How to be a world citizen

You will have to print and email or post this form to register. Or you complete the online form by clicking here. To have a printed form mailed to you, write to the World Service Authority in Washington, D.C. (See address below)

All registered world citizens will receive the World Citizen Card, laminated and in 7 languages: English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Russian, Chinese and Esperanto. The possession of this card is evidence of a global political status allied with each and every other declared and registered World Citizen.

CREDO OF A WORLD CITIZEN

A World Citizen is a human being who lives intellectually, morally and physically in the present. A World Citizen accepts the dynamic fact that the planetary human community is interdependent and whole, that humankind is essentially one. A World Citizen is a peaceful and peacemaking individual, both in daily life and contacts with others. As a global person, a World Citizen relates directly to humankind and to all fellow humans spontaneously, generously and openly. Mutual trust is basic to his/her lifestyle. Politically, a World Citizen accepts a sanctioning institution of representative government, expressing the general and individual sovereign will in order to establish and maintain a system of just and equitable world law with appropriate legislative, judiciary and enforcement bodies. A World Citizen brings about better understanding and protection of different cultures, ethnic groups and language communities by promoting the use of a neutral international language, such as Esperanto. A World Citizen makes this world a better place to live in harmoniously by studying and respecting the viewpoints of fellow citizens from anywhere in the world.

AFFIRMATION

I, the undersigned, do hereby, willingly and consciously, declare myself to be a Citizen of the World. As a World Citizen, I affirm my planetary civic commitment to WORLD GOVERNMENT, founded on three universal principles of One Absolute Value, One World, and One Humanity which constitute the basis of World Law. As a World Citizen I acknowledge the WORLD GOVERNMENT as having the right and duty to represent me in all that concerns the General Good of humankind and the Good of All. As a Citizen of World Government, I affirm my awareness of my inherent responsibilities and rights as a legitimate member of the total world community of all men, women, and children, and will endeavor to fulfill and practice these whenever and wherever the opportunity presents itself. As a Citizen of World Government, I recognize and reaffirm citizenship loyalties and responsibilities within the communal state, and/or national groupings consistent with the principles of unity above which constitute now my planetary civic commitment.

DATA CONSENT: By signing below, the applicant gives explicit consent (opts in) to provide and share their personal information and data.

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Fill out below and sign Affirmation and Consent above and return with fee to: World Service Authority * 5 Thomas Circle, NW * Washington, D.C. 20005 * Tel: (202) 638-2662 * Fax: (202) 638-0638

APPLICATION FOR WORLD CITIZEN REGISTRATION

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Please include your US$40 world citizenship registration fee and choose the left or right column below according to your preference of making an annual financial commitment:

FIRST NAME(S):______________________________________
FAMILY NAME:________________________________________
GENDER: M F X T ___
BIRTHDATE: DAY_____ MONTH_____ YEAR___
BIRTHPLACE:_________________________________________
TELEPHONE:__________________________________________
FAX:________________________________________________
EMAIL:______________________________________________
OCCUPATION:_________________________________________
CURRENT MAILING ADDRESS:
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Registration fee: US$40
Annual minimum contribution to
World Government (Optional): US$30
Required Postage: US$5
TOTAL: US$75

Registration fee: US$40
Annual minimum contribution to
World Government (Optional):
US$30 -or- US$___
Required Postage: US$5
TOTAL: US$___

by Annie Reneau March 8, 2017

I believe that no matter where or how we live or what we look like, we are all part of one human family. Throughout my childhood, I heard a quote from the Bahá’í Faith “The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens” — and have tried to live my life accordingly. While I appreciate and feel grateful for my identity as an American, I have always seen myself as a citizen of the world first. That’s a perspective my husband and I are passing along to our children as well.

Here are some things all parents can do to encourage kids to be world citizens:

Teach them to celebrate differences.

Diversity is what makes life interesting and beautiful. We teach our kids to see differences as positive, as adding flavor and dimension to life, rather than being bad or scary. When kids start noticing differences among people or places or things, get excited and show enthusiasm for their observations. “Isn’t that cool?” or “Wow, neat, let’s learn more about that,” can go a long way to making kids feel comfortable with diverse people and places.

Teach respect for diverse beliefs.

Religion can be a source of conflict, but it doesn’t have to be. There are countless examples around the world of people from different faiths living peacefully, side by side, as friends. A friend with different beliefs is simply a friend with different beliefs. It’s possible to teach your kids your family’s faith and values without disparaging or demonizing others.

