How to be a home economics teacher

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Working as a Home Economics Teacher

Students may not walk out of high school remembering or ever needing to use the periodic table or algebraic functions. However, the skills they learn from a home economics teacher will be relevant for a long time to come.

Home economics teachers teach students practical skills such as budgeting, cooking, managing their health, and sometimes even career counseling. Most home economics teachers work in secondary schools, but some work at special community programs with adult students. For many students, their home economics teacher is the only source of information about practical life skills.

Working as a home economics teacher is a unique opportunity to teach classes that involve more hands-on work than your typical academic subject. However, home economics teachers still have to do grading and curriculum preparation after school, just like other teachers do.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a home economics teacher. For example, did you know that they make an average of $26.64 an hour? That’s $55,409 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 4% and produce 38,200 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does a Home Economics Teacher Do

There are certain skills that many home economics teachers have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed communication skills, patience and resourcefulness.

When it comes to the most important skills required to be a home economics teacher, we found that a lot of resumes listed 76.8% of home economics teachers included online, while 9.6% of resumes included professional development, and 4.2% of resumes included child care. Hard skills like these are helpful to have when it comes to performing essential job responsibilities.

When it comes to searching for a job, many search for a key term or phrase. Instead, it might be more helpful to search by industry, as you might be missing jobs that you never thought about in industries that you didn’t even think offered positions related to the home economics teacher job title. But what industry to start with? Most home economics teachers actually find jobs in the education and non profits industries.

How To Become a Home Economics Teacher

If you’re interested in becoming a home economics teacher, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We’ve determined that 39.8% of home economics teachers have a bachelor’s degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 37.0% of home economics teachers have master’s degrees. Even though most home economics teachers have a college degree, it’s possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a home economics teacher. When we researched the most common majors for a home economics teacher, we found that they most commonly earn bachelor’s degree degrees or master’s degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on home economics teacher resumes include associate degree degrees or diploma degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a home economics teacher. In fact, many home economics teacher jobs require experience in a role such as teacher. Meanwhile, many home economics teachers also have previous career experience in roles such as substitute teacher or special education teacher.

What is the right job for my career path?

Tell us your goals and we’ll match you with the right jobs to get there.

Find The Best Home Economics Teacher Jobs For You

Where do you want to work?

Working as a Home Economics Teacher

Students may not walk out of high school remembering or ever needing to use the periodic table or algebraic functions. However, the skills they learn from a home economics teacher will be relevant for a long time to come.

Home economics teachers teach students practical skills such as budgeting, cooking, managing their health, and sometimes even career counseling. Most home economics teachers work in secondary schools, but some work at special community programs with adult students. For many students, their home economics teacher is the only source of information about practical life skills.

Working as a home economics teacher is a unique opportunity to teach classes that involve more hands-on work than your typical academic subject. However, home economics teachers still have to do grading and curriculum preparation after school, just like other teachers do.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a home economics teacher. For example, did you know that they make an average of $26.64 an hour? That’s $55,409 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 4% and produce 38,200 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does a Home Economics Teacher Do

There are certain skills that many home economics teachers have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed communication skills, patience and resourcefulness.

When it comes to the most important skills required to be a home economics teacher, we found that a lot of resumes listed 76.8% of home economics teachers included online, while 9.6% of resumes included professional development, and 4.2% of resumes included child care. Hard skills like these are helpful to have when it comes to performing essential job responsibilities.

When it comes to searching for a job, many search for a key term or phrase. Instead, it might be more helpful to search by industry, as you might be missing jobs that you never thought about in industries that you didn’t even think offered positions related to the home economics teacher job title. But what industry to start with? Most home economics teachers actually find jobs in the education and non profits industries.

How To Become a Home Economics Teacher

If you’re interested in becoming a home economics teacher, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We’ve determined that 39.8% of home economics teachers have a bachelor’s degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 37.0% of home economics teachers have master’s degrees. Even though most home economics teachers have a college degree, it’s possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a home economics teacher. When we researched the most common majors for a home economics teacher, we found that they most commonly earn bachelor’s degree degrees or master’s degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on home economics teacher resumes include associate degree degrees or diploma degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a home economics teacher. In fact, many home economics teacher jobs require experience in a role such as teacher. Meanwhile, many home economics teachers also have previous career experience in roles such as substitute teacher or special education teacher.

What is the right job for my career path?

