How to be a better christian

I’m a firm believer that we should always strive to become the best versions of ourselves. And if you are a Christian, that’s a part of you. We are all a work in progress and can most certainly become better. God’s work in us is never finished. So this means He doesn’t want us to get complacent and think we are as good as we can be.

Ephesians 4:17-32 tells us that it is easier for the enemy to destroy us in our infancy rather than in our maturity. This means it would be very wise for us to get past the beginning stage in our relationship with Christ and move on to bigger and better things. I don’t know about you but I want God to do big things in my life. But how can He when we haven’t moved past the basics and are constantly struggling to put Him first in our lives?

The best way to become a better Christian is to follow what I like to call The Big 4. This includes fasting, daily prayer, reading your Bible, and staying true to Gods word. These basic Biblical teachings will help strengthen our relationship with Jesus. But how many times have you tried to get more consistent incorporating some of these things into your life and ended up not following through?

I know I have not always been the best Christian I can be. And I have a million excuses why, but it all really boils down to this. I failed to make Christ a priority in my life. Yes, I would still pray every night. But they got shorter and shorter by the day. Can you guess what my problem was? I simply had not created a habit of making time for God. That’s the same reason we don’t follow through with our New Year’s Resolutions or life goals.

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So that’s what we need to do in order to become a better Christian this year. Set your goals that will help you get closer to God and make them a habit. But before I get into how you can turn your goals into habits, I want to offer some examples of goals that you could have. Just in case you have no idea where to begin.

Goal Ideas

Feel free to mix and match however works best for you. Just try not to overwhelm yourself.

  • Pray for 10 minutes a day- Seem like too little? You can always work your way up later.
  • Read one chapter of the Bible a day
  • Fast from deserts or snacks one day a week
  • Fast from the internet for a day
  • Consistently attend church
  • Pay your tithes and offering faithfully
  • Get more involved in your church

Easy enough, right? But it’s also very easy to do any of these things for a couple of days and give up. So here are seven ways to make your goals a habit and become a better Christian.

1.Commit to 30 days

Write out your goals and stick to them for 30 days. That’s about how long it takes the average person to form a habit.

2.Start small

Don’t give yourself any crazy hard goals that you will probably give up on. It’s better to start simple and work your way up. So maybe start praying ten minutes a day for the first two weeks and then go up to twenty the next two weeks. Set a timer if you need to. Before you know it, you will be praying for an hour and wondering where the time went. Ever have that happen with a friend? That’s what God wants for our relationship with Him.

3.Remind yourself

Post sticky notes all over your house or set a reminder in your phone if that’s what it takes. This is not second nature to you yet so be easy on yourself right now.

4.Get help from a friend

Find a friend that you are comfortable with that will help to keep you accountable. And if they want, you can keep them accountable for their goals as well.

5.Don’t forget you’re imperfect

God knows we aren’t perfect. He created us after all. He just wants us to try. Our goal should never be to try to achieve perfection (I mean it is impossible) but to be the best version of ourselves that we can possibly be.

6.Limit or remove temptation

Is your phone, TV, or computer keeping you from spending time with God? I use electronics as an example often because human kind has never had all the distractions that we have today. These devices can hold us back if we aren’t careful.

I’m not saying you have to throw your phone in the garbage, but you could either limit your time on it or remove that game app you just can’t seem to stop playing. I mean does it really make you happy to escape reality? Maybe for the moment, but it will only leave you feeling like you aren’t living up to your full potential.

7.Know the benefits

We are naturally selfish creatures and are always asking “what’s in it for me?” This is obviously not usually a good thing, but it can be helpful. If you aren’t aware of the benefits that go along with becoming a better Christian it can get easy to lose sight of why you’re even trying.

1 Timothy 4:8 tells us, “ For physical training is of some value, but godliness has value for all things, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come.”