Point out connections and commonalities.

While it’s important to teach kids to appreciate diversity, it’s equally important to teach them to find common ground. The vast majority of people share basic human values such as family, friendship, love, and hope. When people start pointing out differences, especially in a negative way, show your kids how to find commonalities.

Explore cultures together.

Every city or town is unique in its demographic makeup, and some places pose more of a challenge in this area than others. If you live in a larger city, seek out opportunities to interact with your hometown’s international population. If you live in a small, not-particularly-diverse town, make use of books and videos to learn more about our family around the world. Listen to music from other countries and in other languages, try out recipes from other cultures, and explore traditional arts from around the globe.

Encourage curiosity and delight in learning about people.

Being a world citizen is really just about loving humanity. When you have a basic, foundational love for your fellow man, you want to get to know them. From a young age, we’ve encouraged our kids to be curious and enjoy learning. We’ve encouraged questions and sought answers together. We’ve tried to serve as examples of being lifelong learners and being genuinely interested in other cultures.

Teach kids to see people’s humanity first, but not to overlook racial or cultural identities.

Every human being is a human being first. But every human being also has a unique identity, which is often influenced by race, ethnicity, and culture. Some feel uncomfortable even acknowledging race, but people’s experiences in the world — which help make up their identity — are impacted by the sociological realities of race, ethnicity, and culture. It’s absolutely okay for your kids to acknowledge those differences, as long as they are learning about those differences from the people whose identities are influenced by them.

Teach them to listen and learn with an open heart and mind.

Part of learning about these differences is learning to listen and learn without judgment or defensiveness. Too many people feel the need to make judgments about anything and everything they see or hear. Teach your kids that it’s possible to listen and learn without automatically categorizing everything as “good” or “bad.” It may be appropriate or necessary to evaluate something that goes against your personal values, but when you’re first being exposed to a different way of thinking or living or eating or whatever, it’s important to keep an open mind.

Travel together.

There is no better way to learn about the beautiful array of people and places on our planet than traveling as a family. Seeing firsthand how different people live, smelling foods being cooked with spices we never use, hearing different languages being spoken all around you, and feeling what it’s like to be an outsider are invaluable experiences. If you can afford to take your kids to another country, do it.

Make service to humanity a priority

Families can find myriad ways of serving others. Ideally, our family strives to help people both locally and internationally. Strengthening our own communities is a vital service, but volunteering with or contributing to global initiatives, especially for those of us from comparably wealthy nations, is also a key component of world citizenship. To avoid getting overwhelmed, choose one issue as a family to focus on — clean water, hunger, etc. — or choose one organization to become involved with.

World citizenship is about celebrating our fascinating world filled with delightfully diverse people and striving to make it a better place. There are many more ways to do that than I listed here, but it’s a start. If we teach our children to see the earth as their home and all people as their family, imagine what an amazing future they can help build for all.

Embrace the idea or ignore it — we are all global citizens. While this citizenship is a birthright, we do have the choice of being contributing global citizens who revel in diversity and seek solutions to the challenges facing our planet or being passive ones who allow others to provide the answers for us.

According to a report recently released by the Institute of International Education, the nation’s leading non-profit educational and cultural exchange organization, more international students studied in the United States during the last academic year than ever before, a trend driven by students from China and Saudi Arabia flocking to American Universities. Conversely, more Americans are studying abroad, primarily in the U.K. and Europe, but with a growing number visiting developing nations.

Now, more than ever, this global generation needs to possess and use the skills necessary to be the environmental stewards of the planet and the international peacekeepers. So, exactly what does it take to be a contributing “global citizen?”

If one is open to it, possessing a passport, traveling to other countries and learning about other cultures and norms do create an awareness, but this plays only a small role in global citizenship. A true global citizen possesses a wide view of the world and the part he or she plays in it. Global citizenship is a way of living that is entrepreneurial and tech-savvy, involves taking risks and encourages critical thinking and connecting the dots. Students in an increasingly global society glean information from all their learning experiences, and analyze and synthesize it when dealing with shared societal issues, be they environmental, financial, social, educational, or political.

This global generation is very different from their 20th-century counterparts. Students need critical thinking skills, a level of self-awareness and confidence that will empower them to take on unfamiliar challenges. They need to be able to work on teams of diverse individuals, opinions and experiences. As they will most assuredly be faced with some of the world’s greatest challenges, they will need to ensure there are sustainable supplies of food, water, and energy; address the needs of more than seven billion people living on a planet with ever-dwindling natural resources. Whatever the challenge, they will need to innovate, work collaboratively and creatively, across borders and disciplines, and with ethics.