Tell us your goals and we’ll match you with the right jobs to get there.

Teacher shortages in home economics in Scotland have led to the subject’s inclusion on a £20,000 bursary scheme

Emma Seith

How to be a home economics teacher

The £20,000 hook to entice career-changers in Scotland to train to teach science, technology, engineering and science subjects has been extended to include home economics.

Health and wellbeing is one of the central planks of Scotland’s Curriculum for Excellence, along with literacy and numeracy. Despite this, official figures show that there were only 786 home economics teachers working in secondary in schools in 2017, compared with 990 in 2007.

Teachers discussing the staff shortage in Scotland on the Tes online community forums in January said that home economics was one of the subjects “disappearing” from school timetables, after multiple job adverts yielded no results.

As part of a drive to tackle the shortage of teachers in the subject, as of today, career changers will be able to apply for a £20,000 Scottish government bursary to support them while training for hard-to-fill teaching roles in home economics and Stem.

Some 100 bursaries are available for postgraduate teacher training courses that get underway in the coming academic year (2019-20) at a total cost of £2 million – with home economics included for the first time. Other subjects included are physics, chemistry, maths, technical education and computing science.

Bursaries to tackle teacher shortage

Education secretary John Swinney said the success of the scheme last year demonstrated that the bursaries had made teaching more accessible.

In 2018-19, 107 bursaries of £20,000 were awarded to career changers to become teachers in Stem subjects

However, teaching unions argue that the best way to attract and retain current teachers is to improve pay. Last week 57 per cent of teachers in Scotland’s largest union, the EIS, voted to reject the latest pay offer, bringing the prospect of national strikes one step closer.

Mr Swinney said: “These bursaries will continue to provide financial help, making it easier for enthusiastic career changers to pursue a career in teaching and share their passion and expertise with pupils.

“The inclusion of home economics in the Stem bursary scheme means it will carry on encouraging new teachers in some of the highest demand teaching posts in schools across the country.”

The move to extend the Stem bursary to include home economics comes in the wake of a report published earlier this year that called for cookery lessons to be compulsory in schools. The Scottish Food Commission report warned that many children could not identify common vegetables and did not know where meat, eggs or milk came from.

Skills Development Scotland education programme lead Ken Edwards said: “The support offered by the Stem Bursary gives career changers the security to make the move from existing employment into teaching.

“This will contribute to getting the right skills balance in the teaching workforce and in supporting young people to be engaged and enthused in their Stem learning.”

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Calculate your salary

There are many factors that determine how much you should be earning as a Home Economics Teacher. Use Zippia’s Salary Calculator to see how your pay matches up.

How Much Does a Home Economics Teacher Earn In The United States?

1. Baltimore, MD

Average Salary: $67,178

2. Saint Paul, MN

Average Salary: $64,974

3. San Jacinto, CA

Average Salary: $63,927

4. Dover, DE

Average Salary: $61,929

5. New York, NY

Average Salary: $61,767

6. Urban Honolulu, HI

Average Salary: $56,636

7. Fayetteville, AR

Average Salary: $54,772

8. Austin, TX

Average Salary: $54,174

9. Ann Arbor, MI

Average Salary: $54,150

10. Tuscaloosa, AL

Average Salary: $53,987

11. Akron, OH

Average Salary: $53,521

12. Muncie, IN

Average Salary: $52,233

13. Lafayette, LA

Average Salary: $51,760

14. Tallahassee, FL

Average Salary: $50,859

15. Richmond, VA

Average Salary: $50,536

16. Denver, CO

Average Salary: $47,408

17. Greenville, NC

Average Salary: $46,852

How much should you get paid?

Tell us about yourself to get a free, personalized Zippia Salary Report and suggestions on how to increase your pay.

Where Home Economics Teachers Earn The Most

The darker areas on the map show where home economics teachers earn the highest salaries across all 50 states.

How Much Do Home Economics Teachers Earn In Different Cities?

Urban Honolulu, HI

High Paying Home Economics Teacher Jobs

Which Companies Pay Home Economics Teachers The Most?

The largest raises come from changing jobs.

See what’s out there.

Home Economics Teacher Salary History

Compare salaries for individual cities or states with the national average.

High numbers enrolling at the State’s only such college placing strain on available space

Ireland’s only home economics college is struggling to cope with rising numbers of students choosing to train as teachers in the subject.

