How to be happy when you are grounded

How to be happy when you are grounded

These days, we’re all working longer and stressing more, busier than ever. But it really is possible to handle everything that’s going on around us–to stay grounded even when everything around us seems to be spinning out of control.

Here are 12 simple but very workable habits to try:

1. Own the moment. When you can make this moment the most important moment, nothing can overwhelm you. Nothing keeps you grounded like being fully present.

2. Take charge of your emotions. The last thing you want is to lose control of yourself when you need it the most. Train yourself to regulate your emotions and responses so you’re always in charge.

3. Control your choice. There are many factors outside your control, so be intentional in focusing your energy and actions on the things you can actually do something about.

4. Boost your self-confidence. If self-doubt is an issue for you, begin now to do daily exercises, with a coach or counselor if needed, to build your confidence. Then it will be ready to fuel you through the tough and challenging times.

5. Help someone else. The times when you’re busiest are the times when it’s most important to make time for others. There’s great power in stepping out of your own struggles and perspective, even for a moment.

6. Take time to reflect. Reflection time is when you give yourself permission to tune out and take a breather. It’s much more valuable than a simple break–it’s a grounding process that is essential to success.

7. Learn to say no. When you’re burned out and too busy to catch your breath, remind yourself that the best way to stay grounded is to learn to say no. Remember, when you say no to something unimportant you are saying yes to something important.

8. Keep yourself healthy. That means fostering in yourself a healthy body, healthy mind, healthy thoughts. Think positive, exercise daily, eat healthy, work hard, stay strong, worry less, dance more, love well and be happy–that’s how you stay healthy and energized.

9. Nurture yourself. Care for your thoughts, your goals, your desires, your hopes, your dreams. Nurture them with your awareness and dedication and give them room to grow.

10. De-stress to avoid dis-ease. Think about what worries, scares, or stresses you, and find a way to deal with it. Stress, worry, and doubt are major negative forces in life–but only if you allow them to be.

11. Create a routine and stick with it. It’s normal to feel ungrounded when you’re doing too many things at once. If multitasking is a challenge for you, learn to create a routine and stick to it–tackle one thing at a time, until it’s done and then move on.

12. Choose yourself. Making time for yourself may seem counterproductive, but that’s the point. Take a time out and allow yourself to reset, reassess and rethink. People make time for the things that are most important, so make yourself a priority.

Start today to develop the habits and strategies that will keep you grounded when everything around you is spinning.

How to be happy when you are grounded

“No yesterdays are ever wasted for those who give themselves to today.”

Anyone can be mindful for a moment or two, but developing your mindfulness muscle means that you have to take things to a higher level.

In today’s world it’s all too easy to get distracted from what’s truly important. Wherever you go and whatever you do, you see messages designed to get you to perform a specific action and distract you from the fact that you are already whole.

There are no reminders to be mindful unless we create them.

The responsibility is in your hands. Staying in the present moment can dramatically reduce stress, increase your happiness, and give you bursts of insight that might change your life.

Ever since I’ve started becoming aware of my thoughts and staying in the now, my life has improved significantly, and I know yours will, too.

Here are a few down-to-earth tips on how to become more mindful:

1. Notice your tendencies.

You and I, we both have our unique tendencies that distract us from the present moment. I’m a worrier, so I tend to think about the future and try to solve problems before they even happen.

What are your tendencies? What kind of thoughts tend to rob you of the now?

These questions will help you become more mindful about what is going on in your head, which in turn leads to mindfulness.

A few examples of tendencies that are very common are:

  • anxiety
  • worry
  • regret
  • guilt
  • fear
  • pleasure seeking

A great tip is to write down your tendencies and how they tease you out of the now. Grab a piece of pen and paper, and just do it.

2. Practice acceptance.

Once you start becoming mindful of your tendencies, it’s crucial that you don’t judge yourself. Practice acceptance and embrace who you are.

The tendencies you have are there for a reason. They are signposts pointing to the areas of your life that need attention.

If you’re a chronic worrier, you need to start noticing whenever you begin drifting to the future. Become mindful, observe your thoughts, and breathe.

