How to be a loan officer

How to be a loan officer

Loan officers determine whether or not individuals and corporations qualify for loans from banks and other financial institutions. They examine the financial records of loan applicants and apply underwriting principles and formulas to determine their ability to repay a loan. Loan officers may look at applicants’ income, job stability, debt-to-income ratio, and liquid assets to evaluate the risk of lending to them.

A large part of a loan officer’s job is sales and customer service. Some types of loan officers, like mortgage originators, must find their own clients, and loan officers who work for banks and credit unions are expected to generate new business for their employer. Once they have a client to work with, loan officers must communicate with them to determine their needs and answer any questions they may have.

What kind of training is required to become a loan officer?

Most loan officers have completed some college education and many have at least a bachelor’s degree, often in a field related to business. Students who major in business or business administration often focus on one area of concentration, like accounting or finance. Students who focus on accounting learn about taxation, auditing, accounting systems, and accounting software. A familiarity with business accounting and financial record auditing can help in a career as a loan officer.

Some community colleges offer undergraduate certificate programs for mortgage loan originators. Students in these programs take courses in topics like real estate fundamentals, real estate fraud, real estate math, real estate finance, sales, marketing, and appraisal.

Organizations like the American Bankers Association’s American Institute of Banking also offer diploma and certificate programs for prospective loan officers through local training providers. Students who pursue an AIB diploma in consumer lending take courses in topics like building customer relationships, client referrals, ethics, general accounting, the law and banking, and personal tax return analysis. The AIB commercial lending diploma program includes courses in analyzing financial statements, evaluating and structuring corporate loans, credit and deposit products for small business, and growing small business relationships.

Much of the training than loan officers receive occurs on the job. Banks, credit unions, and mortgage companies teach new loan officers about the various types of loans they can offer to clients and prepare them to use the technology they’ll need to do their job. Many financial institutions and mortgage brokers rely on a software platform to do everything from manage potential leads, manage client information and documents, underwrite loans, and ensure compliance with any applicable laws and regulations.

Are there any certification or licensure requirements?

Most states require mortgage originators to obtain a license before they can provide their services to clients. The standards mortgage loan originators must meet to become licensed vary by state, but in general, one must first complete several hours of prelicensing education. Mortgage loan originators in most states must complete 20 hours of education, but some states require more.

Prelicensing education is offered by approved providers in each state, and many states follow the standards set by the Nationwide Mortgage Licensing System (NMLS). Topics of study include federal law, ethics, lending standards, and state-specific information. After completion of prelicensing education, prospective mortgage originators must then pass the NMLS National Test.

In addition to passing a licensing exam, candidates may also be required to pass a criminal history background check and a credit check.

Consumer and commercial loan officers are not required to obtain a license to do their job, but organizations like the American Bankers Association offer voluntary certifications to those who want to bolster their credentials. Loan officers who seek certification must meet requirements for experience and education and pass a certification exam.

How long does it take to become a loan officer?

Some banks and mortgage companies require loan officers to hold a bachelor’s degree, so it can about four years to qualify for these jobs.

It can take several weeks or months to meet the prelicensing education requirements and pass the examination to become a licensed mortgage loan originator.

What does a loan officer earn?

The median yearly pay for loan officers in the United States was $59,820 in 2012. The lowest ten percent of earners in this field made less than $32,600 that year, while the top ten percent made more than $119,710.

Compensation for loan officers varies by employer. Loan officers may be paid a commission on the sales they bring in, or they may be paid a salary. Some are compensated with a combination of salary and commission.

What are the job prospects?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of loan officers will grow 8 percent between 2012 and 2020, about as fast as the average for all occupations.

The BLS expects that lending by banks and other financial institutions will increase as the economy improves, which should enhance job prospects for loan officers. Increasing usage of underwriting software, however, may mean that fewer loan officers will be needed to process applications and evaluate clients’ finances.

What are the long term career prospects for loan officers?

With experience, loan officers may be promoted to positions with greater responsibility for closing sales and working directly with bigger clients. Promotions to these positions can lead to higher commissions from sales. Loan officers may also be promoted to management positions where they oversee the activities of a group of loan officers.

