How to be a good student teacher

This post has been updated on July 2, 2020.

A good teacher can change a person’s life. Every teacher wants to be able to influence their students to become productive members of society. Achieving this requires exceptional teaching methods and a way to inspire students.

The question on everyone’s mind is: what makes a “good teacher”? The answer is a lot more complicated than you might think.

There are many qualities that come to mind when describing good teachers. Here are a few that are considered especially important.

1. Be open to teamwork

Education is not a process that you can handle alone. You can’t carry the burden of learning by yourself, you need to make sure that your students are open to cooperation and learning. Many teachers see themselves as leaders that should take charge when it comes to educating students.

It’s a lot more complicated than that.

A good teacher will put themselves in the position of a guide, rather than being a leader.

The brunt of education is on the students, but they require help to be able to overcome difficult subjects. This is where a teacher’s skills are supposed to shine. Instead of being a tyrannical leader in the classroom, try to work with students to help them attain and retain knowledge.

This requires open communication and a willingness to be flexible with your methods.

2. Show passion when teaching

Teachers often start their careers with an extreme passion for their work. This feeling is quickly lost as teaching becomes part of a routine. Repeating the same things and covering the same topics over and over tends to make them feel less interesting for the speaker.

This is something that affects all teachers, even when they cover a wide variety of educational topics.

Unfortunately, losing that bit of passion can have detrimental effects on your quality of teaching. Students often have to learn many different subjects over short time periods, which quickly breeds disinterest for a single topic.

If both students and teachers feel apathetic towards the subject, it’s likely that there won’t be any meaningful learning.

Try to find something interesting about your subject that will reignite the passion you had for it. It’s as easy as learning new tidbits to present to the class. Find something that will pique their interest and try your best to present it as the most interesting fact in existence.

Just putting a little effort into your presentation is good enough to stimulate better learning. More attentive students will also motivate you to put in more effort into your teaching.

It’s a positive cycle that can show great results.

3. Manage your time well

It’s no secret that teachers have a lot of work on their hands. Not only do you have to spend hours and hours teaching students, but you also have to prepare the subject in advance.

Freshening up on topics both new and old helps reinforce your knowledge and it keeps you ready for any questions or difficulties that might come up.

Understandably, this takes a lot of time and it’s hard to keep track of all the different subjects you have to cover. When you consider that teachers can’t dedicate their entire day towards covering an educational topic, you’ll understand why some topics aren’t presented perfectly.

However, this is something that can be improved with some better organization.

Time management is an absolutely essential part of every career, but it’s especially important in education. You have to somehow absorb all that useful information without losing track of the clock.

Use as many helpful tricks you can to ease the time it takes to prepare subjects. Some teachers prefer to write reminders and flashcards to read before an important subject. Master the art of making useful presentations. It’s a skill that can cut your preparation time by quite a bit.

4. Never stop learning

Helping students learn is only half the job of teaching. Students aren’t the only ones that are expected to learn a thing or two. Teachers have to be constantly on the lookout for new and relevant information that pertains to their field.

Those who educate need to have all the facts and a lot of subjects change over time. Sometimes, new information is found that changes the course of a scientific discipline. Other times, the very fundamentals of a field change and this means making some changes to education.

Teachers that aren’t constantly absorbing new information won’t last very long. To effectively teach students, you need to remain educated in the subject you teach. Keep reading as many books as you can and you’ll be able to keep up with the changes.

Teaching is a skill that can be worked on as well. Nowadays, teachers utilize rto learning resources and other tools to get better training and to help students learn on their own. Others will brush up on their pedagogy to improve their classroom strategies.

As long as teachers aim to perfect their profession, they can count on positive results in classrooms and similar teaching environments.

5. Overcome obstacles

Teaching is a very specific job with both benefits and downsides. The teacher’s year is often considered one of the premier benefits of being a teacher. Instead of having a traditional twelve months of work, teachers are able to rest and recuperate while school is out.