We believe our thoughts to be the authority on life, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. Our thoughts are just thoughts.

3. Focus on your breath.

Your breath is a powerful and simple way to anchor yourself in the present moment. Whenever you are having a hard time staying in the now, take deep breaths, and focus on your breathing.

You could even count your breaths. Something I like to do is count to four on the inhale and four on the exhale.

It focuses the logical part of my brain on counting and allows me to focus on my breath. After a while I can release the crutch of counting and just be.

4. Question your thoughts.

Your thoughts aren’t always right. In fact, they are rarely right, especially if they make you feel bad.

Question your thoughts constantly. When you start to feel negative emotions, use it as a reminder to examine what thoughts are causing the commotion.

Most people walk around all day letting negative thoughts cause negative feelings. We both know that nothing good can come out of this.

It takes discipline to be mindful, but the rewards are peace and happiness. Even researchers are discovering the power of emotions. Negative emotions not only have the power to make you feel bad, but can affect your physical health as well.

Whenever a negative thought arises, take a step back, and look at if the thought is true.

5. Use reminders.

Another great way to stay anchored in the now is to use reminders. It can be as simple as tying a white string around your wrist.

Each time you look at the white string, you are reminded of the present moment. Are you in the now, or are you somewhere else?

There are no limits to what you can use as a reminder. If you want to take this even further, you can add a new reminder each week.

Start using external reminders such as red cars, billboards, and so on. If you keep doing this, you will be astonished at the results.

6. Be determined.

Increasing the time you spend in the present moment can be a lot of work. If you’re serious about becoming more mindful, you have to be determined.

There will be times when you feel like you want to throw in the towel. You will face challenges, obstacles, and problems.

But if you’re determined, you will get through them. They are nothing but teachers on your path.

When you make becoming more mindful one of your main goals, you simply cannot fail.

7. Follow your passion.

I have noticed that the more I follow my passion and my hearts deepest desire, the more I am able to stay in the now.

I enjoy every second of every minute when I’m working on something I love. My heart buzzes with joy and I feel amazing.

Writing is one of my passions. I love helping people improve their life. It makes me come alive, and it keeps me in the present moment.

Inspiration flows effortlessly, and it’s almost like I am channeling someone else as I am writing. Find your passion and go after it.

Becoming more mindful is done step-by-step. You do not have to go all-in. You only have to increase the amount of time you spend in the present moment each and every day.

If you do that, it’s impossible for you not to become a mindfulness master.

Written by joshua becker · 34 Comments

Last updated: December 21, 2019

Happiness is a state of mind. Specifically, it is a state of “well-being and contentment.”

But the definition can be tricky and assumptions about the word can cause confusion. Many don’t even realize learning how to be happy is something that can be intentionally practiced. Some people, when they hear the word ‘happiness,’ assume it is speaking of an emotion such as pleasure or joy. For them, it is what people feel in the immediate here and now.

This is the reason some people say, “Don’t pursue happiness, seek joy. Happiness is fickle and fading, joy remains forever.”

But this short-term definition of happiness is not how everyone understands the word. Some define it to mean long-term satisfaction.

In fact, when I speak of experiencing happiness in life, I am not thinking of short-term emotions at all. I think of a quality of living—a much longer-term view of the word.

Both definitions are understood to be correct and speak of different realities.

But are they really that different? I don’t think so.

After all, a long-term experience of life satisfaction is almost certainly made up of many short-term feelings of joy and pleasure. Does that mean every day is a great day with no trials, temptations, or downturns? Certainly not. But it does mean when we look back at the many seasons of life, we can look back satisfied at how we navigated them.

The long-term feeling of life satisfaction is most experienced when we embrace the emotion of joy in the here and now.

And we accomplish that by taking steps each day to be happy. Here are some tips on how to be happier starting today.

Daily Actions

1. Choose happiness

The most important thing to realize about happiness is that it is not an outcome of current circumstances. Just the opposite, happiness is a choice. Is this easier on some days than others? Absolutely. But if you get caught in the trap of thinking your circumstances need to change before you can be happy, you’ll never, ever get there.

