How to be blessed

Question: “What does it mean to be blessed?”

Answer: Quite possibly, the most frequently used word in the Christian’s vocabulary is blessed. “Have a blessed day,” “blessed to be a blessing,” and “God bless you” are just a few of the ways we put it to use. It’s even common among unbelievers to describe themselves as “blessed.” Some people think of blessed as a spiritual term for “good fortune,” like when we receive something good, the desired outcome, or an exceptional comfort. But what does it really mean to be blessed?

The word blessed derives from the Greek term makarios, which means “fortunate,” “happy,” “enlarged,” or “lengthy.” Makarios is used in the Septuagint (a translation of the Old Testament into the Greek language) and the New Testament to define the kind of happiness that comes from receiving favor from God. Consequently, blessed can also be translated “favored.” In the New Testament, it usually carries the meaning of being “blessed by God.” As in the case of Mary, the mother of Jesus, who was “blessed among women” (Luke 1:42–45, 48), it was the Lord God who had blessed and favored her.

While material blessings are certainly included in God’s favor, the Bible ascribes a much fuller meaning to the word blessed.

Perhaps the most well-known use of the word blessed in the Bible is found in the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:3–12; Luke 6:20–23). Jesus used the term blessed in the framework of the Beatitudes to describe the inner quality of a faithful servant of God. This blessedness is a spiritual state of well-being and prosperity—a deep, joy-filled contentment that cannot be shaken by poverty, grief, famine, persecution, war, or any other trial or tragedy we face in life. In human terms, the situations depicted in the Beatitudes are far from blessings, but because God is present with us through these difficult times, we are actually blessed by Him in them.

The true servant of God is blessed, regardless of circumstances, because God has favored him or her with a fully satisfied soul (Psalm 63:1–5; John 4:14). The material things we crave can never bring genuine happiness or contentment. True fulfillment can only be found in a relationship with God through His Son, Jesus Christ (Romans 5:1–2).

From the time God first created humans, He blessed them (Genesis 1:22; 5:2; 12:3) and has continued to do so throughout history (Genesis 26:3; Deuteronomy 7:13; Job 42:12; Judges 13:24). Because of Christ’s work of redemption on the cross, we can now receive the full blessings of God through faith in Him: “Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ” (Ephesians 1:3). We are blessed because our sins are forgiven and can no longer be counted against us (Psalm 32:1–2).

The Bible measures blessedness differently from how people of the world measure it: “Blessed is the one who perseveres under trial because, having stood the test, that person will receive the crown of life that the Lord has promised to those who love him” (James 1:12). To those who rest in God, He grants an inner state of joy that is unaffected by external trials. What is this promised “crown of life?” It is the never-ending, victorious life in the world to come, where all trials will be ended. “In our experience life is often a burden, a weariness, a care. If it be a crown, it is a crown of thorns. But yonder, to live will be blessedness; being will be well-being. The reward of heaven will simply be the fact of living in God” (Alexander MacLaren, Expositions of Holy Scripture, Wm. B. Eerdmans, 1932, entry for James 1:12). The marvelous blessings we experience now are minor compared to the benefits God has stored up for us in His eternal kingdom (1 Corinthians 2:9).

The one who is blessed trusts in God’s love, no matter what: “Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean he no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death? . . . No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us. And I am convinced that nothing can ever separate us from God’s love. Neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow—not even the powers of hell can separate us from God’s love. No power in the sky above or in the earth below—indeed, nothing in all creation will ever be able to separate us from the love of God that is revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord. (Romans 8:35–39, NLT).

Blessed speaks of our inner state of well-being, the prosperity of our souls in Christ. Blessedness comes from unhindered fellowship with God the Father through our Lord Jesus. To be blessed is to experience the full impact of God’s presence in our lives now and for all eternity.

Do you want to be blessed? I’m sure you do. Everybody wants to be blessed in almost every area of life: finances, health, relationships, name it. It’s a good thing to be blessed.

While it’s not wrong to want to be blessed, the moment we chase after the blessing more that we do God, that’s going to be a big problem. Consider Paul’s warning:

“But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation and a snare and into many foolish and harmful lusts, which drown men in ruin and destruction. For the love of money is the root of all evil. While coveting after money, some have strayed from the faith and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.” (1 Timothy 6:9-10)

Getting ourselves pierced with many sorrows is a truly sorrowful thing. Do you want to be blessed without the danger of piercing yourself with something you’ll regret someday? Here are some ways to be blessed, according to the Bible.

