How to be optimistic

How to be optimistic

What Does Optimistic Mean?

What is the meaning of this word? What is optimistic?

Here are a few definitions that explain what it means.

  • Optimistic or being an optimist, means that you hope and expect favorable results.
  • It means being positive, cheerful and confident about the future.
  • It means a person with a positive attitude, who believes and hopes things would turn out well.
  • Optimistic is a person who believes that no matter what the situation is, things would improve.
  • It is the tendency to look at the bright side of life, even in negative events and situations.
  • Being an optimist does not mean that you are out of touch with reality, ignoring difficulties and obstacles, and behaving in a naïve way. You can be optimistic, and at the same time show good common sense and judgment.

What does optimistic mean according to various dictionaries:

  1. Merriam Webster defines it as, “Feeling or showing hope for the future.”
  2. Cambridge dictionary defines it as, “hoping or believing that good things will happen in the future.”
  3. Dictionary.com says about it: “Disposed to take a favorable view of events or conditions and to expect the most favorable outcome.”

It is important to be a balanced optimist. Use your common sense and take action to ensure that things will turn out well. You need to do more than just just tell yourself that nothing bad can happen.

Don’t just close your eyes to reality. Doing so, can lead to being impractical, making poor decisions, and letting people ridicule you or take advantage of you.

What does optimistic mean in everyday life?

  • It means sticking to a positive attitude, no matter what is happening around you.
  • It means not allowing circumstances, situations and people to affect your attitude.

A balanced optimist looks at reality, acknowledge the difficulties and obstacles, but is not discouraged by them.

A balanced optimist can see the good and the bad, but at the same time, expects success, and puts forth effort to make things turn out well.

This state of mind is most important for success, for improving your life, for good relationships, and getting over difficulties and obstacles.

To learn about yourself, ask yourself the following questions and answer them:

Questions to Ask Yourself

  • Are you optimistic or pessimistic?
  • Do you expect the best or the worst to happen?
  • Are you usually positive, hopeful, and confident, or negative?
  • Do you expect problems or good endings?

Being optimistic doesn’t mean waiting for things to happen by themselves. It means expecting the best, believing that the best will happen, but at the same time making decisions, following them, acting and making things happen.

The Importance of Optimistic Outlook

Why be an optimistic?

Because optimism keeps you motivated and energetic.

It gives you the ambition, confidence and joy to pursue your goals and make constructive improvements in your life. It helps you focus on your vision, and makes everyday a happy day.

This attitude does not mean that you are a passive and an impractical person. It does not denote that you ignore difficulties and problems.

Real optimism means facing difficulties and problems without fear. It means believing that you can solve them. With this attitude you seek solutions with confidence, cheerfulness and a positive attitude.

Tips on How to Be Optimistic

Below, you will find tips on how to be optimistic and more positive. I hope you will find these tips useful to learn optimism and implement it in your life.

Remember, just reading these tips is not enough, you need practice them to get results.

  1. Don’t get angry with yourself if you find yourself feeling pessimistic. Acknowledge that it is only natural to feel pessimistic at times, when life is boring or when you encounter difficulties or hardships.
  2. Acknowledge that changing your mental attitude takes time, so be patient.
  3. Keep a list of motivational and inspiring quotes handy, and read them several times a day.
  4. At least once a day, listen to music, your favorite songs, or some inspiring or relaxing music.
  5. Exercise your body often and regularly.
  6. At least once a day do something that makes you happy and satisfied. This can be anything, like eating something you love, watching a favorite T.V. program, reading, or talking to a friend.
  7. Try to smile more often.
  8. Take more care of your appearance and how you dress. What you wear, and how you look affects how you feel. This can make you feel more confident and positive.
  9. Strive to see the good, positive and funny in every situation.
  10. Expect good things to happen in your life. When negative thoughts access your mind replace them with thoughts of hope, cheerfulness and confidence.
  11. Have enough sleep at night. When don’t sleep enough or don’t sleep well you can get moody, unhappy and impatient. Good sleep will make you more energetic, alive, optimistic and feeling good.
  12. If you can, avoid the company of negative people. You don’t want their negative emotions and negative thoughts to affect how you think or feel.
  13. Always, seek the company of positive, happy and cheerful people.
  14. Learn to accept the past, leave it behind and continue to better things. Wallowing in the past creates unhappiness and lack of optimism. You need to learn to let go.
  15. Find a few minutes each day, to visualize yourself happy, satisfied and feeling good.
  16. Repeat inspiring, motivating, and constructive affirmations.

