How to be a good team captain

By Daniel Benjamin

Basketball is a team game where player leadership is essential. Player leadership can be the difference from your team being good rather than mediocre.

You may be asking, “ Why do I need to be a leader, when my coach is an exceptional leader?”

The reason player leadership is so important is because athletes typically respond to peer motivation and peer pressure at a much deeper level than when the message is received from a coach.

Being a team captain is not easy but it is a very important part of the composition of your team. Team captains are generally selected a couple of ways; either the coach chooses the team leaders or there is a team vote.

Either way it is a great honor to be named captain and it shows the team and coach have confidence in your leadership ability. Remember you don’t have to be the star of the team or starter to be a captain.

Here are 10 qualities you need to be an effective team captain.

You must be self-motivated. Team captains are the heart and soul of a team, going all out every minute you are on the floor during games as well as in practice. You also should be the first one at practice and one of the lasts to leave.

Team captains firmly believe that the best interest of the team always comes first.

Team captains are bold, tenacious, fearless, prepared, fluid and enthusiastic.

Team leaders are great listeners and have a thirst to improve. When a coach tells you something, you should listen to the meaning of the words and not how it is said. If a coach didn’t care, he wouldn’t bother to help you become the best player possible.

Team captains expect and demand the best from themselves and their teammates.

Know your role. A key part of being a leader is knowing your role on the team (scorer, rebounder, shutdown defender, sixth man, etc.). If you don’t know, ask.

Team captains choose their words carefully. The words of the team captain mean more than that of any other player.

Encourages teammates. A good leader keeps the team upbeat and positive. If a teammate is down, the captain picks the player’s spirits up.

Understand that mistakes will be made. Team leaders can’t get down on themselves or others when mistakes because if you do others will follow. So, instead of chastising yourself or teammate learn from the mistake and move on. Simple statements like “I got you next time” or “Relax, I will get the ball again next time”, will do wonders for a player’s confidence after a mistake.

Team captains do not allow others to talk negatively about the team. You should take any insult about a team member as an insult against the whole team.

I wana make team captain this year and i am in 9th grade i wanna make the varsity squad but i am up against other 9-12th graders how an i make sure i can get noticed and specifiacally be able to help my team. I wanna make sure my oach notices me any thoughts.

As a 9th/10th grader, what sets you apart from the regular 11th or 12th graders is experience and knowledge of this particular team, lesser interaction with the coaches, and an expectation to wait out your rookie years before you are made captain. But if you are to be considered for the position, you’d have to show the natural ability to lead, not to mention have tremendous work ethic and regularity. be one of the most stable players on your team. Once your skills are strong enough for your teammates to trust your judgement, try leading or creating a few plays for your teammates. It’s not always a point guard that is the captain, but it is often so, as he is the one who communicates maximum with his teammates. Build an individual respect and rapport with each teammate. Striving to shine as a star player will not work. A will to work on the team rather than only yourself is necessary. As you keep your head in the game,have a reliable outlook about you, and maintain your stability and work ethic, you are bound to be considered for captaincy.

My daughter is on a varsity high school basketball team and is clearly the leader of the team, not only as far as skill but more importantly her actions on and off the court, dedication, work ethic, and her ability to lead the team on the floor. She is always the first to arrive at practices and last to leave. My daughter is a sophomore as is most the team. This summer coach told her she would be captain. To her, is was going to be an honor and she was looking forward to the responsibility. At some point before season started, rather than making the decision on the other captain, he decided to rotate captains every game. If they were all strong leaders, maybe, however this isn’t the case. This sends the wrong message to me, diminishes the value, undermines my daughters efforts and really shows that he is unable to make tough decisions. He didn’t want to hurt anyones feelings which instead he undermined his best player. My daughter was hurt and really lost a lot of respect for him with this decision. He is fairly new to coaching and it is obvious that he struggles. What are your thoughts? Rather than getting mad, I wanted to possibly hear another perspective. I see it as everyone get’s a trophy mentality which is fine for a church league or maybe in elementary school but not in high school sports.

I think you made a great call but seeking some other opinions instead of getting made about it. I give you props for that!