Having been an educator in Europe, Asia and the Middle East, I have seen first hand what makes an international education successful, and I am mindful of the life-changing impact such an education has on its students. Via an international curriculum, students become aware of “how the world works.” This is manifested in their open-mindedness to new situations, their desire to strive for a world where social wrongs are eradicated and environmental sustainability is achieved. In a school that is truly international, thinking and acting ‘globally’ is ubiquitous to all grades and content areas as students develop critical thinking skills, gain empathy and the understanding that they can make a difference. Global citizenship cannot be taught; rather, it must be developed and cultivated. If one is lucky enough, it begins in the formative years at home and school, alike.

Global citizenship sees beyond the world’s political borders and ideally starts at an early age. By encouraging our children to share their opinions and explore their own values, while respecting the values and opinions of others, we are creating a foundation for a contributing global citizen that lasts a lifetime. We are also helping to secure our planet for future generations by preparing our current one to take on the challenges that will undoubtedly lie ahead.

How to be a world citizen

A global citizen is someone who identifies with being part of an emerging world community and whose actions contribute to building this community’s values and practices.

You may have heard the terms “global citizenship” or “citizen of the world” in your company’s mission statement, during work meetings, or in ad campaigns. Global citizenship is an increasingly common idea: Universities use the term to promote global awareness and international education, and businesses use it to highlight their commitment to corporate social responsibility and sustainability around the world. It’s also a movement that uses online activism and social media worldwide to work toward ending global poverty.

Specifically, as a professional, global citizenship can benefit your personal and company brand, increase the growth and scope of your work, and help you connect with colleagues and build partnerships around the world.

But, how do you take such a complex concept and implement it in your daily 9-to-5 life?

I’ve learned that the essence of global citizenship is about finding global solutions to major social issues and developing a greater understanding of the world. But since that’s still a pretty broad task, here are four ways you can work toward global citizenship on a daily basis—and get ahead in your career at the same time.

1. Discover a Cause You Care About

Part of the reason that companies adopt the idea of global citizenship is because it allows them—and their employees—to support a variety issues, make an impact, and understand their greater role in the world. But to do that as an employee, you must become knowledgeable about the issues that matter to you.

If you’re not already aware of a social cause that you care about, start by learning more about what’s going on in the world and getting familiar with a few causes or issues that resonate with you. To do that, you can use social media to follow a variety of organizations, volunteer with local nonprofits to learn about the issues firsthand, or join meetups or social groups that take part in local causes.

Once you know what you support, you don’t have to wear your cause on your sleeve—there are plenty of ways to participate in and talk about the cause without being overbearing. For example, it’s easy to work into a conversation with a co-worker that you’re supporting a particular crowdfunding campaign, running in a charity 5K, or going to a happy hour that benefits your chosen cause after work. This is a great way to both be a global citizen and build relationships at work.

2. Be a Social Entrepreneur

Social entrepreneurship—developing innovative solutions to social problems—is one of the pillars of global citizenship. Many companies have launched initiatives with the intention of both making an impact and growing their international brands. The idea behind TOMS, for example, is that the company will help a person in need for every product sold.

Once you’re knowledgeable about the issues that matter to you or your company, think about how you might start something new to contribute to those issues—whether it’s a short-term project, like a fundraising event or an employee workshop, or something bigger, like launching a startup, a nonprofit, or a new socially conscious product line.

You can also get involved in smaller ways, too. As an individual, you can be a part of something just as impactful by getting civically engaged with an existing project or taking on a leadership role with a local organization. Anything that allows you to have an impact on world issues you care about.

3. Network on a Global Scale

Networking is one of the key ideas of global citizenship. But networking in the United States is completely different than networking in Japan or Norway. Would you have the knowledge to navigate the cultural and professional differences if such a foreign networking opportunity came up?

The good news is, you don’t necessarily have to go abroad to practice this skill. It’s about building relationships, striving toward common goals, navigating conflict, understanding differences, being able to work with others, and occasionally putting yourself out there when others won’t.