Inspirational Optimistic Quotes

“An optimist sees an opportunity in every calamity; a pessimist sees a calamity in every opportunity.” –Winston Churchill

“One of the things I learned the hard way was that it doesn’t pay to get discouraged. Keeping busy and making optimism a way of life can restore your faith in yourself.” –Lucille Ball

“Having a positive mental attitude is asking how something can be done rather than saying it can’t be done.” –Bo Bennett

“Optimism is essential to achievement and it is also the foundation of courage and true progress.” –Nicholas Murray Butler

About the Author

Remez Sasson is the author and creator of Success Consciousness website. He is the author of books and articles that motivate and help people to improve their life, achieve success, gain inner strength and inner peace, and become more positive and happy.

Life is better with a half-full glass.

Julian Glander Credit.

Video by Julian Glander

  • Published Feb. 18, 2020 Updated March 23, 2020

When you watch the news these days, it’s hard not to be pessimistic — and even harder for some people, depending on genes and socioeconomic status.

Yet battling your inner Eeyore can have profound effects. Research suggests that optimists earn more money, have better relationships and even live longer. And the thing is: Optimism can be learned.

“Pessimism is one of the personality traits that’s highly heritable, but also modifiable by specific exercises,” said Martin Seligman, director of the Positive Psychology Center at the University of Pennsylvania and author of “The Hope Circuit.”

In other words, you can blame your parents for your bleak outlook, but you don’t have to resign yourself to it forever. Here are four ways to start walking on the sunnier side of the street.

Visualize your best possible self

Imagine your dream life in 10 years — what would it look like? How would it feel? Now sit down and write about it: once a week, for six to eight minutes, for one or two months. Spend each session focusing on your “best possible self” in a single domain, such as family, career, romance or health.

Though it might sound like wishful thinking, dozens of studies show that imagining your ideal future can actually boost your levels of optimism.

Sonja Lyubomirsky, a psychology professor at the University of California, Riverside and author of “The How of Happiness,” has employed this exercise with hundreds of subjects. It works, she said, because you’re strengthening your “optimistic muscles” by “thinking about all your dreams coming true as opposed to worrying about the worst possible outcome.”

Accept the inevitability of disappointment

Constantly expecting the worst? According to Laura Oliff, associate director of the American Institute for Cognitive Therapy, it might be because you’re hoping to protect yourself from disappointment.

But by trying to insulate yourself from life’s ups and downs, you’re missing out on something else, too: the “positive anticipation of events,” which Dr. Oliff called a “very valuable” and “joyful” feeling. (For proof, just think about the pleasure of anticipating a vacation.)

As Dr. Oliff pointed out, “You’ll be disappointed at times no matter what.” So if your choice is between positive expectations that are occasionally proven wrong or negative expectations that are occasionally proven right, you might as well go with the former.

[Like what you’re reading? Sign up here for the Smarter Living newsletter to get stories like this (and much more!) delivered straight to your inbox every Monday morning.]

While this mind-set shift is easier described than done, Dr. Oliff said it can help to remember that “many of the negative things we predict never actually happen” — and that, even when they do, we usually recover pretty quickly.

Argue against yourself

So your co-worker got the promotion you were angling for. And your mind is filling with thoughts like: I’m bad at my job. I’ll never move up the ladder. I might as well quit right now.

When you enter that pessimism spiral, Dr. Seligman says the trick is to first recognize the voice making those negative remarks, then argue with it as if it were “an external person whose mission in life is to make you miserable.”

