How to be a beauty queen

How to be a beauty queen

WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO BE A BEAUTY QUEEN?

  • Post author:missphilusa
  • Post published: April 15, 2015
  • Post category:Blog
  • Post comments:3,013 Comments

How to be a beauty queen
LOS ANGELES — Miss World Megan Young, Miss International Bea Santiago, Miss Earth Jamie Herrell — all Filipina beauties who went on to win in some of the most prestigious pageants in the world. Not to be outdone are the equally impressive and accomplished women, Miss Universe Runners-Up
Venus Raj and Ara Arida and Janine Tugonon.

We see them on our TV screens and on the Internet everyday, being their lovely, graceful selves. Sometimes, we can’t help but wonder, what does it take to be a beauty queen?
Do you need to have the good looks of Aphrodite, yet at the same time have the allure and sex appeal of Poison Ivy? Do you need to be as intelligent and as eloquent as Emma Watson, yet be as charming and witty as Emma Stone?
For Filipina girls across the US who are curious as curious as we are, you can find out for yourselves what really makes a beauty queen by joining one of the most esteemed pageants for Filipino American ladies this side of the world.

Young, beautiful, smart, and talented ladies are invited to join the prestigious Ms. Philippines USA and Ms. Young Philippines USA beauty pageants.

Aspiring candidates must be at least 5’2” tall, and aged between 14-17 years old for Ms. Young Philippines USA, and 18-25 years old for Ms. Philippines USA.

Ideal candidates are single, never married, and have at least 50% Filipino lineage — meaning at least one of her parents must be a natural-born Filipino.

Candidates will be asked to fill out an application form to be submitted to pageant organizers, and will undergo a screening process. Applicants must provide at least two photos for the screening process — a headshot and a full body shot.

But aside from the physical requirements, what else does it take to become the next Miss Philippines USA beauty queen?

According to fashion designer and pageant founder Lou Razon, the ideal candidate should have the confidence to win.
“She must be outgoing, positive, driven and has the desire to represent the Filipino-American community while doing humanitarian work,” Razon said.

How to train a Filipina beauty queen

Written by Janelle Paris

Updated Jan 26, 2017 2:04:00 PM

How to be a beauty queen

Maxine Medina doing the walk as taught by Jonas Gaffud, head of Aces & Queens, a training camp for aspiring beauty queens.

Manila (CNN Philippines Life) — Jonas Gaffud knows beauty when he sees it, and what he sees is more than skin-deep.

He saw it in Janine Tugonon, Shamcey Supsup, Venus Raj, and later on, Pia Wurtzbach. He saw the same potential that he sees in Maxine Medina, the Philippine candidate for this year’s Miss Universe. On January 30, the coronation day of Miss Universe 2016, he wishes to see another one of his alagas make it to the final stages of the competition.

“What strikes me is how classy women can be, it’s the aura that I [see] in them,” Gaffud says.

Gaffud heads Aces & Queens, a training camp for aspiring beauty queens. He gets no pay from this venture; he does so in the service of the beauty and talent that they find. Gaffud recalls that the agency used to scout for girls, making use of connections in the modeling world. After 2010, when Venus Raj made it to the top 5 of the Miss Universe competition, Gaffud says girls have been approaching them. They want to be beauty queens.

Lately, it appears that beauty also crucially lies in the words one says. Having just a pretty face may not work when under the scrutiny of Miss Universe organizers, whom Gaffud says look for a complete package.

How to be a beauty queen

“What strikes me is how classy women can be, it’s the aura that I [see] in them,” Gaffud says.

No beauty in mediocrity

To be the complete package takes a lot of training, and queens are told to steel themselves emotionally in order to handle the pressure that comes with competing in any beauty pageant.

“I don’t believe in mediocrity,” says Gaffud. “We’re trying to make the girls more engaging, powerful, so they know what to do and what to say [onstage and] in public.” Achieving this takes training on many fronts; beauty queens have to know the proper walk and looks suited for their built, they have to keep healthy, and they have to be smart.

