How to be a good ventriloquist

How to be a good ventriloquist

Venting is a great way to release suppressed emotions, feelings, and thoughts. Keeping stuff bottled up never makes things better and can lead to heavy stress or even a nervous breakdown.

Benefits of Venting Your Emotions, Feelings, And Thoughts

  • Less Bottled Up Anger, Sadness, & Frustration
  • Feelings of Relief
  • Let’s Others In & In Most Cases They Can Help
  • Get Advice From Support
  • Express Yourself
  • Clear Your Conscience

Venting is a great way to relieve built up tension and will make you feel better instantly. Unless you vent in some form or another you will only be bottling up emotions and feelings which can lead to more problems down the road. Venting doesn’t always have to be to another person. It can easily be written down on paper or said out load when nobody is around. I’ll tell you more later on in this article about methods and ways to vent, keep reading to find out more.

Everyone needs to vent at some point or another. Learning the correct way to do this and utilizing it will greatly add to your personal development. I recommend learning everything thing you can about the correct way to do this then slowly work your way into a good vent. If you have had a rough day and had no way to release those feelings, then you are in need of a good vent. Once you let out the emotions you will instantly feel better, and it will be like a burden has been lifted off your shoulders.

If you are constantly plagued with negative emotions such as anger, sadness, and frustration you need to vent these off. You need to vent off about situations that happen and things you have no real control over. There are so many times that you can’t react the way you fee,l at the moment something is happening. This is ok. There is nothing wrong with holding in emotions for a little while, until an appropriate time comes when you can release these feelings.

If you are venting to another person who doesn’t mind to listen, this would be a great time to get some advice and possibly some insights into ways of thinking, you may not have thought about. No matter what the reason for your venting is, it is a great tool to have under your belt. Now that you have some idea of why you might need to vent, I will give you some tips & advice that will help guide your venting practice.

Tips & Advice To Help You Vent The Correct Way

  • Vent When Your Calm
  • Think Before You Speak
  • Don’t Complain Too Much
  • Don’t Vent To A Person Your Angry With
  • Vent On Paper First If Possible

Venting is a great tool for you to use, but it must be done the right way, so it doesn’t turn around on you. When you decide you are going to vent make sure you are calm enough to focus and think before you speak. Take the time to think about things very carefully. Thinking clearly when you go to vent can make the whole process run a lot smoother. I recommend you spend at least 10 minutes in complete silence really thinking about what it is you want to vent.

A great way vent without involving another person is to get a sheet of paper and write down all of your thoughts. You can even pretend that you are talking to another person if it helps. First find a quiet place with no distractions. Turn off the T.V. and your cell phone before starting. Once you have your solitude just start writing everything that comes to mind. Don’t stop for at least 10 minutes. Nobody ever has to read this, if you want you can shred it when your done. Knowing this little bit of information will make it easier to keep your mind clear. By doing this you are venting your thoughts and expressing your feelings even if it is just on paper. It will have the same effect as actually saying the thoughts with only one main difference. You won’t get the feedback, like you would from friends, family, or support.

If you are planning on venting to another person let them know you are going to vent. If you just start venting right away without giving them warning it could go wrong. Most friends won’t mind if you vent every once in a while to them as long as you let them know you want them to listen. If you surprise someone with a big rant about a lot of things on your mind, it could be a bad time for them, and they may get upset or irritated with your sudden outburst. Make sure that the person you are venting to is close and someone you can trust. Also, make sure the two of you are on good terms. The last you need is to be venting to a person who don’t want to hear it or is upset at you.

