How to be healthy

How to be healthy

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We all want to know how to be healthy, but it seems like such a lofty goal. Setting out to make healthy lifestyle changes can feel simultaneously inspiring and intimidating. I mean, where do you even start? Do you need to overhaul your entire life in one fell swoop? The answer, you may be happy to know, is: no. When it comes to adopting new healthy habits and making them stick, there are lots of little things you can do that will make a big difference in the long run (and not make you crazy in the process). Instead of trying to upgrade your health with a huge makeover, try these nine small, practically painless moves instead for long-lasting results.

People often pile on the carbs, then mosey on over to the protein, then top it all off with a meager scoop of vegetables in whatever space is left. Instead, go in reverse order, Abby Langer, R.D., owner of Abby Langer Nutrition in Toronto, tells SELF: Fill half your plate with vegetables, then divide the remaining quarters between protein and a starch, ideally something made up of complex carbohydrates instead of refined ones, like brown rice.

Serving yourself this way helps ensure you’re getting your recommended daily servings of vegetables (at least 2 ½ cups, says the USDA), plus it increases your fiber intake and hydration levels thanks to vegetables’ water content.

“Anyone will eat more if the food is staring at them,” Langer says. Always feel free to grab more if you’re truly hungry, but this way, you’ll know it’s because of a physical need for more food instead of pure convenience or temptation.

Drinking the amount of water you need each day is necessary for all of your body’s systems to function smoothly, but it will also keep you from overeating due to hunger, making it easier to take a more mindful approach to your meals, Langer says.

The “reasons you need to slow your roll when eating” list is about as long as your arm, Langer explains. Wolfing down food can lead to bloating because of the extra air you’re swallowing, that way-too-full feeling because you don’t give your body a chance to process satiety before you clean your plate, and completely missing out on how delicious the food actually is.

You can choose a number of chews to abide by per bite, like 20, or you can go for a less regimented approach, like making sure you’re swallowing naturally, not gulping hard to get down barely chewed mouthfuls.

“When people label food as ‘good’ and ‘bad,’ it carries over into a judgment of themselves—if you eat ‘good’ food, you’re a good person, if you eat ‘bad’ food, you’ve been badly behaved,” Langer says. That couldn’t be further from the truth, so stop putting yourself in emotional timeout just because of what you eat.

“Truly, no foods are really bad and no foods are really good—some are healthier than others,” Langer says. Reframing your thinking like this will likely help you learn the art of indulging in moderation instead of bingeing on “bad” foods, plus it’s just a better way to treat yourself.

Sitting all day isn’t good for your butt or your heart. Physical activity is extremely important for your longevity, and it all adds up, women’s health expert Jennifer Wider, M.D., tells SELF. Sometimes it can feel impossible to fit in a ton of exercise when you’re not used to it, but peppering movement throughout your day is much more doable.

For example, if you follow this rule while sitting for eight hours a day, you’ll wind up walking for 40 minutes, putting a commendable dent in the minimum recommendation of 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week.

Yes, dancing to Beyoncé at home counts as exercise. Will it burn as many calories as an intense boot camp class? No. But it’s about picking exercise you’ll actually enjoy enough to continue doing, not the type that makes your soul want to die but has the maximum immediate caloric payoff, Michelle Segar, Ph.D., director of the Sport, Health, and Activity Research and Policy Center at the University of Michigan and author of No Sweat! How The Simple Science of Motivation Can Bring You A Lifetime of Fitness, tells SELF.

Here’s Segar’s recommendation: “Come at it from a curiosity angle and say, ‘What types of positive things would I feel motivated to do?’” This kind of approach helps you get honest with yourself about where your motivation comes from (you can also take Segar’s quiz about workout motivation). Getting to the bottom of this is key when trying to cement any sort of habit, especially physical ones like exercising and eating well. It’s much harder to stick with hellish activities than pleasant ones.

This also makes it easier to see “failures” on your journey to health as the learning experiences they really are: Bowing out of kickboxing class for two weeks in a row doesn’t mean you don’t truly want to get fit or you’re lazy, just that it may not offer the right kind of motivation you need. “Approach everything as a learning opportunity to see what feels good and what works and what doesn’t,” Segar says.