I really like Matthew 6:33, “But seek ye first the kingdom of God, and his righteousness; and all these things shall be added unto you.” I’ve noticed over the years, I would have something I really wanted and I would put all my focus into achieving it. But then I would fall short every time or it would never make me happy when I actually got it. Now that I’m a practicing Christian (instead of just an identifying Christian), I know it’s because I wasn’t putting God first. I don’t claim to be America’s Next Top Christian by any means but I have seen how God has changed me to make me more content and how He has redirected my desires to things that actually matter. So instead of just always wanting more money and focusing on that, I find it much easier to live in the moment and enjoy the little things (which are actually the big things).

Life won’t be perfect for any of us no matter how close we get to God, but when we learn to trust Him our problems don’t affect us as drastically as they did before. There really is a comfort in casting our cares on Him. Our lives are in His hands. And if we just let Him take the wheel, the drive will be a whole lot smoother.

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  • 7 Habits To Living Life To The Fullest

What are some of your goals to help you become a better Christian this year? Let me know in the comments below!

January 10, 2014

Over the last seven decades, Billy Graham has written 32 books which are an extension of his continued ministry and burden to reach as many people as possible with the Good News of the Gospel. In “Peace with God,” Mr. Graham outlines ten guidelines for Christian living. This classic volume by Billy Graham points to the fact that God is the only way to find authentic personal peace in a world in crisis.

How to be a better christianWhether we are playing a game, driving a car, or baking a cake, there are certain rules that must be followed for our safety as well as our success.

The Bible teaches that the Christian life is one of constant growth. When you were born again, you were born into God’s family. It is God’s purpose that you will grow into fill stature and become mature in Christ. It would be against the law of God and nature if you were to remain a baby and thus become a spiritual dwarf. In 2 Peter 3:18, the Bible says that we are to grow. It implies steady development, constant enlargement, increasing wisdom.

For one to grow properly certain rules must be observed for good spiritual health.

  1. Read your Bible daily. Do not be content to skim through a chapter merely to satisfy your conscience. Hide the Word of God in your heart. It comforts, guides, corrects, encourages – all we need is there.
  2. Learn the secret of prayer. Prayer is communicating. Every prayer that you pray will be answered. Sometimes that answer may be “Yes” and sometimes “No,” and sometimes it is “Wait,” but nevertheless it will be answered.
  3. Rely constantly on the Holy Spirit. We know that the Holy Spirit prays for us (Romans 8), and what a comfort that should be to the weakest of us. Stand aside and let Him take over all the choices and decisions of your life.
  4. Attend church regularly. The visible church is Christ’s organization upon earth. Christians need one another, we need to gather together to worship God and nothing can take the place of church attendance.
  5. Be a witnessing Christian. We witness in two ways: by life and by word – and the two, where possible, should go hand in hand.
  6. Let love be the ruling principle of your life. Jesus said to those who followed Him, “By this shall all men know that ye are my disciples, if ye have love one to another” (John 13:35). The greatest demonstration of the fact that we are Christians is that we love one another.
  7. Be an obedient Christian. Let Christ have first place in all the choices of your life.
  8. Learn how to meet temptation. Temptation is not sin. It is yielding that is sin. Let Christ through the Holy Spirit do the fighting for you.
  9. Be a wholesome Christian. Our lives and appearance should commend the Gospel and make it attractive to others.
  10. Live above your circumstances. Don’t let your circumstances get you down. Learn to live graciously within them, realizing the Lord Himself is with you.

Guidelines for Christian Living is excerpted from“Peace with God” by Billy Graham, published in 1953, revised and expanded in 1984.