2. Focus on the good

There are good things in your life right now: you are alive, you are fed, you are healthy, you have family and friends, and you have opportunit i es each day to pursue meaningful work. Maybe not all of those are true for you right now, but certainly some of them are—which means there is good in your life that you can focus on.

Marine Sgt. Jonny Joseph Jones lost both of his legs in an explosion while serving in Afghanistan. I was struck by a quote of his I saw recently. He said this, “People ask how I stay so positive after losing my legs… I simply ask how they stay so negative when they have both of theirs.”

Happiness is about perspective and if you’re looking for reasons to be happy, you’ll probably find them. Happy people focus on positive thoughts.

3. Stop comparing

No matter how you choose to define happiness—short-term or long-term—comparison will rob you of it. Whether we compare our finances, our body type, our vacations, our talents, our house size or our shoe size, there are no winners in the game of comparison. But here’s the good news: Nobody is forcing you to play! You can stop any time you want. Be grateful for what you have, appreciate who you are, work hard every day to live your best life, and stop comparing yourself to others.

4. Practice gratitude and generosity

In the world of positive psychology, there are a few themes that emerge every time happiness is studied. Among those recurring themes, we find gratitude and generosity.

Both of which can only be understood correctly when we see them as disciplines rather than responses. A discipline is something we practice regardless of our circumstances. If you are waiting for enough money to become generous, you’ll never get there. Likewise, if you are waiting for everything to be perfect to be grateful, you’ll never experience it. Choose to be thankful today. And choose to be generous with your time and money. Making them both a discipline in your life will result in a happier today… and tomorrow.

5. Don’t pursue physical possessions

Possessions are necessary for life, but our society has seemed to confuse consumerism with happiness. Marketers work hard to convince us their products are not just needed for life, but that they are essential for happiness.

Slowly but surely, we begin to believe their empty promises and waste our lives pursuing things that can never satisfy. We sacrifice time, money, energy, and focus chasing and accumulating things we do not need.

These excess possessions add stress, worry, and burden onto our lives. Want to become a bit more happy today? Go declutter a closet or drawer and start to challenge consumerism in your life.

6. Be present in your relationships

Robert J. Waldinger is an American psychiatrist and Professor at Harvard Medical School where he is best known for directing the world’s longest-running longitudinal study tracking the health and mental well-being of a group of 724 American men for 76 years.

One thing that he has learned, and has been confirmed by studies elsewhere, is that relationships hold the key to happiness:

Close relationships, more than money or fame, are what keep people happy throughout their lives, the study revealed. Those ties protect people from life’s discontents, help to delay mental and physical decline, and are better predictors of long and happy lives than social class, IQ, or even genes.

We don’t get to control every aspect of our relationships (we didn’t choose our family, for example). But we can all take steps to be a good friend. And good friends tend to attract healthy community.

7. Develop healthy habits

Annie Dillard is credited for saying, “How we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.” And she is right. Our lives are filled with days, our days are filled with hours, and this present hour is filled with whatever you chose to fill it with. So pursue healthy habits that add value to your hours, days, and lifetime.

Spend time outside. Eat healthy. Exercise regularly. Quit smoking. Put down your cell phone. Work hard. Pray often. And get enough sleep.

8. Look outside yourself

The pursuit of self comes natural to us. We don’t need to be reminded to pursue our own self-interests. We pursue self-survival, self-promotion, self-actualization, and self-exaltation as if it is hardwired in our genes.

But the most efficient pathway to lasting happiness and fulfillment is not to look only at your own interests, but also to the interests of others. When we shift our focus off of ourselves, we live lives of greater meaning and greater contribution. When we serve others without concern over what we might receive in return, we experience the beauty of selfless love. The size of our universe (and happiness) begins to expand exponentially.

It is no small thing that happiness is pursued by so many. Let’s make sure we find it—in both the short term and the long term.