However, this time is often utilized for preparing the syllabus and teaching materials. In a way, teachers never really take a break from teaching.

The long days will often prove to be unbearable and students won’t always cooperate. It’s important that teachers don’t lose sight of their end goal – education. Even bad days are offset by dedicated classes and a passion for teaching.

You can deal with bad days and inattentive students once you figure out that these drawbacks are only temporary. The main factor that influences the student’s education is your quality of teaching.

As long as you keep going at it, students will eventually learn everything they need to know.

Conclusion

Teaching is a profession that requires an enormous amount of patience and dedication. However, it’s also one of the most rewarding professions out there. You’re part of one of the most essential systems in society. Education is crucial, and society requires good teachers.

Follow some of the above tips and you’ll be on your way to becoming an even better teacher.

Neil White is a HR specialist from Sydney. He has worked in HR for over 10 years in multiple companies all over Australia. He has been interested in people his entire life and that is why the part of his job he particularly enjoys are employee relations. He has learned a lot dealing with all kinds of people throughout his career and therefore he thinks his job is the best.

How to be a good student teacher

How to Become the Best Teacher: Students’ Advice

How to be a good student teacher

Nobody’s perfect.

And when you are a teacher, it becomes even more difficult to become perfect for ALL your students. It’s clear, that we all are different, so your students are, and each of them has his own learning style. When your teaching style suits a learning style of your student, you will definitely become his best teacher ever. This is like to be on the same wave with someone. But it’s obvious, that all your 30 students (or 20, or even 10, it doesn’t matter actually) will never have the same opinion about your teaching methods, so, misunderstandings are impossible to avoid.

However, you always can become a better teacher for your students, the main thing is to listen to them carefully. Here we have 10 advice from students to teachers, that will help you understand their principles better. You teach them of course, but you can always let them teach you a bit as well, can’t you?

So, if you want to become the best teacher for your students, you’d better not ignore what they say.

Let Your Students Help You Be a Better Teacher for Them

A good teacher is an assertive teacher

Your students can have problems, bad days, stress, or even depressions as well. If you see that some of your students start to study worse, have no desire to do all schoolwork you give them, and just want to give up everything, do not be in a hurry to argue and tell them about how bad or lazy they become.

You can become like a parent to them. Support your student, ask about what happens to him, push him to do better. If you see that your student is depressed, maybe it would be better to meet with him after classes and find out what exactly is going on.

Be their friend, but don’t go too far

Students just don’t like when their teacher starts behaving like a student himself. Stay professional, help students with schoolwork, listen to them, talk about their lives, but remember who you are. Even if you are a young specialist, and you are almost of the same age with your students, there is no need to use all those slang words (even if you use them in your everyday life).

Your students will find it rude and unprofessional. As far as you understand, this is not the best method to get a good reputation. Your students just will not take you seriously.

Make your lesson relevant to their lives

If you want your students to remember your lessons, just try to connect the information you provide with some moments of your students’ life. You can use some of them as an example, describing this or that situation: it would be more interesting for them to visit such lessons, but not those boring ones where you try to explain them the importance of differential equations for our science.

Just try to come up with an example, how these differential equations can help THEM in the future.

How to be a good student teacher

Your time should be used wisely

Remember who you are and where you are. Students don’t like, when their teacher begins to tell them about his life, how better it was when he was younger, how better and more patient all students were then, blah-blah-blah. Your student visits your lesson to learn something on the subject, so, don’t give him a reason to miss this class next time.

Remember, that time is important for your students as well, so, they would not be happy to waste it for lessons which don’t give them anything except personal stories from their teacher’s life.

More explanations

Even if you consider yourself a cool teacher who explains everything in a way that even the stupidest person would understand you, don’t be lazy to explain it to your students several times, and what is even more important – try to do that in different manners. Sometimes, they really don’t get it, but it’s not because they are stupid: maybe some of them just think different.