Quite simply, maintaining good physical health and runway walks are easily perfected through dedication. Show up for trainings. Never use an invalid excuse for underperformance. These are all Nad Bronce — who works with Gaffud — asks from his trainees.

A Q&A trainer like Bronce does not believe in formula. As a long-time pageant enthusiast and trainer, he has seen pageant trends as they ebbed and flowed. They anticipate this degree of unpredictability by developing good trainer-contestant dynamic and comprehensive training sessions.

How to be a beauty queen

Aces & Queens’ Q&A coach Nad Bronce giving Medina tips on the question and answer portion of the upcoming Miss Universe pageant.

On Bronce’s part, he holds Q&A trainings with a classroom type set-up. Beauty queens are seated as classmates, Bronce asks possible questions, trainees answer, comment, and give each other suggestions. Bronce fondly recalls that the reigning Miss Universe, Pia Wurtzbach, was his star student.

Si Pia, palagi siyang nagtataas ng kamay, giving alternative answers. Ganoon siyang kapursigido (Pia always raises her hand, giving alternative answers. She’s that determined),” he says of Wurtzbach. She kept three notebooks filled with points from his classes. She would use it even after her crowning as Miss Universe, Bronce fondly shares.

But what constitutes as smart in Miss Universe and in the world of beauty pageants may be a bit more challenging to pin down. Pageant judges and enthusiasts seem to have an eye for the perfect combination of wits and beauty. For most, cracking the code is crucial as all pageants culminate in the Q&A segment.

How to be a beauty queen

Former Miss Universe winners offer advice to Medina and future contestants. Gloria Diaz (left) encourages to answer in Filipino, while Margie Moran (right) advises to read up on current events. Photo by JL JAVIER

No beauty in Filipino?

Historically, the metric of intelligence for the Filipino audience is mediated by language.

“[Answering in English] has to do with Filipinos trying to project a global image through the English language, this entitlement to cosmopolitanism, to a career out there in New York,” says J. Pilapil Jacobo, a Filipino instructor at the Ateneo De Manila University and long-time beauty pageant enthusiast.

“The standard of intelligence here in bourgeois Philippines is Anglophony, [and] it’s an attitude that can be attributed to colonialism,” he adds. Maxine Medina, the country’s bet this year, was recently criticized for not being able to express herself in English at her send-off party on January 10.

For the Filipino audience, confidence and authenticity are not enough. One must have eloquence in the English language too.

“Intelligence and language acquisition, or eloquence [in a particular language], are not mutually exclusive,” Jacobo emphasizes. “[If Maxine succeeds in answering in Filipino] it’s a postcolonial point — that finally, Filipinos can be confident, be beautiful, in their own language,” Jacobo believes. He saw partial triumph in 1994 Miss Universe Sushmita Sen, who articulated her answer in a kind of English only Indians speak.

Jacobo here refers to Hinglish. “Her English is an English mediated by Hindu philosophy, the kind of thinking that can only be born and raised in New Delhi, for example.”

But the ultimate hope is to be able to show the Filipina’s wit in Filipino. Jacobo is hopeful and certainly would like to see the country’s Miss Universe representatives use our language soon — even if the organizers and the audience of the pageant remain Anglophonic.

“[Maxine] is a Filipina and I don’t think it will make her less of a beauty queen if she will decide to use our language on the grand coronation,” believes Gloria Diaz, Miss Universe 1969. She also wishes that contestants not forget to enjoy themselves.

But Medina has big shoes to fill, competing the year after Wurtzbach was crowned. Preparation is key, says Margie Moran, Miss Universe 1973. And preparation goes beyond physical training; a future Miss Universe must be well-read, Moran believes. “You must know what’s happening in the world.”

Miss Universe Philippines-Parañaque Bella Ysmael prefers breaking into a sweat over rigid exercise routines

How to be a beauty queen

How to be a beauty queen Practicing more yoga has taken her to a new level of self-understanding, says the beauty queen.

With all huge gatherings halted due to the pandemic, concert fans and theater geeks can only reminisce on past performances and dream of heading back to their favorite venues. One other group that has been left in the lurch are the country’s many beauty pageant enthusiasts, some of whom can recite the names of winners and runners-up of all the major crowns going back decades.