When you find the right person to vent to, let them speak just as much as you do. Some people may just want to listen to everything you have to say before giving you input. This is fine and truthfully the venting is about your feelings. The other person is just there for support. If they chose to have an active and engaged conversion or just to listen, either way you will still receive all of the benefits. Start out with the basics and remember to stay on topic as much as possible. If the other person hints that they may be short on time, be considerate of them as well, and wrap up your conversion. It is best to start out with whats most important to you and cover the small things last. You need to get what’s bugging you the most off your chest first, that way at least the worse part will be off your shoulders. As a good rule of thumb, never vent to the person you are mad at or caused your frustration. This is an easy way to start an argument or a fight. The other person may have different views than you have and may not agree to everything you say. The last thing you need in the middle of a vent is someone arguing with you.

Practice venting and learning the correct way to relieve these feelings. Once mastered you will be a better person. Good Luck!

Learn-Ventriloquism.com – Master Class

“This series is a mind blower. I am on fire now…” – Cory Coleman

Your Material Has To Entertain And Give An Audience A Reason To Watch.

This Master Class consists of interviews with five professional ventriloquists:

Mark Wade, Ken Groves, Steve Petra, Sarah Jones and Bill DeMar.

Each was asked questions about their script writing process. Their answers will provide you with a unique look into the minds of these performers.

Consisting of twelve videos, the Ventriloquist Script Writing Master Class will inspire you. It will make you think. It will help you understand how different performers approach writing original material. You will discover secrets to make writing and editing easier. You will gain insights to processes and ideas that can help you – but only if you apply them.

There may be times when one of my guests say something you’ve heard before. Listen to it again with an open mind. Chances are you will hear it again, and start to wonder if maybe you should listen to the advice – instead of just hearing the information.

The final video in the series will detail a synopsis of the script writing processes laid out by my guests. Combined with the interviews, you will have a complete resource that you will refer to time and again.

“Tom’s courses will go down as the best value ventriloquist and script writing ever. It already surpasses the renown Maher course.” – Dizzy Desmond

How to be a good ventriloquist

This Master Class Includes The Following Video Material:

  • An Interview With Mark Wade – 13:03
  • Interview With Bill DeMar – 8:03
  • The Bill DeMar Interview – Part Two – 10:35
  • An Interview With Steve Petra – 8:53
  • Interview With Sarah Jones – 11:06
  • The Sarah Jones Interview – Part Two – 14:11
  • Ken Groves On Script Writing – 11:09
  • Ken Groves On Script Writing #2 – 11:51
  • Ken Groves On Script Writing # 3 – 13:15
  • Ken Groves On Script Writing #4 – 15:47
  • Ken Groves On Script Writing #5 – 19:04
  • The Script Writing Process Synopsis – 22:10
  • Terry Fator Video Bonus – 43:51

These twelve lessons will be time released, one every three days. Each day, you will receive an e-mail that will encourage you to work on the materials my guest discusses. (Due to a recent change – the e-mails will now be available each day on the web site. They are released every 24 hours.) At the end of the course, you will maintain full access to the videos and be able to review the materials any time you need inspiration.

WARNING:

If you think this Master Class will “magically” turn you into a successful ventriloquist script writer – look elsewhere. Developing original, solid material is not easy. It will take work. Lots of work. If you want easy, stick with the dialog books.

If you are looking for scripts to use, or another performer’s routines – do not purchase this Master Class.

This course is strictly for people who want to advance their careers. People who want to experience the thrill of an audience laughing at material they craft. If you are one of the select few – sign up below.

“I have learned Sooo much from this series!! It is a totally amazing value.” – Jim Chaput

The Ventriloquist Script Writing Course Now Includes As A Free Bonus:

TERRY FATOR’S SCRIPT WRITING LECTURE

Recorded At The 2013 Vent Haven Ventriloquist Convention.
– THIS IS THE LIVE LECTURE PRESENTED AT THE CONVENTION –
NOT JUST THE VIDEO OF THE WRITING SESSION!

The VENTRILOQUIST SCRIPT WRITING MASTER CLASS IS STILL ONLY:

CLICK BELOW FOR INSTANT ACCESS!