Be patient, and explain your material over and over again, making sure all students understand what you’re talking about. You know, how difficult it will be for them to learn further, if they don’t get the basis.

Teach in a variety of ways

Don’t be lazy to use as many different materials for your lessons as possible. Students believe that the best teacher is able to teach in a big variety of ways: use books, videos, music, presentations, speeches, and everything that can be interesting for your students to accept (you know them better, so, you will definitely come up with good ideas).

If you show them a video, then give some papers with facts described in that video, then tell them all this info yourself, it will be much easier for your students to understand and get the material.

Be firm

It doesn’t mean you should be a dictator. But students do not like teachers who are too soft and mild. Too nice is not always nice, especially when it comes to teaching. There are always some students in a class (we think, you remember all those movies about high schools), who will try to persuade you that they do not need the material you give. Don’t make a sad face like that Okay meme on the Internet has!

Just stay consistent!

How to be a good student teacher

A good teacher always has objectives

When you start a lesson, make your students understand clearly what they will learn today. You should have clear objectives, as such a plan will help students concentrate and know what they are supposed to do during this class.

You can write something like “do nows” on the board, or just tell them your plan step by step.

Be a good example for your students

One student has told us a story about his teacher, who always brought tasty organic food and shared it with those students who didn’t bring lunch with them. He looked younger and very energetic, and some students changed their mind about what they age, because they just wanted to look like a teacher.

This is an example of a teacher who influenced his students positively. If you follow this advice, your students will thank you.

Believe in them!

Don’t ignore your student, if you see he is not interested in your subject, or he doesn’t understand anything. Just try to believe in everyone, and don’t leave any of your students behind.

Ask each of them to explain what exactly they don’t like or understand, explain this once again, make sure they’ve got it this time. It is very important for a student to feel the support of his teacher and know, that he will always help when it is needed.

How to be a good student teacher

The best teachers are capable of maximizing the learning potential of each student in their class. They understand that the key to unlocking student potential is by developing positive, respectful relationships with their students beginning on the first day of the school year. Building a trusting relationship with your students can be both challenging and time-consuming. Great teachers become masters at it in time. They will tell you that developing solid relationships with your students is paramount in fostering academic success.

It is essential that you earn your students’ trust early on in the year. A trusting classroom with mutual respect is a thriving classroom complete with active, engaging learning opportunities. Some teachers are more natural at building and sustaining positive relationships with their students than others. However, most teachers can overcome a deficiency in this area by implementing a few simple strategies into their classroom on a daily basis. Here are some strategies to try.

Provide Structure

Most kids respond positively to having structure in their classroom. It makes them feel safe and leads to increased learning. Teachers who lack structure not only lose valuable instructional time but often never gain the respect of their students. It is essential that teachers set the tone early by establishing clear expectations and practicing class procedures. It is equally critical that students see that you follow through when boundaries are overstepped. Finally, a structured classroom is one with minimal downtime. Each day should be loaded with engaging learning activities with little to no downtime.

Teach With Enthusiasm and Passion

Students will respond positively when a teacher is enthusiastic and passionate about the content she is teaching. Excitement is contagious. When a teacher introduces new content enthusiastically, students will buy in. They will get just as excited as the teacher, thus translating to increased learning. Exuberance will rub off on the students in your classroom when you are passionate about the content you teach. If you are not excited, why should your students be excited?

Have a Positive Attitude

Everyone has terrible days including teachers. Everyone goes through personal trials that can be difficult to handle. It is essential that your personal issues do not interfere with your ability to teach. Teachers should approach their class each day with a positive attitude. Positivity is transcending.

If the teacher is positive, the students will generally be positive. No one likes to be around someone who is always negative. Students will in time resent a teacher who is always negative. However, they will run through a wall for a teacher is positive and continuously offering praise.

