket Recipe

  1. Rinse the beef brisket under cold water and dry it off completely.
  2. Trim the brisket. If it has a layer of fat greater than a ½ inch, trim it down to between ¼ and ½ inch.
  3. Combine all the spices (including the optional seasonings, if you want) together in a bowl.
  4. Rub the mixture onto the trimmed brisket. Be sure to cover all sides and the layer of fat.
  5. Wrap the brisket in plastic wrap or put it into a bowl and cover tightly.
  6. Allow the brisket to sit in the refrigerator for at least 6-8 hours, or overnight.

If you plan to cook the brisket using a charcoal BBQ grill, continue to the next section. If you want to use an electric or gas smoker, skip to the second section.

How to bbq brisket

Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
1162 Calories
46g Fat
158g Carbs
26g Protein

×

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 6 to 8
Amount per serving
Calories 1162
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 46g 60%
Saturated Fat 23g 114%
Cholesterol 61mg 20%
Sodium 3916mg 170%
Total Carbohydrate 158g 57%
Dietary Fiber 12g 43%
Protein 26g
Calcium 487mg 37%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Brisket is simultaneously one of the easiest and most difficult cuts of meat to cook on a barbecue. It is the easiest because all you really need is a piece of brisket (seasoning and sauces are optional); it is challenging since brisket is one of the toughest cuts of meat, and if not cooked properly, which means low and slow, then it will be inedible.

Low and slow cooking is most often done in a smoker and sometimes on a charcoal grill. Many barbecue enthusiasts believe that you cannot cook a brisket on a gas grill, but there are methods that make this possible.

If you do not own a smoker or are not up to smoking a full-sized brisket, this slow-grilled brisket recipe is a great alternative. It calls for using your grill’s rotisserie attachment, but if you do not have one you can cook the brisket in a shallow foil pan on the grill.

When you are planning out your barbecue session it can be tricky figuring out how long to smoke a brisket. There are a lot of variables that go into this equation but the biggest one is whether you are cooking “Low and Slow” or “Hot and Fast”.

A general guideline is, if you are cooking “Low and Slow” at 250F, then a 12 pound brisket will take between 9-15 hours depending upon if you choose to wrap it in butcher paper, aluminium foil or leave it unwrapped. If you are cooking “Hot and Fast” at 300F then you can shorten that cook time down to about 6 hours.

Use the chart below to estimate cook times for different sized briskets.

How to bbq brisket

Limitations of Time/Temperature Guidelines

The guidelines given above are for a full sized packer brisket. The guidelines start to break down when you are smoking smaller pieces like a 3.5 pound section of brisket flat.

A small section of brisket, say 3-4 pounds, will still take at least 5 hours to cook and that is if you are wrapping in foil after it has smoked for at least 2 hours. The reason the time per pound guidelines break down for smaller cuts is that the real variable is not the weight of the brisket. The variable that actually matters is the thickness of the meat.

In full sized briskets there is usually a direct correlation between weight and thickness. For example, a 12 pound full packer brisket will be around 1.5 inches thick in the flat while a 17 pound brisket might be around 2.5 inches thick. It makes sense that the thicker brisket is going to take longer to cook.

However, if we sliced off a four pound section of the flat from the 17 pound brisket it is still going to be about 2.5 inches thick and need a long time to cook.

Brisket is a tough piece of meat and you are going to need a lot of time to get it tender. The chefs at Cook’s Illustrated explain that brisket takes so long to get tender because the meat has a high level of insoluble collagen. The insoluble collagen found in brisket takes much longer to break down than the soluble collagen found in other braising cuts.

A thick, four pound section of brisket is still going to have plenty of insoluble collagen.

Another factor that causes deviations from the time/temperature guides is the nature of the beef itself. The fat content between a Select, Choice and Prime brisket are extremely different and this will impact cook times. In general, the higher the quality of the beef the quicker it will cook. This is especially true when you bump up in quality and cook a Wagyu brisket.

Why Does Butcher Paper and Aluminum Foil Speed Up The Cook?

The use of butcher paper and aluminum foil serves two purposes. The first purpose is to protect the brisket from taking on additional smoke that would impact the flavor and appearance of the bark.