Honestly, this does not sound like a big deal to me at all. I would not be worry or thinking much about it at all. If I were the coach, I might do the same thing. It just depends on the situation and what I think is best for my players and their growth as people and growth for our team. Sometimes that is not easy to figure out!!

Maybe the coach is actually making the “tough decision” and knew he might look bad but he truly believed that is what’s best for the people on his team. That would be a tough call as a coach. but in your gut you might know it’s right. Or maybe he made a mistake. So what. Everyone makes mistakes. You make the best of the cards you are dealt.

I would not read into it too much. You don’t know what happens in the locker room, at practice, or behind the scenes. It’s impossible to try and guess what and why a coach does what he does. You have no control over that. Let him do his job. you won’t agree with everything he does. I guarantee that. but that is typical.

I know this is hard to do but that is my best advice as someone with a lot of coaching and some parenting experience.

I always tell my players and my own children not to worry about things you can’t control. focus on the things you can control.

Make lemons out of lemonade.

See it as a challenge to develop character. A top notch leader would not let things like this bother them. they would see this as an opportunity.

Focus on what you can control, have fun, and don’t worry about the coach. If you are upset, you’re choosing to be upset — it’s not the coaches fault you’re upset.

I say. Go play basketball and enjoy the awesome experience of playing high school basketball!

You only get one chance to play high school ball, it sounds like she has an amazing role to be grateful for. So go and have a blast. So many players would be ecstatic to have an opportunity to play varsity basketball. let alone as a captain and as a sophomore!

You always have control of your attitude and that seems like a good attitude and outlook on things to me.

Key takeaways:

  • For every role, employers seek candidates who can work well in a team environment.
  • “Team players” typically have strong communication, collaboration, active listening, and problem-solving skills.
  • To build your teamwork skills, consult with your manager or a trusted coworker to identify your areas of improvement.

The ability to achieve goals in the workplace requires collaboration. Whether you are currently part of a team or are preparing to join a new one, developing strong teamwork skills can help you succeed in your career no matter your level or industry.

In this article, we discuss what it means to be a team player, common characteristics of team players and how you can improve your own teamwork skills.

What is a team player?

A team player is someone who actively contributes to their group in order to complete tasks, meet goals or manage projects. Team players actively listen to their coworkers, respect ideas and aim to improve the product or process at hand. Team players understand that their team’s success is their own success, and they share responsibility when their team experiences difficulties along the way.

Team player qualities and characteristics

There are many common soft skills that make individuals great team players. While soft skills are not as easily learned as technical skills, they can certainly be developed with time and practice.

Here are several qualities you can focus on to be a better team player:

1. You understand your role

As a team member, you understand your role within the team and work to achieve your duties to the best of your ability. Though you may offer help or solutions to other team members, you also respect the boundaries of your position.

2. You welcome collaboration

Working with a team means there will be varying opinions and ideas. Even if you think your idea is best, you should listen to all ideas before pushing yours. Search for compromises, and remain respectful if your work is criticized.

3. You hold yourself accountable

Take responsibility for your mistakes and look for solutions. Understand how your actions impact the entire group. In doing so, you will learn from your errors and command more respect from your team.

4. You are flexible

You should readily accept any tasks your manager gives you. Flexibility in your role allows you to learn more and help your team. Look at every opportunity as a chance to learn.

5. You have a positive attitude

Maintaining a positive attitude even during stressful times helps the rest of your teamwork through that difficult time without getting upset. Your positive attitude will create a better atmosphere.

6. You commit to the team

You should be fully invested in the team. You will be a great team player if you can show others that you believe in the group, the process and the goals. This sort of positivity can radically increase morale and productivity.

How to be a better team player

Working well with others shows that you are committed to achieving both personal and organizational goals. Displaying consistent teamwork skills also shows a strong work ethic, increasing your chances for raises, promotions and other earnings. No matter your experience level or position, continuously focusing on becoming a better team player will lead to success in your career.

Here are several ways you can focus on improving your teamwork skills:

  • Offer help. If you see a coworker who seems overwhelmed or is struggling to keep up with tasks, ask if you can help. Team players support each other during difficult times. Remember to ask for help, as well.