But what about the contestants themselves who spend months preparing, making sure they look their best on pageant night?

Ysabella “Bella” Roxas Ysmael was determined to join the Miss Universe pageant this year. Two years ago, she placed first runner-up in the Century Tuna Superbods competition, which helped boost her popularity in the pageant circuit.

With her almond-shaped eyes, high forehead and full lips, this 24-year-old is already blessed with the makings of a beauty queen. She credits her toned body to the rigors of dance, ballet in particular.

“I never really considered myself a ‘fitness buff,’ as exercising isn’t my favorite thing to do,” Ysmael told Lifestyle in an email interview. “Exercise for me is more about dancing, yoga, running, boxing—anything I can do to remain active and break a sweat.”

She started taking ballet classes as a toddler. “I’ve always been known as the ballerina. I try out other dances, too, like a bit of jazz and contemporary ballet, plus the occasional hip-hop class when I feel like I need to explore a different dance world.

“What most people don’t know about me is that I am also quite sporty. I played volleyball in elementary, badminton in high school. I enjoy playing football on the beach with my cousins and friends, and I used to play basketball out on the street with my brothers and their friends. Now, I’m more into water sports—surfing and wakeboarding are two things I’m quite obsessed with,” Ysmael said.

Her decision to join the Superbods competition seemed almost unplanned. “I decided to join just about a month before auditions so I really went hardcore and exercised more than I usually did. My body was in transformation throughout that competition. I wasn’t completely ready for it in the beginning, but I did gain a lot of new knowledge on what it meant to take care of my body that I was able to apply to myself.”

Her best shape

Joining Miss Universe Philippines was more deliberate. Ysmael had months to prepare with a physical trainer who helped get her into her best shape.

“We would work out four or five times a week. I also had ballet classes during the weekends, and I did my best to maintain a balanced diet,” she said.

Her hard work paid off, and she was chosen Miss Universe Philippines-Parañaque. Ysmael said that when they started in February, she had to get used to the rigid schedule. The pageant and corollary events, however, were later postponed.

“Since March, the pageant has been more online, with me and the other candidates remaining active on our social media platforms, conducting meetings with the MUPh Team, basically doing everything from home.”

How to be a beauty queen Miss Universe Philippines-Parañaque Bella Ysmael: “I was able to find my comfort zone in exercise.”

The lockdown gave her more time to exercise because she didn’t need to worry about travel time, call times or schedules. “I had the liberty to decide how long I was going to exercise and when I would do that. This helped me a lot, because I was able to find my comfort zone in exercise and what routines helped me best,” Ysmael said.

Lockdown has also allowed her to be more introspective, more attuned to herself.

“A huge chunk of my time in lockdown has been dedicated to connecting with myself. We take so much time in our usual schedules traveling, working, being distracted with our busy lives that we often overlook our mental and physical needs. I have taken this time to practice more yoga and meditation, and I can definitely say it has taken me to a different level of understanding of who I am and what I have been doing.”

Although many of us have settled into a routine, the prolonged lockdown and its many privations (human contact, shared meals, normal conversation) have affected our mental health in ways we have yet to fully understand.

She shares a few tips for those who may be struggling.

“When you feel down, and can’t seem to shake it off, it’s good to sit in silence for a few minutes and just try to keep your head clear. It can help you understand what you’re feeling, or simply calm you down.

“If that doesn’t help, I suggest moving. If your knees feel stiff, shake them. If your neck feels tired, move it around. If your hips feel stuck, sway them around and side to side. Keeping a healthy mind is essential during a time like this, and it is crucial to our productivity in quarantine,” Ysmael said. INQ

How to be a beauty queen

WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO BE A BEAUTY QUEEN?