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How to be a better christian

Sometimes I find myself wishing I were a better Christian in certain, specific ways. “I wish I knew a better technique for how to pray more effectively.” Or, “I wish I were better at serving by going out to soup kitchens and homeless shelters.” I think every Christian does this. Often we can trick ourselves into thinking that there’s some “magic bullet” that will chop up all the different ingredients of what being a Christian is and combine them into a single purée that’s easy to gulp down in one sitting. “If only I knew some special technique for Bible study, I’d have a more consistent study habit.” We can see somebody else’s good example of consistency in one area—whether it be service of some kind, or faith, or godly love—and assume that they’ve always been that way and that it comes easily for them. Or perhaps that they’ve figured out some special technique that makes it easy for them.

In the book How to Write by Richard Rhodes, he tells about an early mentor he had whose name was Knickerbocker. He had a good rule for how to become a better writer, which the author coined as the “Knickerbocker rule.”

The rule is simply, “butt to chair.”

It’s a shorthand way of saying a bunch of things: Time. Commitment. Diligence. Perseverance. Hard work. You become a better writer by…well, writing. I think we can apply the Knickerbocker rule to lots of other things, including aspects of our Christianity.

Growing up, I mistook my dad’s extensive knowledge of the Bible as him just being naturally smart. But in fact, it was years of work in the form of daily prayer and Bible study. I saw him wake up and do the same routine every single day, no matter where we were—whether we were at home, on a trip staying at a hotel or as guests at somebody’s home—he’d get his shower, then read the Bible and pray for about 30 minutes. Every day. For decades. I don’t think you can do that without coming away with an extensive knowledge of the Bible.

Malcolm Gladwell has determined that it takes approximately 10,000 hours for an individual to become an expert at something. Have you considered your Christianity in such a way? Do we strive to become an expert at being a Christian the way we might strive to be an expert at another skill? Playing piano, for example. Or writing. It reminds me of the story of famous classical violinist who was known for being one of the best in the world. One evening after a stunning concert performance with the symphony, a woman who had attended the concert said to him, “Sir, I’d give my life to be able to play the violin like you!” The violinist looked at her and said, “Madam, I did.” Perhaps the violinist had a natural gift or talent for playing the violin. But that didn’t make him one of the best in the world—it was hours of practice every single day for his entire life that did.

Solomon wrote that “work brings profit, but mere talk leads to poverty!” (Proverbs 14:23 Proverbs 14:23 In all labor there is profit: but the talk of the lips tends only to penury.
American King James Version× , New Living Translation). This principle can be applied to every facet of our Christian lives: “I admire JoAnn so much—she’s always sending cards to people who are sick. I wish I were more like that.” OK, then do it. How? By writing cards and sending them. Make it happen. Find out who’s sick, where they live, and send them a card. “I want to get better at meditating on God’s Word.” OK, then start meditating on God’s Word. The more you do it, the more naturally it will come. And you’ll discover things along the way that help you get better at it.

I agree that this approach may sound overly simplistic. There is certainly an aspect of wisdom that should be applied—the Bible says: “Using a dull ax requires great strength, so sharpen the blade. That’s the value of wisdom; it helps you succeed” (Ecclesiastes 10:10 Ecclesiastes 10:10 If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
American King James Version× , NLT). We should definitely seek out the advice and expertise of those who have gone before. We should try to glean wisdom from their experience. This is the reason we have women’s enrichment weekends and men’s Christian leadership clubs. But an over-reliance on trying to find the magic formula for success in whatever area can lead to paralysis and inaction. Sometimes we try different techniques for a few days, we don’t keep up with it, and it falls by the wayside. Or sometimes there may not be anybody to ask. In the absence of good counselors or advisors, or if you aren’t finding something that works for you, following the Knickerbocker rule will not fail in helping you to become a better Christian. Most of those people we see who seem to have it together—who seem to have it all figured out—got there through years of commitment, diligence and hard work.