The second purpose is that wrapping the brisket helps it push through “The Stall”. The Stall is the point in which the internal temperature of the brisket will not budge for a couple of hours and is caused by evaporative cooling. The team at Texas A&M University did a demonstration of cooking briskets either wrapped or unwrapped side by side and showed how wrapping helps the brisket push through the stall faster. Here is a link to the graphical data as well as the original article.

While wrapping the brisket in either butcher paper or aluminum foil helps the brisket push through the stall there are trade offs between the two materials. When you wrap with aluminum foil for get a tighter seal which really speeds the cook up. It is commonly held that a brisket wrapped in butcher paper will have a better bark than one wrapped in aluminum foil as the butcher paper lets he brisket “breathe” while the aluminum foil can cause the bark to get soggy and “washed out”.

How to bbq brisket

How Do You Know When The Brisket Is Done?

The biggest mistake people make when smoking a brisket is they take it off the pit before it is finished. An undercooked brisket is going to be tough, dry and not a fun eating experience.

There are two ways to tell when a brisket is finished. The first in that the internal temperature of the flat will be between 200F-210F. The real test for doneness is when you insert your thermometer into the flat it simply slides through the meat. You don’t even need a thermometer to do this test. You can take a wooden skewer and as soon as it is able to slide through the point like it is going through warm butter then you have a finished brisket.

One way people mess up on determining doneness is by measuring the temperature of the point instead of the flat. A brisket is composed of two muscles, the fatty “point” and the lean “flat”. Because the point is so fatty it will ALWAYS finish cooking before the flat. The point will get to 205F and be probe tender while the flat might only be at 190F and is still tough.

The work around is that once the point is fished you can seperate it from the flat. You can wrap the point in foil to keep it warm and return the flat to the pit to finish cooking. Alternatively, now is the time to cut the finished point into cubes, apply sauce and a little more rub, then put back on the smoker to make burnt ends. By the time the burnt ends are ready the flat should be as well!

The Last Step (Extra Time)

If you can plan ahead and have a few extra hours to spare then you can follow the lead of the competition brisket masters and take your brisket to a whole other level.

One of the best brisket cooks in the country is Myron Mixon. Myron has stated multiple times that the most important factor in making an awesome brisket is to start with amazing meat (he cooks American Wagyu). Myron says the second most important factor is to wrap the finished brisket in foil, place in an insulated cooler, and allow it to rest for 2-4 hours before slicing. Multiple competition pitmasters have said the exact same thing. By the way, here is the link to Myron’s complete brisket recipe.

I know that after smoking a brisket for 12 hours that you just want to cut into it and start devouring the slices but, if you have the time and patience, letting it rest in a warm location for a few hours is going to make a HUGE difference.

How to bbq brisket

Knowing how to cook a brisket isn’t an easy task but when you have an idea of what is going on it isn’t that hard either. There are a few ways of doing this job properly and one of them is using your gas grill. Now, most people will say that this is best done on a coal grill but that isn’t true, as gas models can also handle this task properly, depending on the steps you follow. In this article we’ll go through the steps it takes to make the perfect brisket on your gas grill and see are there any other alternatives to this process.

Before we move on with the best methods to get your brisket properly cooked, why don’t you check out this gas grills buyer’s guide, where we’ve compiled a list of the best grills on today’s market and have given you tons of useful information and tips on the topic!

Table of Contents

The Two Methods

There are two main methods that you can cook a brisket with. Those are:

    Grilling it Cooking it in the oven

Now, let’s take a look at both methods individually and see which are their exact steps as well as advantages over the other method…

Grilling A Brisket

Before you get to the grilling part there are some preparations you need to undergo. The first one is to season the brisket itself.

Rub it with salt and pepper and place it on a baking sheet for about an hour. This step helps the water to be drawn out of your brisket prior to the smoking which you will do in a few moments.

The second thing is to prepare the wood chips. Get 4 soaked cups of wood chips and 2 cups of dried ones. The best kinds for this job are hickory, oak, apple, etc.

When it comes to the actual gas grill, keep only one of the burners fired up (or one side of the grill). Let it warm up to around 220-250 degrees which is the perfect temperature for the job. Put your smoke box on top and place roughly half a cup of the soaked chips. If you want to increase the smoke without increasing the temperature add some of the dry wood chips.