Actively listen. Active listening means hearing and thoughtfully responding to what your team member says. Ask questions about things you don’t understand.

Communicate. Keep your team updated on your progress and what you need to be successful in your job. You should be in constant communication with your team to ensure that everyone is working toward the same goal and no one is repeating work.

Respect others. Recognize that other team members are also trying to fulfill their roles, and consider how you can support them. Take the time to get to know your team. Everyone has a role to play that is no less critical than your own.

Be a problem-solver. When you recognize a problem, take action to solve it. Brainstorm solutions to your problems and ask for feedback.

  • Celebrate teammates’ successes. If a member of your team succeeds in the workplace, so do you. It means you are one step closer to completing a goal. Celebrate their success. Also, stay updated on their personal lives and take the time to express interest and care.
  • If you’re unsure about what areas you need to improve to be a better team player, ask a trusted friend or colleague for honest feedback about your teamwork skills. Set SMART goals to improve those skills over time. You might also consider asking someone you respect in your industry to be your mentor. Seeking out someone who has strong teamwork skills can help you improve your own.

    Collaboration is a crucial part of working successfully and learning how to be a positive force for your team is vital. When you aim to be a great team player, others will follow. In doing so, you can improve your workplace, grow personally and advance in your career.

    The role of team captain has the potential to be both the most challenging and the most rewarding role of all for a player. If you’re about to appoint, consider the following soccer coaching tips on qualities to look for.
    Even today, with leadership roles and responsibilities shared amongst the players, the skipper’s role remains central to the team’s performance.

    Not only must captains be competent in their playing, they need to inspire confidence in their players, evaluate the game plan and change it if circumstances dictate. They need to handle pressure well, make tactical decisions and communicate effectively with the referee as well as the team.

    Not only is the captain a player, he is a leader, communicator, key decision maker, and important link between team and coach. What, then, should you as a coach be looking for in your captain?

    1. Each captain is different

    The first thing to remember is that there is no one set of characteristics possessed by effective captains. Very different personalities can be successful captains.

    2. Mentally strong

    The mental part of the job is arguably the hardest part. All captains should be mentally strong. Inevitably, the captain will be criticised at some point, both within and outside the team.

    Equally, the captain needs to remain focused and aware while under intense pressure during a game, so that he can make the correct decisions at the right time. To cope with this requires considerable mental fortitude.

    Some captains say the mental aspect of captaincy is the hardest part, because there is so much more to think about, as well as playing.

    3. Excellent communicator

    KISS – Keep It Simple Stupid

    This is a skill required by all captains. The captain will need to encourage and manage on-field communication between all the players, as well as maintaining effective communication both with players and between players and the coaching staff off of it.

    However, this does not mean that the only voice to be heard on the field should be that of the captain. Indeed, the captain should only speak when necessary, being able to keep his communication concise and to the point.

    4. Emotionally disciplined

    “Fire in the belly but ice in the brain.”

    This is important for three main reasons:

    a) As a role model the example set by the captain must meet every expectation he has of the players. For example, if the captain becomes angry with the referee and constantly questions his decisions, he cannot expect his players to accept refereeing decisions themselves.
    b) If the captain loses self-control and vents his anger or frustration (whether against an opponent, teammate or the referee), he will have lost the ability to make rational decisions. His own performance will also suffer; a loss of emotional control will affect timing, co-ordination and the ability to “read” the game as awareness becomes more narrowly focused.

    c) A loss of emotional control will be seen as a sign of weakness by the opposition, boosting their confidence whilst undermining that of the team. This does not mean that your captain becomes an emotionless robot, devoid of passion.

    5. Knows the players

    The first thing you have to remember as captain is while soccer is very much a team game you are dealing with individuals who are all different in attitudes, temperament and experience. Thus you have to find out each person’s strengths and weaknesses… And you have to find out which players best respond to the carrot and which to the stick.

    The captain should have the ability to deal with each player as an individual. Consequently, he will know what motivates different players and how they prefer to prepare themselves mentally for a game (not all players respond to being shouted and/or sworn at!).