And when it comes those great examples, it’s good to have a role model to look up to. Someone whose example is good and who we can emulate, or who can mentor us. But sometimes when their example is so good, it can work against us. The thought of ever measuring up to it is can be too overwhelming. And in the fact of that, we don’t do anything instead. For me, my dad’s impeccable example of daily Bible study and prayer was too much to attain. I knew I should be studying the Bible and praying every day, so I’d try to copy his exact routine. I’d make it about, oh, three days before I fell off the wagon. I’d get discouraged and it would be a long time before I started trying again. Eventually I got too discouraged, my laziness took over, and I didn’t do anything in the way of prayer or Bible study. Then I’d be guilty for not having a better prayer and study habit.

Until one day I had an epiphany: You have to start somewhere. Anything is better than nothing. I realized I didn’t have to get my dad’s 10,000 hours of experience all in one week. If just reading one chapter of Proverbs a day was all I could reasonably get done, so be it. Once I developed that habit, I could build on it, working up over time to more and better Bible study and prayer.

Being a Christian in many other aspects is the same. The more you do it, the more you practice it, the more naturally it will come to you. If you practice a more regular praying habit, praying will become less of this daunting challenge and more a delight you look forward to. If you practice responding to insults with patience, kindness and love, you will more often have that response first just by default. If you practice meditating for 15 minutes every day over lunchtime, you will start being able to slip into that mindset more quickly when that time comes every day, and the things to meditate on will make themselves more readily apparent to you.

Take-away

Remember that work brings profit, but mere talk leads to poverty. Make every effort to become an “expert” at being a Christian by applying the Knickerbocker rule. Seek out wisdom and advice from others, but don’t become inactive by an overwhelmingly good example. You have to start somewhere, and you must. Put butt to chair, figuratively (or literally), and watch as the fruits of your labor begin to grow.

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Login or Create an Account

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How to be a better christian

Sometimes I find myself wishing I were a better Christian in certain, specific ways. “I wish I knew a better technique for how to pray more effectively.” Or, “I wish I were better at serving by going out to soup kitchens and homeless shelters.” I think every Christian does this. Often we can trick ourselves into thinking that there’s some “magic bullet” that will chop up all the different ingredients of what being a Christian is and combine them into a single purée that’s easy to gulp down in one sitting. “If only I knew some special technique for Bible study, I’d have a more consistent study habit.” We can see somebody else’s good example of consistency in one area—whether it be service of some kind, or faith, or godly love—and assume that they’ve always been that way and that it comes easily for them. Or perhaps that they’ve figured out some special technique that makes it easy for them.

In the book How to Write by Richard Rhodes, he tells about an early mentor he had whose name was Knickerbocker. He had a good rule for how to become a better writer, which the author coined as the “Knickerbocker rule.”

The rule is simply, “butt to chair.”

It’s a shorthand way of saying a bunch of things: Time. Commitment. Diligence. Perseverance. Hard work. You become a better writer by…well, writing. I think we can apply the Knickerbocker rule to lots of other things, including aspects of our Christianity.

Growing up, I mistook my dad’s extensive knowledge of the Bible as him just being naturally smart. But in fact, it was years of work in the form of daily prayer and Bible study. I saw him wake up and do the same routine every single day, no matter where we were—whether we were at home, on a trip staying at a hotel or as guests at somebody’s home—he’d get his shower, then read the Bible and pray for about 30 minutes. Every day. For decades. I don’t think you can do that without coming away with an extensive knowledge of the Bible.

Malcolm Gladwell has determined that it takes approximately 10,000 hours for an individual to become an expert at something. Have you considered your Christianity in such a way? Do we strive to become an expert at being a Christian the way we might strive to be an expert at another skill? Playing piano, for example. Or writing. It reminds me of the story of famous classical violinist who was known for being one of the best in the world. One evening after a stunning concert performance with the symphony, a woman who had attended the concert said to him, “Sir, I’d give my life to be able to play the violin like you!” The violinist looked at her and said, “Madam, I did.” Perhaps the violinist had a natural gift or talent for playing the violin. But that didn’t make him one of the best in the world—it was hours of practice every single day for his entire life that did.