It’s possible to look on the bright side even when no one else is

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Amy Morin, LCSW, is the Editor-in-Chief of Verywell Mind. She’s also a psychotherapist, the author of the bestselling book “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do,” and the host of The Verywell Mind Podcast.

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Carly Snyder, MD is a reproductive and perinatal psychiatrist who combines traditional psychiatry with integrative medicine-based treatments.

How to be happy when you are grounded

Sometimes, it’s hard to be happy when you think about what’s going on in the world. It’s harder still when the people around you constantly complain about all those things that are happening. That doesn’t mean that you have to join ranks with the pessimists, though. In fact, it means it’s more important than ever to look on the bright side as much as possible.

Benefits

Choosing to be optimistic offers surprising benefits. A study from the University of Pittsburgh concluded that women who had an optimistic outlook had a 30 percent lower risk of heart disease.  

A University of Michigan study linked optimism to a lower risk of stroke.   Additionally, research published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that optimists are less likely to experience disabilities as they get older and end up living longer than pessimists.  

Optimism Is a Choice

If you think you’re a natural-born pessimist and there’s no way you can turn your mindset around, think again—research published in the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry compared two groups of people to test their thinking patterns.  

The first group completed a 5-minute exercise that involved thinking positive thoughts about their future, while the second group just went about their daily lives without making effort to think optimistically. The first group significantly increased their optimism over the two-week period, with many of them feeling more optimistic after just one day.

If you want to become a more optimistic person—despite the negativity surrounding you—then you can take measures to think positively and spread that optimistic outlook to those around you.

Change Your Thinking

You have choices in your life. You can spend the day cleaning or spend the day reading. You can go out to dinner or cook at home. You can have coffee with that long-lost friend or you can blow them off.

And, finally, you can decide to be positive or you can just go on living like you are. Being an optimistic person in a negative world begins with the decision to be positive and choosing to live that life every single day.

Avoid Negativity

You might refer to them as “whiners” or even “toxic,” but however you think of them, pessimists suck the positive energy out of the room. These people think the world revolves around them, and they often lack any sense of empathy for others.

It’s important to establish healthy boundaries with people who chronically choose to stay stuck in their own misery. That may mean having to say things to a friend like, “I notice every time I offer you an idea about how you could make your situation better, you insist nothing will work. I am not sure I’m able to help.”

It may also mean distancing yourself a bit from a relative who insists on sharing his latest predictions about the end of the world. Limit your media intake as well. Watching too many tragic stories on the news or consuming too much political news on social media can decrease your ability to maintain a “glass half full” outlook.  

Recognize Negative Thinking

It’s OK to acknowledge that bad things might happen. After all, ignoring reality isn’t helpful. In fact, being realistic could be the key to doing your best. If you’re excessively positive about an upcoming interview, you might not spend any time preparing because you’re confident you’ll land the job.

If however, you have an exaggeratedly negative outlook, you might sabotage your chances of getting hired. Thinking, “No one will ever hire me,” will cause you to look and feel defeated when you walk into the interview room. Your lack of confidence may be the reason you don’t get hired.

A healthy outlook would be to remind yourself that all you can do is your best and you’ll be OK, regardless of the outcome.

Being optimistic helps you believe that brighter opportunities are on the horizon and you’re able to put in the effort to earn those opportunities. When you’re thinking negatively, take a moment to assess how realistic your thoughts truly are. Reframing your exaggeratedly negative thoughts into more realistic statements can help you maintain a healthy dose of optimism.  

Cultivate Positivity

While it’s not your job to make everyone happy, it doesn’t hurt to perk up someone’s day. Once a day, share positive feedback with someone.

At work, compliment someone about a good question raised in an email or salient points that they brought up in an important meeting. At home, praise your child for how hard they worked on their math homework. Or, tell your partner how much you appreciate them.

Making other people feel positive has lasting effects on your own life.  

With that, don’t forget to bestow positivity on yourself. Before bed, think about what you did during the day. Even if it was a generally lackluster day, there’s bound to be something you can praise yourself for, whether it was keeping your cool when a driver cuts you off or wrapping up a project that has really been a challenge for you.