So, consider every cocktail reception, conference, or work dinner as a chance to bring out your global citizenship A-game. For example, if you recognize your clients may not feel comfortable conducting business in a bar because they come from a country where alcohol is prohibited (or maybe they just don’t partake in it as a personal choice), find an environment that is comfortable for everyone. In other cases, international colleagues may expect to have a coffee break every hour, so it’s important to build in room and flexibility for that. It’s all about being able to make people from all over the world (including your own local colleagues) comfortable.

4. Develop Sustainable Solutions

Global citizenship requires that people stay engaged and committed to their goals over the long term. That means even if it takes years to build your organization, pass a law, or raise the money you need, you stick with it. Most movements won’t achieve change overnight, but they can still make a huge impact as you work toward that goal. Many of the eight Millennium Development goals, for example, have not been met completely, but there have been vast improvements in gender equality, maternal health, and education for girls around the world because of that project—and the progress will continue until all the goals are achieved.

It’s fairly easy to solve problems in the short term—but can you make those solutions last? Whenever you start a project or implement a solution in your company, think about the changing landscape of your field, the flexibility that may need to be factored in, and what the impact over time will be. No matter how big or small the project, consider the how you will see it all the way through to completion.

Global citizenship is a philosophy that doesn’t have to be an out-of-reach goal or some public relations jargon—it’s an excellent way to advance your skills, build new partnerships and create awesome new opportunities as a “citizen of the world.”

Embrace the idea or ignore it — we are all global citizens. While this citizenship is a birthright, we do have the choice of being contributing global citizens who revel in diversity and seek solutions to the challenges facing our planet or being passive ones who allow others to provide the answers for us.

According to a report recently released by the Institute of International Education, the nation’s leading non-profit educational and cultural exchange organization, more international students studied in the United States during the last academic year than ever before, a trend driven by students from China and Saudi Arabia flocking to American Universities. Conversely, more Americans are studying abroad, primarily in the U.K. and Europe, but with a growing number visiting developing nations.

Now, more than ever, this global generation needs to possess and use the skills necessary to be the environmental stewards of the planet and the international peacekeepers. So, exactly what does it take to be a contributing “global citizen?”

If one is open to it, possessing a passport, traveling to other countries and learning about other cultures and norms do create an awareness, but this plays only a small role in global citizenship. A true global citizen possesses a wide view of the world and the part he or she plays in it. Global citizenship is a way of living that is entrepreneurial and tech-savvy, involves taking risks and encourages critical thinking and connecting the dots. Students in an increasingly global society glean information from all their learning experiences, and analyze and synthesize it when dealing with shared societal issues, be they environmental, financial, social, educational, or political.

This global generation is very different from their 20th-century counterparts. Students need critical thinking skills, a level of self-awareness and confidence that will empower them to take on unfamiliar challenges. They need to be able to work on teams of diverse individuals, opinions and experiences. As they will most assuredly be faced with some of the world’s greatest challenges, they will need to ensure there are sustainable supplies of food, water, and energy; address the needs of more than seven billion people living on a planet with ever-dwindling natural resources. Whatever the challenge, they will need to innovate, work collaboratively and creatively, across borders and disciplines, and with ethics.

Having been an educator in Europe, Asia and the Middle East, I have seen first hand what makes an international education successful, and I am mindful of the life-changing impact such an education has on its students. Via an international curriculum, students become aware of “how the world works.” This is manifested in their open-mindedness to new situations, their desire to strive for a world where social wrongs are eradicated and environmental sustainability is achieved. In a school that is truly international, thinking and acting ‘globally’ is ubiquitous to all grades and content areas as students develop critical thinking skills, gain empathy and the understanding that they can make a difference. Global citizenship cannot be taught; rather, it must be developed and cultivated. If one is lucky enough, it begins in the formative years at home and school, alike.

Global citizenship sees beyond the world’s political borders and ideally starts at an early age. By encouraging our children to share their opinions and explore their own values, while respecting the values and opinions of others, we are creating a foundation for a contributing global citizen that lasts a lifetime. We are also helping to secure our planet for future generations by preparing our current one to take on the challenges that will undoubtedly lie ahead.

As technology advances and governance is increasingly conducted beyond the parameters of the nation-state, the concept of global citizenship remains mysteriously absent. What does the term mean in historical terms and what practices might help its evolution into a coherent and democratic political practice?

A global citizen is someone who identifies with being part of an emerging world community and whose actions contribute to building this community’s values and practices. Such a definition of global citizenship is based on two assumptions which this article explores: (a) that there is such a thing as an emerging world community to which people can identify; and (b) that such a community has a nascent set of values and practices.