Solomon wrote that “work brings profit, but mere talk leads to poverty!” (Proverbs 14:23 Proverbs 14:23 In all labor there is profit: but the talk of the lips tends only to penury.
American King James Version× , New Living Translation). This principle can be applied to every facet of our Christian lives: “I admire JoAnn so much—she’s always sending cards to people who are sick. I wish I were more like that.” OK, then do it. How? By writing cards and sending them. Make it happen. Find out who’s sick, where they live, and send them a card. “I want to get better at meditating on God’s Word.” OK, then start meditating on God’s Word. The more you do it, the more naturally it will come. And you’ll discover things along the way that help you get better at it.

I agree that this approach may sound overly simplistic. There is certainly an aspect of wisdom that should be applied—the Bible says: “Using a dull ax requires great strength, so sharpen the blade. That’s the value of wisdom; it helps you succeed” (Ecclesiastes 10:10 Ecclesiastes 10:10 If the iron be blunt, and he do not whet the edge, then must he put to more strength: but wisdom is profitable to direct.
American King James Version× , NLT). We should definitely seek out the advice and expertise of those who have gone before. We should try to glean wisdom from their experience. This is the reason we have women’s enrichment weekends and men’s Christian leadership clubs. But an over-reliance on trying to find the magic formula for success in whatever area can lead to paralysis and inaction. Sometimes we try different techniques for a few days, we don’t keep up with it, and it falls by the wayside. Or sometimes there may not be anybody to ask. In the absence of good counselors or advisors, or if you aren’t finding something that works for you, following the Knickerbocker rule will not fail in helping you to become a better Christian. Most of those people we see who seem to have it together—who seem to have it all figured out—got there through years of commitment, diligence and hard work.

And when it comes those great examples, it’s good to have a role model to look up to. Someone whose example is good and who we can emulate, or who can mentor us. But sometimes when their example is so good, it can work against us. The thought of ever measuring up to it is can be too overwhelming. And in the fact of that, we don’t do anything instead. For me, my dad’s impeccable example of daily Bible study and prayer was too much to attain. I knew I should be studying the Bible and praying every day, so I’d try to copy his exact routine. I’d make it about, oh, three days before I fell off the wagon. I’d get discouraged and it would be a long time before I started trying again. Eventually I got too discouraged, my laziness took over, and I didn’t do anything in the way of prayer or Bible study. Then I’d be guilty for not having a better prayer and study habit.

Until one day I had an epiphany: You have to start somewhere. Anything is better than nothing. I realized I didn’t have to get my dad’s 10,000 hours of experience all in one week. If just reading one chapter of Proverbs a day was all I could reasonably get done, so be it. Once I developed that habit, I could build on it, working up over time to more and better Bible study and prayer.

Being a Christian in many other aspects is the same. The more you do it, the more you practice it, the more naturally it will come to you. If you practice a more regular praying habit, praying will become less of this daunting challenge and more a delight you look forward to. If you practice responding to insults with patience, kindness and love, you will more often have that response first just by default. If you practice meditating for 15 minutes every day over lunchtime, you will start being able to slip into that mindset more quickly when that time comes every day, and the things to meditate on will make themselves more readily apparent to you.

Take-away

Remember that work brings profit, but mere talk leads to poverty. Make every effort to become an “expert” at being a Christian by applying the Knickerbocker rule. Seek out wisdom and advice from others, but don’t become inactive by an overwhelmingly good example. You have to start somewhere, and you must. Put butt to chair, figuratively (or literally), and watch as the fruits of your labor begin to grow.

Question: “In what ways is being a Christian difficult?”

Answer: Anyone who tells you that committing your life to Christ makes your life easier is not telling the truth. Fulfilling, yes. More joyful, absolutely. But easier? No. In some ways, life gets more difficult after we come to Christ. The struggle against sin is more pronounced, for one thing. Laziness, gluttony, swearing, anger, envy, self-centeredness, materialism, covetousness, intimacy issues—the temptations seem never-ending. The world, the flesh, and the devil don’t go away because we have stepped into a relationship with Christ.