    He or she should observe players both on and off the field in order to learn how best to deal with them.

    The captain needs to know which players are best left alone, which require a quiet reminder of expectations and which need a more forceful articulation of what is required.

    The captain that also takes time to get to know his teammates as people and not just players will ultimately achieve far more respect and effort from them.

    6. Self-confident

    “Don’t ask me how I played. I always think I played well.” A self-confident captain inspires confidence in others. It also helps him maintain his own performance.

    This is easy when things are going well, it is harder, but arguably even more important, to do so when the going gets tough. The captain needs to make sure he at least gives the impression of confidence in these circumstances.

    Looking and acting confident will, sooner or later, lead to being confident.

    Click here to subscribe to Soccer Coach Weekly and get more soccer coaching tips delivered direct to your inbox.

    By: Eliza Martinez

    Published: 31 October, 2018

    How to be a good team captain

    Being the captain of a sports team requires certain traits that promote other team members to respect and follow your direction. However, the captain isn’t necessarily the best player on the team. Not everyone can handle the position of team captain. The coach and members of the team generally agree on who is best for the position. Some teams have multiple captains. Understanding why the captain’s position is important to the success of a team helps you carry out your duties for everyone’s benefit.

    Personality Traits

    An outgoing personality is more conducive to being a team captain, but isn’t the only important trait for motivating and supporting your team. The Association for Applied Sports Psychology emphasizes the “3 Cs” of being a good team captain. The first is caring. As captain, you must care about the success of the team as well as the success of each player individually. Courage is the second “C” and requires the captain to be prepared and work hard to set an example for the rest of the team. The third is consistency. A team captain must use consistent communication with the team members and always play to the best of his ability at each practice and game.

    Leadership

    An effective team captain leads her team members by influencing them in a positive way. This involves putting the most effort into each practice and game and expecting the other team members to do the same. You’ll also lead by helping solve conflicts among team members, understanding all the rules of the game, building team spirit and coordinating ideas into action. The Leadership Expert website suggests taking charge, doing more than is expected, taking responsibility for your strengths and weaknesses, leading with actions rather than words and avoiding thinking you are better than the rest of the team. This will motivate your team to act the same, creating a cohesive unit that performs well and wins games.

    Working Together

    As the captain, you might have more authority regarding some decisions, such as what plays to use or what uniforms to wear. However, working together as a team to make these decisions fosters a team feeling as well as respect among players. A captain does this by meshing the needs and talents of each team member with the ultimate goal of the team, which is winning games. For example, this might mean switching the playing position of a couple players if their skills aren’t helping your team score.

    Considerations

    Some people are born leaders, but this doesn’t exclude others from being an effective team captain. If you’d like to be the captain of your sports team, talk with coaches and players who have held the position, advises the Association for Applied Sports Psychology. This is a valuable way to learn the attributes and skills that will help you. Reading books written by coaches and professional sports figures is another way to gather information about good techniques for a team captain.

    Trying to figure out how to determine your team captains for the upcoming season?

    Coaches often ask me the question, “What’s the best way to determine my team leaders?” There are a variety of ways to select your team leaders, each with their own unique advantages and disadvantages. Because each program and each season is unique, the real key is to find the best way for your team for this specific season.

    Here are seven strategies you can use to find the best leaders for the critical captain role, and the pros and cons of each selection method along with my advice.

    How to be a good team captain

    Pros: The advantages of this selection method are that you allow your team input on deciding their leaders. Rather than arbitrarily imposing a captain on them from above, you show your athletes that you respect them enough to allow them to choose their leader(s). And by giving them a choice, you also are much more likely to find a leader the team is willing to follow.

    Cons: While there are many benefits to allowing your team to vote for captains, there are two potentially problematic drawbacks. The first is that the team might select someone who the coaching staff does not think would make a good captain. The person could be more of a “ring leader” than a leader. If you solely let your team decide the captain(s) by voting, you might regret who they select.

    The second problem with allowing the team to vote is that the captain selection process might be more of a popularity contest. Here again the athletes might pick someone who is popular in a social setting, but does not have the necessary skills to be a leader on the field/court or in the locker room. If you are allowing your team to vote, it is very important to gauge the maturity level of your athletes to determine if they have the foresight and understanding to actually pick a true leader.