Historically human beings always have organized themselves into groups and communities based on shared identity. Such identity gets forged in response to a variety of human needs – economic, political, religious, and social. As group identities grow stronger, those who hold them organize into communities, articulate shared values, and build governance structures that reflect their beliefs.

Today the forces of global engagement are helping some people identify themselves as global citizens, meaning that they have a sense of belonging to a world community. This growing global identity in large part is made possible by the forces of modern information, communication, and transportation technologies. In increasing ways these technologies are strengthening our ability to connect to the rest of the world: through the internet; through participation in the global economy; through the ways in which world-wide environmental factors play havoc with our lives; through the empathy we feel when we see pictures of humanitarian disasters, civil conflicts and wars in other countries; or through the ease with which we can travel and visit other parts of the world.

Those who see ourselves as global citizens are not abandoning other identities; such as allegiances to our countries, ethnicities, and political beliefs. These traditional identities give meaning to our lives and will continue to help shape who we are. However, as a result of living in a globalized world, we find we have an added layer of responsibility. We have concern and a share of responsibility for what is happening to the planet as a whole, and we are members of a world-wide community of people who share this concern.

The values being proposed for the world community are not esoteric and obscure. They are the values that world leaders have been advocating for the past 100 years. They include human rights, religious pluralism, gender equity, the rule of law, environmental protection, sustainable worldwide economic growth, poverty alleviation, prevention and cessation of conflicts between countries, elimination of weapons of mass destruction, humanitarian assistance, and preservation of cultural diversity.

Since World War II efforts have been undertaken to develop global policies and institutional structures that can support these enduring values. Such efforts have been made by international organizations, sovereign states, transnational corporations, NGOs, international professional associations and others. They have resulted in a growing body of international agreements, treaties, legal statutes, and technical standards.

Yet, despite such efforts, we have a long way to go before there is a global policy and institutional infrastructure that can support our emerging world community and the values it stands for. There are significant gaps of policy in many domains, large questions about how to get countries and organizations to comply with existing policy frameworks, and issues of accountability and transparency. Most importantly, from a global citizenship perspective, there is an absence of mechanisms that enable greater citizen participation in the growing number of institutions practicing global governance.

Governance at the global level, for the most part, is in the hands of the representatives of sovereign states and technocrats. Global governance organizational leaders are usually distant and removed from those that their institutions serve. Therefore most people feel disconnected and alienated from the global governance arena, making it difficult to build a sense of grass-roots community at the global level.

There is an urgent need for a cadre of citizen leaders who can play activist roles in forming world community. Such global citizenship activism can take many forms, including: advocating, at the local and global level, for policy and programmatic solutions that address global problems; participating in the decision-making processes of global governance organizations; adopting and promoting changes in behavior that help protect the earth’s environment; contributing to world-wide humanitarian relief efforts; and organizing events that celebrate the diversity in world music and art, culture and spiritual traditions.

Instinctively, most of us feel a connection to others around the world facing similar challenges to ourselves, yet we lack adequate tools, resources, and support to act on this emotion. Our ways of thinking and being are still colored by the trapping of old allegiances and ways of seeing things that no longer are as valid as they used to be. Nonetheless, there is a longing to pull back the veil that keeps us from more clearly seeing the world as a whole, and finding more sustainable ways of connecting with those who share our common humanity.

How to be a world citizen

How to be a world citizen

How to be a world citizen

How to be a world citizen

How to be a world citizen

How to be a world citizen

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WSD World Citizens

A new initiative for a new age

How to be a world citizen

We are all World Citizens Now.

While societies grapple with self-isolation and social distancing, we aim to bring people around the world closer together through the simple power of speech.

Under the banner of WSD World Citizens we are creating a worldwide community of people who wish to share ideas on world citizenship.

This is a journey – an emergence.

You can help build this. Starting today. We are inviting schools, universities, colleges, public speaking groups across the globe to connect: to take part in WSD World Citizens

Scroll down and you can see what’s going in the World Citizen Google Group right now. And go to “Join” below for more information

How to be a world citizen

What You Can Do Right Now

Join Us! Once you’re signed up we will send you regular updates on how you can be part of this global discussion and information on the opportunities to link with others.

We can connect you with universities/schools/colleges/clubs in other nations to exchange talks.

We’ll also be inviting you take part in a truly global “Web-ate” under the Making Future project – you can check some initial details on the Making Future website.

From here on, use the tag #worldcitizens in all your social media posts about this initiative. We have created a simple wall to collect these posts.

