How to be a girly girl in school

Being a tomboy comes naturally to some ladies and is sometimes a lifestyle that is hard to leave behind. Playing in dirt, shooting hoops and hanging out with the guys are traditionally not the actions of a “girly girl.” If you want to make a change and be seen for the lady you are, start slowly. Implement small changes that you are comfortable with and watch yourself bloom. Stay true to yourself; you can still play sports while maintaining the look and feel of femininity. Easily make the transition from a tomboy to a girly girl in seven days by mapping out your quest.

Make a list of the changes you want to make and check them off as you complete them. This will allow you to see how much time you have left of your allotted seven-day time span to tackle the rest of the changes you want to make to become a girly girl. For example, if you want to dress more like a girly girl, give yourself two or three days to go shopping, and once you’ve purchased your clothes, check this off your list.

Visit a beautician for a haircut and style. According to Glamour magazine, visit your hair stylist every six to eight weeks for a trim. Request a cut that will be easy for you to maintain with the styling tools you have at home and ask the stylist to walk you through the styling steps. Watch closely to ensure that you can re-create this style.

Get a makeover by a cosmetician at a local department store. Ask what colors highlight your best features and be sure to purchase makeup that can take you from a daytime outing to a night out with the girls. Learn how to achieve a “five-minute face,” which allows you to look your best even when running a quick errand.

Purchase new clothing that is versatile and yields several different outfits by changing one article and/or accessories. For example, if you already have several pairs of jeans, buy shirts or blouses that can be worn with two different pairs of shoes and different accessories to create both daytime and evening looks. Hang on to those old T-shirts; you still need clothes to get dirty in.

Throw away or donate any articles of your clothing that were bought in the men’s section of a retail or department store. Men’s clothing is cut differently and runs larger, which sometimes adds an additional 5 to 10 pounds to your female frame. They may be more comfortable to wear, but you will lose your girly girl appeal.

Accessorize your outfits with stylish shoes, fashion jewelry and purses. Reserve those dingy sneakers for mowing the grass, a quick jog or a leisurely walk and slip into your heels for outings with friends or family. A girly girl collects accessories that can be worn or used with multiple outfits for various occasions. Be sure to purchase storage bins to neatly store your goodies.

Change your mannerisms. Cross your legs, resist the urge to spit and refrain from using curse words. Walk with your head held high and make eye contact when speaking. These steps will make you more attractive because you will exude confidence. Maintain a positive outlook on life and don’t be afraid to laugh when something is funny. Avoid being fake because this is noticeable (for example, don’t pretend to be friends with someone and then talk about her when she’s not around). Speak your mind respectfully.

Make friends with more girls. Don’t terminate your existing friendships with the guys, but if you want to be seen as a potential girlfriend instead of “one of the guys,” you have to be “one of the girls.”

How to be a girly girl in school

Most Helpful Girls

How to be a girly girl in school

Absolutely not, as a 25 year old women I still in some ways act similarly to how I did so as a little girl. Sometimes I sit with my legs wide open, burp like there is no tomorrow without saying excuse or closing my mouth, and say really gross unfeminine like things. I’ve always been told to wear makeup, dress this certain way, be a certain way and sometimes I caved in and felt miserable, feeling like an imposter to please family members. The real question you need to ask yourself is, “Do I follow what people tell me to do for their happiness or do I continue to explore what I enjoy doing at the moment for my own happiness?”

As I grew older on my own time I started to embrace certain aspects of femininity. I started experimenting with makeup, buying more feminine like clothes. Occasionally getting my nails done, stopped playing video games because they became too addicting and distracting and switched to watching Korean drama, enjoying how love and relationships are represented within the drama. Buying cute things and so forth. People are always going to question you and at some point you need to stand up for yourself and say this is who I am right now in a respectful manner of course. If anything, anytime someone told me I wasn’t being feminine “enough” I started to act more masculine to revolt against them. It wasn’t until I started giving them a hard time every time they critique me that they eventually just stopped and I eventually came into certain aspects of femininity on my own. Mind you, sometimes I wasn’t respectful and it kind of back fired on me, which is why I am saying to try to be respectful about it and if you aren’t be mindful of how you may make someone feel because many of these family members are only continuing what their parents and family members did to them, it is a pattern.