How would you argue with your nemesis? You’d present evidence to prove them wrong, such as: I’m not bad at my job — my co-worker has been here for two years longer than I have. Or: I’ll eventually get promoted — another position is opening up soon.

Turning this type of self-argument into a habit requires a little practice. “It’s not instantaneous,” Dr. Seligman said. “But on the other hand, it’s not really onerous and difficult. It’s something that most people can acquire in a few days.”

Put things in perspective

Another evidence-based approach to boost your optimism is to intentionally counteract your extremely negative predictions with extremely positive ones. This will enable you to find the middle of the road — or, as Dr. Seligman said, to “put things in perspective.”

Let’s say you have a doozy of a fight with your partner. She leaves the house, slamming the door on the way out. If you’re like many humans, Dr. Seligman said you’ll naturally be attracted to the “most catastrophic interpretation”: This is the end, I’m unlovable, I’m going to die alone.

As a counterbalance, imagine the least catastrophic interpretation, too: Your partner’s on the way home with a tub of ice cream and will never mention the disagreement again.

Between those two poles is where you’ll find the sweet spot — the realistic interpretation. It might be: She’ll come back in a few hours, we’ll talk, it’ll be weird tomorrow and then back to normal. Though not as pleasant as the ice cream scenario, this outlook is far better (and far more plausible) than the ultra-pessimistic one with which you started.

By consistently practicing the two previous strategies — arguing against yourself and putting things in perspective — Dr. Seligman said you can make changes that stick.

“This is not armchair stuff,” he said. “These are things that have been tested with literally thousands of people.” Over time, he said these exercises can produce long-lasting results that “basically permanently change extreme pessimism into something much less pessimistic.”

That sounds like something to be optimistic about.

Perspective is everything, and you can learn to change a negative outlook.

Think happy thoughts. Find the silver lining. Look on the bright side.

Rolling your eyes yet? Alexandra Hruz is. She’s a 27-year-old self-proclaimed pessimist who lives in Chattanooga, TN. “When people are overly optimistic, it’s much easier to be let down by circumstances,” she says. “I don’t think the world is going to end tomorrow, but I also don’t like to hang my hopes on things working out on their own, simply by the power of positive thinking.”

But experts say positive thinking has serious benefits that go beyond a perky attitude. According to a recent study from the University of Pittsburgh, women who expect good things to happen have a 30% lower risk for heart disease.

Optimism was also linked to a lower risk of stroke in a University of Michigan study. And a study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal found that as they age, optimists tend to get fewer disabilities and live longer than pessimists.

If you’re a pessimist, you can still change your view. “Pessimism is a learned behavior, which means anyone can also learn to be optimistic,” says Elizabeth Lombardo, PhD, author of A Happy You: Your Ultimate Prescription for Happiness. “It’s a skill you can teach yourself.” Here’s how:

Continued

Reframe your frustrations. Researchers at the University of Kent in England found that people who strived to see the positive side of things that went wrong — rather than venting to friends about what went wrong, or blaming themselves for small failures — were happier and more satisfied at the end of the day.

“If you didn’t get that promotion or you failed an exam or a relationship disintegrated, what can you learn from it? Failure can be a huge gift,” Lombardo says.

Just say “om.” Recent research suggests that people who meditate daily have more positive emotions than those who don’t. Mindful meditation works just as well, says Richard O’Connor, PhD, author of Rewire: Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destructive Behavior. Savor positive moments — notice a pretty flower or get an ice cream with your kids, for examples. That helps train your brain to observe more good things.

Make a happy list. Every evening, write down three or four great things that happened that day. A recent study in the Journal of Research in Personality found that writing about positive experiences for just 3 straight days has lasting effects on mood.

Sources

AHA Journals: “Optimism, Cynical Hostility, and Incident Coronary Heart Disease and Mortality in the Women’s Health Initiative” and “Dispositional Optimism Protects Older Adults From Stroke.”

Canadian Medical Association Journal: “Enjoyment of life and declining physical function at older ages: a longitudinal cohort study.”

Science Daily: “Positive reframing, acceptance and humor are the most effective coping strategies.”