    Jeff’s Advice: Think twice about having a team vote solely determine your team captains if your athletes are not mature or sophisticated enough to pick an effective leader. Additionally, if you are having your team vote, invest the time on the front end to have your athletes really think through what it takes to be an effective leader. You might transform the selection into a short team building activity and have your team discuss and list the characteristics so that everyone is clear.

    Many coaches have told me that they also have their team look at the Team Leadership Evaluation, listed in The Team Captain’s Leadership Manual , to help their athletes gain a full understanding of what it means to be a leader before voting. Further, some coaches like Nebraska Softball Coach Rhonda Revelle have their athletes apply for a captain position – then the interested leaders get time in front of the team to explain why they feel they would be an effective captain for the program. All of these ways help ensure that your athletes put some serious thought and consideration in selecting the leaders of the team. When selecting team captains, follow the adage of “measure twice and cut once.”

    A further variation of the team voting is to allow the coaches to have a vote as well. Some coaches even weigh their votes more – meaning a coach’s vote counts as two to three times as much as an athlete’s vote. While the weighting of the votes might help balance out the smaller numbers of the coaching staff in comparison to the athletes, it also sends a potentially unfortunate message that a coach’s opinion is worth more than the athletes.

    How to be a good team captain

    Pros: The obvious advantage to this one for the coaching staff is that you get to work with someone who you respect, trust, and feel will do a great job. You also won’t have to worry about the captain selection becoming an athlete popularity contest – or the athletes choosing someone who would make a poor leader for your team.

    Cons: The potential problem with having the coaches select the captain(s) is that you might select someone who the team doesn’t really respect or follow. You might pick one of your favorite athletes – but for whatever reason, this person has not fully connected with the rest of the team. Further, by you imposing a captain on the team without their input, you might actual hurt your captain’s platform of leadership. The team might have the tendency to view the person as a “Coach’s Pet” and be less likely the follow the coach-named leader.

    Jeff’s Advice: It is important to allow your athletes at least some input on who their leader might be. Unless you are fully confident that your choice will be almost unanimously supported by the team, avoid imposing a leader on your team solely determined by the coaching staff. Instead, work together with your athletes to find someone who will be respected by both coaches and athletes.

    How to be a good team captain

    List the Top Three people who you trust the most:

    List the Top Three people who have the best relationships with their teammates:

    List the Top Three people who are willing to confront and hold their teammates accountable:

    As you might imagine if you did this with your team, certain athletes’ names will likely be listed across several questions. It’s these athletes then that your team already sees as displaying positive leadership qualities and behaviors. In essence then, you give your athletes a chance to identify who they look to as leaders and value their input in the process. After compiling the various lists made by the team and coaching staff, you will likely see who the team looks to for leadership.

    You can then come back to the team and say by the results of this exercise it is clear that this team looks to the following people as leaders. You can then either leave it at that or take it the next step and officially name them as captains.

    Pros: The Team Nominates – Coach Endorses selection method should give you the best of both worlds. You provide your athletes with input on who they believe has exhibited leadership behaviors – but you also provide yourself with the latitude and discretion to make the final choice.

    Cons: The primary disadvantage to this option is when the team and the coaching staff aren’t on the same page. Your team might list some individuals that they look to for leadership – but you as a coaching staff might not feel comfortable endorsing them as leaders. Fortunately with the quantity and quality of questions that make up the Top Three Leaders List, this rarely happens.

    Jeff’s Advice: This is one of my favorite ways of determining captains because it provides both coaches and athletes with a way to provide valuable input on the critical captain selection process. Athletes get to have their say on who they respect through the Top Three Leaders List – and coaches are allowed the freedom and flexibility to make the final determination. In the vast majority of cases, the coach’s choice is simply an endorsement of what the athletes already listed.

    And, even if you don’t use the Top Three Leaders List to help select your team captains, it will still be an interesting exercise that can give you tremendous insights into your team.

    For four more strategies on how to select your team captains, our Championship Coaches Network members can click on Part 2 of the article below.