Imagine a Positive Future

It sounds kitschy, but writing down your ideas of an optimistic future can truly make a difference when it comes to your overall outlook. If you need a primer, here’s what to do: Spend 20 minutes on four consecutive days on writing down what you want to happen tomorrow, next week, next month and next year—feel free to dream big.

Consider a serious challenge you have in your life right now and think about possible positive outcomes.

Practice Gratitude

Thinking about all the things you have to be grateful for, from warm sunshine to clean water, can give you an instant boost of optimism. You might even decide to keep a gratitude journal, in which you write down everything that makes you crack a smile during the day.  

If nothing else, take a moment to stop, smile and be grateful for the good things in your life.

It’s hard to be optimistic without feeling gratitude toward those that helped you get to that happy place. While thinking about how grateful you are is helpful, sharing your gratitude with others provides added benefits. You’ll spread a bit of joy and cheer when you tell others how much you appreciate them.

Write a letter to someone who made a positive impact on your life, whether it’s a teacher, a former boss or even your mom. If possible, deliver that letter in person.

Making change predictable.

Your life is a journey with lots of stops along the way and if you could have some idea what to expect, at least some of the time, you might feel a lot better about the whole thing. The image of life as a journey is so much a part of our language that we don’t even stop to think about it.

There are crossroads, back roads, peak experiences, mountains to climb, valleys of despair, deserts and oases, wildernesses and wastelands, rivers to cross, forks in the road, detours, dead ends, and the open road. They’re all descriptive of places we’ve been. Wouldn’t it be nice to know beforehand what lies ahead in order to avoid an unpleasant, or difficult, or seemingly insurmountable, obstacle on our path?

Here are some basic ways to help you think about your journey and to help keep you grounded, especially when the unexpected happens.

Change, the constant rhythmic ebb and flow of events, is the rule and not the exception. Whether you like change or not (and many people don’t), you at least know to expect something, and that makes the unpredictable more predictable.

Transition is what you do with the changes that happen. Essentially, transition tells you that it’s time to move on, that you need to let go of someone or something. Transition implies taking action—externally or internally, or both—as opposed to just letting things happen on their own.

What you’re leaving behind may be an old behavior or pattern, a part of your identity or status in which you were once very invested, or a relationship that no longer fits or honors you. An anticipated ending, and certainly one you’ve initiated, may be dealt with more smoothly and with less angst than an ending that surprises or shocks by its sudden appearance and dramatic presentation.

There are six recognizable stages that accompany transition: loss, uncertainty, discomfort, insight, understanding, and integration. The accompanying emotions for these stages can run the gamut, depending on the individual and how they perceive and negotiate transitions. Essentially, the energy that has powered an outdated role, status, or persona needs to be released in order for it to be available for what you are to become.

This sense of loss may leave you wondering, “If I am not who I once thought I was, then who am I?” It may be necessary to take time to grieve for what once was first, before you move through the rest of the stages.

Not knowing is part of the process. Before you can find and anchor yourself to something new, you must go through a period of not knowing. You may know you are moving forward but you don’t know yet where you’re going. Making change implies a taking apart of the old and a putting together of the pieces of the new, changed self.

The place of not knowing, where you don’t know where or how to belong because you are between identities, is also the place of your greatest potential. When all is stripped away from the identity that is “you,” the realization may hit that what you refer to as my life is just simply the core of who you are, your “real” self, wrapped in the “stuff of life,” all of the external things that make up life as you think about it. When this stuff is peeled away layer by layer, what’s left—who you are—is all that really matters.

Question what you mean by reality. Many of us are invested in believing that what we experience as reality is fixed and absolute, probably because we feel reassured and safe when life continues in the same way it always has. But in fact, reality is illusory.

As you let go of the people and events to which you’ve been attached, you also let go of a thinking that has imbued these specific people and events with special significance and meaning. This is the process of stripping away the veil of idealism surrounding the world you’ve created for your own purposes, in order to reveal things as they truly are. So in the process of shifting your focus, shifting your consciousness begins.