Your Credit Card Will Be Billed By: ClickBank or CLKBANK*COM

How to be a good ventriloquist

Venting is a great way to release suppressed emotions, feelings, and thoughts. Keeping stuff bottled up never makes things better and can lead to heavy stress or even a nervous breakdown.

Benefits of Venting Your Emotions, Feelings, And Thoughts

  • Less Bottled Up Anger, Sadness, & Frustration
  • Feelings of Relief
  • Let’s Others In & In Most Cases They Can Help
  • Get Advice From Support
  • Express Yourself
  • Clear Your Conscience

Venting is a great way to relieve built up tension and will make you feel better instantly. Unless you vent in some form or another you will only be bottling up emotions and feelings which can lead to more problems down the road. Venting doesn’t always have to be to another person. It can easily be written down on paper or said out load when nobody is around. I’ll tell you more later on in this article about methods and ways to vent, keep reading to find out more.

Everyone needs to vent at some point or another. Learning the correct way to do this and utilizing it will greatly add to your personal development. I recommend learning everything thing you can about the correct way to do this then slowly work your way into a good vent. If you have had a rough day and had no way to release those feelings, then you are in need of a good vent. Once you let out the emotions you will instantly feel better, and it will be like a burden has been lifted off your shoulders.

If you are constantly plagued with negative emotions such as anger, sadness, and frustration you need to vent these off. You need to vent off about situations that happen and things you have no real control over. There are so many times that you can’t react the way you fee,l at the moment something is happening. This is ok. There is nothing wrong with holding in emotions for a little while, until an appropriate time comes when you can release these feelings.

If you are venting to another person who doesn’t mind to listen, this would be a great time to get some advice and possibly some insights into ways of thinking, you may not have thought about. No matter what the reason for your venting is, it is a great tool to have under your belt. Now that you have some idea of why you might need to vent, I will give you some tips & advice that will help guide your venting practice.

Tips & Advice To Help You Vent The Correct Way

  • Vent When Your Calm
  • Think Before You Speak
  • Don’t Complain Too Much
  • Don’t Vent To A Person Your Angry With
  • Vent On Paper First If Possible

Venting is a great tool for you to use, but it must be done the right way, so it doesn’t turn around on you. When you decide you are going to vent make sure you are calm enough to focus and think before you speak. Take the time to think about things very carefully. Thinking clearly when you go to vent can make the whole process run a lot smoother. I recommend you spend at least 10 minutes in complete silence really thinking about what it is you want to vent.

A great way vent without involving another person is to get a sheet of paper and write down all of your thoughts. You can even pretend that you are talking to another person if it helps. First find a quiet place with no distractions. Turn off the T.V. and your cell phone before starting. Once you have your solitude just start writing everything that comes to mind. Don’t stop for at least 10 minutes. Nobody ever has to read this, if you want you can shred it when your done. Knowing this little bit of information will make it easier to keep your mind clear. By doing this you are venting your thoughts and expressing your feelings even if it is just on paper. It will have the same effect as actually saying the thoughts with only one main difference. You won’t get the feedback, like you would from friends, family, or support.

If you are planning on venting to another person let them know you are going to vent. If you just start venting right away without giving them warning it could go wrong. Most friends won’t mind if you vent every once in a while to them as long as you let them know you want them to listen. If you surprise someone with a big rant about a lot of things on your mind, it could be a bad time for them, and they may get upset or irritated with your sudden outburst. Make sure that the person you are venting to is close and someone you can trust. Also, make sure the two of you are on good terms. The last you need is to be venting to a person who don’t want to hear it or is upset at you.