Completely abandoning your to-do list, whether it’s business or personal, to go to sleep three hours earlier just isn’t feasible. But if you do it bit by bit, you’ll acclimate yourself to your new, well-rested reality in a manageable way, Christine Carter, Ph.D., senior fellow at UC Berkeley’s Greater Good Science Center and author of The Sweet Spot: How To Find Your Groove At Home And Work, tells SELF. Try going to bed five minutes earlier each night (or every few nights, if this is really tough for you) until you hit the seven to nine hours the National Sleep Foundation recommends for adults.

“I’m a big fan of small, easy tweaks,” Carter says. So is Segar: “Small is smart. Small is strategic. You can’t take people who don’t know how to play piano and have them play Mozart. When something’s complex, it takes time to learn.” Because that’s what a habit really is: Learning how to live your life in a different way.

This can apply to anything and everything health-wise. Let’s say you’ve been having a huge sandwich for lunch every day but want to cut back on refined carbs. Don’t swear you’ll never let another piece of white bread pass your lips—tuck into a salad first, then let yourself have the sandwich until you’re satisfied. Or opt for whole-wheat bread some days of the week until you get used to it, then phase out the refined sort.

Carter explains that when you’re not saying you can never have your favorite sandwich again, just that you’ll start by making a tiny change to boost its health content—or whichever small step you’ve chosen toward a goal you may have—it’s easier for your brain to get on board, learn to like it, and prime you for success.

You may also like: An 8-Minute Cardio Boot Camp Workout You Can Do at Home

E ven if we have the best of intentions, the goals we set to get healthy (after this last slice of pizza, of course) sometimes fall by the wayside. It can be hard to stay motivated, or even properly informed, since the recommendations for what to eat and how long to exercise can be confusing and conflicting. (Fat, for example, was off the menu for years under official guidance that eating fat makes you fat, and now that advice is getting kicked to the curb.) As a result, truly healthy behaviors can have a hard time cutting through the noise. Despite everything we know about the health benefits of exercise, a recent study found that 43% of employed adults do not exercise often.

Yet getting healthier is still a worthy goal, and many experts in the fields of exercise, health and nutrition have clear ideas about how to get there. Here are some low-stress, bare-minimum ways to become a healthier person, even for those of us who love to eat and hit snooze.

How to eat

Eating healthy shouldn’t be a nutrient numbers game. And no: you don’t have to go vegan or adopt a Paleo diet. Just make sure your plate contains more than two different colors, says Simin Nikbin Meydani, director of the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. “If it’s not, it’s boring, and you won’t meet your nutrient requirements,” she says. “If it’s green and red and brown, you can.”

After coloring your plate, make sure to consume it—and enjoy it—with someone else. “Sharing a meal with friends and family impacts our health and how we age and fare as we get older,” Meydani says.

Some countries, like Brazil, follow just that advice. Their government recommends eating whole foods, avoiding processed ones and dining with other people.

7 Simple Tip to Improve Your Health and Well-Being

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Mark Stibich, PhD, FIDSA, is a behavior change expert with experience helping individuals make lasting lifestyle improvements.

Robert Sadaty, MD, is a physician specializing in internal medicine, obesity, and wound care, and practicing in Naples, Florida.

People’s health in their 70s varies a lot. Some people are completely healthy while others have multiple illnesses. No matter what your condition, there is a lot you can do to improve your health, prevent illnesses, and keep your brain sharp.

Here is a list of longevity “to-dos” that will have you feeling better and living longer. Embark on one or two per month with the aim of remaining consistent and progressing as your health and wellness improve.

Live With Purpose

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One of the things in common about the world’s longest-lived people is that they have a strong sense of purpose as they grow older. Much of this is reflected in the role elders play in traditional cultures. Unlike in the United States, older people in some cultures are often revered and turned to for advice and counsel.

This doesn’t mean that older adults here should give up on finding purpose for themselves. To find purpose in your life:

  • Engage in daily practices. This may involve walking, yoga, meditation, or other practices in which you can progress and improve.
  • Be creative. Arts, crafts, music, and writing are artistic ways of being creative, but there are other ways to feel creative. It may be taking up cooking a new cuisine, taking a stab at indoor gardening, or finding hobbies that you never had time for before in the past.
  • Join clubs. Even if you are relatively self-sufficient, joining a club puts you in touch with people of similar interests with whom you can build friendships and embark on special projects you would never dream of doing yourself.
  • Play. Play is not reserved for young people. Whether it be active sports or board games, scheduling playtime provides you something to look forward to on a weekly or monthly basis.
  • Volunteer. People can contribute no matter how old they are. It may be offering time to the local library to read to children or pitching in at the local food bank on a regular basis. Volunteering allows you to give back and contribute to society in a substantive way.