Surround yourself with positive people who support and encourage you. Ditch the naysayers: those who remind you about what went wrong, those who don’t support your choices and decisions, those who advise through fear. True friends are those available when you need them, those who will stick around for the long haul, no matter what.

Weigh your options. Before you take action, spend as much time as you need sorting out the problem and focusing on the possible solutions. If you’re not ready to make a decision, don’t do anything. Wait until the dust settles and you’re absolutely clear about what the necessary next step should be.

Here’s a good visual: If you’re walking down a road and the path is no longer clearly marked and it’s very possible that you might get lost—stop. Turn around and retrace your steps to where you began. If you don’t know where to go or what to do once you’re back on familiar territory, set up camp at the side of the road and wait. Don’t just take any old road. Wait until you have determined what the best course of action is and what’s the best path to take.

Draw upon your past experiences of transition. When you can view what once was with a perspective altered by time and distance you can see all that was for what it really is, rather than for what you wished it had been. Each re-view broadens your perspective on your life; the cumulative effect of this is learned wisdom.

Seek professional help if you need it. When you’ve done everything you possibly can on your own and you remain confused, mired in indecision, overwhelmed, anxious and/or depressed, it’s time to consult with a qualified professional to help you sort out the problem and help you take the first steps toward moving forward.

You will get through this. No matter how bleak things seem to be, change—that constant rhythmic flow of life—promises new twists and turns in the road, new frontiers, and new horizons. And possibly, what you had once thought absolutely necessary for your life is just a thing of the past.

It’s possible to look on the bright side even when no one else is

  • facebook
  • twitter
  • linkedin
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Amy Morin, LCSW, is the Editor-in-Chief of Verywell Mind. She’s also a psychotherapist, the author of the bestselling book “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do,” and the host of The Verywell Mind Podcast.

  • facebook
  • twitter
  • linkedin

Carly Snyder, MD is a reproductive and perinatal psychiatrist who combines traditional psychiatry with integrative medicine-based treatments.

How to be happy when you are grounded

Sometimes, it’s hard to be happy when you think about what’s going on in the world. It’s harder still when the people around you constantly complain about all those things that are happening. That doesn’t mean that you have to join ranks with the pessimists, though. In fact, it means it’s more important than ever to look on the bright side as much as possible.

Benefits

Choosing to be optimistic offers surprising benefits. A study from the University of Pittsburgh concluded that women who had an optimistic outlook had a 30 percent lower risk of heart disease.  

A University of Michigan study linked optimism to a lower risk of stroke.   Additionally, research published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that optimists are less likely to experience disabilities as they get older and end up living longer than pessimists.  

Optimism Is a Choice

If you think you’re a natural-born pessimist and there’s no way you can turn your mindset around, think again—research published in the Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry compared two groups of people to test their thinking patterns.  

The first group completed a 5-minute exercise that involved thinking positive thoughts about their future, while the second group just went about their daily lives without making effort to think optimistically. The first group significantly increased their optimism over the two-week period, with many of them feeling more optimistic after just one day.

If you want to become a more optimistic person—despite the negativity surrounding you—then you can take measures to think positively and spread that optimistic outlook to those around you.

Change Your Thinking

You have choices in your life. You can spend the day cleaning or spend the day reading. You can go out to dinner or cook at home. You can have coffee with that long-lost friend or you can blow them off.

And, finally, you can decide to be positive or you can just go on living like you are. Being an optimistic person in a negative world begins with the decision to be positive and choosing to live that life every single day.

Avoid Negativity

You might refer to them as “whiners” or even “toxic,” but however you think of them, pessimists suck the positive energy out of the room. These people think the world revolves around them, and they often lack any sense of empathy for others.

It’s important to establish healthy boundaries with people who chronically choose to stay stuck in their own misery. That may mean having to say things to a friend like, “I notice every time I offer you an idea about how you could make your situation better, you insist nothing will work. I am not sure I’m able to help.”

It may also mean distancing yourself a bit from a relative who insists on sharing his latest predictions about the end of the world. Limit your media intake as well. Watching too many tragic stories on the news or consuming too much political news on social media can decrease your ability to maintain a “glass half full” outlook.  