The 2,000-year-old list of sins in Galatians 5:19–21 is still familiar ground for those of us living in the 21st century. That list is followed by another list—the fruit of the Spirit: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. It is the change from the works of the flesh to the fruit of the Spirit that can prove difficult.

Accepting Christ as Savior means we receive instant justification before God (Romans 10:10). We are reconciled to Him, and we have all the legal rights and privileges of a son or daughter (John 1:12). We now have a relationship with the Creator of the universe.

What is often overlooked is that we also need to accept Christ as Lord. Being a blood-bought child of God means we give up the right to ourselves (1 Corinthians 6:20). This is the point where sanctification begins, and this moment-by-moment dying to self continues as long as we live in our earthly bodies (Matthew 16:24).

The Spirit’s regeneration sets off an alert system that lets us know things have changed. Sinful behaviors that we once found comfortable no longer are. The old way of life grows rather—old (2 Corinthians 5:17).

Being a Christian is difficult because we must now confront our lives from a different worldview that comes with a new set of values—God’s values. We are immersed in a world system that trumpets its ideals and slanders anyone who demurs. Before we are saved, we accept what the world says without even thinking about it. We don’t know anything else. After we are saved, our eyes are opened to the truth, and we can perceive the lies of the world. Fighting against those lies can be difficult.

Being a Christian is difficult because, once we are saved, we are suddenly swimming upstream, against the current of the world around us. Though our appetites will change, our sanctification can be a difficult process. Friends no longer understand us; our families question our new involvements and associations. Those we love often feel rejected, angry, and defensive. They don’t see why we can no longer continue in our old ways.

Being a Christian is difficult because it requires growth. God loves us too much to let us stay the same. Growth can be painful at times, and we usually don’t like to leave our comfort zone, but positive change is always rewarding. As we grow in Christ, we realize that God isn’t just desirous of our conforming to a set of rules. He wants all of us; He wants a crucified life, given totally to Him. We learn through obedience and trust to find rest in His guidance.

Being a Christian is difficult because we must constantly say “no” to our own fleshly desires and yield to the Spirit. We learn to handle conflict with grace, instead of through retaliation. We learn to forgive, rather than hold grudges. We learn to replace the vacillating emotions we once called love with true, unconditional love. We grow through the opportunity to die to ourselves daily, to become obedient.

Yes, being a Christian is difficult in many ways. But that’s only half the story. The difficulties believers face are not tackled alone. Every challenge is met through the power of Christ who lives within us (Philippians 4:13). The faithful follower of Christ is never completely overwhelmed (2 Corinthians 4:8–9).

There are definite, eternal rewards for following Christ (Luke 18:29–30). We learn by experience that God’s ways are better, safer, and more reliable than the world’s ways. Our trusting obedience to God becomes the pathway to a transformed and abundant life (John 10:10).

Contributed by Dean Courtier on Jul 29, 2004 (message contributor)

Scripture: John 15:1-17

Denomination: Pentecostal

Summary: Do you desire to be a better Christian? Most Christians sincerely want to be better. But how do we become better Christians? Some people say that reading the Bible or other Christian books will make you a good Christian. Other people say that doing a lot

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Text: “Remain in me, and I will remain in you. No branch can bear fruit by itself; it must remain in the vine. Neither can you bear fruit unless you remain in me. I am the vine; you are the branches. If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing” (John 15:4-5 Niv).

Do you desire to be a better Christian? Most Christians sincerely want to be better. But how do we become better Christians? Some people say that reading the Bible or other Christian books will make you a good Christian. Other people say that doing a lot of good works will make you a better Chris¬tian. Actually, we don’t begin the Christian life in faith and continue it sheerly through faithful study and good works. Genuine faith results in faithful study and good works.