Journal of Personality and Social Psychology: “Open Hearts Build Lives: Positive Emotions, Induced Through Loving-Kindness Meditation, Build Consequential Personal Resources” and “The health benefits of writing about intensely positive experiences.”

Psychology Today: “All About Pessimism.”

Elizabeth Lombardo, PhD, author, A Happy You: Your Ultimate Prescription for Happiness.

Alexandra Hruz, 27, Chattanooga, Tenn.

Richard O’Connor, PhD, author of Rewire: Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destructive Behavior.

  • Adopt
  • Foster
  • Donate
  • Volunteer

At KVC, we want every child and adult to be safe & connected to a strong family and a healthy community. We’re proud to be a leader in innovative, effective and compassionate care.

Services Provided

Services Near You

Kansas

  • Strengthening Families
  • Reintegration
  • Foster Care
  • Adoption
  • Psychiatric Hospitals
  • Outpatient Services
  • Technology
  • Kansas PMTO

Kentucky

  • Family Preservation
  • Foster Care
  • Behavioral Health
  • Substance Use Treatment

Missouri

  • Residential Treatment
  • Therapeutic K-12 School

Nebraska

  • Family Reunification
  • Foster Care
  • Fostering Educational Success
  • In-Home Services
  • Disability Services (Shared Living)
  • Other Services

West Virginia

  • Safe at Home WV
  • Foster Care
  • Adoption
  • Foster to Adopt
  • In-Home Therapy

We also provide consultation and training through the KVC Institute. Learn more about our software and technology.

The Heart of Our Work

KVC helps health and human service agencies excel at caring for families with the most complex needs through a proven model that improves people’s health, their experience of care, and costs.

Focus Areas

  • Overview
  • Free Parenting Tips & Mental Health eBooks
  • Consulting for Managed Care & Primary Health
  • Consulting on Child Welfare & Behavioral Health
  • Keeping Families Safely Together
  • Right-Sizing Congregate Care
  • Preventing & Treating Childhood Trauma
  • KVC’s Partnership with Sesame Street
  • KVC Institute Overview

Children & Families Need You

Through KVC, you can strengthen families, prevent child abuse and neglect, and help create a bright future where every person is safe and connected to a strong family and a healthy community. Please join us today!

Help Someone Today

  • Explore the Best Ways to Get Involved
  • Foster or Adopt a Child in Need
  • Donate Now
  • Become an Everyday Hero
  • Download Parenting & Mental Health eBooks

About KVC

KVC Health Systems is committed to enriching and enhancing the lives of children and families by providing medical and behavioral healthcare, social services, and education.

Who We Are

  • About KVC Health Systems
  • Our Leadership
  • Annual Reports & Hero Award Recipients
  • News and Blogs
  • Videos
  • Social Media
  • 2021 Kansas Legislative Priorities
  • Adopt
  • Foster
  • Donate
  • Volunteer

How to be optimistic

As the coronavirus health crisis continues to affect our daily lives, many of us are struggling to find a silver lining. The daily headlines can feel heavy and social distancing continues to be the norm. If you’re searching for ways to stay optimistic during this uncertain time, you’re not alone.

Studies show there are many benefits to optimism. Optimists tend to live longer, healthier and less stressful lives than their pessimistic peers. In addition, an optimistic outlook encourages persistence which often leads to a successful outcome. Positive thinking doesn’t mean you’re in denial about the reality of a situation. It’s a tool that helps you face challenges, focusing on solutions instead of becoming overwhelmed by fear or hopelessness.

Do you believe every child deserves to be safe and connected to a strong family? Join us to receive a few inspiring stories each month and help end childhood adversity. Subscribe here!

As part of our Coping During COVID-19 series, KVC’s Chief Clinical Officer, Chad E. Anderson shares his top tips to help you stay optimistic, even through stressful and uncertain times.