Recognize Negative Thinking

It’s OK to acknowledge that bad things might happen. After all, ignoring reality isn’t helpful. In fact, being realistic could be the key to doing your best. If you’re excessively positive about an upcoming interview, you might not spend any time preparing because you’re confident you’ll land the job.

If however, you have an exaggeratedly negative outlook, you might sabotage your chances of getting hired. Thinking, “No one will ever hire me,” will cause you to look and feel defeated when you walk into the interview room. Your lack of confidence may be the reason you don’t get hired.

A healthy outlook would be to remind yourself that all you can do is your best and you’ll be OK, regardless of the outcome.

Being optimistic helps you believe that brighter opportunities are on the horizon and you’re able to put in the effort to earn those opportunities. When you’re thinking negatively, take a moment to assess how realistic your thoughts truly are. Reframing your exaggeratedly negative thoughts into more realistic statements can help you maintain a healthy dose of optimism.  

Cultivate Positivity

While it’s not your job to make everyone happy, it doesn’t hurt to perk up someone’s day. Once a day, share positive feedback with someone.

At work, compliment someone about a good question raised in an email or salient points that they brought up in an important meeting. At home, praise your child for how hard they worked on their math homework. Or, tell your partner how much you appreciate them.

Making other people feel positive has lasting effects on your own life.  

With that, don’t forget to bestow positivity on yourself. Before bed, think about what you did during the day. Even if it was a generally lackluster day, there’s bound to be something you can praise yourself for, whether it was keeping your cool when a driver cuts you off or wrapping up a project that has really been a challenge for you.

Imagine a Positive Future

It sounds kitschy, but writing down your ideas of an optimistic future can truly make a difference when it comes to your overall outlook. If you need a primer, here’s what to do: Spend 20 minutes on four consecutive days on writing down what you want to happen tomorrow, next week, next month and next year—feel free to dream big.

Consider a serious challenge you have in your life right now and think about possible positive outcomes.

Practice Gratitude

Thinking about all the things you have to be grateful for, from warm sunshine to clean water, can give you an instant boost of optimism. You might even decide to keep a gratitude journal, in which you write down everything that makes you crack a smile during the day.  

If nothing else, take a moment to stop, smile and be grateful for the good things in your life.

It’s hard to be optimistic without feeling gratitude toward those that helped you get to that happy place. While thinking about how grateful you are is helpful, sharing your gratitude with others provides added benefits. You’ll spread a bit of joy and cheer when you tell others how much you appreciate them.

Write a letter to someone who made a positive impact on your life, whether it’s a teacher, a former boss or even your mom. If possible, deliver that letter in person.

Hello there! In this post, we’ll talk about “How To Find the Sunken Treasure BURG.L Chip” in the grounded game. As BURG.L always tries to keep you busy in the “Grounded” game by providing some quests and tasks. This quest is also very interesting and hope is that you are going to like this one. This game guide will also help you with the locations of the Sunken Treasure Chip and the key of the treasure box.

Sunken Treasure BURG.L Chip Location | Outpost Chip

” data-medium-file=”https://needforgaming.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Grounded-Sunken-Treasure-BURG.L-Chip-Location-300×188.jpg” data-large-file=”https://needforgaming.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Grounded-Sunken-Treasure-BURG.L-Chip-Location-1024×640.jpg” loading=”lazy” width=”1024″ height=”640″ src=”https://needforgaming.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Grounded-Sunken-Treasure-BURG.L-Chip-Location-1024×640.jpg” alt=”Grounded Sunken Treasure BURG.L Chip Location” srcset=”https://needforgaming.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Grounded-Sunken-Treasure-BURG.L-Chip-Location-1024×640.jpg 1024w, https://needforgaming.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Grounded-Sunken-Treasure-BURG.L-Chip-Location-300×188.jpg 300w, https://needforgaming.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Grounded-Sunken-Treasure-BURG.L-Chip-Location-768×480.jpg 768w, https://needforgaming.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Grounded-Sunken-Treasure-BURG.L-Chip-Location-600×375.jpg 600w, https://needforgaming.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Grounded-Sunken-Treasure-BURG.L-Chip-Location.jpg 1440w” sizes=”(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px” data-pagespeed-url-hash=”833379361″ onload=”pagespeed.CriticalImages.checkImageForCriticality(this);”/> Sunken BURG.L Chip Location

This is the key location of the “Sunken Chip” treasure box on the map. It is just near to the T-Rex toy and on the way to the Pond lab. But first, you have to find out the key that unlocks this box.