    Posted March 12, 2018 in School Youth/Rec

    How to be a good team captain

    Becoming a Quality Captain

    When you became a dancer, you became a leader. This leadership role is sacred. And if it’s used properly, it’s powerful.

    Your team is a collection of leaders. It’s a melting pot of personalities, interests and talents. It takes a special person to relate to such a diverse group of individuals. Perhaps you’ve been given the chance to serve as team captain. Or maybe you’re a hopeful candidate. Either way, it is important to approach the position with poise. A quality captain strives to improve themselves and their team. You are expected to wear many hats. Although the following functions seem contradictory, a fearless leader succeeds by discovering a delicate balance.

    A captain is a:

    Friend

    You are a trusted confidant. You are approachable and available. Team members aren’t afraid to come to you with questions. You keep your word and have an open mind. You work to keep the peace among the team.
    Teacher
    You are easy to respect. You don’t abuse your power. Your teammates value your authority and don’t take advantage of you. You set an example and behave with decency. You are fair and confront issues head-on.

    Optimist

    You see potential in every individual. You expect team members to be active in the school and the community. You set lofty goals and have faith that the team can achieve them.

    Realist

    You realize that academics and family come first. You allow team members to have a life outside of cheer and don’t over-commit them. You only give the team what you are confident they can handle.

    How to be a good team captain

    Encourager

    You acknowledge strengths. You praise them when they have done something great. You are patient and you help members develop at their own pace.

    Trainer

    You push your team to step outside of their comfort zone. You deliver constructive criticism effectively. You don’t let your teammates get by with being “okay.” When your team faces an obstacle, you rally them to overcome.

    Player

    You are a teammate. Your energy is contagious and you create an enjoyable environment. You don’t mind delegating your duties. You highlight each member’s strength by assigning individual tasks.

    Worker

    You are a leader. You have your ducks in a row. You are on time and always prepared. You have a plan. And a back-up plan.

    While many of these qualities come natural, finding that balance is learned. And hey – nobody is perfect! There is no such thing as a “perfect” captain. Each team is different, so each captain unique. The job requires heart and commitment. If you are dedicated to the success of your team, you are headed in the right direction.

    Key takeaways:

    • For every role, employers seek candidates who can work well in a team environment.
    • “Team players” typically have strong communication, collaboration, active listening, and problem-solving skills.
    • To build your teamwork skills, consult with your manager or a trusted coworker to identify your areas of improvement.

    The ability to achieve goals in the workplace requires collaboration. Whether you are currently part of a team or are preparing to join a new one, developing strong teamwork skills can help you succeed in your career no matter your level or industry.

    In this article, we discuss what it means to be a team player, common characteristics of team players and how you can improve your own teamwork skills.

    What is a team player?

    A team player is someone who actively contributes to their group in order to complete tasks, meet goals or manage projects. Team players actively listen to their coworkers, respect ideas and aim to improve the product or process at hand. Team players understand that their team’s success is their own success, and they share responsibility when their team experiences difficulties along the way.

    Team player qualities and characteristics

    There are many common soft skills that make individuals great team players. While soft skills are not as easily learned as technical skills, they can certainly be developed with time and practice.

    Here are several qualities you can focus on to be a better team player:

    1. You understand your role

    As a team member, you understand your role within the team and work to achieve your duties to the best of your ability. Though you may offer help or solutions to other team members, you also respect the boundaries of your position.

    2. You welcome collaboration

    Working with a team means there will be varying opinions and ideas. Even if you think your idea is best, you should listen to all ideas before pushing yours. Search for compromises, and remain respectful if your work is criticized.

    3. You hold yourself accountable

    Take responsibility for your mistakes and look for solutions. Understand how your actions impact the entire group. In doing so, you will learn from your errors and command more respect from your team.

    4. You are flexible

    You should readily accept any tasks your manager gives you. Flexibility in your role allows you to learn more and help your team. Look at every opportunity as a chance to learn.

    5. You have a positive attitude

    Maintaining a positive attitude even during stressful times helps the rest of your teamwork through that difficult time without getting upset. Your positive attitude will create a better atmosphere.