Put the brisket with its fatty side up as far away as possible from the burner and close the top lid of the grill. Check on the wood chips and the brisket every one hour and refill with soaked chips if you run low. Keep the openings to a minimum.

Smoke the brisket for around 12 hours and turn it every 3-4 hours (only if the cooking is uneven!). When you are done the thickest part should read around 200 degrees while the meat itself should be tender and should come apart easily.

Pro Tip: You need to cook with the fat side up. Of course, it is a matter of choice and preference, but if you do that all the flavor and sauce will drip through the brisket itself and will base around it resulting in a richer taste!

If you are wondering what type of gas grill you need, check out the Weber 49010001 which is ideal for this and many other purposes!

Using your oven

How to bbq brisket

If you don’t want to wait all day for your brisket to be ready then this method is just the right thing for you. Wrap the brisket in tin foil and place it in a preheated to 250 degrees oven. Let it cook for around 4 hours until it reaches that same 200 degree temperature.

What this method lacks is that you won’t have the same smoked flavor but you can actually combine both methods with the first few hours on the grill and then placing it in the oven. That way it will take some of the smoking taste and flavor and maintain it throughout the oven cooking.

After you are done cooking the brisket let it rest for half an hour. Then, if you are into the Texan way, eat it with no sauce but a little vinegar and BBQ sauce won’t hurt!

If smoking ribs is what you are after, we suggest checking out this article on the topic.

Related Questions

How Long Do You Cook Brisket Per Pound?

There is no exact answer to this question, as different temperatures and grill styles (coal, gas, etc) will handle the brisket differently. As a rule of thumb, try to stick to 1 hour of cooking per every pound of your brisket.

How long do you cook a brisket on a charcoal grill?

Charcoal grill cooking of a brisket isn’t much different than the one done on a gas grill with the main difference being how hard it is to keep the exact 220-250 degree range of temperature. When that is done, place the brisket over the indirect heat portion of your grill and smoke it for around 4 hours (or up to 8 hours for larger briskets).

How long do you cook a brisket at 225 degrees?

The time it takes for a brisket to be properly cooked at a 225 degree temperature is around 6 to 8 hours. Once the temperature of the thermometer (instant read one) reaches 175 degrees, your meal is ready.

Final Words

Cooking the perfect brisket is an art and most modern home-chefs think that the only way to properly do this is with a coal grill. Still, there are countless of other recipes by using a gas grill and even an oven. Another way of doing it is by braising it, which is the traditional way in some states and it results in a very tasty end product. Still, knowing how to cook a brisket on a gas grill is an advantage as it will save you a lot of effort required when cooking on top of coals. We hope that this article was helpful to you and if you got any cooking related questions, feel free to reach us on via contact page!

How to bbq brisket

Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
1162 Calories
46g Fat
158g Carbs
26g Protein

×

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 6 to 8
Amount per serving
Calories 1162
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 46g 60%
Saturated Fat 23g 114%
Cholesterol 61mg 20%
Sodium 3916mg 170%
Total Carbohydrate 158g 57%
Dietary Fiber 12g 43%
Protein 26g
Calcium 487mg 37%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Brisket is simultaneously one of the easiest and most difficult cuts of meat to cook on a barbecue. It is the easiest because all you really need is a piece of brisket (seasoning and sauces are optional); it is challenging since brisket is one of the toughest cuts of meat, and if not cooked properly, which means low and slow, then it will be inedible.

Low and slow cooking is most often done in a smoker and sometimes on a charcoal grill. Many barbecue enthusiasts believe that you cannot cook a brisket on a gas grill, but there are methods that make this possible.

If you do not own a smoker or are not up to smoking a full-sized brisket, this slow-grilled brisket recipe is a great alternative. It calls for using your grill’s rotisserie attachment, but if you do not have one you can cook the brisket in a shallow foil pan on the grill.

How to bbq brisket

Cooking brisket is more about technique than a recipe. Seasoning isn’t as important as how you actually smoke the brisket. Yes, it affects the final result but not as much as the smoking process.

When shopping look for a whole brisket, which is comprised of two muscles – the point and the flat. You want even thickness from side to side on the flat end, as well as a flexible flat.