1) Keep God’s commandments

God loves to bless those who obey Him. While He’s a fierce enemy to those who hate Him and commit sin, He’s a wonderful Father and friend to all who love Him. He said in Exodus 20:6 that He loves “showing mercy to thousands, to those who love Me and keep My commandments.”

2) Honor your parents

This has been forgotten by many. God wants us to honor our father and mother no matter how imperfect they may be. When we do that, we are promised that our “days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God is giving you.” (see Exodus 20:12)

3) Ask God for it

Why be jealous of other Christians when we can ask our Father God to bless us too? James tells us not to covet what others have. Instead, we are to ask God for blessings.

“You lust and do not have, so you kill. You desire to have and cannot obtain. You fight and war. Yet you do not have, because you do not ask.” (James 4:2)

Ok, so we’ve tried asking God for blessings but He didn’t give us what we asked for. James says maybe we’re asking God for the wrong reasons – maybe it’s because we are jealous of others, or perhaps want to be blessed for selfish reasons. That is so wrong.

James tells us, “You ask, and do not receive, because you ask amiss, that you may spend it on your passions.” (James 4:3)

4) Be a blessing to others

The Bible teaches us the principle of sowing and reaping. Simply put, if we want to reap blessings, we sow it. Choose to be a blessing to others, and see how God blesses you so that you can continue to be a blessing.

Proverbs 11:25 tells us, “The generous soul will be made rich, and he who waters will also be watered himself.”

5) Simply be in Christ

The best way to be blessed? To simply be in Christ Jesus, the only begotten Son of God. Ephesians 1:3 tells us,

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ. “

It ultimately comes down to knowing Christ’s value: His value is greater than anything else in your life so keep Him first and greatest – always. We are already blessed with all the spiritual blessing we could ever need and long for in Christ. This is why we could declare with David the lines of Psalm 23, saying,

“The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.”

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What does it mean to be blessed?

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I’ve always been intrigued by the idea presented in The Arabian Nights , when Aladdin finds the lamp and a genie permits him a wish. It makes me wonder what I would choose if given such a choice. Since I’ve never been wildly wealthy, the first things that come to mind are endless riches, a dream house, or luxury travel. But as soon as I think of those things, I wonder if that’s really what I want. I think of some of the names we see constantly in the tabloids and wonder if they would trade all their fame and fortune for some inner peace and a sense that what they’re doing matters.

Of course, if I read my Bible with the intent of obeying what it says, I’ll find it difficult to wish for wealth and luxury. Jesus said things such as, “the Son of Man has no place to lay his head” (Matthew 8:20), and “those who are last now will be first then, and those who are first will be last” (Matthew 20:16, NLT), and “When someone has been given much, much will be required in return” (Luke 12:48, NLT), and “These things dominate the thoughts of unbelievers, but your heavenly Father already knows all your needs” (Matthew 6:32, NLT).

What was Jesus’ purpose in saying such things? Was it just to be a killjoy? Did he want to make sure we were miserable while here on Earth so we would long for heaven? Or was it because he knew what would really make us happy?

To Be Blessed Means …

One of my favorite Scripture passages is the Beatitudes in Matthew 5:1-12, where Jesus lists what it means to be blessed. It’s certainly not what comes to my mind when I think of being blessed or when I pray for others to be blessed. Remember all those childhood prayers, “Bless Mommy, Daddy, and Auntie Sue”? We had no idea what we were saying! We were actually saying, “Let them be poor in spirit, mourning, meek, hungering and thirsting for righteousness, merciful, pure, peacemakers, and persecuted.”

So how could such things lead to happiness? It seems like they lead more to the opposite of happiness. But the Beatitudes tell us one thing clearly. We can never be happy when we live self-centered lives. We may be fooled into thinking we’re happy for a while, but eventually it will fold in on us because true happiness can be found only in a relationship with our Creator. Only the One who made us knows what will truly make us happy and give us satisfaction in life. We have to get to the end of ourselves and the beginning of God to gain any lasting contentment in life. And that can happen only through divine revelation and transformation through God’s Word and the Holy Spirit dwelling in us. It’s the “pearl of great value” (Matthew 13:46), worth selling everything to gain it. And ultimately, it’s the secret to true satisfaction.

Digging Deeper

  1. If you found a genie in a lamp, what would you wish for? Quick, name the first thing that comes to your mind. After you’ve named it, take time to think about it. Would that really make you happy? Why or why not?
  2. Have you ever been physically hungry or thirsty to the extreme—perhaps after an illness, an intense workout, or during a hot spell? If so, think back to that experience. Read Psalm 63:1, Matthew 5:6, and John 6:35. What do you think it means to hunger and thirst after God? Why is this essential to being satisfied about life?