    6. You commit to the team

    You should be fully invested in the team. You will be a great team player if you can show others that you believe in the group, the process and the goals. This sort of positivity can radically increase morale and productivity.

    How to be a better team player

    Working well with others shows that you are committed to achieving both personal and organizational goals. Displaying consistent teamwork skills also shows a strong work ethic, increasing your chances for raises, promotions and other earnings. No matter your experience level or position, continuously focusing on becoming a better team player will lead to success in your career.

    Here are several ways you can focus on improving your teamwork skills:

    • Offer help. If you see a coworker who seems overwhelmed or is struggling to keep up with tasks, ask if you can help. Team players support each other during difficult times. Remember to ask for help, as well.

    Actively listen. Active listening means hearing and thoughtfully responding to what your team member says. Ask questions about things you don’t understand.

    Communicate. Keep your team updated on your progress and what you need to be successful in your job. You should be in constant communication with your team to ensure that everyone is working toward the same goal and no one is repeating work.

    Respect others. Recognize that other team members are also trying to fulfill their roles, and consider how you can support them. Take the time to get to know your team. Everyone has a role to play that is no less critical than your own.

    Be a problem-solver. When you recognize a problem, take action to solve it. Brainstorm solutions to your problems and ask for feedback.

  • Celebrate teammates’ successes. If a member of your team succeeds in the workplace, so do you. It means you are one step closer to completing a goal. Celebrate their success. Also, stay updated on their personal lives and take the time to express interest and care.
  • If you’re unsure about what areas you need to improve to be a better team player, ask a trusted friend or colleague for honest feedback about your teamwork skills. Set SMART goals to improve those skills over time. You might also consider asking someone you respect in your industry to be your mentor. Seeking out someone who has strong teamwork skills can help you improve your own.

    Collaboration is a crucial part of working successfully and learning how to be a positive force for your team is vital. When you aim to be a great team player, others will follow. In doing so, you can improve your workplace, grow personally and advance in your career.

    Posted March 12, 2018 in School Youth/Rec

    How to be a good team captain

    Becoming a Quality Captain

    When you became a dancer, you became a leader. This leadership role is sacred. And if it’s used properly, it’s powerful.

    Your team is a collection of leaders. It’s a melting pot of personalities, interests and talents. It takes a special person to relate to such a diverse group of individuals. Perhaps you’ve been given the chance to serve as team captain. Or maybe you’re a hopeful candidate. Either way, it is important to approach the position with poise. A quality captain strives to improve themselves and their team. You are expected to wear many hats. Although the following functions seem contradictory, a fearless leader succeeds by discovering a delicate balance.

    A captain is a:

    Friend

    You are a trusted confidant. You are approachable and available. Team members aren’t afraid to come to you with questions. You keep your word and have an open mind. You work to keep the peace among the team.
    Teacher
    You are easy to respect. You don’t abuse your power. Your teammates value your authority and don’t take advantage of you. You set an example and behave with decency. You are fair and confront issues head-on.

    Optimist

    You see potential in every individual. You expect team members to be active in the school and the community. You set lofty goals and have faith that the team can achieve them.

    Realist

    You realize that academics and family come first. You allow team members to have a life outside of cheer and don’t over-commit them. You only give the team what you are confident they can handle.

    How to be a good team captain

    Encourager

    You acknowledge strengths. You praise them when they have done something great. You are patient and you help members develop at their own pace.

    Trainer

    You push your team to step outside of their comfort zone. You deliver constructive criticism effectively. You don’t let your teammates get by with being “okay.” When your team faces an obstacle, you rally them to overcome.

    Player

    You are a teammate. Your energy is contagious and you create an enjoyable environment. You don’t mind delegating your duties. You highlight each member’s strength by assigning individual tasks.

    Worker

    You are a leader. You have your ducks in a row. You are on time and always prepared. You have a plan. And a back-up plan.

    While many of these qualities come natural, finding that balance is learned. And hey – nobody is perfect! There is no such thing as a “perfect” captain. Each team is different, so each captain unique. The job requires heart and commitment. If you are dedicated to the success of your team, you are headed in the right direction.