How to bbq brisket How to bbq brisket

HOT TIP: Some people either cut a notch or stick a tooth pick in this corner, so that they know which direction to slice once cooked.

Looking at a top down view of the brisket with the flat facing up, you should see the point sticking out from under the flat on the right side. Notice how the grain of the flat runs diagonally to the upper left corner. Once cooked, you will slice perpendicular to the grain.

How to bbq brisket How to bbq brisket

HOT TIP: Some people either cut a notch or stick a tooth pick in this corner, so that they know which direction to slice once cooked.

Make sure that you have planned for your brisket. Cooking a brisket takes time. Even if hotter cooking temperatures of 275°F to 325°F, it can still be 7-8 hours for cook with a 4 hour hold. Add that to the 12 hour seasoning time and you have a full 24 hour process.

Preparing your brisket for smoking consists of trimming injecting, and seasoning. We suggest having this done about 12 hours before the brisket goes onto the grill or smoker.

Most whole briskets come with a fat cap on one side. Use a very sharp knife trimming this to a quarter inch in thickness.

How to bbq brisket How to bbq brisket

Always inject briskets so that the needle is parallel with the grain of the beef.

How to bbq brisket How to bbq brisket

Now it is time to season. Simple is better when thinking about rubs for brisket. Here are three options that you can use. Don’t worry about using too much rub, it’s a large piece of meat and can take it.

How to bbq brisket How to bbq brisketHow to bbq brisket How to bbq brisket

Once prepared, keep the brisket well refrigerated until it is time to smoke. Your brisket needs to be cold when it hits the grates.

Set your grill or smoker up for indirect cooking. Your brisket will not be directly over the heat source.

For the Charcoal Grill 780, the coal and wood are placed on the left. Notice the gap in the middle. This is where live coals will be placed. The brisket will go on the right side, away from the direct heat.

How to bbq brisket How to bbq brisket

Start a batch of live coals using a chimney starter.

When adding live coals, they will provide initial heat and start the other coals and wood to for a sustained heat.

How to bbq brisket How to bbq brisket

If you are using a Kettleman™ grill, we recommend using a fuse style burn set up like this to get longer, steady cooking temperatures.

How to bbq brisket How to bbq brisket

If you are lucky enough to have a Char-Broil® Digital Electric Smoker, it’s super easy. Just preheat the unit as normal and put the brisket diagonally on one of the grates.

HOT TIP: Whatever you use, you don’t want a billowing, thick smoke. This will leave you with a brisket that tastes like charcoal. The smoke should be thin and very light in color.

A key to a great brisket is moisture.

  • Add moisture to the air by using a water pan in the cooker. For the Charcoal Grill 780, you can put a foil steam pan on the gates directly above the coals. For the Kettleman™ grill, you can just put a foil steam pan in the center of the fire ring. he Digital Electric Smoker comes with an integrated water pan.
  • Add moisture directly to the brisket during the cook. Use a highly seasoned mop, dabbing the brisket every hour or so. This will also add layers of flavor. You can also use a squirt bottle with beef stock to spritz the brisket every hour or so as well.
  • Retain moisture towards the end of the cook using the “Texas Crutch.” Wrap the brisket in foil or butcher paper. Add beef stock to the foil packet to finish your cook with a braise. This is a much gentler process than smoking. We suggest doing this when the “bark,” or outer surface, is very dark, usually somewhere around an internal temperature of 160°F to 175°F.

Using a thermometer to monitor the brisket’s internal temperature. There is no exact temperature at which you pull the brisket off of the grill. After it hits an internal temperature of 200°F in the thickest portion, we suggest sliding either a temperature probe or bbq skewer into the brisket to test its tenderness. When the probe or skewer slides in with little resistance, the brisket is ready to come off.

How to bbq brisket

The bigger a cut of meat, the more intimidating it is to cook. But I was ready to tackle my fears when I saw the new brisket recipe from 2017 Top 50 Restaurant Mamaleh’s in our December issue. Even though I’ve braised many pounds of pork shoulder and cook the annual Thanksgiving turkey, something about cooking a 6-8 lbs. brisket was terrifying to me. It was also the most expensive meat I’ve purchased at nearly $50, and watching the numbers tick up at the register at Wegmans made my heartbeat do the same. Thankfully, it wasn’t as scary as I thought it would be, and it turned out so well that my family of five ate the entire thing over the course of a few days. It didn’t come together without a few hiccups, though.