Mortgage loan officers may eventually become independent mortgage brokers who match clients with the best lender for their needs. Successful mortgage brokers may hire loan officers to take care of some of their business, and these brokers act as managers as well.

How can I find a job as a loan officer?

You can find loan officer jobs through the typical channels of online job boards and community resources. Many banks post information about job openings on their websites, so you can check with banks, credit unions, and other financial institutions in your area. If you attended a business school, you can work with your school’s alumni network to make contacts in the industry. A strong professional network can lead to valuable information about job openings.

How can I learn more about becoming a loan officer?

You can learn more about becoming a loan officer through groups like the American Bankers Association, the Association of Mortgage Professionals, and the Mortgage Bankers Association.

How to be a loan officer

Become A Loan Officer With Our Loan Officer Training Courses!

Do I Need A License To Become A Loan Officer?

If you work for yourself or any organization other than an insured depository, then yes, you need to get a mortgage license to become a Mortgage Loan Officer.

Mortgage Loan Officers need to be licensed by the state in which they do business, which means they must complete the pre-licensing education requirements and pass the state and national SAFE / NMLS exam. Check below for applicable Loan Officer licensing courses for you state.

How To Become A Mortgage Broker:
Mortgage Broker Licensing Requirements
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What Does A Mortgage Loan Officer Do?

Loan officers should be knowledgable about various types of loans, such as FHA, VA, conventional, and commercial mortgages that are offered by the financial institutions they represent.

Essentially, Mortgage Loan Officers gather clients’ financial information such as earnings and debts, among many other things, to determine if the applicant qualifies for a mortgage loan. With these basics, they advise potentials borrowers on the best options and type of loan for their needs.

From there, the Mortgage Loan Officer is responsible for working with the borrower to complete mortgage loan application, submitting the application to underwriting, following up on any additional information needed or requested from the underwriter, and communicating the loan decision to the potential borrower. This work includes:

  • Calculating the loan amount
  • Selecting the right loan program and interest rate
  • Estimating closing costs and prepaids
  • Evaluating the loan file based on underwriting guidelines such as income, Loan-To-Value (LTV), and more
  • Providing federal disclosures
  • Preparing closing documents

What Is The Difference Between A Mortgage Loan Officer And A Mortgage Loan Originator?

In simple terms, a Mortgage Loan Officer or a Mortgage Broker works for a licensed mortgage broker, whereas a Mortgage Loan Originator is typically an employee paid by a bank to originate mortgage loans.

Find The Best Loan Officer Assistant Jobs For You

Where do you want to work?

Working as a Loan Officer Assistant

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a loan officer assistant. For example, did you know that they make an average of $21.67 an hour? That’s $45,079 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 8% and produce 24,300 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does a Loan Officer Assistant Do

There are certain skills that many loan officers assistant have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed detail oriented, initiative and interpersonal skills.

When it comes to the most important skills required to be a loan officer assistant, we found that a lot of resumes listed 23.8% of loan officers assistant included loan portfolio, while 21.6% of resumes included customer service, and 6.5% of resumes included loan applications. Hard skills like these are helpful to have when it comes to performing essential job responsibilities.

When it comes to searching for a job, many search for a key term or phrase. Instead, it might be more helpful to search by industry, as you might be missing jobs that you never thought about in industries that you didn’t even think offered positions related to the loan officer assistant job title. But what industry to start with? Most loan officers assistant actually find jobs in the finance and hospitality industries.

How To Become a Loan Officer Assistant

If you’re interested in becoming a loan officer assistant, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We’ve determined that 45.3% of loan officers assistant have a bachelor’s degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 7.5% of loan officers assistant have master’s degrees. Even though most loan officers assistant have a college degree, it’s possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a loan officer assistant. When we researched the most common majors for a loan officer assistant, we found that they most commonly earn bachelor’s degree degrees or high school diploma degrees. Other degrees that we often see on loan officer assistant resumes include associate degree degrees or master’s degree degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a loan officer assistant. In fact, many loan officer assistant jobs require experience in a role such as administrative assistant. Meanwhile, many loan officers assistant also have previous career experience in roles such as customer service representative or loan processor.

What is the right job for my career path?

Tell us your goals and we’ll match you with the right jobs to get there.