  • Post author:missphilusa
  • Post published: April 15, 2015
  • Post category:Blog
  • Post comments:3,013 Comments

How to be a beauty queen
LOS ANGELES — Miss World Megan Young, Miss International Bea Santiago, Miss Earth Jamie Herrell — all Filipina beauties who went on to win in some of the most prestigious pageants in the world. Not to be outdone are the equally impressive and accomplished women, Miss Universe Runners-Up
Venus Raj and Ara Arida and Janine Tugonon.

We see them on our TV screens and on the Internet everyday, being their lovely, graceful selves. Sometimes, we can’t help but wonder, what does it take to be a beauty queen?
Do you need to have the good looks of Aphrodite, yet at the same time have the allure and sex appeal of Poison Ivy? Do you need to be as intelligent and as eloquent as Emma Watson, yet be as charming and witty as Emma Stone?
For Filipina girls across the US who are curious as curious as we are, you can find out for yourselves what really makes a beauty queen by joining one of the most esteemed pageants for Filipino American ladies this side of the world.

Young, beautiful, smart, and talented ladies are invited to join the prestigious Ms. Philippines USA and Ms. Young Philippines USA beauty pageants.

Aspiring candidates must be at least 5’2” tall, and aged between 14-17 years old for Ms. Young Philippines USA, and 18-25 years old for Ms. Philippines USA.

Ideal candidates are single, never married, and have at least 50% Filipino lineage — meaning at least one of her parents must be a natural-born Filipino.

Candidates will be asked to fill out an application form to be submitted to pageant organizers, and will undergo a screening process. Applicants must provide at least two photos for the screening process — a headshot and a full body shot.

But aside from the physical requirements, what else does it take to become the next Miss Philippines USA beauty queen?

According to fashion designer and pageant founder Lou Razon, the ideal candidate should have the confidence to win.
“She must be outgoing, positive, driven and has the desire to represent the Filipino-American community while doing humanitarian work,” Razon said.

Ageless” profiles seniors who are pursuing their passions well into their golden years, from drag queen performances to competitive sports.

Beauty queens come in all shapes, sizes and ages.

At least that’s the stance of contestants in the Ms. Pennsylvania Senior America Pageant, where older women compete for the title of Pennsylvania’s most beautiful senior.

Denise Russo-Caiazzo, the administrator for Ms. Pennsylvania Senior America, explained the pageant’s aim to honor the “Age of Elegance.”

“Any woman over the age of 60 …. we’ve reached a point where we’re done with our careers, we’ve raised our children, our children are grown so we just become elegant women and our beauty is emanating from the inside,” she said.

The pageant judges contestants based on a handful of different categories: personal interview, evening gown, philosophy of life and talent, to name a few.

In 2019, In The Know followed a handful of contestants competing for the title of Ms. Pennsylvania Senior America.

How to be a beauty queenCredit: In The Know

One named Esmerelda said, as she was putting lipstick on ahead of the competition, “you work with what you have.”

“I’m competing because it’s an opportunity to share that we’re not dead,” she told In The Know. “After 60, life only begins.”

Another contestant, Connie, said she’s been coaching women for the last 10 years and always telling them to step out of their comfort zones.

“When I heard about this, I decided that I would take my own advice,” she told In The Know.

She showed off her martial arts skills in the talent portion of the competition.

A third contestant named Faye told In The Know she was excited to hear the results of the competition.

“I’m happy and I’m confident that I’ve done the best that I can do,” she said. “Can’t ask for anything more than the best.”

Russo-Caiazzo shared what quality the judges try to identify in each of the contestants before choosing a winner.

“Age doesn’t mean anything to them, they really have that zest for life,” she said.

At the end of the day, Esmerelda wowed the judges and was crowned Miss Pennsylvania Senior America.

How to be a beauty queenCredit: In The Know

“It’s really astounding, but I’ve got big shoes to fill and I’ve got to sit down and reassess how I can do the best that I can do for the organization,” she told In The Know. “You know we’ve done that, been there, and now you know we just want to be recognized, we want to be respected, and want to still continue to contribute.”

If you enjoyed this story, you might also like reading about America’s oldest performing drag queen.

How to be a beauty queen

Are you fascinated by the beauty of queens? Well, it is next to impossible to be a queen but it is possible to look like one. You heard that right! With the right beauty and makeup tricks, you can also look like a beauty queen. Read on to know more on this.