Maintain Healthy Sleep Habits

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There is a myth that older people need less sleep. This is simply not true. Older people need the same amount of sleep as young adults; the general recommendation is seven to nine hours per night.  

The challenge is that health conditions, medications, and poor sleep habits can make it difficult for older adults to get the rest they need.

It is important to take time in your 70s to make your sleep habits a priority. There are several key ways to improve your sleep hygiene:

  • Maintain a regular sleep routine.
  • Avoid daytime naps.
  • Don’t stay in bed awake for more than five to 10 minutes.
  • Don’t watch TV, use the computer, or read in bed.
  • Drink caffeinated drinks like coffee, tea, and colas with caution.
  • Have a quiet, comfortable, and dark bedroom.  

Consistency is key. By maintaining these practices every day, they will soon become a habit and afford you more consistent sleep patterns.

Avoid Falls

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Falls are a common source of injuries and disabilities as people age. Not only does it take longer for an older person to recover from a fall, but, in some cases, a fall can be calamitous, particularly if it causes a hip fracture.  

The problem is bigger than some people think, with over 700,000 people hospitalized in the United States each year as a result of a fall.  

Among some of the things you can do to prevent falls:

  • Take time to assess the potential fall risks in your house.
  • Make a habit of using handrails, installing them where needed (such as in the bathtub).
  • Be sure that all your stairs are well lit, installing lights if needed.
  • Don’t avoid using mobility devices, even at home.
  • Practice balance exercises, ideally under the supervision of an instructor or physical therapist, to prevent falls from stumbles or missteps.
  • Avoid any risky behaviors that can lead to falls, such as drinking or mixing your medications with alcohol.

It is also important to have a hands-free medical alert system installed in your home, particularly if you live alone and are frail.

Exercise Regularly

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Exercise doesn’t only help keep the weight off and build muscle, but it can also help you feel great and live longer. Routine exercise in older adults is linked to improvements in emotional, psychological, cognitive, and social function as well as improved mobility and endurance.  

When done appropriately, exercise training in older people is associated with a reduction in blood pressure and cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and stroke.   Moreover, researchers have found that people who expended the most energy during daily activities are 32% less likely to die over a six-year period.  

Despite these benefits, exercise levels among older adults remain low, teetering well below the recommended 150 minutes per week.  

Your body is built to be active; be sure that it gets moving every day. Going for walks, joining group exercise classes, and engaging in other routine activities can keep you healthy, energized, and help you sleep better.  

Before embarking on any exercise plan, meet with your doctor to assess how much exercise you can reasonably tolerate, particularly if you have a heart or respiratory condition.

It also helps to find a physical therapist or personal trainer experienced with older adults to create a program appropriate to your age and health status.

Health is just like wealth. Unltill we loose it, we don’t understand it’sreal value. When there are some major issues going on related to our health, only then we say “No! Now I have to take care of my health”.

If we take care before we get ill, then we don’t have to face the pain of diseases. The time and energy you spend daily on your mobile phone, if you invest only that amount of time and energy on your health, then you have no idea how much your life can be improved. I will share withyou 5 simple and easy to implement tips which are much more effective.

1, Sleep on Your Left Side.

2, Drink More Water.

Reminder in our busy life most of us totally forget to drink water time to time. Or just when we feel thirsty, we drink a littlebit to quench the thirst. Which is not good at all for our health.

3, Walk More.

How many steps do you walk on a

daily basis?

It will help you to get an exact idea of what is your current daily average steps and how much you should increase it. It is not necessary to buy the band to walk. If something is necessary, that is awareness. Find out any excuse to walk more. Use stairs instead of lift, or you can justwalk here and there in your house also, little is more.

4, Chew your Food 32 times.

According to Ayurveda, the root of our every disease is our stomach. If we can keep our stomach healthy, then wecan easily stay healthy.