It is important to not be like ” I never want to be feminine because everyone tells me that I should be feminine” and rather to have the mentality of “I am having fun with what I am doing and how I am and will continue to be as such however if I am curious about exploring a certain aspect of femininity that I would/need to allow myself to do so in spite of whether other people want it for me or not because it is starting to catch my interest.” In other words, if you want to go there at some point in your life hun, give yourself the opportunity to do so otherwise you will be holding yourself back at that stage rather than the people who want you to be completely different from how you are now. Give yourself the chance to!

As a teenager, I was quite proud of the fact that I hardly ever wore frilly dresses and played field hockey. I could not, and had zero desire to, relate to the cheerleaders at school. I never rushed a sorority and if I’m honest, deliberately did not befriend girls who did. Even now, I only wear makeup for special occasions and don’t know the difference between foundation and primer. I’m a tomboy and always have been. Super girly things make me uncomfortable. But here’s the kicker: I have two daughters, one of whom is the epitome of a girly girl.

This tomboy has no idea what she’s doing raising a girly girl. Like, zero.

My oldest, who is eight years old, loves princess dresses, dolls, all my high heeled shoes, and makeup. I don’t let her wear makeup, but it doesn’t stop her from asking. She has long, beautiful hair that I’m terrible at doing pretty things with. During her preschool days, all the cute little girls in her class wore these giant bows every day in their hair that confounded me. Why, just why?

My daughter loves to wear skirts and dresses, no matter the season. I was on a work trip during the winter and my husband sent me a photo of my daughter in the snow wearing a skirt. To his credit, she did have on pants under it. She even wears skirts when we go hiking.

As any mother, I love my child with all my heart. Along with her sister, she is my most precious gift. But I look at her some days and just hope I’m not messing up too terribly.

My mom was a super girly girl who tried her best to make me presentable as a kid. It wasn’t easy for her, so I imagine she is in heaven chuckling over my current conundrum. Kids have a lot to teach their parents. Accepting who she is right now is the lesson I’m currently being taught by my daughter.

As a parent, I have learned that you need to let your child blossom into what she is meant to be. You need to nurture her and care for her, but be able to back off a bit and let her develop into herself. She’s not me, and I cannot expect her to be.

I can’t make my child stop wearing skirts everywhere, and I wouldn’t want to do that because that’s her style.

I’ve tried to find a balance between exposing her to things I enjoy, like the great outdoors (and pants), while also letting her partake in things she enjoys, like princesses and glittery bows, because she loves all things pretty and pink.

I’ve taken her to princess tea parties for her birthday and watched her face light up when Rapunzel gave her a hug. I’ve snapped a hundred photos every Halloween when she chooses to be a different princess every year. I’ve sat still as she practiced French braids in my hair. I’ve been speechless when she walks better in my own heels than me.

She’s teaching me that the love of all things girly isn’t a terrible thing. I’m even starting to regret making fun of the cheerleaders in high school. I’m also learning how to keep quiet and pick my battles. So she wants a Barbie and a giant bag of bows for her birthday? I can deal with that. But wanting to wear lipstick to school (or anywhere)? That’s a no.

I give her credit for wildly surprising me, too. She went to a summer camp where they did no girly things at all. It was an adventure camp where the kids learned about building character and self-esteem but also how to shoot a bow and arrow, as well as BB guns. When it came time for awards at the end of the week, my little princess earned a sharpshooter award. She couldn’t stop talking about how much she loved learning to use a bow.

For me, this was my comfort zone. I could talk about this stuff and ask relevant questions and understand where she was coming from.

I also came away from that week with a deeper understanding about my daughter—that she is just as excited about being a sharpshooter as she is dancing with a princess at a tea party. Those two sides don’t have to be opposed to each other either. They can co-exist even in the same person. What a cool lesson to learn from your child.

Makeup and high heels won’t ever be my thing, but raising a girly girl with an openness to a world where princesses shoot arrows is something I can get used to.

Editors’ Note: Share your own Making of a Mom story here.