When you find the right person to vent to, let them speak just as much as you do. Some people may just want to listen to everything you have to say before giving you input. This is fine and truthfully the venting is about your feelings. The other person is just there for support. If they chose to have an active and engaged conversion or just to listen, either way you will still receive all of the benefits. Start out with the basics and remember to stay on topic as much as possible. If the other person hints that they may be short on time, be considerate of them as well, and wrap up your conversion. It is best to start out with whats most important to you and cover the small things last. You need to get what’s bugging you the most off your chest first, that way at least the worse part will be off your shoulders. As a good rule of thumb, never vent to the person you are mad at or caused your frustration. This is an easy way to start an argument or a fight. The other person may have different views than you have and may not agree to everything you say. The last thing you need in the middle of a vent is someone arguing with you.

Practice venting and learning the correct way to relieve these feelings. Once mastered you will be a better person. Good Luck!

Venting feels good at the time, but is it good for us?

Yesterday I was peacefully walking my dog when all of a sudden: HONK HONK! I looked to my right and saw a woman enraged, arms flailing, because the car in front of her wasn’t making a left turn fast enough. We’ve all seen that driver. Hey, let’s be honest, most of us have probably been in her seat. I know I have my days—sometimes I have the patience of a saint, sometimes my hand happens to find its way to the horn.

I’m no neuropsychologist so I won’t attempt to explain how our primitive amygdalas are firing off in anger. Or how our prefrontal cortex needs a moment to get our emotional ducks in a row. (I’ve included some resources below for additional reading on those fascinating creatures.)

So, let’s take road rage, or any rage, one step further. What if that woman doesn’t feel calmer once the car ahead of her makes the turn? Let’s say she arrives at work and can’t stop thinking about “drivers these days.” She is so distracted that she goes to a co-worker and lets loose:

“That [you-know-what] on the way to work today just wouldn’t turn! I was late as it is! It never fails, some idiot driver just has to screw things up. Traffic is so horrible . “ and blah blah so on and so on.

Venting. Catharsis. Can feel good right? Actually, more and more research shows that venting isn’t all that good for us. In fact, it can perpetuate problems, anger issues as an example, by reinforcing negative responses to situations. And when we enlist friends or coworkers in our rants, it can reinforce our position all the more. You vent, they agree. They share a story in return, it reinforces your story. The result is even more ammunition for getting angry next time you’re on the road. We vent about everything, we do it often, and we do it everywhere.

A while back, I worked as a phone-based crisis counselor. I worked the night shift so a number of my calls would inevitably be from people who wanted to vent about their bad day. Phone counselors learn quickly that if a caller is permitted to vent for too long, you find yourself headed down a long road with no turning back. The venting can last for an hour and no problems get solved. What the caller then learns is that he can call a crisis line anytime he needs to vent, crisis or not. Counselors learned to set limits on the venting: “OK, take no more than five minutes to tell me what happened today and when your five minutes are up we’ll talk about what’s going to help you feel better tonight.” It’s not that we didn’t want to listen to the caller, it’s that the caller was ultimately seeking help and our job was to help them find solutions.

People have an innate desire to talk and be heard. After all, we humans have developed and evolved a pretty complex system of communication. And we’ve become very skilled at venting. But just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. In the end, what does it do for us? The venting does not change the situation that made us angry, it won’t prevent the situation from happening again in the future, it raises our blood pressure, and it bring negativity to our environment. The rush of venting and ranting can feel intoxicating, when it fact it’s usually just toxic.

The good news is, we can learn how to react and act differently. We can practice and build brain fitness, that emotional intelligence that helps us maneuver through triggering situations. Our brains are not fixed unchangeable blobs; they are highly adaptable, malleable, and can learn new tricks. Here are a few ideas:

The 5 W’s of Venting:

1. Wait. When you feel triggered, commit yourself to giving some time for the situation to process. In other words, allow that prefrontal cortex to make sense of it all. Angry at a driver? You can choose not to act on your initial reaction. First, a minute to just breathe and let the moment pass.