What exactly does a Loan Officer do? Put simply, a Loan Officer’s job is to make the phone ring. As successful Loan Officers, we bring in the business and our team helps us by taking applications through the closing process – while we go out and sell, sell, sell!

Whether you’re a Loan Officer, Mortgage Broker, or a Producing or Non-Producing Branch Manager, there are certain skills and best practices you need to master to be successful.

Let’s talk about 4 of the processes you should make a part of your business each day…

1. The Half-Way Survey

Are you waiting too long to ask your clients for feedback? If you don’t send out a satisfaction survey until after a loan has closed, the answer is yes, you are!

After all, you can’t fix a problem you don’t know about, and you can’t know if you don’t ask.

At the Mortgage Marketing Animals, we recommend using the Half-Way Survey. Reach out to your clients midway through the loan process to see how things are going.

Ask for specifics of how you’re doing as their Loan Officer. Would they give you 5 stars?

If not, find out how you can make things right, and do it ASAP. If they would, take the opportunity to ask for referrals from their friends and family.

PS: If you’d like access to our Half-Way Survey script (or get help creating one of your own), we’d love to chat with you about it!

2. The “I Choose” Mentality

Do you find yourself complaining about not closing enough loans? Or maybe it’s a less than ideal relationship with your loan processor?

No matter what negative thoughts you might be having about any part of your business, you can make one quick change to turn things around – put an “I choose” in front of them!

For example, instead of saying “I’m only closing 4 loans a month,” change it to “I choose to only close 4 loans a month.”

This one tweak will take you from complaining about a situation to owning it. When you see it from the perspective of choosing to be in every situation, you’re in control of your own destiny and your profitability. This is the mindset of successful Loan Officers.

Ditch the victim mentality and choose to put yourself in a new situation – one where you go from complaining to winning. Your bottom line will show just how powerful the “I choose” mentality is!

3. The Delegate, Delegate, Delegate

If you feel like there’s not enough time in a day to make the income you want, you need to step back and reevaluate things. It’s time to let go and trust your team!

When it comes to the day-to-day running of your mortgage business, you should be asking yourself “who,” not “how” about almost everything that isn’t getting the phone to ring.

That’s what successful loan officers do, right? We sell, sell, sell, so delegate out everything else. This gives you the time to do what only you can do – focus on selling and let your team do the rest.

Whether it’s finding a better mortgage CRM, running FB ads, or any other administrative task, it doesn’t matter who does it, but it does matter that it gets done.

Delegate it out and give a deadline, and then get back to doing what you do best!

4. The Employee Multiplier

Do you think of payroll as overhead? Man, you’re missing out! You need to make the switch to seeing payroll for what it really is – investing in ink to print out $100 bills.

We already talked about how delegation is one of the best ways to smooth out your processes and boost your bottom line. But with the Employee Multiplier mindset, you get so much more.

Each employee brings new and unique experiences to your business. They’ll have thoughts and ideas that you most likely have missed – and they just might be better than yours!

Plus, every team member brings their own personal database to work with them. That means even more mortgage marketing leads for your business. And you’ll be giving your employee’s network of family and friends a trustworthy resource for home loans.

After all of the hard work, great ideas, and sales you get from each one of your team member’s personal networks, your employees end up paying their own salary. That’s some serious ROI!

Ready to close more loans in less time? Here are 3 ways we can help…

1. Listen to the #1 mortgage marketing podcast in the world at Loan Officer Freedom

2. Learn how to earn more while working less with the Mortgage Marketing Animals

3. Schedule your complimentary coaching session at Loan Officer Strategy Call

What Is a Loan Officer?

A loan officer is a representative of a bank, credit union, or other financial institution who assists borrowers in the application process. Loan officers are often called mortgage loan officers since that is the most complex and costly type of loan most consumers encounter. However, most loan officers assist consumers and small business owners with a wide variety of secured and unsecured loans.

Loan officers must have a comprehensive knowledge of lending products, banking industry rules and regulations, and the required documentation for obtaining a loan.

How a Loan Officer Works

The loan officer is the direct contact for most borrowers applying for a loan from a financial institution. The entire process can be handled over the internet, but most consumers probably still prefer a well-informed human on the other side of what is, after all, a costly and complex transaction. In fact, one reason why banks continue to have so many branch offices is that they need to bring loan officers face to face with potential borrowers.