A national shortage of teachers in the discipline and an increasingly health-conscious population is making the field more attractive than ever, lecturers believe.

Last year numbers enrolling at St Angela’s College in Co Sligo increased almost 20 per cent, from 85 to 101. In September the intake will rise again another 10 per cent.

Local Fine Gael TD Tony McLoughlin has called on party colleague and Minister for Education Richard Bruton to free up funding for more buildings at the NUI Galway-affiliated campus overlooking Lough Gill.

Mr McLoughlin said “significantly increasing” numbers meant money was needed straight away for bigger classrooms and larger lecture halls.

“The classroom size is inadequate given the increased demand for student places,” he said, adding it is “vitally important” funding is secured “immediately”.

The college has been knocking through smaller rooms to make larger halls, said Amanda McCloat, head of home economics.

“Applications have been consistently quite high for years, and students need up to 500 points for a place here,” she said. “We are coping at the moment, but we need investment for more buildings, larger lecture halls and increased specialist facilities.”

Ms McCloat said home economics teachers are in demand for a number of reasons. The subject is popular at junior cycle – more than a third of secondary pupils, mainly girls, take lessons – and there is a proliferation of – again mainly female – teachers taking family leave or moving into management.

Smaller class size

Like all practical subjects, class sizes are necessarily smaller than academic lessons, requiring more teachers.

While there is little hard data at present quantifying the exact numbers needed, the Teaching Council includes the subject among Irish, science and modern languages as in “critical” shortage.

And at a time of increasing obesity, Ms McCloat said the subject is arguably more important than ever.

“People are much more concerned about life skills now, more health conscious and health aware. They understand the components to have a better lifestyle, and one of the only places all of those components are taught is home economics,” she said. “It is the only subject on the curriculum teaching people how to cook, how to budget from a family perspective, how to shop, how to read food labels, how to take a recipe and know that if you cut out the butter it will reduce the calories, or serve it with brown rice it will increase the fibre and so on.”

The 700-member strong Association of Teachers of Home Economics wants the subject made mandatory in all schools.

It is already compulsory in Northern Ireland, Japan, Korea and Finland, but some schools in Ireland don’t offer the subject at all, including several all-boys boarding schools.

There also remains a “gendered approach”, with home economics often timetabled in the same slot as wood technology, for instance, where boys may be influenced on their choice by “traditional connotations”.

“It will only become normalised when everyone has the chance to study it – it is a chicken-and-egg situation,” Ms McCloat said.

Of the 101 first-year students at St Angela’s last year, just four were male. The figures reflect the applications.

The association is attempting to redress the imbalance through a number of initiatives, including the recruitment of chef Neven Maguire as its patron.

Mr Bruton has acknowledged the scarcity of home economics teachers and his department gave St Angela’s €343,100 last year to help it deal with increasing numbers.

Funding for more building works is “currently under consideration”, he said.

High numbers enrolling at the State’s only such college placing strain on available space

Ireland’s only home economics college is struggling to cope with rising numbers of students choosing to train as teachers in the subject.

A national shortage of teachers in the discipline and an increasingly health-conscious population is making the field more attractive than ever, lecturers believe.

Last year numbers enrolling at St Angela’s College in Co Sligo increased almost 20 per cent, from 85 to 101. In September the intake will rise again another 10 per cent.

Local Fine Gael TD Tony McLoughlin has called on party colleague and Minister for Education Richard Bruton to free up funding for more buildings at the NUI Galway-affiliated campus overlooking Lough Gill.

Mr McLoughlin said “significantly increasing” numbers meant money was needed straight away for bigger classrooms and larger lecture halls.

“The classroom size is inadequate given the increased demand for student places,” he said, adding it is “vitally important” funding is secured “immediately”.

The college has been knocking through smaller rooms to make larger halls, said Amanda McCloat, head of home economics.

“Applications have been consistently quite high for years, and students need up to 500 points for a place here,” she said. “We are coping at the moment, but we need investment for more buildings, larger lecture halls and increased specialist facilities.”

Ms McCloat said home economics teachers are in demand for a number of reasons. The subject is popular at junior cycle – more than a third of secondary pupils, mainly girls, take lessons – and there is a proliferation of – again mainly female – teachers taking family leave or moving into management.

Smaller class size

Like all practical subjects, class sizes are necessarily smaller than academic lessons, requiring more teachers.