2. Why? Practice not jumping to conclusions. We are very good at labeling situations and condemning people on a moment’s notice. But what if we just couldn’t see the dog sitting in the road just in front of that car that was taking so long to turn? What if their car stalled and they just needed a few seconds to restart it? There are endless possibilities as to ‘why’ something just happened and we may not have all the information we need to make an informed reaction. Practice staying in the moment without labeling and judging, i.e. mindfulness

3. Who? Whose business was it anyway? If someone didn’t do something directly at you or intentionally to you, is it really your business to react to it? Step back and ask yourself, “Is this any of my business?” “Is there a solution to this problem and, if so, who is responsible?” Why do we spend so much time getting our feathers ruffled over things we see that don’t even involve us?

4. Write. Try an alternative to venting out loud. Rather than rushing off to a coworker or yanking out that cell to gab, grab a pen and jot down some notes or email yourself about what you’re angry about. I’m not saying you need to carry around a venting journal, but jotting down some thoughts rather than blabbing them all over the office will engage your body physically and mentally and allow your brain to drain- to slow down. And it makes for a friendlier office.

5. Witness. If you still need to talk with someone after you’ve tried the other ideas, ask a trusted friend to witness your venting and set limits. “Can I talk to you for five minutes? And I really mean five!” Next time you find yourself venting, pay attention to how many times you repeat the same information. Probably a lot. When we’re worked up we repeat ourselves for emphasis. Setting limits will force us to keep it brief, sort out our thoughts, and then focus on to a solution. If the venting doesn’t lead to a solution, a lesson learned, or an idea for next time, you might just start to wonder “what’s the point?”

How to be a good ventriloquist

There have probably been plenty of times when your friends needed to vent, and there is nothing more painful than when you can’t help them in their time of need. But whether you believe it or not, figuring out how to be a good listener is the most important thing you could do. In a society where we all love to voice our opinions on social media, sometimes, it’s best to take a step back. There’s more to listening than just sitting there and “kind of” paying attention; it’s about being fully engaged with that other person and letting the speaker feeling validated while they express themselves to you.

It seems it takes a lot to get someone to truly listen to you. There is so much out there that can easily distract us, and it seems, that people (especially us millennials) actually get bored fairly quickly. According to an article on Dr. Don Friedman’s personal website, Michael Nichols, PhD said this in his book, The Lost Art of Listening, “To listen is to pay attention, take an interest, care about, take to heart, validate, acknowledge, be moved, appreciate” While we might consider it normal to be distracted by everyday things while we are talking to our friends, why not change that outlook and conform to a new way of “listening” instead? To elaborate even more, here are six ways you can easily amp up your listening skills the next time someone needs a shoulder to lean on.

1. Don’t Be Distracted

Get rid of that phone. Stop picking at your nails. Your friend is coming to you because they trust you enough to be open and vulnerable. The most respectable thing you could do is to be completely present and make eye contact. It’s not easy for everyone to be open about their feelings, and if your nonverbals are talking louder than what your friend is expressing, then that’s not a good thing. For myself, this makes me feel more connected to my friend because I feel like they are truly listening. It shows that they really care about what is going on in my life and they want to help any which way they can — even if it that means they’re just letting me vent.

2. Talk Less

Sometimes the best thing you could do while your friend talks about their emotions and current events is to literally just sit there. Trust me, I know that that may sound strange, but for the majority of the time, when your friend asks to talk, it’s merely for them to get things off their chest. Of course, it’s totally OK to jump in when you feel like there is a pause in the conversation, but if you feel that you are starting to talk about your own life more than your friend’s, well. you might want to switch it up. It’s always good to ask questions every now and then as well; it shows that you really want to help and you’re concerned enough to want to know more information about the situation.

3. Have A Thinking Mindset Not a Doing Mindset

When you are listening, you are thinking about what your friend is talking about. According to Arie Kruglanski, a social psychologist, and his colleagues at the University of Maryland in an article on Fast Company, there are two distinct motivational mindsets: A thinking mindset and a doing mindset. When you allow yourself to think, it puts the conversation and your surrounding in perspective. Absorb what your friend is by allowing your mind to rest while your friend speaks. It’s really the polite thing to do.