1. Use a cleanser

Before starting your makeup, cleanse your skin with a good cleanser. Use an exfoliating cleanser so that it helps to remove all the unwanted dust from your skin. The idea is to make your skin shine in the most natural way. Cleanser will also help to even out your skin tone so that your skin shines naturally.

2. Use a liquid foundation

To get that natural glow on your skin, use a liquid foundation for your makeup. Use a tone that ideally matches up your skin tone or is a shade lighter than your skin. Apply the foundation with gentle strokes on your face and your neck. Use air brush technique to get the right finish and touch for your foundation. This will help to make your skin look flawless.

3. Use a good concealer

It is important to use a good concealer for your face. But, use a shade lighter than your foundation. Use a brush and gently apply it all over your face where you see visible spots. Also, apply the concealer under your eyes to hide your black spots or under eye circles if any. Use a concealer which suits your skin.

4. Use a loose powder

Complete your beauty makeup by using a loose powder on your face. This is to enhance your face to make it look brighter. Choose a same color or a shade darker. For beauty queen makeup, the ideal shade would be bronze. Apply it around your cheek bones to make your face look brighter. This would really help to define your look. Complete the look by applying a bronzer.

  • Share
  • Whatsapp
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
  • Linkedin
  • SMS
  • Email

How to be a beauty queen

“I won [Miss Syracuse], Miss New York State, and Miss America all within six months, so I went from my junior year to all of a sudden, I was the first Black Miss America in 1983. And I had death threats because we’re talking 37 years ago,” she said on ‘The Fat Joe Show’.

“A lot of people don’t like to be confronted with diversity, and I was the symbol of that, so I had to prove that I was smart enough. I was talented enough,” she added. However, towards the end of her reign, Vanessa had to give up her crown after Penthouse magazine published her now “iconic” unauthorized nude photographs, which were shot in 1982. “After being Miss America, there was an issue with some pictures I had done, which did not have a release, and they were sold behind my back. Six weeks before I was finishing my year, I resigned,” she opened up.

Due to constant pressure from the Miss America Organization, Vanessa stepped down from her throne and was replaced by first runner-up Suzette Charles. Still, after a long thirty-two years, Miss America CEO Sam Haskell offered her a public apology during the Miss America 2016 pageant.

Even after all her struggles, she worked hard and is now a celebrated American singer, actor, and fashion designer. “I never wanted to be a beauty queen, and, of course, I never wanted to be a scandalized beauty queen. So, I had so much judgment from a very early age against me,” she gasped. “People thought I would just disappear. And I thought, ‘Once the dust settles, you’ll get to know who I really am.’ And, that’s how I live my life,” she said as she concluded.

Checkout the complete interview in the post below:

The former Miss Philippines is in Abu Dhabi this week to hold a series of workshops on how to win in pageants

How to be a beauty queen

Miss Universe runner-up Venus Raj during an interview at the Club Of Asia in Wafi Mall, Dubai. Image Credit: A.K Kallouche/Gulf News

Miss Universe 2010 fourth runner-up Maria Venus Raj is visiting the UAE to conduct modelling workshops in Abu Dhabi from November 30 to December 3. The 28-year-old Filipino-Indian beauty queen and model will be joined by model and actor Mark McMahon for the Ramp Modelling Workshop in UAE 2016 at the Intaleq Training Centre and at the Al Jaheli Theatre of the Armed Forces Officers Club.

“Basically, I’ll be teaching children who are as young as four, five, seven years old. And then probably 13 and above — so [it will be a mix of] adult and children,” says Raj.

Raj will also be joined by Philippine “beauty queen maker” Jonas Gaffud, who has been credited for moulding beauty queens such as the reigning Miss Universe Pia Wurtzbach, former Miss Philippines and now Victoria’s Secret model Janine Tugonon, and Miss Universe runners-up Shamcey Supsup and MJ Lastimosa.

Watch: Filipino-Indian MissUniverse runner-up VenusRaj live in Dubai.