While there is little hard data at present quantifying the exact numbers needed, the Teaching Council includes the subject among Irish, science and modern languages as in “critical” shortage.

And at a time of increasing obesity, Ms McCloat said the subject is arguably more important than ever.

“People are much more concerned about life skills now, more health conscious and health aware. They understand the components to have a better lifestyle, and one of the only places all of those components are taught is home economics,” she said. “It is the only subject on the curriculum teaching people how to cook, how to budget from a family perspective, how to shop, how to read food labels, how to take a recipe and know that if you cut out the butter it will reduce the calories, or serve it with brown rice it will increase the fibre and so on.”

The 700-member strong Association of Teachers of Home Economics wants the subject made mandatory in all schools.

It is already compulsory in Northern Ireland, Japan, Korea and Finland, but some schools in Ireland don’t offer the subject at all, including several all-boys boarding schools.

There also remains a “gendered approach”, with home economics often timetabled in the same slot as wood technology, for instance, where boys may be influenced on their choice by “traditional connotations”.

“It will only become normalised when everyone has the chance to study it – it is a chicken-and-egg situation,” Ms McCloat said.

Of the 101 first-year students at St Angela’s last year, just four were male. The figures reflect the applications.

The association is attempting to redress the imbalance through a number of initiatives, including the recruitment of chef Neven Maguire as its patron.

Mr Bruton has acknowledged the scarcity of home economics teachers and his department gave St Angela’s €343,100 last year to help it deal with increasing numbers.

Funding for more building works is “currently under consideration”, he said.

Expand all

Course Overview

The Bachelor of Arts (Education, Home Economics and Biology) and Professional Master of Education (with Home Economics) is a concurrent teacher education degree leading to a National Framework of Qualifications (NFQ) Level 9 Master’s.

After four years students will be awarded a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Education, Home Economics and Biology; an NFQ level 8 honours degree. In order to qualify to teach, students must progress into Stage 5 which carries the award Professional Master of Education (PME) at NFQ Level 9. Upon graduation students will meet all the Teaching Council requirements to be registered as a Newly Qualified Teacher (NQT) in Home Economics and Science / Biology. The course is an integrated five year process. Students do not have to compete for a place in the fifth stage. However, students must reach the required standard of H2.2 after Stage 4 before they can progress into Stage 5.

Applications and Selections

Who Teaches this Course

Requirements and Assessment

Key Facts

Entry Requirements

Minimum Grade H5 in two subjects and passes in four other subjects at O6/H7 level in the Leaving Certificate, including Irish, English, another language, Mathematics, a Laboratory Science subject* and any one other subject recognised for entry purposes.

*Laboratory Science subjects include: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Physics/Chemistry or Agricultural Science.

Additional Requirements

Students must satisfy the Garda/police vetting requirements.

Duration

BA: Four Years
PME: One Year

Next start date
A Level Grades (2020)
Average intake
Closing Date
Next start date
NFQ level

Level 8 (BA) / Level 9 (PME)

Mode of study
ECTS weighting
Award

Professional Master of Education (with Home Economics)

Course code

Course Outline

The programme consists of three main components: Home Economics, Education and Biology.

The study of Home Economics includes the interrelated areas of Food Studies, Family Resource Management and Textiles, Fashion and Design with underpinning content which includes; Physics, Chemistry, Food Science, Microbiology and Design Studies which are integrated across all years of the course. At PME level students will extend their professional enquiry in Home Economics and Home Economics Education and will undertake a self-selected research Dissertation in Home Economics Education.

The Education component of the course provides students with both the foundation studies and professional studies in Initial Teacher Education (ITE). The foundation studies include: Psychology of Education; History and Policy of Education; Philosophy of Education; and Sociology of Education, incorporating Special Education and Development Education. Also addressed are Professional Studies, including Curriculum Studies, Pedagogic Studies/Teaching Methodologies, Information and Communication Technologies and Educational Research. School Placement and microteaching are integral components of the course and provide a unique interface between education and the subject disciplines. This allows student-teachers to establish the links between the theory, planning and practice of teaching and learning. Students complete their teaching practice in a variety of schools and educational settings.

Biology and related science modules extend overall years of the course with specialisation modules in the following areas: Biological Sciences (Anatomy, Physiology, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Genetics, Zoology, Botany, Ecology, Molecular Biology and Environmental Biology) Physical Sciences (Chemistry and Physics), and Special Methodology of Science and Biology Teaching.