Incorporate Humor into Lessons

Teaching and learning should not be boring. Most people love to laugh. Teachers should incorporate humor into their daily lessons. This may involve sharing an appropriate joke related to the content you will be teaching that day. It may be getting into character and donning a silly costume for a lesson. It may be laughing at yourself when you make a silly mistake. Humor comes in several forms and students will respond to it. They will enjoy coming to your class because they love to laugh and learn.

Make Learning Fun

Learning should be fun and exciting. Nobody wants to spend time in a classroom where lecturing and note-taking are the norms. Students love creative, engaging lessons that grab their attention and allow them to take ownership of the learning process. Students enjoy hands-on, kinesthetic learning activities where they can learn by doing. They are enthusiastic about technology-based lessons that are both active and visual.

Use Student Interests to Your Advantage

Every student has a passion for something. Teachers should use these interests and passions to their advantage by incorporating them into their lessons. Student surveys are a fantastic way to measure these interests. Once you know what your class is interested in, you have to find creative ways to integrate it into your lessons. Teachers who take the time to do this will see increased participation, higher involvement and an overall increase in learning. Students will appreciate the extra effort you have made to include their interest in the learning process.

Incorporate Story Telling into Lessons

Everyone loves a compelling story. Stories allow students to make real-life connections to the concepts that they are learning. Telling stories to introduce or reinforce concepts bring those concepts to life. It takes the monotony out of learning rote facts. It keeps students interested in learning. It is especially powerful when you can tell a personal story related to a concept being taught. A good story will allow students to make connections that they may not have made otherwise.

Show an Interest in Their Lives Outside of School

Your students have lives away from your classroom. Talk to them about their interests and extracurricular activities that they participate in. Take an interest in their interests even if you do not share the same passion. Attend a few ball games or extracurricular activities to show your support. Encourage your students to take their passions and interests and turn them into a career. Finally, be considerate when assigning homework. Think about the extracurricular activities occurring on that particular day and try not to overburden your students.

Treat Them With Respect

Your students will never respect you if you do not respect them. You should never yell, use sarcasm, single a student out, or attempt to embarrass them. Those things will lead to a loss of respect from the entire class. Teachers should handle situations professionally. You should deal with problems individually, in a respectful, yet direct and authoritative manner. Teachers must treat each student the same. You cannot play favorites. The same set of rules must apply to all students. It is also vital that a teacher is fair and consistent when dealing with students.

Go the Extra Mile

Some students need teachers who will go that extra mile to ensure that they are successful. Some teachers provide extra tutoring on their own time before and/or after school for struggling students. They put together extra work packets, communicate with parents more frequently and take a genuine interest in the well-being of the student. Going the extra mile may mean donating clothing, shoes, food or other household goods that a family needs to survive. It may be continuing to work with a student even after he is no longer in your classroom. It is about recognizing and assisting in meeting student needs inside and outside of the classroom.

Kindness, empathy, and a focus on building community are among the qualities of a great teacher.

How to be a good student teacher

What does it mean to be a great teacher? Of course credentials, knowledge, critical thinking, and all other faculties of intelligence are important. However, a great teacher should be much more than credentials, experience, and intelligence.

What lies in the heart of a great teacher?

You are kind: A great teacher shows kindness to students, colleagues, parents, and those around her or him. My favorite saying is “kindness makes the world go around.” It truly changes the environment in the classroom and school. Being a kind teacher helps students feel welcomed, cared for, and loved.

You are compassionate: Teaching is a very humanistic profession, and compassion is the utmost feeling of understanding and showing others you are concerned about them. A compassionate teacher models that characteristic to the students with her or his actions, and as a result students will be more open to understanding the world around them.

You are empathetic: Empathy is an important trait to have and to try to develop in ourselves and our students. Being able to put yourself in someone’s shoes and see things from their perspective can have a powerful impact on our decisions and actions.

You are positive: Being a positive person is not an easy task. Being a positive teacher is even harder when we’re always met with problems with very limited solutions. However, staying positive when it’s tough can have a tremendous positive impact on the students and everyone around us. Looking on the bright side always seems to help make things better.