Key Takeaways

  • A loan officer assists consumers and business people in choosing a loan product and applying for it.
  • This person is the main contact with the financial institution through the loan closing.
  • Most loans require a pile of paperwork, and mortgages are the worst.

Loan officers are knowledgable about all of the various types of loans offered by the financial institutions they represent and can advise borrowers on the best options for their needs.

They also can advise the potential borrower about what type of loan they might be eligible to get. The loan officer is responsible for the initial screening process and is unlikely to proceed with an application from someone who does not meet the lender’s qualifications.

The Application Process

Once a borrower and a loan officer agree to proceed, the loan officer helps prepare the application. The loan officer then passes the application along to the institution’s underwriter, who assesses the creditworthiness of the potential borrower.

If the loan is approved, the loan officer is responsible for preparing the appropriate documentation and the loan closing documents.

The loan officer is responsible for collecting the appropriate closing documents for a mortgage or other loan.

Some loans are more work than others. Secured loans generally require more documentation than unsecured loans. Mortgage loans require a hefty stack of documentation due to the many federal, state, and local regulations that pertain to them. Reverse mortgages and mortgage refinancings require that the borrower receive a HUD-1 settlement statement before the closing.  

Some loan officers are compensated through commissions. This commission is a prepaid charge and is often negotiable. Commission fees are usually highest for mortgage loans.

It is awfully nice of lenders to be offering free loans. At least, that’s what it sounds like they’re doing—at least in all of those internet ads or e-mails trumpeting loans at super-low rates with no out-of-pocket costs.

Have you ever wondered how lenders can do this? If they are not charging you, the money has to come from somewhere. It helps to clear things up when you understand how a loan officer makes their money.

key takeaways

  • Loan officers are compensated either “on the front”—via fees you pay upon getting your loan—and/or “on the back,” a commission from their institution (which you indirectly pay via a higher interest rate).
  • The good faith estimate a lender gives you delineates the APR on your loan, which represents its total annual costs.
  • Beware of loan officers that push you into adjustable-rate mortgages or into refinancing.
  • Using a mortgage broker might find you better terms than dealing with an individual loan officer.

How Mortgage Loan Officers Get Paid

Loan officers get paid in a way that they call “on the front” and/or “on the back.” If a loan officer makes money on the front, that means they are charging for things that you can see—miscellaneous charges for processing your loan, often categorized as settlement costs or processing fees. You can pay these fees out-of-pocket when you sign the papers, or incorporate them into the loan.  

If a loan officer makes money on the back, that means money is being received from the bank as a sort of commission for filing the loan. This is the money you do not see. When lenders claim to be giving you a “no out-of-pocket” or “no-fee” loan, they are still making money, but they are charging it on “the back.”

So isn’t that better for you? Not necessarily. Although the bank is paying the loan officer a commission now, the money is really coming from you, the borrower—in the form of a higher interest rate. Lenders that are not charging fees on the front can be charging a higher rate to make up for lost fees. In fact, the lending institution could be making a lot more money this way as they are getting a higher rate of interest for possibly 30 years or more.

Comparing Loans to Discover Costs

How do you compare loans to be sure which deal is the best for you? You need to understand something called the annual percentage rate (APR).

When you apply for a loan, the loan officer must give you a good faith estimate—sort of a preview of your mortgage and its terms. That estimate includes the APR on your loan, which demonstrates the entire cost of the loan to you on a yearly basis—factoring in what the fees cost as well as the interest rate. By comparing good faith estimates and their APRs, you can get a better idea of what lenders are planning to charge you.  

A comparison often will make abundantly clear that, as they say, there is no such thing as a free lunch. You might not be paying money out-of-pocket right now, but either you pay now or you eventually pay later. Many times it is a better deal to pay the fees now to get a lower rate instead of paying a higher rate over 30 years.

Loan Officer Pitches

Remember, despite their authoritative-sounding name, loan officers are salespeople; they get paid by selling you something—specifically, a loan. And the loan that best benefits them may not be in your best interests.