Do Something about It

Spend time reading the Beatitudes (Matthew 5:1-12) and asking God to give you insight into what they mean in your life. Pray that God will give you a desire for him that is all-consuming. Ask for victory over anything that keeps you from desiring him in such a way. And ask that God give you a real sense of what it means to be satisfied.

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Feeling blessed is in vogue.

A quick look at Facebook and Twitter shows how many people today feel #blessed. In our social-media world, saying you’re blessed can be a way of boasting while trying to sound humble.

College scholarship? #Blessed. Unexpected raise? #Blessed. Wonderful family? #Blessed.

As Christians we use that term too, of course. We pray God will bless our family. We attribute our undeserved gifts to “God’s blessings.” We talk about ministries being blessed. But what does it really mean? How should we understand the blessing of God?

The Good Life

“My trials grounded my faith in ways that prosperity and abundance never could.”

For believers, is the blessed life synonymous with the successful life? Is it the Christian version of the good life? A loving marriage, obedient children, a vibrant ministry, a healthy body, a successful career, trusted friends, financial abundance — if these are the characteristics of a blessed life, then having all of them should translate into an extraordinarily blessed life.

But does it? If someone had all those things, would they be extraordinarily blessed?

Rather than turning to God, they might feel self-sufficient and proud. Perhaps a bit smug and self-righteous. After all, their hard work would be yielding good fruit.

Moreover, they wouldn’t need to cry out to God for deliverance; everything would already be perfect. They wouldn’t need to trust God; they could trust in themselves. They wouldn’t need God to fill them; they would already be satisfied.

God’s Richest Blessings

My desire for God is greatly fueled by my need. And it is in the areas of loss where I feel my need most intensely. Unmet desires keep me on my knees. Deepen my prayer life. Make me ransack the Bible for God’s promises.

Earthly blessings are temporary; they can all be taken away. Job’s blessings all disappeared in one fateful day. I, too, had a comfortable life that was stripped away within a span of weeks. My marriage dissolved. My children rebelled. My health spiraled downward. My family fell apart. My dreams were shattered.

And yet, in the midst of those painful events, I experienced God’s richest blessings. A stronger faith than I had experienced before. A deeper love than I had ever known. A more intimate walk than I could explain. My trials grounded my faith in ways that prosperity and abundance never could.

While my trials were not blessings in themselves, they were channels for them. As Laura Story asks in her song “Blessings,” “What if your blessings come through rain drops? What if trials of this life — the rain, the storms, the hardest nights — are your mercies in disguise?”

This revolutionary idea of blessing is also firmly established in Scripture.

The Common Thread

One translation of the New Testament (ESV) has 112 references with the words bless, blessing, or blessed, none of which connects blessing to material prosperity. Consider these passages:

“Suffering and trials are not blessings in themselves, but they are channels for God’s grace.”

“Blessed are the poor in spirit. . . . Blessed are those who mourn. . . . Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness’ sake . . . Blessed are you when others revile you and persecute you.” (Matthew 5:3–4, 10–11)

“Blessed rather are those who hear the word of God and keep it!” (Luke 11:28)

Blessed are those whose lawless deeds are forgiven. (Romans 4:7; quoting Psalm 32:1)

Blessed is the man who remains steadfast under trial. (James 1:12)

“Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on. . . . Blessed are those who are invited to the marriage supper of the Lamb.” (Revelation 14:13, 19:9)

There is no hint of material prosperity or perfect circumstances in any New Testament reference. On the contrary, blessing is typically connected with either poverty and trial or the spiritual benefits of being joined by faith to Jesus.

According to the Key-Word Study Bible, “The Greek word translated blessed in these passages is makarioi which means to be fully satisfied. It refers to those receiving God’s favor, regardless of the circumstances” (emphasis added).

What is blessing, then? Scripture shows that blessing is anything God gives that makes us fully satisfied in him. Anything that draws us closer to Jesus. Anything that helps us relinquish the temporal and hold on more tightly to the eternal. And often it is the struggles and trials, the aching disappointments and the unfulfilled longings that best enable us to do that.

Truly Blessed

“Unmet desires keep me on my knees and make me ransack the Bible for God’s promises.”