You are a builder: A great teacher bridges gaps and builds relationships, friendships, and a community. Teachers always look to make things better and improve things in and outside of the classroom. Building a community is something a great teacher seeks to do in the classroom and extends that to the entire school and its community.

You inspire: Everyone looks at a great teacher and wants to be a better teacher, a better student, and even a better person. A great teacher uncovers hidden treasures, possibilities, and magic right before everyone’s eyes.

This piece was originally submitted to our community forums by a reader. Due to audience interest, we’ve preserved it. The opinions expressed here are the writer’s own.

This post has been updated as of December 2017.

Being an elementary school teacher is one of the most admirable roles an educator can hold—at the same time, it’s no doubt challenging. You’re required to produce results for your district and are perhaps even evaluated based on those statistical results and data analysis. You have to consider state standards and test results, in addition to your students’ overall well-being and development. And, of course, you want your students to love coming to school.

It’s a lot, but what you put into it, you get out of it. And if you’re reading this, we’d venture to guess that you’re already doing an incredible job. To up your game even more, here are a few tips and strategies.

5 tips for being a successful elementary school teacher:

Consistency is key

Effective teachers are a reliable presence in their students’ lives. Students need to know what to expect from teachers and when they can expect it. Young people thrive on consistent schedules, so be sure to implement one in your classroom that encompasses academic subjects, arts, exercise, and quiet time—and remind them that you’re here to help them along the way.

Establish classroom rules and post them on the wall

Setting behavior expectations is a fundamental part of classroom management as well. Try choosing short phrases that set clear expectations for conduct such as listening, being kind to others, and following directions, then compile these into a short list of classroom rules that are posted where students can always see them.

To help students understand the class rules, model them on the first day of school. For example, make a list of ways to show respect for others—and explain the related rewards and consequences. Posted classroom rules are an effective visual aid for students to remember how they should behave in class.

Get to know your students

With each new bunch of students will come 20, 30, or even 40 new personalities. It’s important for children to feel that their teacher cares about them individually for obvious reasons. Not sure how to convey that? A simple act like greeting students at the classroom door is a great way to connect. Learn your student’s names as quickly as possible and include some getting-to-know-you activities in the first few days of the school year.

Some teachers even send home a “Beginning of the Year Survey” that students fill out with their parents, answering questions about their learning style, likes and dislikes, reading preferences, and goals. By getting to know everyone in your classroom, you’ll be better equipped to teach to students’ strengths, identify and intervene on problems early, and find a balance for the different learning styles and personalities in the class.

Keep the lines of communication open

Elementary school teachers who expect students to listen to and respect them must provide them with the same courtesy. Asking students questions and paying close attention to their answers helps you adjust your instruction to suit students’ strengths and weaknesses and supports development of soft skills .

A successful teacher’s students will feel comfortable coming to them with questions or problems, confident they’ll get a fair chance. Good communication with teachers also builds trust in students as they continue their educational journey.

Make learning fun

One of your main duties as an elementary school educator is to provide an educational foundation for the future. At the same time, you want students to look forward to entering the classroom each day. Fortunately, you can use many strategies to create a learning environment that engages students and ignites their intellectual curiosity. Here are just a few:

  • Develop and use creative lesson plans
  • Experiment with instructional methods such as project-based learning and flipped classrooms
  • Provide options for every type of learner , whether that involves students working quietly on their own or hands-on activity
  • Use social media as a classroom tool

Incorporating unique activities into the daily routine helps students to find learning enjoyable rather than a chore.

How to be a good student teacher

The best teachers are capable of maximizing the learning potential of each student in their class. They understand that the key to unlocking student potential is by developing positive, respectful relationships with their students beginning on the first day of the school year. Building a trusting relationship with your students can be both challenging and time-consuming. Great teachers become masters at it in time. They will tell you that developing solid relationships with your students is paramount in fostering academic success.