The main two things that are needed

for a healthy stomach

• Avoiding the junk foods.

• Have a good digestion power.

In both the two cases it will be very helpfulif you can eat your food after chewing it 32 times. Any junk food, if you chew it for 32 times and then you swallow it, you will notice it will not feel so tasty anymore. On the other side, if you chew any healthy food for 32 times, it will be more tasty to eat. So if you can make it a habit of chewing your food 32 times, then automatically you will no more like to eat junk foods at all. And also 50% of the digestion process is supposedto be happen while the food is in our mouth. The remaining 50% in our stomach. If we swallow the food quickly, then the partof the mouth remains incomplete and as a result we suffer from different digestion problems. So if we can make it a habit of chewing ourfood 32 times, then we can easily overcome many of these problems.

5, Create a Healthy

Environment.

So if possible try to choose your closest 5 persons in life with whom you spend the most of the time in a day, who are health conscious. Who understand that “Health is the real wealth”and also practice it. Also if your freeze is all time packed upwith a lot of junk foods like cadbury and cold drinks, then stop doing this. Because if your own room is full of junk foods then it is meaningless to try to be healthy. Because it will become too hard for you. So try to create a healthy environment around you.

Conclusion:

To easily stay healthy -1. Always sleep on you left side, 2. Use the water drink reminder app and drinkright amount of water daily, 3. Walk 8000 steps daily, 4. Chew your food 32 times before swallowingit, 5. Create a healthy environment around you.

Always remember, “It’s never too early or too late to work towards being the healthiest you”

Health is just like wealth. Unltill we loose it, we don’t understand it’sreal value. When there are some major issues going on related to our health, only then we say “No! Now I have to take care of my health”.

If we take care before we get ill, then we don’t have to face the pain of diseases. The time and energy you spend daily on your mobile phone, if you invest only that amount of time and energy on your health, then you have no idea how much your life can be improved. I will share withyou 5 simple and easy to implement tips which are much more effective.

1, Sleep on Your Left Side.

2, Drink More Water.

Reminder in our busy life most of us totally forget to drink water time to time. Or just when we feel thirsty, we drink a littlebit to quench the thirst. Which is not good at all for our health.

3, Walk More.

How many steps do you walk on a

daily basis?

It will help you to get an exact idea of what is your current daily average steps and how much you should increase it. It is not necessary to buy the band to walk. If something is necessary, that is awareness. Find out any excuse to walk more. Use stairs instead of lift, or you can justwalk here and there in your house also, little is more.

4, Chew your Food 32 times.

According to Ayurveda, the root of our every disease is our stomach. If we can keep our stomach healthy, then wecan easily stay healthy.

The main two things that are needed

for a healthy stomach

• Avoiding the junk foods.

• Have a good digestion power.

In both the two cases it will be very helpfulif you can eat your food after chewing it 32 times. Any junk food, if you chew it for 32 times and then you swallow it, you will notice it will not feel so tasty anymore. On the other side, if you chew any healthy food for 32 times, it will be more tasty to eat. So if you can make it a habit of chewing your food 32 times, then automatically you will no more like to eat junk foods at all. And also 50% of the digestion process is supposedto be happen while the food is in our mouth. The remaining 50% in our stomach. If we swallow the food quickly, then the partof the mouth remains incomplete and as a result we suffer from different digestion problems. So if we can make it a habit of chewing ourfood 32 times, then we can easily overcome many of these problems.

5, Create a Healthy

Environment.

So if possible try to choose your closest 5 persons in life with whom you spend the most of the time in a day, who are health conscious. Who understand that “Health is the real wealth”and also practice it. Also if your freeze is all time packed upwith a lot of junk foods like cadbury and cold drinks, then stop doing this. Because if your own room is full of junk foods then it is meaningless to try to be healthy. Because it will become too hard for you. So try to create a healthy environment around you.

Conclusion:

To easily stay healthy -1. Always sleep on you left side, 2. Use the water drink reminder app and drinkright amount of water daily, 3. Walk 8000 steps daily, 4. Chew your food 32 times before swallowingit, 5. Create a healthy environment around you.