Jesus used the illustration of the vine and the branches to describe the Christian life. Jesus referred to himself as the vine and to his followers as the branches. Using this analogy we can learn more about the Christian life.

I. A vital union with Christ.

A. Many people have mistaken concepts about how to become a Christian. The Jews considered themselves branches because of birth, nationality, and race. Yet they refused to have vital union with Jesus Christ.

People take many measures to be united with God. However, union with the Lord does not come by belonging to a church. Nor does union come by being born into a Christian home. Nor does it come by observ¬ing rules and regulations.

B. Becoming a Christian means to be united with Christ. How does a branch receive life? It receives life by being grafted into the vine. The life of the vine then flows into the branch.

How then do you become a Christian? You become a believer by open¬ing your life to Jesus Christ. The Lord comes into your heart and gives you new life. Paul’s favorite expression for a Christian was a person “in Christ.”

II. A constant abiding in Christ.

A. Abiding in Christ is essential to Christian growth. “Remain in me, and I will remain in you” (John 15:4 NIV) . A branch cannot bear fruit of itself. We can’t be better Christians by our own power. As branches we must abide in the vine. The word abide means to keep in constant contact.

B. Abiding in Christ will result in Christlikeness. “If a man remains in me and I in him, he will bear much fruit; apart from me you can do nothing” (John 15:5 NIV) . We bear fruit and become more like Christ as we depend on him to sustain us. No one attaches a branch of grapes to a vine and expects them to receive nourishment. A person who is not really attached to Jesus Christ will not bear fruit.

Abiding in Christ results in God’s kind of character. “But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, longsuffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance” (Gal. 5:22-23).

III. A reaching out for Christ.

A. Christians are chosen for a divine purpose. The analogy of the vine and branches had been a significant symbol of the mission purpose for Israel. When Israel failed to fulfill God’s intention, the prophets applied the analogy of the vine. Isaiah pictured Israel as a vineyard run wild (cf. 5:1 -7). Jeremiah described Israel as a degenerate branch (2:21). Hosea called Israel an empty vine (10:1).

B. Christians can reach out and bless the world. Christians have been chosen for joy. “I have told you this so that my joy may be in you and that your joy may be complete” (John 15:11 NIV). Christians have been chosen for love. “My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you” (v. 12 NIV) . Christians also have been chosen to be ambassadors. ’You did not choose me, but I chose you and appointed you to go and bear fruit— fruit that will last. Then the Father will give you whatever you ask in my name”(v. 16 NIV).

Once a German prince wished to possess a Cremoni violin. He offered an enormous price. It was published at marketplaces throughout the region. For months he had no success. One day an old man appeared at the castle gate. The man was poorly dressed and had a worn violin case under his arm. The servants refused to admit him

Finally, the old man insisted that the servants carry a message to the master. He asked them to say, “Heaven’s music is waiting at your door.”

The prince ordered him to be admitted immediately. The old man took a perfect violin from the worn case. He made marvelous music and won the prince’s praise.

How to be a better christian

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“Start children off on the way they should go, and even when they are old they will not turn from it.”

-Proverbs 22:6 (NIV)

Parenthood can be overwhelming at times; beautiful, but also scary. Every parent fears for their children’s futures, and every parent fears that they will not measure up. As Christ followers, we are called to make young disciples of our children. All mothers and fathers aspire to teach their children well and set a good example.

Children are great blessings, so we should treat them with great care. Raising a child in an ungodly atmosphere and then expecting him or her to be a saint later on in life is unthinkable. Instead, God says we should, ‘start children off on the way they should go, and even when they are old they will not turn from it.’ So how, exactly, do you start children off on the way they should go?

1. Be loving. If we are to be Christ-like examples for our children, we must be loving. We are called to care for our children in the same way God cares for us, his own children. In everything you do to and for your children, do it in love.