Gulf News tabloid! sat down with Raj for a one-on-one interview ahead of her workshop in Abu Dhabi.

What does it take to become a model and beauty titlist? What are the skills and qualities needed to become one?

I don’t know really what qualifications are needed to be a model, but I can speak for myself and on behalf of beauty queens. We are taught how to [walk the] ramp like a ramp model, but there’s a difference when walking like a beauty queen and like a model. What supermodels do is different from what we are taught to do. But, based on experience, I’ve learned also a lot from the modelling industry.

I think one important thing is that you should like what you do, especially with children. It’s nice if they like what they do, because you know they’re focused. It’s hard to walk on heels if you don’t want to do what you are doing.

[Walking right] builds confidence in how you carry yourself professionally. I think it also helps in that way.

Looking back, what do you think brought you success in the Binibing Pilipinas Universe and the Miss Universe?

Wow, that was a long time ago — that was like six years. You know I was so young when I joined Miss Universe. I was just 22 and at that time I was not emotionally mature yet. But looking back, I think it was the Lord who really orchestrated everything to happen, because even if I was so beautiful or talented or thin or tall, the physical appearance is just a bonus.

The real reason why I think I won Miss Universe fourth runner-up is because the Lord has a purpose for me to be there. And now I understand why: I am able to influence young ladies, especially children. I am able to share my experience and learnings. Especially in [dealing with] insecurities in life as a woman or as a young girl. When their physical features are not the same as the other women they see on TV or in the magazine, they will feel bad about themselves.

I think one of the reasons the Lord allowed me to be in that situation is for me to become a voice for women who are feeling insecure, that there’s actually no real reason for them to be insecure because we are all wonderfully made. We should celebrate the way we look, not to copy whoever.

What advantages do Filipinos have, if any, in a pageant like Miss Universe?

Well right now there are really huge advantages for a Filipino beauty queen in an international beauty pageant because we’ve been placing in the past few years in many beauty pageants.

I think right now if a Filipina enters an international pageant she is easily recognised because of the country she’s representing. That’s the same theory why the Venezuelans, the Columbians, the Indians have been winning in international pageants. Whenever you see them you always look at them as winners because they are beautiful women. I think the Philippines is in the same situation. Whenever they wear the sash of the Philippines they always look at the Philippines as someone who is beautiful because we are. Someone who is competitive, someone who is strong, someone who can be a spokesperson for the world to see. So right now, it’s really an advantage.

In a few months the new Miss Universe winner will be crowned. What do you think of the chances of Maxine Medina making it a historic back-to-back win for the Philippines? What support and advice are you giving her?

So far I really haven’t talked to Maxine compared to other past beauty queens, but I remember I [gave her advice] about the Q&A portion, which is one of the most tedious part[s] of a beauty pageant. She’s beautiful physically, she knows how to walk and I’m sure she’s emotionally ready. One thing I told her about the Q&A is that you should really know who you are. You should know yourself first before you could give a comment, suggestion or opinion about something. In beauty pageants we are only given 30 seconds to answer a question and people would judge you because of what you say from that one question. I told her whatever comes first to your mind just say it, don’t complicate things, don’t overthink, don’t try to impress the judges. Whatever comes to your mind just say it, because it will come naturally. I know that she’s been training really hard and I’m sure she’s ready right now.

Do you think there is enough support from the government to aspiring beauty titlists?

I think the Philippines has more heavy issues to focus on, not just the beauty pageants. Yes I agree it would give the Philippines a very nice image in the international scene and that it could also help in tourism. But there are also many issues like poverty, education, drugs that the President is really fighting for now.

What are the biggest misconceptions about beauty queens?

As for me I haven’t experienced anything that is negative as a beauty queen. I think [that] people expect you to look good everyday is a pressure.

Don’t miss it!

Register for the Ramp Modelling Workshop in UAE 2016 on December 2 at City Seasons Hotel, Abu Dhabi, from 9am-10am. Dh300 gets you entry and access to a buffet lunch. Call 050-8182966 or 050-7637060.