For example, be careful of the loan officer who wants to sell you an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM), and then keep on selling you ARM after ARM for the same property. ARMs are a good choice for certain people, especially those who know they won’t be in their home very long or plan to pay off the loan in full within a certain period. However, if you are planning to stay in your home for more than seven years or so, an ARM may not be a very good choice, since the interest rate could dramatically increase on you.

It behooves officers to make as many loans as possible. One way to do this is to get people into ARMs that may need to be refinanced often. When they are telling you it is a good time to refinance—whether it’s an ARM or a fixed-rate mortgage—you need to figure out how much that loan is going to cost you. To do this, you must consider how many out-of-pocket fees you will be paying, if the loan interest rate is less, and if you’ll be in the loan long enough to recoup these expenses. If you are getting a lower interest rate and not paying any fees, it could be a better deal than what you have now.

Mortgage Broker vs Bank Loan Officer

Sometimes the people behind those tempting ads are not bank loan officers themselves, but mortgage brokers. Brokers serve as an intermediary between borrowers and lenders; they do not service loans themselves. If a loan is approved, the mortgage broker collects an origination fee from the lender as compensation.  

The advantage of using a broker for you, the borrower, is brokers can shop around at the different banks for the lowest rates, whereas a loan officer can only deal in the rate offered by his institution. The advantage of using a bank directly is that they don’t have to pay the broker a fee—the cost of which, you can bet, is eventually going to come out of your pocket, one way or another. If the broker can find a lower rate, charge their fee, and still offer the most advantageous loan, then they may be your best choice.

You will have to do your homework and compare good faith estimates to be sure. Remember, the loan officer decides how much money they want to make to some extent; they may have some negotiating room. Don’t always expect that brokers will give you the best rate that they can. They may not be telling you the lowest rate they can offer because by offering the rate they originally quoted, they may be getting more commission on the back-end.

The Bottom Line

How can you best protect yourself? Do your research. Shop around. Do not accept the first good faith estimate. Get several estimates. Compare the APR on each one. Go to both brokers and bankers to see what they offer.

Be wary of the loan officer that doesn’t ask you how long you will be living in your home. If they don’t ask you questions, they don’t know which loan fits you the best. If you are planning to only be in your home a short time—less than a decade or so— you might consider an ARM. If you are going to be there for a long time, consider a 30-year loan. Even better, if the day comes and you can afford it, pay extra each month on your 30-year loan and pay it off in 15 years instead.

How to Become a Loan Officer in Arizona

If you would like to become a loan officer in Arizona, you have come to the right place.

This guide gives you a step-by-step overview of the process you must follow to reach your goal. By the time you complete this guide, you can move forward with confidence and peace of mind because you will know what to expect at each turn.

Completing the process within a few months is possible if you have enough time and dedication.

You are about to take the vital first step toward your dream career.

Education

This section covers the educational requirements you have to meet before you can become a loan officer.

All prospective loan officers need to complete 20 hours of education at the start of their career and eight hours of education each year to maintain their license.

The classes you take will cover lending standards, ethics and federal lending laws. Before you can take the exam, you must also learn about the lending laws unique to Arizona.

Look for approved classes in your area that match your schedule if you would like to complete your training as quickly as possible and avoid roadblocks along the way.

Below are some loan officer training classes we recommend:

Arizona School for Loan Officers

ASREB is probably the most well know and prominent Loan Officer and Real Estate school. (Webinar and Self-Paced) .

Check out their FB page for more info:

Loan Officer School

Loan officer school is an online only loan officer education school. They are located in Phoenix and have some good reviews on record. Probably worth taking a look.

Once you complete your training, you can sign up to take the Safe Act exam. You must pay a $115 registration fee before setting a date for the exam.

On the day of your exam, you will have 195 minutes to answer 115 questions.

If you have trouble with a question, you can skip it to avoid losing too much time, and you can then go back to the question after submitting the answers you know.

Studying before your exam is a powerful way to boost your results and enhance your odds of passing the first time.

Those who fail the exam must wait 30 days and pay the fee before retaking it. If someone fails the exam three times, that person has to wait six months before taking the exam again.

You should not have anything about which to worry as long as you study and put in the effort to prepare.

To sign up or find out more about the exam go to:

Background Check

Submitting to a background check is the final step in your journey of becoming an Arizona loan officer.