Send us a video of a short speech (no more than 2 minutes) on some aspect world citizenship and we will post this direct to the WSD YouTube channel for all to watch. Here’s the link to send the file to.

Volunteer for one of our livestream discussions when you can select students to be part of the broadcast. Mail us here or via Join Up email process below.

Organise a discussion at your school/university/club and also with another school or university in another nation. Or, feed in ideas into our Google group:https://groups.google.com/a/worldspeechday.com/d/forum/worldcitizens

SO JOIN HERE: World citizenship is not a new idea. But is an idea that now needs urgent discussion, debate and dissemination.

As technology advances and governance is increasingly conducted beyond the parameters of the nation-state, the concept of global citizenship remains mysteriously absent. What does the term mean in historical terms and what practices might help its evolution into a coherent and democratic political practice?

A global citizen is someone who identifies with being part of an emerging world community and whose actions contribute to building this community’s values and practices. Such a definition of global citizenship is based on two assumptions which this article explores: (a) that there is such a thing as an emerging world community to which people can identify; and (b) that such a community has a nascent set of values and practices.

Historically human beings always have organized themselves into groups and communities based on shared identity. Such identity gets forged in response to a variety of human needs – economic, political, religious, and social. As group identities grow stronger, those who hold them organize into communities, articulate shared values, and build governance structures that reflect their beliefs.

Today the forces of global engagement are helping some people identify themselves as global citizens, meaning that they have a sense of belonging to a world community. This growing global identity in large part is made possible by the forces of modern information, communication, and transportation technologies. In increasing ways these technologies are strengthening our ability to connect to the rest of the world: through the internet; through participation in the global economy; through the ways in which world-wide environmental factors play havoc with our lives; through the empathy we feel when we see pictures of humanitarian disasters, civil conflicts and wars in other countries; or through the ease with which we can travel and visit other parts of the world.

Those who see ourselves as global citizens are not abandoning other identities; such as allegiances to our countries, ethnicities, and political beliefs. These traditional identities give meaning to our lives and will continue to help shape who we are. However, as a result of living in a globalized world, we find we have an added layer of responsibility. We have concern and a share of responsibility for what is happening to the planet as a whole, and we are members of a world-wide community of people who share this concern.

The values being proposed for the world community are not esoteric and obscure. They are the values that world leaders have been advocating for the past 100 years. They include human rights, religious pluralism, gender equity, the rule of law, environmental protection, sustainable worldwide economic growth, poverty alleviation, prevention and cessation of conflicts between countries, elimination of weapons of mass destruction, humanitarian assistance, and preservation of cultural diversity.

Since World War II efforts have been undertaken to develop global policies and institutional structures that can support these enduring values. Such efforts have been made by international organizations, sovereign states, transnational corporations, NGOs, international professional associations and others. They have resulted in a growing body of international agreements, treaties, legal statutes, and technical standards.

Yet, despite such efforts, we have a long way to go before there is a global policy and institutional infrastructure that can support our emerging world community and the values it stands for. There are significant gaps of policy in many domains, large questions about how to get countries and organizations to comply with existing policy frameworks, and issues of accountability and transparency. Most importantly, from a global citizenship perspective, there is an absence of mechanisms that enable greater citizen participation in the growing number of institutions practicing global governance.

Governance at the global level, for the most part, is in the hands of the representatives of sovereign states and technocrats. Global governance organizational leaders are usually distant and removed from those that their institutions serve. Therefore most people feel disconnected and alienated from the global governance arena, making it difficult to build a sense of grass-roots community at the global level.

There is an urgent need for a cadre of citizen leaders who can play activist roles in forming world community. Such global citizenship activism can take many forms, including: advocating, at the local and global level, for policy and programmatic solutions that address global problems; participating in the decision-making processes of global governance organizations; adopting and promoting changes in behavior that help protect the earth’s environment; contributing to world-wide humanitarian relief efforts; and organizing events that celebrate the diversity in world music and art, culture and spiritual traditions.

Instinctively, most of us feel a connection to others around the world facing similar challenges to ourselves, yet we lack adequate tools, resources, and support to act on this emotion. Our ways of thinking and being are still colored by the trapping of old allegiances and ways of seeing things that no longer are as valid as they used to be. Nonetheless, there is a longing to pull back the veil that keeps us from more clearly seeing the world as a whole, and finding more sustainable ways of connecting with those who share our common humanity.