How to be a girly girl in school

OK, so here’s the problem: I am a tomboy. I wear just regular t-shirts and jeans, and I told everyone at school I hate pink…but now I wanna become a little more girly. How do I transition to a girly-girl?

There’s no need to make complete 180 in terms of clothes from tomboy to Barbie, but there are tons of ways to blend the two looks. By incorporating more feminine pieces into your current look (think Alexa Chung, who does tomboy chic), you won’t have to buy a brand new wardrobe and can keep the old you in tact. But first thing’s first, chica: Why do you want to change?

A greater reason
Before you head to the mall and ditch your old wardrobe for one that’s all pink and ruffles, ask yourself why you want to become a “girly-girl.” Is it because of your friends or peers? Your parents? In short, if the reason isn’t for you, think long and hard about it. Clothing is an expression of who you are, and you should never let someone else dictate who that person is. Instead, go for the clothes that you like. Don’t feel pressured to conform to a single look. The people and celebs whose styles we most adore don’t. Rather, they stand out because they make their own look.

In the middle
Still want to makeover your wardrobe a bit? No need to empty your closet. Instead, try to add more feminine clothes into your wardrobe through accessories and gradually adding new pieces (skirts, dresses, etc.). For example, with a plaid button-up and jeans, toss on a cardi, heart pendant and flats. Wear a dress but keep it true to you with a cool pendant necklace, tights and boots. When changing up your style, it’s all about adding new pieces gradually and using what you’ve got. When you mix your two sets of clothes together, you’ll get an awesome, unique look that will catch eyes.

No such thing as labels
In the end, know there’s no such thing as an exact “girly girl” formula. We make our own style and no matter what end of the girly-tomboy spectrum you fall, your look is still distinct from everyone else’s. That’s why it’s important to remember who you’re dressing for. You don’t have to adhere to what everyone else wants or expects. Instead, by combining pieces, you can have your own look that’s original and one of a kind, just like you! Happy shopping, chica!

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How to be a girly girl in school

Most Helpful Girls

How to be a girly girl in school

Absolutely not, as a 25 year old women I still in some ways act similarly to how I did so as a little girl. Sometimes I sit with my legs wide open, burp like there is no tomorrow without saying excuse or closing my mouth, and say really gross unfeminine like things. I’ve always been told to wear makeup, dress this certain way, be a certain way and sometimes I caved in and felt miserable, feeling like an imposter to please family members. The real question you need to ask yourself is, “Do I follow what people tell me to do for their happiness or do I continue to explore what I enjoy doing at the moment for my own happiness?”

As I grew older on my own time I started to embrace certain aspects of femininity. I started experimenting with makeup, buying more feminine like clothes. Occasionally getting my nails done, stopped playing video games because they became too addicting and distracting and switched to watching Korean drama, enjoying how love and relationships are represented within the drama. Buying cute things and so forth. People are always going to question you and at some point you need to stand up for yourself and say this is who I am right now in a respectful manner of course. If anything, anytime someone told me I wasn’t being feminine “enough” I started to act more masculine to revolt against them. It wasn’t until I started giving them a hard time every time they critique me that they eventually just stopped and I eventually came into certain aspects of femininity on my own. Mind you, sometimes I wasn’t respectful and it kind of back fired on me, which is why I am saying to try to be respectful about it and if you aren’t be mindful of how you may make someone feel because many of these family members are only continuing what their parents and family members did to them, it is a pattern.

It is important to not be like ” I never want to be feminine because everyone tells me that I should be feminine” and rather to have the mentality of “I am having fun with what I am doing and how I am and will continue to be as such however if I am curious about exploring a certain aspect of femininity that I would/need to allow myself to do so in spite of whether other people want it for me or not because it is starting to catch my interest.” In other words, if you want to go there at some point in your life hun, give yourself the opportunity to do so otherwise you will be holding yourself back at that stage rather than the people who want you to be completely different from how you are now. Give yourself the chance to!

As a teenager, I was quite proud of the fact that I hardly ever wore frilly dresses and played field hockey. I could not, and had zero desire to, relate to the cheerleaders at school. I never rushed a sorority and if I’m honest, deliberately did not befriend girls who did. Even now, I only wear makeup for special occasions and don’t know the difference between foundation and primer. I’m a tomboy and always have been. Super girly things make me uncomfortable. But here’s the kicker: I have two daughters, one of whom is the epitome of a girly girl.