2. Be patient. You can’t expect children to know everything from the very start. They must learn through experience, and as they grow up we must be gentle with them. God says that love is patient and slow to anger; so if we are called to love our kids, we are also called to be patient. If we are too quick to lose our tempers with children who don’t know any better, they will only be more likely to go astray.

3. Use diligent discipline. Discipline is necessary so that our children will know right from wrong; however, it shouldn’t be used to the point of scaring them away. Discipline should be done out of love, not anger. Make sure the child understands why they are being disciplined. Don’t be afraid to discipline your child either; it’s better for a child to learn from discipline than to continue believing that what they are doing is acceptable.

“Whoever spares the rod hates their children, but the one who loves their children is careful to discipline them.”

-Proverbs 13:24 (NIV)

4. Tell them about Jesus. No child is ever too young to hear about Jesus; while some aspects of Christianity may be too confusing for them yet, there are many Bible stories that, they will enjoy and learn from. Be sure to especially stress the important things in the Bible, such as God’s love for us and the world. Put everything into terms they can understand; every future Christian has to start somewhere, and childhood is the best place.

Parenthood is a great responsibility, but also an amazing, God-given privilege. He has given us the task of raising up the next generation in a godlike manner, and it is up to us to follow his commands and pass them on to our children.

So don’t be afraid of making mistakes; no one is perfect, and assuming to be will give our children a false impression. But if we do our best as Christian parents, our children will be that much more blessed.

What are some ways you think we can be better parents in Christ? Leave your tips below!

How to be a better christian

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Online influence is booming, and two of the main reasons why—you guessed it—are the money and power that usually go along with a huge follower base. A recent article by the New York Times titled, “The Follower Factory,” reports:

For some entertainers and entrepreneurs, this virtual status is a real-world currency. Follower counts on social networks help determine who will hire them, how much they are paid for bookings or endorsements, even how potential customers evaluate their businesses or products.

The article goes into detail regarding how people have gone so far as to even purchase online followers via companies that provide automated accounts known as “bots” to boost their clients’ status.

It is important to note that there can be considerable value in having an online presence in order to connect with people for many worthy purposes. Yet, it’s not the only way. Everyone can be an influencer for the good of others—and they don’t need social media to make it happen. Here are seven ways that have been effective long before there was ever something called the Internet!

1. Listen

Listening has almost become a forgotten art. Try not to think about the next thing you are going to say, and instead focus on what is being said. Ask questions so that you can better understand what people are trying to communicate in order to be of help to them (James 1:9).

2. Pray

God is sovereign, and nothing can thwart his will. Share your burdens for others with your heavenly Father and ask for his help in their lives (1 Timothy 2:1).

3. Invest

Find a way to do something to invest in people; don’t just say that you hope things will go well for them. Be a mentor; teach a skill; help pack for a move; make a connection that could result in a job offer; babysit for a couple that needs a date night; cook, bake, clean, garden, or run errands for a new mom or someone who is recovering from an illness or accident (Galatians 6:2).

4. Share

Not a post or a tweet or a pin, but actual stuff. If you own something that you are not using on a regular basis, consider sharing it—either temporarily or permanently—with someone who needs it (Hebrews 13:16).

5. Fulfill

When you fulfill your responsibilities and comport yourself with honor, diligence, and humility in your family life, work, church, and community on a consistent basis, people notice. True, you won’t do everything perfectly, but your commitment over the long haul to loving God and your neighbor—even amidst struggles and failures—will inspire others. As the old saying goes, “Your actions speak so loudly, I can’t hear what you are saying” (see Luke 6:46).

6. Invite

Invite people over to your home for a meal, snack, coffee, Bible study, movie, or game night. Opening up your home to people on a regular basis is fertile ground for nurturing relationships and building trust (Titus 1:8).

7. Love

When people sense that you genuinely love them and want their best, they are more likely to listen to your advice (1 John 4:7).