Pain and loss transform us. While they sometimes unravel us, they can also push us to a deeper life with God than we ever thought possible. They make us rest in God alone. Not what we can do or achieve for him. And not what he can do or achieve for us.

In pain and loss, we long for Presence. We long to know that God is for us and with us and in us. Great families, financial wealth, and good health are all wonderful gifts we can thank God for, but they are not his greatest blessings. They may make us delight, not in God, but in his gifts.

God’s greatest blessing always rests in God himself. When we have that, we are truly #blessed.

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How to be blessedPixabay

Do you want to be blessed? I’m sure you do. Everybody wants to be blessed in almost every area of life: finances, health, relationships, name it. It’s a good thing to be blessed.

While it’s not wrong to want to be blessed, the moment we chase after the blessing more that we do God, that’s going to be a big problem. Consider Paul’s warning:

“But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation and a snare and into many foolish and harmful lusts, which drown men in ruin and destruction. For the love of money is the root of all evil. While coveting after money, some have strayed from the faith and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.” (1 Timothy 6:9-10)

Getting ourselves pierced with many sorrows is a truly sorrowful thing. Do you want to be blessed without the danger of piercing yourself with something you’ll regret someday? Here are some ways to be blessed, according to the Bible.

1) Keep God’s commandments

God loves to bless those who obey Him. While He’s a fierce enemy to those who hate Him and commit sin, He’s a wonderful Father and friend to all who love Him. He said in Exodus 20:6 that He loves “showing mercy to thousands, to those who love Me and keep My commandments.”

2) Honor your parents

This has been forgotten by many. God wants us to honor our father and mother no matter how imperfect they may be. When we do that, we are promised that our “days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God is giving you.”В (see Exodus 20:12)

3) Ask God for it

Why be jealous of other Christians when we can ask our Father God to bless us too? James tells us not to covet what others have. Instead, we are to ask God for blessings.

“You lust and do not have, so you kill. You desire to have and cannot obtain. You fight and war. Yet you do not have, because you do not ask.” (James 4:2)

Ok, so we’ve tried asking God for blessings but He didn’t give us what we asked for. James says maybe we’re asking God for the wrong reasons – maybe it’s because we are jealous of others, or perhaps want to be blessed for selfish reasons. That is so wrong.

James tells us, “You ask, and do not receive, because you ask amiss, that you may spend it on your passions.”В (James 4:3)

4) Be a blessing to others

The Bible teaches us the principle of sowing and reaping. Simply put, if we want to reap blessings, we sow it. Choose to be a blessing to others, and see how God blesses you so that you can continue to be a blessing.

Proverbs 11:25 tells us, “The generous soul will be made rich, and he who waters will also be watered himself.”

5) Simply be in Christ

The best way to be blessed? To simply be in Christ Jesus, the only begotten Son of God. Ephesians 1:3 tells us,

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us with every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places in Christ. “

It ultimately comes down to knowing Christ’s value: His value is greater than anything else in your life so keep Him first and greatest – always. We are already blessed with all the spiritual blessing we could ever need and long for in Christ. This is why we could declare with David the lines of Psalm 23, saying,

“The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want.”

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It’s so easy in today’s world to fall into that slump. You know the one: where you think everyone else is passing you by, you wonder where you were when God was handing out all the talent, you convince yourself you have nothing to offer to the world, and life just really, REALLY exhausts you.

Well, think again! Here are three ways that you are the center of the universe. Unique. One of a kind. The apple of God’s eye. There was never anyone like you before, there is no one like you now, and there will never be anyone like you ever again. Your blessing of time is at hand. So jump on this precious life and ride it for all it’s worth!

You Are a Self-Taught Artist of Life
Genesis 1:27 is really How You Are Blessed 101: God created you in His image.

The ultimate artist of life created you (YOU!) to also be an artist of life — your life. You may argue, “But I don’t have a creative bone in my body!” Not true. You were born with nothing but creative bones, and mind, and heart, and soul.

Everything you do from the time you get up in the morning until you fall asleep (and even while sleeping!) is you designing-building-producing-discovering your life, as well as adding accent and color to the world around you. How you manage your day, how you handle interactions with people, where you focus your energies — for better and for worse, these actions are the paintbrush to your canvas, the chisel to your block of marble.

Now I won’t argue, there is a lot of amateurish artwork in the world, but only because the artists need a little more practice and direction. Same with us and our lives. It’s one step at a time, forward, even if the way is messy with twists and turns, bumps and crossroads.