4. Keep Your Nonverbals In Check

Although I already touched a little bit on this subject earlier, it’s really this important, especially when you are face-to-face with your friend. According to an article for Lee Hopkins, a communication specialist’s site, social scientists have stated that “verbal communication skills account for 7 percent of the communication process. The other 93 percent consist of nonverbal and symbolic communication and are called ‘listening skills.” The way you sit and position yourself is vital to how your friend perceives you and your listening skills. If you have your hands crossed and/or your rolling your eyes, your friend is definitely going to think that you are being closed off and not open-minded. Keep it light and simple. Don’t be afraid to show an occasional nod or even a slight smile, depending on the subject at hand .

5. Listen With Empathy

There may be some of those fleeting moments that you may have had in your head, when you can’t believe your friend thought that or did that. But, in the end, your friend is human and that’s why we have buddies to vent to. If you show any sort of judgement towards your friend, you are essentially violating their trust. Before making any quick evaluations on your friends, try to envision what the whole picture might entail. An article on Psychology Today referenced a quote from the Dalai Lama that said, “People take different roads seeking fulfillment and happiness. Just because they’re not on your road doesn’t mean they’ve gotten lost.”

6. Don’t Try To Fix The Problem

This one is pretty hard for me. When my friend is in pain and is trying to find a solution for their own troubles, sometimes it’s hard for me to not want to jump in to help them out any which way I can. But there is always a time and place for that, and when your friend is venting, it’s important to focus on just listening, of course, unless they ask for your advice. If you want to try to help your friend, sometimes asking questions might put things in perspective for them. According to a Harvard Business Review article, Mark Goulston, a psychiatrist and author of Just Listen says,”Pose questions like, ‘What are you most angry about?’ and ‘What are you really worried about?’ They’ll feel heard, and you’ll get to the root of the problem.”

After all, your friend needs you more than you know. Make sure that you are fully focused on what they are saying and don’t let them feel judged for them opening up to you in the first place. Take these steps and try practicing the next time a love one needs to do a little venting. You’ll be a listening pro in no time.

Most residential building drainage systems are vented directly through the building’s roof. Here’s an example. See the white pipe on the roof at left. The plastic pipe is “flashed” or sealed at the roof penetration to prevent rainwater from leaking into the building.

During maintenance you’ll want to be assured the top of the vent is kept open. A blocked vent can be caused by leaves, dead animals and ice dams (in very cold climates). Another “not-so-common” way the vent can become clogged is when a horizontal section of the venting system itself (inside the attic) is sloped the wrong way. When that happens it can fill with rain water or condensation. Experienced home inspectors should be on the look out for these conditions.

How to be a good ventriloquistImage Source: CarsonDunlop

Air Admittance Valves (AAV)

Sometimes we can’t (or don’t want to) vent through the roof line.

In these rare cases plumbers use an Air Admittance Valve. Air Admittance Valves (aka Studor vents) are “negative-pressure-activated” one-way mechanical valves. Used most commonly at an island sink or vanity the vents are also located in the attic to prevent the roof penetrations (as seen above) on the front roof line elevation. Think about it – when have you ever seen a plumbing vent on the front roof line?

How It Operates

If we didn’t have either venting method you would have very noisy sink and toilet drains. A discharge of wastewater down your sink drain causes a valve on the AAV to open. When it opens air is allowed to enter the plumbing system. Watch this video to help understand how a plumbing vent works.

The Pros

An AAV can significantly reduce the amount of venting materials needed in a plumbing system. That’s money in the pocket for the plumber. They also allow greater flexibility in the layout of plumbing fixtures, and reduce long-term roof maintenance. If we don’t have a hole in the roof, it’s easier to maintain the roof. AAVs have been effectively used in Europe for more than two decades. However, there are a few limitations.