It is essential that you earn your students’ trust early on in the year. A trusting classroom with mutual respect is a thriving classroom complete with active, engaging learning opportunities. Some teachers are more natural at building and sustaining positive relationships with their students than others. However, most teachers can overcome a deficiency in this area by implementing a few simple strategies into their classroom on a daily basis. Here are some strategies to try.

Provide Structure

Most kids respond positively to having structure in their classroom. It makes them feel safe and leads to increased learning. Teachers who lack structure not only lose valuable instructional time but often never gain the respect of their students. It is essential that teachers set the tone early by establishing clear expectations and practicing class procedures. It is equally critical that students see that you follow through when boundaries are overstepped. Finally, a structured classroom is one with minimal downtime. Each day should be loaded with engaging learning activities with little to no downtime.

Teach With Enthusiasm and Passion

Students will respond positively when a teacher is enthusiastic and passionate about the content she is teaching. Excitement is contagious. When a teacher introduces new content enthusiastically, students will buy in. They will get just as excited as the teacher, thus translating to increased learning. Exuberance will rub off on the students in your classroom when you are passionate about the content you teach. If you are not excited, why should your students be excited?

Have a Positive Attitude

Everyone has terrible days including teachers. Everyone goes through personal trials that can be difficult to handle. It is essential that your personal issues do not interfere with your ability to teach. Teachers should approach their class each day with a positive attitude. Positivity is transcending.

If the teacher is positive, the students will generally be positive. No one likes to be around someone who is always negative. Students will in time resent a teacher who is always negative. However, they will run through a wall for a teacher is positive and continuously offering praise.

Incorporate Humor into Lessons

Teaching and learning should not be boring. Most people love to laugh. Teachers should incorporate humor into their daily lessons. This may involve sharing an appropriate joke related to the content you will be teaching that day. It may be getting into character and donning a silly costume for a lesson. It may be laughing at yourself when you make a silly mistake. Humor comes in several forms and students will respond to it. They will enjoy coming to your class because they love to laugh and learn.

Make Learning Fun

Learning should be fun and exciting. Nobody wants to spend time in a classroom where lecturing and note-taking are the norms. Students love creative, engaging lessons that grab their attention and allow them to take ownership of the learning process. Students enjoy hands-on, kinesthetic learning activities where they can learn by doing. They are enthusiastic about technology-based lessons that are both active and visual.

Use Student Interests to Your Advantage

Every student has a passion for something. Teachers should use these interests and passions to their advantage by incorporating them into their lessons. Student surveys are a fantastic way to measure these interests. Once you know what your class is interested in, you have to find creative ways to integrate it into your lessons. Teachers who take the time to do this will see increased participation, higher involvement and an overall increase in learning. Students will appreciate the extra effort you have made to include their interest in the learning process.

Incorporate Story Telling into Lessons

Everyone loves a compelling story. Stories allow students to make real-life connections to the concepts that they are learning. Telling stories to introduce or reinforce concepts bring those concepts to life. It takes the monotony out of learning rote facts. It keeps students interested in learning. It is especially powerful when you can tell a personal story related to a concept being taught. A good story will allow students to make connections that they may not have made otherwise.

Show an Interest in Their Lives Outside of School

Your students have lives away from your classroom. Talk to them about their interests and extracurricular activities that they participate in. Take an interest in their interests even if you do not share the same passion. Attend a few ball games or extracurricular activities to show your support. Encourage your students to take their passions and interests and turn them into a career. Finally, be considerate when assigning homework. Think about the extracurricular activities occurring on that particular day and try not to overburden your students.

Treat Them With Respect

Your students will never respect you if you do not respect them. You should never yell, use sarcasm, single a student out, or attempt to embarrass them. Those things will lead to a loss of respect from the entire class. Teachers should handle situations professionally. You should deal with problems individually, in a respectful, yet direct and authoritative manner. Teachers must treat each student the same. You cannot play favorites. The same set of rules must apply to all students. It is also vital that a teacher is fair and consistent when dealing with students.