Ten Tips for Staying Optimistic

  1. Make up mantras. You are not alone. We’re all in this together. These aren’t just snappy sayings for t-shirts, they’re positive affirmations that can be a powerful tool in helping to shape your outlook. Pick one that resonates with you and repeat it often.
  2. Focus on successes. Remembering challenges you have overcome in the past can help inspire you to face future roadblocks. Tough times can become learning opportunities.
  3. Challenge your negative thoughts. We can’t always choose what happens to us, but we can choose the way we respond to it. Reframe the situation and see what possible positive outcomes there are. For example, being “stuck at home with nothing to do” can be reframed as being “safe at home with an opportunity to connect with my family.”
  4. Cultivate an attitude of gratitude. Start or end your day with a gratitude practice. Write down three things you are grateful for each day, or partner with a loved one and share them out loud. Gratitude trains your brain to see the positive.
  5. Stay in the present moment. It’s easy to get caught in a spiral of anxious thoughts about the future. We all want to know when this will end. If you find yourself stuck in this negative pattern, try this simple exercise to bring yourself back to the present moment.
  6. Let it go. Similarly, staying in the present moment can keep you from unnecessarily ruminating on the past. Traumatic events and other circumstances require appropriate support, time and attention to heal, but give yourself grace for minor mistakes or imperfect plans.
  7. Connect with positive people. Social connection contributes to happiness and is strongly correlated with optimism. Seek out the company of people that make you feel good and fuel your positive energy. Likewise, limit interactions with those who leave you feeling drained or pessimistic.
  8. Pay it forward.Performing acts of random kindness for others is a great way to boost your happiness. In addition, those you help and even those who simply witness your kind gestures will also benefit. Learn more about using kindness as a coping skill here.
  9. Do it for your family. Optimism can be a learned behavior and is a teachable skill. Give your family the many benefits of optimism by setting an example for them to follow.
  10. Practice makes progress. Of course, all new habits take time and continuous practice before they become automatic. Make the choice to be more optimistic each day and enjoy the rewards of your improved outlook.

Find other helpful tips and resources from our Coping During COVID-19 series here. You can also follow us on Facebook or Instagram for more updates and information.

  • Adopt
  • Foster
  • Donate
  • Volunteer

At KVC, we want every child and adult to be safe & connected to a strong family and a healthy community. We’re proud to be a leader in innovative, effective and compassionate care.

Services Provided

Services Near You

Kansas

  • Strengthening Families
  • Reintegration
  • Foster Care
  • Adoption
  • Psychiatric Hospitals
  • Outpatient Services
  • Technology
  • Kansas PMTO

Kentucky

  • Family Preservation
  • Foster Care
  • Behavioral Health
  • Substance Use Treatment

Missouri

  • Residential Treatment
  • Therapeutic K-12 School

Nebraska

  • Family Reunification
  • Foster Care
  • Fostering Educational Success
  • In-Home Services
  • Disability Services (Shared Living)
  • Other Services

West Virginia

  • Safe at Home WV
  • Foster Care
  • Adoption
  • Foster to Adopt
  • In-Home Therapy

We also provide consultation and training through the KVC Institute. Learn more about our software and technology.

The Heart of Our Work

KVC helps health and human service agencies excel at caring for families with the most complex needs through a proven model that improves people’s health, their experience of care, and costs.

Focus Areas

  • Overview
  • Free Parenting Tips & Mental Health eBooks
  • Consulting for Managed Care & Primary Health
  • Consulting on Child Welfare & Behavioral Health
  • Keeping Families Safely Together
  • Right-Sizing Congregate Care
  • Preventing & Treating Childhood Trauma
  • KVC’s Partnership with Sesame Street
  • KVC Institute Overview

Children & Families Need You

Through KVC, you can strengthen families, prevent child abuse and neglect, and help create a bright future where every person is safe and connected to a strong family and a healthy community. Please join us today!

Help Someone Today

  • Explore the Best Ways to Get Involved
  • Foster or Adopt a Child in Need
  • Donate Now
  • Become an Everyday Hero
  • Download Parenting & Mental Health eBooks

About KVC

KVC Health Systems is committed to enriching and enhancing the lives of children and families by providing medical and behavioral healthcare, social services, and education.