As creator of your life, the charge and choice is solely yours to ensure that your life — no matter the circumstances — is one of learning, growth, smiles, compassion, productivity, small victories, and leaving a positive mark as you pass this way.

You Have Hidden Gifts Waiting to Be Discovered
I can’t tell you how many times people have said to me, “I wish I could write like you!” They say this with defeat — even regret, as if writing is the only talent in the world.

My response: “I’m sure there are many things you can do that I can’t, and wish I could!” Oh, like surf, understand algorithms, recite Scriptures by heart, run a five-minute mile, and not let the little things bother me so much.

Too often, we compare ourselves to others: the neighbor who is a mini-clone of Martha Stewart; the political genius who is changing the world with his groundbreaking investigative reports; the literary agent with a brilliant knack for making deals that have made him a powerhouse in the publishing industry; the athlete who defies gravity to score medal after medal . . . Need I go on?

Instead, take a good look in the mirror — into your own eyes, and ask, “What am I good at?”

If the answer is, “Nothing,” then ask again, and again, and again. That “nothing” shouldn’t be the end of the discussion, but rather a launching point for the search to discover what your talents are.

Believe me, those gifts are in you somewhere. Sometimes they’re just hidden deep within like surprises, waiting for us to discover and unwrap them — then, most importantly, use them.

You’re Breathing, Aren’t You?
Have you ever really thought about how your breathing works? Bear with me now.

You inhale. That breath travels through your nose and mouth, down your throat and windpipe into bronchial tubes, then into your lungs and smaller bronchioles, all ending in hundreds of millions of little sacs called alveoli. That’s Phase 1.

Phase 2: Oxygen from said breath above then travels into your blood via a system of capillaries. From there, it goes to your heart, which pumps it to the bazillion cells within your body. (We won’t even get into what happens next, or during exhalation — the removal of carbon dioxide and all that.)

I mean, not even the precision of a Wyeth painting, the golden ratio of a pyramid, Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 5, or a hole in one on the golf course can come close to that divine perfection.

Simply put, here’s an equation even my mathematically-challenged mind can understand:

Each Breath = Blessing!

(Now would be a good time to take a long, deep breath and ponder this.)

BONUS BLESSING:
Have No Doubt — You Are Loved!

One of the biggest afflictions in the world today is loneliness. From newborns to folks tipping the century mark, we all need to feel loved.

If you have any doubt about this within your own life, I’m here to tell you: YOU ARE LOVED!

God loves you. Others love you.

And as sure as I am sitting here, sharing one of my God-given blessings with you, let these words confirm, if nothing else, that I love you, too!

Earlier today someone posted a comment on the blog topic I’ve been calling “The Eucharist Diet” – a day to day report of my practice of taking daily communion and the corresponding results on my weight. I thought this question was worth highlighting and addressing:

“Hi. I’ve been following your efforts with great interest. I recently gained around 5 pounds over the holidays (and would prefer to be 10 pounds lighter, actually, for better blood pressure control) and I’d love to do what you’re doing. But I’m a lay person, not a pastor like you are. (I’m not Roman Catholic so I don’t believe in actual transubstantiation, but I do believe that Christ’s presence enters into the sacrament when it’s blessed in church. I believe this is a pastoral function.) What do you suggest I do instead?”

Yes, the “lay/clergy” question: How can someone not an ordained minister “administer” the sacraments in communion?

I speak here from my own opinion and theological perspective. I know for many of you my answers will not suffice because your own theologies discourage or forbid partaking of communion in unauthorized settings. So take this with a grain of salt…

I (like the commenter) am not Catholic and I do not hold to a doctrine of transubstantiation. For Catholics there is no real way around this position and celebrating communion outside the sanction of the Church is impossible. For Catholics the option for a “Eucharist Diet” could be 1) go to mass regularly or even every day, or 2) take wine or juice and bread on your own and see it as a symbolic representation (and nothing more) of the real Eucharist, without interpreting it as the actual substance.

The rest of us have other options: As a Lutheran pastor I believe (like the reader) in a “real presence” of Jesus in the bread and the wine. This is not the same as transubstantiation nor is it akin to the representation view of traditional evangelicals, who see communion as a symbol only. Evangelicals might try a “Eucharist Diet” (they should have no issue doing this at home on their own) as a “picture” of what Jesus has done and could invite Jesus at this time to “fill” them with spiritual food accordingly…

That said, again, I do believe in a “real presence” of Jesus in the bread and the wine. I believe that what brings this power of Jesus into the elements themselves is a combination of faith and the Words of God, specifically the words that Jesus himself spoke at the Last Supper:

For I received from the Lord what I also passed on to you: The Lord Jesus, on the night he was betrayed, took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and said, “This is my body, which is for you; do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way, after supper he took the cup, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in my blood; do this, whenever you drink it, in remembrance of me.” For whenever you eat this bread and drink this cup, you proclaim the Lord’s death until he comes (I Corinthians 11:23-26).