The Cons

Some state and local building departments prohibit AAVs. Check with your local AHJ – Authority Having Jurisdiction for more info.

AAV’s are certified to reliably. However anything mechanical can and will fail. Some manufacturers claim they’re good for 500,000 uses (approximately 30 years of use).

US manufacturers offer warranties that range from 1 year to “lifetime”. You’ll want to seek out the warranty info. Most plumbers won’t have it.

Note: An AAV should should not be tampered with or spray painted. I have had plumbers tell us that sewer flies and bugs have been seen at failed air admittance valves. So if you detect a sewer odor under and around your sink or in the attic, the AAV could have let you down.

Inspecting The Studor AAV

  1. STUDOR AAVs must be located a minimum of four (4”) inches above the horizontal branch drain or fixture drain being vented.
  2. STUDOR AAVs shall be accessible should replacement be required. For in-wall installation, use STUDOR recess box/grill combination.
  3. STUDOR AAVs location must allow for adequate air to enter the valve. When located in a wall space or attic space lacking ventilation openings, opening shall be provided. Locating the valve in a sink or vanity cabinet is acceptable.
  4. STUDOR AAVs must be installed in the vertical, upright position. A maximum deviation (in either direction) for plum of 15 degrees is allowed.
  5. The vent shall connect to the drain vertically to maintain an unobstructed opening in the piping to the STUDOR AAVs.
  6. A minimum of one vent pipe shall extended to the open atmosphere for each building drainage system for relief of positive pressure, the size of this vent is not specified because this single vent does not determine the total amount of aggregate cross-sectional area of the vent system. The total amount of the cross-sectional area of vents combined on the system has to equal the aggregate cross-sectional area of the building drain. When properly installed an air admittance valve in the system is equivalent to an open vent pipe having the same cross sectional area as any other vent. Such open air vent is recommended, not required, to be located as close as possible to the connection between the building drain and building sewer.
  7. The Maxi-Vent® must be installed six (6”) inches above the highest flood level rim of the fixtures being vented in stack applications.
  8. STUDOR AAVs installed in attic area must be located a minimum of six (6”) inches above the ceiling insulation.
  9. The use of Tec-Vent® in return air plenums shall be allowed only in engineered drainage systems designed by a design professional and approved by the local authority.
  10. The maximum height of drainage stack being vented by a MAXI-VENT must not exceed six (6) branch intervals unless it is used in conjunction with a stack that is connected to a P.A.P.A. and AAVs on the branches.
  11. When a horizontal branch connects to a stack more than four (4) branch intervals from the top of the stack. A relief vent shall be provided. The relief vent must be located between the connection of the branch to the stack and the first fixture connecting to the branch. The relief vent may also serve as a vent for the fixture. The relief vent must connect to the vent stack, stack vent or extend outdoors to the open air unless it is used in conjunction with a stack that is connected to a P.A.P.A. device and AAVs on the branches.
  12. Only Teflon® tape can be used on the valves’ threads. Use of primer, solvent cement or pipe dope will void the STUDOR warranty.
  13. The Redi-Vent®, Mini-Vent®, Maxi-Vent®, Tec-Vent® and Chem-Vent® must be installed at finish, after the system rough-in and pressure test.
  14. Air Admittance Valves may be used on grease traps as long as they are not subject to positive pressure.
  15. Other Information – Studor PDF

NAHB Research Center video showing the basic principals of the AAV

How to be a good ventriloquist

Home Inspector – Home Builder and Building Consultant/Coach

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Based on your 1100 sq. ft. and this guideline, you’ll need a minimum of:

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How to be a good ventriloquist

How to be a good ventriloquist

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How to be a good ventriloquist

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How to be a good ventriloquist

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How to be a good ventriloquist

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How to be a good ventriloquist

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Who isn’t guilty of having their eyes glaze over when someone is talking? Or saying a perfunctory “that’s wild!” to someone, even though you didn’t totally process the story they just told you? We’ve all been there from time to time, but if you find you’re the type who habitually loses track of what people are saying, or you can’t remember details of stories, or you have, on occasion, been told you don’t seem like you’re listening when a friend is venting, it might be time to learn how to be a better listener — at least for the sake of being there for the people you love, you know?