Who We Are

  • About KVC Health Systems
  • Our Leadership
  • Annual Reports & Hero Award Recipients
  • News and Blogs
  • Videos
  • Social Media
  • 2021 Kansas Legislative Priorities
  • Adopt
  • Foster
  • Donate
  • Volunteer

How to be optimistic

As the coronavirus health crisis continues to affect our daily lives, many of us are struggling to find a silver lining. The daily headlines can feel heavy and social distancing continues to be the norm. If you’re searching for ways to stay optimistic during this uncertain time, you’re not alone.

Studies show there are many benefits to optimism. Optimists tend to live longer, healthier and less stressful lives than their pessimistic peers. In addition, an optimistic outlook encourages persistence which often leads to a successful outcome. Positive thinking doesn’t mean you’re in denial about the reality of a situation. It’s a tool that helps you face challenges, focusing on solutions instead of becoming overwhelmed by fear or hopelessness.

Do you believe every child deserves to be safe and connected to a strong family? Join us to receive a few inspiring stories each month and help end childhood adversity. Subscribe here!

As part of our Coping During COVID-19 series, KVC’s Chief Clinical Officer, Chad E. Anderson shares his top tips to help you stay optimistic, even through stressful and uncertain times.

Ten Tips for Staying Optimistic

  1. Make up mantras. You are not alone. We’re all in this together. These aren’t just snappy sayings for t-shirts, they’re positive affirmations that can be a powerful tool in helping to shape your outlook. Pick one that resonates with you and repeat it often.
  2. Focus on successes. Remembering challenges you have overcome in the past can help inspire you to face future roadblocks. Tough times can become learning opportunities.
  3. Challenge your negative thoughts. We can’t always choose what happens to us, but we can choose the way we respond to it. Reframe the situation and see what possible positive outcomes there are. For example, being “stuck at home with nothing to do” can be reframed as being “safe at home with an opportunity to connect with my family.”
  4. Cultivate an attitude of gratitude. Start or end your day with a gratitude practice. Write down three things you are grateful for each day, or partner with a loved one and share them out loud. Gratitude trains your brain to see the positive.
  5. Stay in the present moment. It’s easy to get caught in a spiral of anxious thoughts about the future. We all want to know when this will end. If you find yourself stuck in this negative pattern, try this simple exercise to bring yourself back to the present moment.
  6. Let it go. Similarly, staying in the present moment can keep you from unnecessarily ruminating on the past. Traumatic events and other circumstances require appropriate support, time and attention to heal, but give yourself grace for minor mistakes or imperfect plans.
  7. Connect with positive people. Social connection contributes to happiness and is strongly correlated with optimism. Seek out the company of people that make you feel good and fuel your positive energy. Likewise, limit interactions with those who leave you feeling drained or pessimistic.
  8. Pay it forward.Performing acts of random kindness for others is a great way to boost your happiness. In addition, those you help and even those who simply witness your kind gestures will also benefit. Learn more about using kindness as a coping skill here.
  9. Do it for your family. Optimism can be a learned behavior and is a teachable skill. Give your family the many benefits of optimism by setting an example for them to follow.
  10. Practice makes progress. Of course, all new habits take time and continuous practice before they become automatic. Make the choice to be more optimistic each day and enjoy the rewards of your improved outlook.

Find other helpful tips and resources from our Coping During COVID-19 series here. You can also follow us on Facebook or Instagram for more updates and information.

How to be optimistic

Grow Your Business, Not Your Inbox

How to be optimistic

When running a business, as we all know, there will be difficult days, hard times and stressful periods. Although it’s not easy to spot the silver linings, having a positive attitude can help us push through rough patches.

Here are a few benefits optimism and positivity can bring, even in the face of adversity:

1. See failure as a new start.

Failure is not the end, in fact it is often the beginning of something great. When things are good, we coast along without making any quantum leaps. When things go bad, our world gets shaken up, which requires us to grow, see new things and start afresh.