I believe it isn’t WHO speaks these words that matters, but the words themselves as coming from Jesus, and my faith which takes those words seriously. I think a child could read these words and the bread and wine would still deliver the presence of Jesus.

Relationships metter too. Communion is intended to be shared with other believers. At times I’ll have communion alone, but generally I believe it should be shared. Still. it’s the message not the messenger that matters. There’s nothing special or sacred about ME as an ordained minister, just something special about the WORD I – or anyone else – might speak in relation to the wine and bread…

Again, take this for what it’s worth in your own theological context. If you have “allergy” to doing communion in your own home, then do it simply as a representational event and ask God to make it more for you himself.

How to be blessed

How to be blessed

Every so often I come across a Facebook status from someone saying that they’re blessed. “I’m blessed!” “You’re blessed!” “It’s a blessing!”.

Usually if I know them well, I can’t help but think about the fact that they’ll say this despite the recent inconveniences and sometimes hardships they’ve faced prior to that statement.

How can they say their well-off when they’re not actually well-off, even by their own standards?

To be fair, I don’t think people question the words they use to validate whether it’s appropriate or not — let alone if the definition of the word even applies to what they mean to say. So, if they knew better maybe they would be more accurate.

Still, I’d like to pose the following questions…

The idea of being blessed is very much like the idea of being lucky. It’s basically whenever you feel fortunate.

The difference between being blessed and being lucky is not so different.

When you say that you are blessed, I presume that you imply your life situation must have been orchestrated by God.

It seems to me, that some people often times rather say that they’re blessed instead of lucky, so that they can add an emphasis on the idea that God had something to do with their circumstances.

To me, that sounds rather arrogant.

It’s basically saying that God (an all-knowing, most powerful being in the universe) has focused on your well-being more than others because you are… that awesome?

The problem with thinking God has your back is that it’s actually kind of disgusting.

To be blessed, in other words, is to be special; but logically speaking, in order to be special there must be people who are not-special.

That means that you must consider your life to be better than others in some way.

Put it this way: If you were the only person in the world, the idea of feeling blessed would be kind of meaningless. There’s nothing to compare your life outcome with. I guess in this scenario you can compare your life to other animals, like a fish — or something. But…

Ego can be irrational and it may be an indicator for a mindset that is based on logical fallacies.

Now, in some respect, all of that is ok. You may think you’re life is better than others but you don’t take it to the extreme and rub itin peoples faces.

However, if you view a blessing as an award for how good of a person you are (and I hope it does) then wouldn’t you feel a bit guilty for implying that your life is better than others?

If you truly care about others and wish to add value to their well-being, why is there a need to proclaim that you’re blessed?

When you say that you’re lucky, it implies that your circumstances can happen to anyone.

When you say that you’re blessed, it implies that your circumstances happened to you on purpose.

Saying that you’re lucky actually seems to be a bit more accurate (and humble, for those who like that word better) and overall inclusive, than saying that you’re blessed.

Consider this: God has offered you a ton of blessings in your life and you’re grateful for that.

Well, I’m curious, would you still be grateful without the blessings? For instance, will you still be grateful that you’re even alive?

No, I don’t mean right after a car accident, I mean being grateful that you’re just alive right now.

If you can feel gratitude for just being alive right now, then what makes blessings so exclusive when it comes to gratitude?

If you always feel gratitude, then is it intellectually inconsistent to single-out a certain circumstance as a moment to be grateful?

Surely the answer is no, but that’s okay because people are not grateful by default. Sometimes it takes a bit of effort.

But if you’re grateful because you’re “blessed”, then why not just say you’re grateful instead?

Saying you’re blessed doesn’t clearly describe the context of what you’re feeling.

Because of this, I question the authenticity and motive behind those who claim that they’re blessed but say it means they’re grateful.

You’re not stupid, you chose the word “blessed” rather than “grateful” for a reason. Why?

A quick google search will enlighten you to how egotistical the word actually is.

What does google say is the definition of blessed?

How to be blessed

So if the word blessed means to be made holy or consecrated, then I suspect that most people don’t mean to use the word in its literal sense.