Finding the Sunken Treasure Chip Key | Mossy Key

This key is hidden somewhere below the pond lab. So, you need to reach the underwater Pond Lab first and turn on all the dials to unlock the Lab door. If you don’t know how to unlock the door then we have made a separate article “Pond Lab Quest” guide, you can check that. When you reach the lab, there is a hidden cave under this light shown in the image.

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When you enter this cave, equip the underwater Lantern and a weapon. This is because you may face some Diving Bell Spiders in this cave. It may possible that you have to fight with them to go ahead. There are many turns in this cave, so don’t get puzzled about where you are heading to. When you reach the last point of the cave, you’ll find a pipe there and you can also get oxygen from this pipe.

Sunken Treasure Chip Mossy Key

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The “Mossy Key” is under the pipe, pick it up and get out of the cave.

Opening Of The Treasure Chest

After getting the key, go back to the treasure chest near the T-Rex. When you reach there, use the key to unlock this chest and open it. You’ll find the “Sunken Treasure BURG.L Chip” inside this box. Now your work is simple, get the chip and return it to BURG.L in exchange for Raw Science.

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That’s all! We hope that this guide has helped you. If you have any other queries regarding the post then drop your comments below. We’ll be happy in helping you.

How to be happy when you are grounded

You know those huge fights you have with your mom that end up in you saying something not-so-great and your mom grounding you? Apparently that’s not doing anything for either of you.

Your parents punish you because they want to stop you from doing something they think is bad, and because they’re angry. Or, like you, your mom might be focused on winning the fight, not making you actually stop swearing at her. That punishment, though, might make you think twice about that bad behavior, but probably won’t deter you completely, right? Even worse, studies say, is if your parents used spanking, or now hit you in any way to punish you. Not only is violence wrong, but science says it doesn’t work. If your parents really want to change your behavior, this article says they should be nicer to you.

Alan Kazdin, director of the Yale Parenting Center, told the Atlantic that when parents punish their child, it doesn’t change the child’s behavior. If your mom buys into his method, that means she might not ground you anymore, so keep reading.

Kazdin said that punishment doesn’t dissuade a child or teenager from the behavior the parent is punishing. For example, if you swear at your parents, them not letting you go out with your friends won’t make you less likely to swear at them again, right? It just makes you more angry, and strains that relationship even more. Even gentle punishment, like a stern talking to, doesn’t work, he said.

“There’s probably not a cigarette smoker on the planet who would say, ‘What?! Smoking is bad for me, why didn’t you tell me that?’” Kazdin said. “Telling people, it can help, but it usually doesn’t change much behavior.”

To change behavior, Kazdin recommends something called positive opposites. Instead of admonishing the bad behavior, Kazdin says parents should reward good behavior with praise. So, if your parents want you to say nicer things at the dinner table, Kazdin says they should start by praising you when you’re not saying negative things, or even anything at all.

“The teen may be at the dinner table and just being quiet and not saying negative things. Well, when you’re starting out, one of the positive-opposites can sometimes be reinforcing the non-occurrence of the behavior,” Kazdin said. “And you just say, ‘Marion, it’s nice having dinner with you, it’s nice that you’re here.’ What that does is reinforce the likelihood that Marion will be at the dinner table and not say negative things.”

That, Kazdin said, will lead to you saying less negative things overall, and maybe even participating in family conversation at the table.

Basically, Kazdin wants your parents to play some Jedi mind tricks on you, but if you’re in on the secret and it leads to less punishment, it sounds to us like it’s worth a try.