And seriously, as basic as it might seem, being able to listen when people are talking to you — like, really listen — is important. It makes you a better friend, a better storyteller, and an all-around better communicator. Plus, as Murray Nossel, Ph.D., author of the book Powered by Storytelling, tells Elite Daily, stories are how people connect with one another. “Storytelling is in our DNA and is hardwired into our brains,” he says. “Whether we’re telling at personal story or a story at work, for stories to have any kind of impact, someone has to be listening.”

And while this might seem counterintuitive, Nossel says, the best way to improve your own storytelling skills is, first and foremost, to become a better listener. So really, you could be reading this article for purely selfish reasons to become a more engaging storyteller yourself — or you could work on your listening skills, like I said earlier, for the sake of your loved ones. I promise I won’t tell anyone what your real intentions are. Either way, here’s what you need to know, y’all.

1. Identify The Obstacles To Listening

Consider what’s making it hard for you to listen. Is it because you’re scrolling through Twitter at the same tiem, perhaps, or maybe that you’re agitated about something else? “Obstacles to listening include environmental factors, e.g. jackhammers in the street, extreme heat or cold, and the constant stimulation of personal devices,” Nossel tells Elite Daily, but they can also include psychological and inner states, he adds, like fatigue, hunger, thoughts, and feelings.

“If it’s too noisy, try to move to another space,” he suggests. “Eat if you’re hungry. These are the easy ones. More difficult is letting go of feelings like resentment and anger; but the first step here is to recognize them.”

2. You First Have To Learn How To Tune Into Yourself

“Listening always begins with you,” Nossel says. It’s a simple piece of advice, yes, but it hits home because, before you can effectively listen to anyone else, you need to be able to tune into your own mind and body. In practice, this might mean taking a few moments to yourself to simply listen to your own breathing, or the various sensations happening in your body when you just sit still, and really pay attention to them — what they feel like, what they make you think of, etc.

In fact, Nossel says, this is really the only way you’ll be able to identify most of the aforementioned listening obstacles anyway, and from there, you can avoid the distractions to the best of your ability.

3. Make Sure It’s A Good Time For Everyone

“Before sharing a story with someone, ask them if they’re able to listen,” Nossel tells Elite Daily. “If someone’s in a rush or under deadline, they’re unlikely to be able to listen. So it’s not the best time to share anything important.”

Of course, the same goes for the opposite situation: If someone wants to share a story with you, but you know you’re busy doing something else for the moment, be honest about your distractions, and make it known you want to set aside a time for when you’ll be able to really give this person your full, undivided attention.

4. Be Grateful For Everyone’s Time

Again, engaging in the importance of listening from both sides is really important, Nossel says. He suggests making sure to thank the people who listen to your stories, and you might, indeed, find how thankful other people are when you do the same for them.

“Given our busy lives, listening is a rare gift,” Nossel tells Elite Daily. “Acknowledging your listener reinforces the importance of their part in the communication and enhances the connection.”

5. Refrain From Always Sharing Your Opinions And Judgments

According to clinical psychologist Dr. Viola Drancoli, when a friend is venting to you, it’s important to listen to them without judgment. “Listening to each other, rather than coming up with advice or passing judgment, is one important way of providing support and showing empathy,” she tells Elite Daily.

So, no, you don’t always need to tell your friend right away that it’s time to quit that job, or to ease up on the dating apps. Sometimes, all you really need in a friend is someone who’s down to listen to you go on and on about anything and everything. Whenever the opportunity presents itself, try to do the same for the people you love. Trust me, they will appreciate it.