Go the Extra Mile

Some students need teachers who will go that extra mile to ensure that they are successful. Some teachers provide extra tutoring on their own time before and/or after school for struggling students. They put together extra work packets, communicate with parents more frequently and take a genuine interest in the well-being of the student. Going the extra mile may mean donating clothing, shoes, food or other household goods that a family needs to survive. It may be continuing to work with a student even after he is no longer in your classroom. It is about recognizing and assisting in meeting student needs inside and outside of the classroom.

How To Be A Better Teacher: The Secret Recipe That Every Pro Knows

How Can You Be A Good Teacher?

  • Voice – Speak in a normal native speed. Do not slow further for understanding when giving key directions. Use of language clarification.
  • Attitude – Natural, attentive, exigent, assertive, challenging, energetic, personable, at times uses humor.
  • Lesson Preparation – Announce objectives topically/functionally. Have a lesson outline on the board. Lesson should proceed from presentation/checking for understanding to practice to application stages. Summarize lesson at the end. No hesitations. Material selection is appropriate.
  • Classroom management – Set time limits. Use pairs. Monitor and modify behavior. Call on students randomly. Switch partners, Create accountability. Hurry students along. Take charge of seating. Efficient switching of partners i.e. student on one end has to move to the other end.
  • Materials management – Give directives clearly, efficiently and concretely. Modify text lesson to improve communication and relevance. Use writing as a springboard for production. Use brainstorming as a prelude to presentation.
  • Break management – Assign mingling. Check on a few students after the break to create accountability.
  • Vocabulary/Grammar Presentation – Present grammar inductively. Pre-teach and brainstorm needed vocabulary. Explain vocabulary through context, paraphrase, gestures etc. Lead students with cues, hints, silent pauses. Challenge students.
  • Pacing/Variety –Activities may include pair/writing/review/grammar awareness/info gap/grammar correction /presentation/fluency. Aim for a good variety.
  • Student speaking time60% of class time in pairs is ideal.
  • Lesson relevance – lesson is consistently applied to the student’s world.
  • Error correction – Correct directly/anonymous indirect teacher correction. Use peer/self correction.
  • Student empowerment – Allow the students the opportunity for using language clarification. Students should cooperate and peer correct. Compliment students for desirable SE behaviors.
  • Behavior modification – Compliment for correct responses/emphatic behavior modification.
  • Props/Visual aids – gestures/handouts/mime/student’s imagination/facial expressions etc.

What About Special Teaching Situations?

A ‘good teacher’ should focus on particular needs:

1) Young Learners – It is important to consider how children learn, so classes should be child-initiated, creating a need to learn and then filling it. To get a child involved emotionally and psychologically requires skilled judgment and imagination.
2) Senior Learners – You must pace the lesson according to the students and appreciate that knowledge may not be retained or quickly forgotten. Patience and understanding and sometimes socially therapeutic talents are called into play.
3) Large Classes – This is so challenging as you must cater for individual learning styles, different levels and interests, activate quieter students, delegate responsibilities and manipulate group activities to ensure maximum potential.
4) Limited Resources – This really tests your resourcefulness without the dependence upon technical equipment or supporting materials, as you communicate and interact directly and creatively by generating your own ideas as situations demand.
5) One-to-One – This requires the ability to ‘tailor-make’ lessons based on a preliminary needs analysis and then streamline or modify your course as necessary, whilst performing a variety of roles including participation as a fellow student.
6) Business English – Commerciality necessitates a high level of focus on customer service and personalization of course design and delivery to client needs. Language trainers should desirably bring their own corporate background to class and be able to understand, analyze and produce results in a highly demanding environment, to ensure repeat contracts. Sensitivity, negotiation skills and a genuine interest in business are also important.
8) On-line teaching – this may be the future format for many teachers and you really need to be up-to-date with the latest developments-and creative in composing materials.