Any felonies within the last seven years will prevent you from becoming a loan officer in Arizona. If you have a felony related to financial crimes, the law prevents you from ever becoming a licensed loan officer.

Keep these facts in mind while moving forward if you wish to make the right choice for your situation. If you pass the background check without trouble, you can begin your career.

Final Thoughts

Becoming a loan officer in Arizona does not need to be a challenging or complicated task as long as you follow a few proven steps.

The tips you have just learned can do wonders to help you reach your goal and turn your dream into a reality.

Keep these things in mind as you begin your journey, and you will have no trouble becoming an Arizona loan officer.

What exactly does a Loan Officer do? Put simply, a Loan Officer’s job is to make the phone ring. As successful Loan Officers, we bring in the business and our team helps us by taking applications through the closing process – while we go out and sell, sell, sell!

Whether you’re a Loan Officer, Mortgage Broker, or a Producing or Non-Producing Branch Manager, there are certain skills and best practices you need to master to be successful.

Let’s talk about 4 of the processes you should make a part of your business each day…

1. The Half-Way Survey

Are you waiting too long to ask your clients for feedback? If you don’t send out a satisfaction survey until after a loan has closed, the answer is yes, you are!

After all, you can’t fix a problem you don’t know about, and you can’t know if you don’t ask.

At the Mortgage Marketing Animals, we recommend using the Half-Way Survey. Reach out to your clients midway through the loan process to see how things are going.

Ask for specifics of how you’re doing as their Loan Officer. Would they give you 5 stars?

If not, find out how you can make things right, and do it ASAP. If they would, take the opportunity to ask for referrals from their friends and family.

PS: If you’d like access to our Half-Way Survey script (or get help creating one of your own), we’d love to chat with you about it!

2. The “I Choose” Mentality

Do you find yourself complaining about not closing enough loans? Or maybe it’s a less than ideal relationship with your loan processor?

No matter what negative thoughts you might be having about any part of your business, you can make one quick change to turn things around – put an “I choose” in front of them!

For example, instead of saying “I’m only closing 4 loans a month,” change it to “I choose to only close 4 loans a month.”

This one tweak will take you from complaining about a situation to owning it. When you see it from the perspective of choosing to be in every situation, you’re in control of your own destiny and your profitability. This is the mindset of successful Loan Officers.

Ditch the victim mentality and choose to put yourself in a new situation – one where you go from complaining to winning. Your bottom line will show just how powerful the “I choose” mentality is!

3. The Delegate, Delegate, Delegate

If you feel like there’s not enough time in a day to make the income you want, you need to step back and reevaluate things. It’s time to let go and trust your team!

When it comes to the day-to-day running of your mortgage business, you should be asking yourself “who,” not “how” about almost everything that isn’t getting the phone to ring.

That’s what successful loan officers do, right? We sell, sell, sell, so delegate out everything else. This gives you the time to do what only you can do – focus on selling and let your team do the rest.

Whether it’s finding a better mortgage CRM, running FB ads, or any other administrative task, it doesn’t matter who does it, but it does matter that it gets done.

Delegate it out and give a deadline, and then get back to doing what you do best!

4. The Employee Multiplier

Do you think of payroll as overhead? Man, you’re missing out! You need to make the switch to seeing payroll for what it really is – investing in ink to print out $100 bills.

We already talked about how delegation is one of the best ways to smooth out your processes and boost your bottom line. But with the Employee Multiplier mindset, you get so much more.

Each employee brings new and unique experiences to your business. They’ll have thoughts and ideas that you most likely have missed – and they just might be better than yours!

Plus, every team member brings their own personal database to work with them. That means even more mortgage marketing leads for your business. And you’ll be giving your employee’s network of family and friends a trustworthy resource for home loans.

After all of the hard work, great ideas, and sales you get from each one of your team member’s personal networks, your employees end up paying their own salary. That’s some serious ROI!

Ready to close more loans in less time? Here are 3 ways we can help…

1. Listen to the #1 mortgage marketing podcast in the world at Loan Officer Freedom

2. Learn how to earn more while working less with the Mortgage Marketing Animals

3. Schedule your complimentary coaching session at Loan Officer Strategy Call