I was raised by a Jewish mom, but we didn’t celebrate all the high holidays. I didn’t have my first brisket until I went to Katz’s for a sandwich in 2011, and most associations with the dish were of the barbecue variety rather than the wine-braised Rosh Hashanah situation. To get myself into the right headspace, I talked to a few coworkers for tips and pep talks, but ultimately it was about following the very specific directions for the brisket recipe. The multi-day process seems like a massive project, but really it’s about making sure the meat is properly seasoned (salting ahead of time is key) and that the sauce isn’t fatty (refrigerating or freezing so it rises to the top and can be tossed easily). Here’s what else I learned from my first foray into brisket-cooking.

1. Salt It and Forget It

Okay, maybe don’t totally forget about it, but a few days before you cook your brisket, heavily salt it, and store it tightly-wrapped in plastic wrap in the fridge. This will tenderize and season the meat like a less fussy dry brine. And really wrap it tight, because mine leaked a bit and I had to clean out the fridge before I started cooking. I only did a day and a half in advance, but you can do this up to three days ahead.

2. Check Your Roasting Pan Before You Wreck Your Roasting Pan

You have to sear off the brisket to caramelize the meat before letting it slow-cook in the oven at 275°, so it goes from stove to oven. Afterward, you bring it back to the stovetop to thicken the sauce. My family’s cheap nonstick roasting pan from 2004 was not safe for using on a stovetop—it immediately started smoking over low flame. I ran out and bought a Calphalon Signature roasting pan as an early Christmas gift for my parents. It was two of the eight roasting pans at the stores that actually was stovetop-to-oven safe—the other was All-Clad, both stainless steel and non-stick for both—which will come in handy for other stovetop-to-oven braises like a leg of lamb for Easter.

Helloooo, beautiful brisket.

Photo by Alex Lau

3. Get That Meat Deeeeeply Caramelized

Flipping 6 lbs. of brisket is not easy. I used a spatula and tongs at the same time to get the job done. I should have let it caramelize for at least a few minutes more because there were still some gray spots on the meat from where it cooked but didn’t get brown—especially on the side with the fat cap. Learn from my mistakes and get as much beautiful browned flavor in your brisket before it cooks low and slow for a few hours. The directions say 7-10 minutes per side, and I’d go for at least 10 minutes. Proper caramelization takes time, so don’t cook it too fast!

4. Don’t Drown Your Brisket

The problem with cutting a recipe down from commercial measurements to a home kitchen is that sometimes the BA test kitchen’s pans are bigger than home cooks’. To braise properly, you don’t want the meat to be all the way covered with stock and wine—liquid should come up about halfway on the brisket. For me, that was about 1 ½ quarts of chicken stock, but a bigger pan may need 2 quarts.

5. For a Quick Fat Skim, Use Your Freezer

Basically editor Amiel Stanek told me to stick the whole pan in the freezer—if you have the space!—to speed up the fat-skimming process. The fat floats to the top, solidifies, and can be easily lifted out and thrown away. This makes for a non-greasy sauce. I managed to do most of the three-day process in one day because of this. I seared in the morning, let it cook during the day, and took the brisket out to rest on a sheet pan underneath foil. I took the whole roasting pan filled with broth and drippings and put it in the freezer to do its fat-skimming work. After thickening the sauce, the brisket warmed through, and dinner was served with the creamiest mashed potatoes I’ve ever had, and green beans for color and health. I over-cooked my brisket a bit so it was more shreddy than beautifully sliced, but it disappeared so fast from the platter that it didn’t matter. What are you waiting for? Your brisket time is now.

How to bbq brisket

Anyone from Texas will tell you that BBQ cuisine is all about the brisket. This American staple is beloved by all. Those first few tender bites of a freshly cooked brisket will make your mouth water just thinking about it.

Cooking and enjoying a brisket for dinner is a homey and comfort meal that we all love.

A smoked beef brisket is a popular dish that you can order from Texas-style BBQ joints and restaurants across the globe.

However, we all prefer meals made from the heart, right at home.