This tomboy has no idea what she’s doing raising a girly girl. Like, zero.

My oldest, who is eight years old, loves princess dresses, dolls, all my high heeled shoes, and makeup. I don’t let her wear makeup, but it doesn’t stop her from asking. She has long, beautiful hair that I’m terrible at doing pretty things with. During her preschool days, all the cute little girls in her class wore these giant bows every day in their hair that confounded me. Why, just why?

My daughter loves to wear skirts and dresses, no matter the season. I was on a work trip during the winter and my husband sent me a photo of my daughter in the snow wearing a skirt. To his credit, she did have on pants under it. She even wears skirts when we go hiking.

As any mother, I love my child with all my heart. Along with her sister, she is my most precious gift. But I look at her some days and just hope I’m not messing up too terribly.

My mom was a super girly girl who tried her best to make me presentable as a kid. It wasn’t easy for her, so I imagine she is in heaven chuckling over my current conundrum. Kids have a lot to teach their parents. Accepting who she is right now is the lesson I’m currently being taught by my daughter.

As a parent, I have learned that you need to let your child blossom into what she is meant to be. You need to nurture her and care for her, but be able to back off a bit and let her develop into herself. She’s not me, and I cannot expect her to be.

I can’t make my child stop wearing skirts everywhere, and I wouldn’t want to do that because that’s her style.

I’ve tried to find a balance between exposing her to things I enjoy, like the great outdoors (and pants), while also letting her partake in things she enjoys, like princesses and glittery bows, because she loves all things pretty and pink.

I’ve taken her to princess tea parties for her birthday and watched her face light up when Rapunzel gave her a hug. I’ve snapped a hundred photos every Halloween when she chooses to be a different princess every year. I’ve sat still as she practiced French braids in my hair. I’ve been speechless when she walks better in my own heels than me.

She’s teaching me that the love of all things girly isn’t a terrible thing. I’m even starting to regret making fun of the cheerleaders in high school. I’m also learning how to keep quiet and pick my battles. So she wants a Barbie and a giant bag of bows for her birthday? I can deal with that. But wanting to wear lipstick to school (or anywhere)? That’s a no.

I give her credit for wildly surprising me, too. She went to a summer camp where they did no girly things at all. It was an adventure camp where the kids learned about building character and self-esteem but also how to shoot a bow and arrow, as well as BB guns. When it came time for awards at the end of the week, my little princess earned a sharpshooter award. She couldn’t stop talking about how much she loved learning to use a bow.

For me, this was my comfort zone. I could talk about this stuff and ask relevant questions and understand where she was coming from.

I also came away from that week with a deeper understanding about my daughter—that she is just as excited about being a sharpshooter as she is dancing with a princess at a tea party. Those two sides don’t have to be opposed to each other either. They can co-exist even in the same person. What a cool lesson to learn from your child.

Makeup and high heels won’t ever be my thing, but raising a girly girl with an openness to a world where princesses shoot arrows is something I can get used to.

Editors’ Note: Share your own Making of a Mom story here.

As our world continues to progress, societies views on gender and genders roles are becoming extremely open. We see more and more gender stereotypes being broken, the idea of a woman belonging in the kitchen, while the man goes out to work is a thing of the past.

As we grow up, we may begin to realize we don’t necessarily fit the stereotype’s that our genders associate ourselves with, which leads many of us to break free from these customs. Although stereotypes typically have a negative connotation, sometimes it’s just embedded in us to fit them, however there is nothing wrong with fitting the stereotype.

I’m a 20 year old woman, who wears make-up everyday and always carries around a huge Michael Kors bag. I jump to any occasion I can to put a dress and high heels on. The best part about going out in my opinion is the getting ready stage of the night. My room is purple and pink with glitter everywhere. I am a girly-girl.

I grew up living in a house with my mom and my retired hair-dresser grandmother. I was always excited when my grandmother put rollers in my hair and my mom put make-up on me for Halloween. I looked up to fashion icons such as Coco Channel and Audrey Hepburn, to me these ladies were the epitome of sophistication and style.