Always remember, “It’s never too early or too late to work towards being the healthiest you”

A healthy lifestyle can help you thrive throughout your life. Making healthy choices isn’t always easy, however. It can be hard to find the time and energy to exercise regularly or prepare healthy meals. However, your efforts will pay off in many ways, and for the rest of your life.

Steps you can take:

  • Be physically active for 30 minutes most days of the week. Break this up into three 10-minute sessions when pressed for time. Healthy movement may include walking, sports, dancing, yoga, running or other activities you enjoy.
  • Eat a well-balanced, low-fat diet with lots of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Choose a diet that’s low in saturated fat and cholesterol, and moderate in sugar, salt and total fat.
  • Avoid injury by wearing seatbelts and bike helmets, using smoke and carbon monoxide detectors in the home, and using street smarts when walking alone. If you own a gun, recognize the dangers of having a gun in your home. Use safety precautions at all times.
  • Don’t smoke, or quit if you do. Ask your health care provider for help. UCSF’s Tobacco Education Center offers smoking cessation and relapse prevention classes as well as doctor consultations for smokers trying to quit.
  • Drink in moderation if you drink alcohol. Never drink before or while driving, or when pregnant.
  • Ask someone you trust for help if you think you might be addicted to drugs or alcohol.
  • Help prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV/AIDS by using condoms every time you have sexual contact. Condoms aren’t 100 percent foolproof, so discuss STI screening with your provider. Birth control methods other than condoms, such as pills and implants, won’t protect you from STIs or HIV.
  • Brush your teeth after meals with a soft or medium bristled toothbrush. Also brush after drinking and before going to bed. Use dental floss daily.
  • Stay out of the sun, especially between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. when the sun’s harmful rays are strongest. You are not protected if it is cloudy or if you are in the water — harmful rays pass through both. Use a broad spectrum sunscreen that guards against both UVA and UVB rays, with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher. Select sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of the sun’s rays.

Maintaining a Healthy Outlook

Women today have busy, demanding lives. You may feel pulled in different directions and experience stress from dealing with work, family and other matters, leaving little time for yourself. Learning to balance your life with some time for yourself will pay off with big benefits — a healthy outlook and better health.

Steps you can take:

  • Stay in touch with family and friends.
  • Be involved in your community.
  • Maintain a positive attitude and do things that make you happy.
  • Keep your curiosity alive. Lifelong learning is beneficial to your health.
  • Healthy intimacy takes all forms but is always free of coercion.
  • Learn to recognize and manage stress in your life. Signs of stress include trouble sleeping, frequent headaches and stomach problems; being angry a lot; and turning to food, drugs and alcohol to relieve stress.
  • Good ways to deal with stress include regular exercise, healthy eating habits and relaxation exercises, such as deep breathing or meditation. Talking to trusted family members and friends can help a lot. Some women find that interacting with their faith community is helpful in times of stress.
  • Get enough sleep and rest. Adults need around eight hours of sleep a night.
  • Talk to your health care provider if you feel depressed for more than a few days; depression is a treatable illness. Signs of depression include feeling empty and sad, crying a lot, loss of interest in life, and thoughts of death or suicide. If you or someone you know has thoughts of suicide, get help right away. Call 911, a local crisis center or (800) SUICIDE.

UCSF Health medical specialists have reviewed this information. It is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or other health care provider. We encourage you to discuss any questions or concerns you may have with your provider.

How to be healthy

Change is an important part of living with heart disease or trying to prevent it. A jump in blood pressure or cholesterol earns you a lecture on healthy lifestyle changes. Heart attack and stroke survivors are often told to alter a lifetime of habits.

Some people manage to overhaul their exercise pattern, diet, and unhealthy habits with ease. The rest of us try to make changes, but don’t always succeed. Instead of undertaking a huge makeover, you might be able to improve your heart’s health with a series of small changes. Once you get going, you may find that change isn’t so hard. This approach may take longer, but it could also motivate you to make some big changes.

Here are 10 small steps to improve heart your health.

1. Take a 10-minute walk. If you don’t exercise at all, a brief walk is a great way to start. If you do, it’s a good way to add more exercise to your day.

2. Give yourself a lift. Lifting a hardcover book or a two-pound weight a few times a day can help tone your arm muscles. When that becomes a breeze, move on to heavier items or join a gym.