Follow this simple formula:

  • Be presentable and professional in your approach.
  • Always have a lesson plan, but be flexible as required.
  • Be enthusiastic, positive, challenging and motivating.
  • Create fun and give that added value to ensure economic survival in these recessionary times.

What makes a ‘good teacher’? You do.

How to be a good student teacher

Sarah Hagan, a young algebra teacher in rural Oklahoma oil country, stays where she is because her students “deserve better.” Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

Sarah Hagan, a young algebra teacher in rural Oklahoma oil country, stays where she is because her students “deserve better.”

Great teachers have two things in common: an exceptional level of devotion to their students, and the drive to inspire each one to learn and succeed.

At NPR Ed we’re just about halfway through our 50 Great Teachers project.

We’ve profiled teachers at all levels, in all subjects, from all over the country and overseas too. The series has taken us from rural Drumright, Okla., to a mountaintop in Israel. From a jazz class in New Orleans to a Boy Scout troop in South Central LA to the lost world of ancient Greece.

And so we’ve taken a moment here to pull from those stories some of the thoughts and lessons from those teachers that have stuck with us.

Together, they almost make a mini-guide for teachers.

1. Realize Teaching Is A Learned Skill

“I’m really trying hard to dispel this idea that teaching is this thing you’re born to do and it’s somehow natural to everyday life. I don’t think either of those things is true.”

2. Get To The Truth

“I’ll tell you the truth, you tell me the truth. The rest is commentary.”

How to be a good student teacher

For 20 years, Conrad Cooper has been teaching children in Los Angeles to swim by earning his young students’ unwavering trust. Elissa Nadworny/NPR hide caption

For 20 years, Conrad Cooper has been teaching children in Los Angeles to swim by earning his young students’ unwavering trust.

3. Build Trust

“Swimming is the easy part. It’s the trust part that’s the most difficult for them.”

4. Assume a Secret Identity

“Giving myself a name, Mr. Spider, gave me an out. It gave me a way to express a side of me I musta had but never took out.”

5. Be A Sparring Partner

“All these students around me, they can easily come, and they can challenge me. They can reject me. They can oppose me. They can laugh with me. Sometimes they can even laugh at me. They can!”

6. Be Someone To Watch Over Them

“I want them to say, ‘At least one person, Miss Begay, is there every day for me. Miss Begay is going to wonder where I am if I go missing. There will be one person looking out for me, and it’s Miss Begay.’ “

7. Be A Teacher, Not A Friend

How to be a good student teacher

Coach Nick Haley talks with a student during crew practice in Portland, Or. He stresses teaching over friendship. David P Gilkey/NPR hide caption

Coach Nick Haley talks with a student during crew practice in Portland, Or. He stresses teaching over friendship.

David P Gilkey/NPR

“It’s important to support them. It’s important to respect them. It’s important to nurture them. But, a friend? No.”

8. Believe In Their Success

“The same tools the schools use to show they cannot succeed, we use them in opposite way.”

9. Recognize It Takes Vulnerability To Learn

“It takes a lot for any student, especially for a student who is learning English as their new language, to feel confident enough to say, ‘I don’t know, but I want to know.’ “

Thomas Whaley, 2nd grade teacher, Patchogue, N.Y.

10. Look For The Success Stories

“I know that you cannot save everybody. But if one of them could just go along, complete his education, go to college, and I see him in the future doing something positive with his life, that makes me think that what I was doing is all worthwhile.”

11. Blow Off Steam, But Remember Why You’re Here

“Yeah, there’s days where I complain. And the people I complain to think I’m insane because I haven’t left this place. But these kids deserve better.”

12. Be Grateful To Your Own Teachers

“I am the product of great teachers. They can show you something that you have never seen before. And awaken that little something inside of you that you’ve never seen before.”