Going into my teen years, I continued to doll myself up for every school dance and event. As I entered college I began working at an office on campus where I had the opportunity to dress to impress everyday of work.

However, being a girly-girl hasn’t always been as “glamorous” as it seems. Somehow over the years, the world “girly” has developed a bad connotation. I have been told I put make-up on to “please a man” and that I come off as weak or stupid because I wear high heels and skirts.

We need to break the stigma that woman who are “girly” are ditzy or are “bimbos”. Your appearance has absolutely no effect on your intelligence or skill level. Your appearance is simply your outer shell, but what really matters is on the inside.

My Four and More

How to be a girly girl in school

How to be a girly girl in school

Sometimes, I feel like electronics and busy schedules keep kids from being kids. I want my girl to experience all the same girly girl things that I had the opportunity to enjoy as a child. I want her to make her own memories but I want her to have memories that she can look back and think, “I had such a fun childhood!”. What comes to mind from your childhood?

How to be a girly girl in school

Fun With Friends

Some of my favorite memories include having sleepovers with my friends where we would stay up all night giggling and laughing about nothing in particular. We would fix each other’s hair to give the prettiest style we could come up with, paint each other’s nails, and then dress up and act like we were entering a beauty pageant. Once we were done with being all formal and proper, we would morph ourselves into trying to look like a clown or something else funny.

How to be a girly girl in school

My friends and I even had journals that we took turns writing in. Anytime I would see my friend, I would give her my journal. She would read what I wrote and then add a journal entry herself before giving it back to me. Of course, we HAD to fold the paper to keep it a real secret. I think I even still have one of them in my attic!

How to be a girly girl in school

Oh, the memories.

My Dreams of Making My Girl Know it is Okay to Be a Girly Girl

I want my daughter to have memories like that with her friends. It may just be drawings in her journals now but give her a few more months of school and she will be starting to write some sentences. I have a variety of really cute diaries from Smitco that she will go through in no time!

How to be a girly girl in school

Allowing children to express themselves through journaling or even drawings helps them process their feelings. It is great to offer a “secret” diary to allow your child to be able to get their feelings out and feel comfortable doing so.

How to be a girly girl in school

Smitco also has nail polish for when she is ready to dress up as if she is a beauty pageant contestant.

Here are some neat products to check out:

How to be a girly girl in school

How to be a girly girl in school

How to be a girly girl in school

How to be a girly girl in school

How to be a girly girl in school

How to be a girly girl in school

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How to be a girly girl in school

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How to be a girly girl in school

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12 thoughts on “ Nothing Wrong With Being a Girly Girl ”

You put the first real fun thing I remembered too as a kid, the sleepovers. Doing stuff with each others hair. Talking about the neighbor boys and which ones we thought were cute and which ones we thought were pains because maybe they kind of liked you but you didn’t like them. The giggling.

We have 4 grown daughters and eleven granddaughters & Christmas is coming! Some of my girls go overboard on being girly girls! But they are girls and they are just accenting on who they are! Thank you for the opportunity

We have 3 girls that Smitco products are something they LOVE, they are everything girly.

I have one girl and she loves the Smitco products

I have 3 granddaughters under 10 and they love all things girly. They love getting their hair done, nails done and dressing up.

I have 6 granddaughters and so far 2 of them are girly girl and 1 tomboy. I enjoy seeing what they choose as they get older.

I have one daughter and she would love these kits because she loves products like that. She’s always wanting to do her nails.

I have one seven year old great niece. Just today she was looking at a kit similar to this one and asking about it for Christmas. I told her it was not a toy, it was something she has to use very carefully to add to her nails, or to have an arts and crafts time at home with mom to make a special book. She wanted to try the ‘special book’ as she called it, lol ?

I have two grown daughters, but one fabulous granddaughter, who would absolutely love this.

I have one daughter and she would love this item bc she likes emojis

I know about 4 girls who would love these. My daughter and her friends.

I have one daughter. She loves to get her nails done, this would be nice for her to do herself (with my help) and use the emojis. (who doesn’t like emojis. )