Year One
• Understanding Education
• General Pedagogics 1
• Subject-Specific Pedagogics 1
• School Placement 1
• Food Studies
• Introduction to Textiles and Design
• Family Resource Management
• Chemistry 1
• Botany
• Animal Diversity
• Human Anatomy and Physiology 1

Year Two
• Understanding Education
• Pedagogics for Practice 2
• School Placement 2
• Food Studies: Food Science and Nutrition
• Family Resource Management
• Physics 1
• Chemistry 2
• Human Anatomy and Physiology 2
• Physics 2

Year Three
• Understanding Education
• Pedagogics for Practice 3
• School Placement 3
• Food Microbiology
• Nutritional and Sensory Science
• Textiles, Fashion and Design
• Family Resource Management: Resource Management and Consumer Empowerment
• Ecology and Ecosystems
• Biochemistry 1
• Microbiology: Food and Water
• Molecular Biology: Nucleic Acids

Year Four
• Understanding Education
• Pedagogics for Practice 4
• School Placement 4
• Food Quality, Nutrition and Health
• Family Resource Management
• Home Economics Practice in Everyday Living
• Choose from one of the following:
– Nutritional Food Product Development
– Social, Personal and Health Education
– Textiles, Fashion and Design
– Interior Design
• Biochemistry 2: Metabolism
• Molecular Cell Biology
• Biochemistry 3: Biochemical Basis of Disease
• Environmental Biology

Year Five (PME)
• Sociological Perspectives in Education
• Dissertation Research Methods in Education
• Professional Preparation and Development: Home Economics
• Professional Preparation and Development: Biology
• School Placement in Home Economics and Biology
• Professional Inquiry in Home Economics and Home Economics Education
• Dissertation

Note: Modules in each year of the course are subject to change.

Further Education

Students with an honours degree have the option to pursue further studies at Postgraduate and PhD levels in Science/Science Education/Home Economics / Home Economics Education.

How to be a home economics teacher

Why Choose This Course?

Career Opportunities

Graduates of this course are qualified to teach Junior Certificate Home Economics, Junior Certificate Science and Leaving Certificate Home Economics and Biology at higher level. Graduates are provided with a professional and academic qualification which enables them to also pursue careers in a wide range of fields including Education, Home Economics and Applied Science.

Who’s Suited to This Course

Learning Outcomes

Work Placement

School Placement is a core element of the teacher education course.

This critical part of initial teacher education is designed to give the student teacher an opportunity to learn about teaching, learning and assessment, to gain practice in teaching and to apply theory in a variety of teaching situations and school contexts.

Student teachers undertake School Placement on a block release basis in the spring term of every year of their BA/PME programme. The duration of School Placement for each year of the BA/PME is outlined below;

Year 1: 3 weeks in a Post-primary School setting
Year 2: 4 weeks in a Post-primary School setting
Year 3: 4 weeks in a Post-primary School setting
Year 4: 4 weeks in a Special Community and Further Education setting
Year 5: 10 weeks in a Post-primary School setting

Home economics Teacher – Redbridge – Mixed Secondary School & Sixth form – Immediate start

** Home economics Teacher – Redbridge

** Home economics Teacher – Mixed Secondary School & Sixth Form

** Home economics Teacher – £135 – £200 per day

** Home economics Teacher – ASAP

Can you offer strong subject knowledge of catering and home economics?

Do you have experience teaching Home economics at GCSE?

Are you looking for a new role starting ASAP as a home economics teacher?

About the role – Home Economics Teacher

I am currently working with this mainstream secondary school based in Redbridge who are looking to appoint a QTS trained Home Economics Teacher. The school are looking for someone who is confident to teach at key stage three and GCSE as a Food technology teacher. The successful candidate will join the school on a long term, temp to perm contract starting ASAP with views of going permanent in September.

About the school – Home Economics Teacher

This ‘Good’ co-educational comprehensive secondary school located in the London borough of Redbridge split between two sites catering to students in key stages 3 up to key stage 5 catering to approximately 1700 pupils across all age groups, 11-18. The school has a focus upon creating morals among students allowing their students to grow and develop personalities in order to fulfil their greatest potentials. With specialism in science, the school has great opportunities available for students, adding to its outstanding level of achievement.

If you are interested in this Home economics role, click apply now or contact Tom at Qualiteach for more information