3. Eat one extra fruit or vegetable a day. Fruits and vegetables are inexpensive, taste good, and are good for everything from your brain to your bowels.

4. Make breakfast count. Start the day with some fruit and a serving of whole grains, like oatmeal, bran flakes, or whole-wheat toast.

5. Stop drinking your calories. Cutting out just one sugar-sweetened soda or calorie-laden latte can easily save you 100 or more calories a day. Over a year, that can translate into a 10-pound weight loss.

6. Have a handful of nuts. Walnuts, almonds, peanuts, and other nuts are good for your heart. Try grabbing some instead of chips or cookies when you need a snack, adding them to salads for a healthful and tasty crunch, or using them in place of meat in pasta and other dishes.

7. Sample the fruits of the sea. Eat fish or other types of seafood instead of red meat once a week. It’s good for the heart, the brain, and the waistline.

8. Breathe deeply. Try breathing slowly and deeply for a few minutes a day. It can help you relax. Slow, deep breathing may also help lower blood pressure.

9. Wash your hands often. Scrubbing up with soap and water often during the day is a great way to protect your heart and health. The flu, pneumonia, and other infections can be very hard on the heart.

10. Count your blessings. Taking a moment each day to acknowledge the blessings in your life is one way to start tapping into other positive emotions. These have been linked with better health, longer life, and greater well-being, just as their opposites — chronic anger, worry, and hostility — contribute to high blood pressure and heart disease.

Image: FatCamera/Getty Images

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How to be healthy

The New Year has come and gone (more than three weeks ago now—where has time gone?), and with it, the making and breaking of New Year’s resolutions: to lose weight, to train for a marathon, to quit smoking. The latter, as always, was a particularly popular one: A poll found that this year, 34 percent of smokers planned to quit smoking at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve; unfortunately, most them relapsed within the first eight days.

As hard as it is for us health addicts to swallow, the reality is that people smoke. Lots of people smoke, especially here in Philly. Question is, are they lost causes when it comes to healthy lifestyles? “There is a prevalent myth out there that smokers do not really care about their health,” says New York-based family-medicine doc Tamir Katz. “I found that with my patients that this simply wasn’t true.”

In fact, in his newly released book, A Smoker’s Guide to Health and Fitness, which Katz co-wrote with his sister and UPenn grad, Hila Katz, he boldly proclaims this: There’s more to you than your cigarette habit. I talked with Katz about why he wrote the book, how smokers can be healthy and still light up, and—gasp!—how he used to smoke two packs a day.

What inspired you to write the book?

I have several patients who smoke—many who do not desire to quit at this time. There is a prevalent myth out there that smokers do not really care about their health. I found that with my patients that this simply wasn’t true. Many of them exercise regularly, watch their diets and follow up with me regularly. Of course I always encourage them to quit, but I came to realize that for those people who do not wish to quit, there is no health and fitness book around to address their unique needs. At most, a health book will recommend smoking cessation, but that’s about it. In addition, there is an entire segment of the population who used to smoke and who have specific health issues due to the damage done from their former smoking. When I looked around, I realized that there really was no health guide dedicated to current and former smokers.

Did you ever smoke?

I used to smoke in high school and college—at times, as much as two packs a day—even though I was in great shape from participating sports and exercising. I never thought that because I smoke, I should eat poorly or refrain from exercising.

Do you think it’s unfair to say that smokers don’t care about their health?

Many people, especially in the health-care field, look down at smokers. “How can you smoke?! Don’t you know how bad it is for you?! What is WRONG with you?!” In a way, we set a double standard. People don’t generally go up to an overweight person at McDonald’s eating fries and talk down to them. Same with those who don’t exercise—no one will give them a nasty look and yell at them for not working out. With smokers, it’s different. It’s almost as if they have a problem with their personality or character if they smoke.

What are your quick tips for those who continue to smoke but want to be as healthy as possible?

Of course, quitting smoking or reducing the number of cigarettes you smoke is probably the single best way to improve your health. However, there are several other things a smoker can do to stay healthy:

  • Eat a healthy diet, rich in fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Engage in regular exercise
  • Visit your doctor for check-ups and make sure you’ve had your flu shot (especially this year, as it’s been a pretty bad season)
  • Manage your stress levels

We discuss these details in the book, as well as several other health-promoting measures.