How to bbq brisketBut can you cook a brisket at home? We love that smokey flavor and crispy exterior texture, and you may be wondering how this is possible to recreate.

Of course if you have a smoker, you know that there are thousands of recipes that tell you how to smoke a brisket. It takes time, dedication and a lot of practice.

Making a traditional Texas barbecue brisket will take you forever to do. But when you execute the perfect brisket, you can call yourself a pitmaste r.

However, smoking a brisket joint will take you all day. The preparation and seasoning will take hours before you even get to smoking it.

We would argue that the results are worth every minute.

If you’re being held back from enjoying a delicious cooked brisket because you do not have a smoker, forget about it. You can make a beautiful brisket on a gas grill!

Using a gas grill to cook a brisket is an easy way of delivering that Texas taste sensation right in the comfort of your own home.

If you are thinking there’s no way you can make a brisket on a gas grill and deliver the result, we are here to show you how to cook a brisket on a gas grill.

Step By Step

  1. Set yourself some time before you are ready to cook your brisket. About an hour before preparing your gas grill, you need to start seasoning the meat. Grab a rimmed baking sheet and place your brisket cut on top. (If your brisket isn’t trimmed, check out our guide on how to do that here)
  2. Mix your salt, spices and pepper into a bowl together to create your brisket rub. Next, you need to cover your brisket with the mixture and season all over. This should be a super thick layer, and try to get a texture that resembles salt stuck to the brisket.
  3. Following this, you must leave the meat to sit at room temperature for about an hour. This allows the seasoning to penetrate the meat ready for cooking.
  4. The preparation is not over. Now you will need a source of smoke for flavoring. For this part you can use either wood chips or wood pellets in a smoker tube. You should soak six cups of chips for around 30 minutes prior to cooking. Try to leave 2 cups of wood chips dry as this will help the smoking process. The favorite types of woods for smoking a brisket are hickory, oak and cherry.
  5. You can create your own smoker kit by placing the wood chips in a disposable aluminum pan and cover it with foil. We do this by waiting until the chips have soaked, then we drain them and add them to the foil pan. Cover the pan with aluminum foil and poke holes in the top to allow the smoke to pass through.
  6. While you rest your brisket, set up your gas grill. You want to have a temperature of between 225-250 degrees to get that perfect brisket. This is achievable with a two zone set up, where only one side of your grill’s burners are turned on.
  7. You want to have your heat and smoking method on one side of the grill and your brisket on the far other side. So, in this sense, light the grill burner to medium on the left side, and place your smoker box on this side.
  8. A smoker box or kit will be a tray filled with your soaked wood chips. Add 1-2 cups of your dry chips to increase the smoke levels and close your grill. After a few moments, it will begin to smoke.
  9. You can then place your brisket on the opposite side of the grill away from your smoking wood chips. Cover your grill and wait for the smoke to work its magic. Try not to open and check the meat too often as you will lose your heat.
  10. Make sure that your brisket is fat side up, since the flow of heat will be coming from the top side of the brisket in a two zone setup. Also, as the juices cook they will drip down and cover your meat in delicious flavors. Always place a pan underneath the brisket as it cooks to catch all of the drip. You can then use this to baste the top of your brisket to add more taste.
  11. Keep smoking your brisket, and consider wrapping it after 6 hours or so. A rough guide of how long to smoke a brisket is about 10-12 hours in total.
  12. You should use a meat thermometer to check the internal temperature of the brisket. This way, you know that it is cooked when it reaches about 180 degrees. However, for a really tender and juicy meaty meal, you want to let it get to 195-203 degrees.
  13. Once you have checked your brisket is cooked correctly, it can be removed from the gas grill, and you should leave it to rest for about a half hour before you slice. The best brisket should be very tender and almost falling apart when you slice through.

Best Brisket Tips

The key with cooking a brisket on a gas grill is to always remember to cook it low and slow.

Brisket is made from a cow’s chest and breast area.

This is built up of connective tissue and muscles, so the low and slow method helps to relax the muscles and tenderize them into that delicious result that we want.

You want to take time to allow the smoke to flavor the meat, the low cooking temperature ensures that the brisket will be soft and succulent for the perfect Texas BBQ brisket.