Optimism allows us to learn from failures, pick up the pieces and move on to something greater. The greatest business ideas, and times in life, can be born from failure.

2. Be expansive.

Pessimism makes us contract and shy away from new or adventurous things. It causes us to fixate on the negative possibilities and be trapped by fear of failure.

Optimism, however, opens us up to new ideas, new experiences and new possibilities. It frees us up to consider new options and change our businesses, and lives, for the better. It helps us look to the future and create expansive, evolving realities.

3. Get healthy.

Dwelling on negativity isn’t healthy. Not only are optimists generally happier and less stressed, but also they tend to have healthier hearts.

In a study of more than 5,100 adults, researchers from the University of Illinois found that those who were the most optimistic were 76 percent more likely to have health scores in an ideal range. In addition, optimists had significantly better blood sugar and cholesterol levels, exercised more, and had healthier body mass indexes, and were less likely to smoke than pessimists.

Focusing on the positive, instead of the negative, improves mental well-being, which can motivate individuals to take better care of their bodies, as well.

4. Spread good vibes.

Optimism is contagious. Having an upbeat attitude can inspire everyone around us. A survey conducted by Gallup found that only 35 percent of U.S. managers are engaged in their jobs. This lack of engagement and its impact on employees costs the U.S. an estimated $77 billion to $96 billion each year.

Attitude is everything. Optimistic leaders can help motivate and engage their employees. A positive team will be driven to accomplish goals and work together to move things forward.

5. It is the best choice.

There is no better alternative to optimism. Pessimism doesn’t achieve much, and doesn’t have any benefits over optimism. Being optimistic obviously doesn’t mean seeing rainbows 24-7. Everything won’t always be great. But optimism helps us see new opportunities, learn from different situations, and keep moving.

In life, movement and growth is essential, which optimism helps us achieve.

Before inventing the light bulb, Thomas Alva Edison, made no less than 1,000 unsuccessful attempts. But, can you imagine failing 1,000 times? How would you react to it?

After inventing the bulb, Edison said, “I didn’t fail 1,000 times. The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.”

Such powerful was the spirit of optimism and perseverance in him.

Amidst everyday life, are you the one who strongly believes that every cloud has a silver lining, or do you look for pitfalls in every miracle?

It is easy to be happy and cheerful when life treats you well. But how do you react when bad things come your way? These are the times when being an optimist can help you sail through the crisis easily.

It is easier to persevere with hope in your heart when you can see the brighter side of things, when you are more positive. This helps you work towards seemingly impossible goals. That is the power of optimism.

Optimism isn’t losing sight of what is real. But it gives you the drive to face challenges, especially when you are down. You will be able to explore the realm of the extraordinary, by learning how to be optimistic. Just like Edison.

Let’s look at some unique ways of staying upbeat through the vagaries of life with meditation.

Make your mind your best friend

How to be optimistic

“Nothing in the world can bother you as much as your own mind. Others seem to be bothering you, but it is not others; it is your own mind!” – Gurudev Sri Sri Ravi Shankar

Have you ever noticed what happens when you have a fight with your family or friends? Hurtful words do the rounds. You hurl words at them, they give it back to you and then the words you label yourself with.

Though hard to digest, but the words that you say to yourself are usually the unkindest cut of all. No one can hurt you as much as you can hurt yourself. Once you realize that your mind is directly responsible for these words, you can easily resolve it.

Just be friend your mind. It can be your best friend, counsel and support, not only in good, but most importantly, in bad times.

How do you do that? How do you control and mentor your mind so that it supports you like a best friend? This is possible with knowledge and awareness. Meditation makes you aware. You let go of petty thoughts and doubts. Your mind naturally settles in equilibrium, giving you control over it. You can then steer it to optimistic thoughts and move ahead.

See the light at the end of the tunnel

“When one door closes, another opens, but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” – Alexander Graham Bell

Did you lose your job? Did your friends hurt you? Did you fail an exam? It is easy to get lost in the darkness surrounding you at these times. But this is when you most need to envision the light at the end of the tunnel, especially when you cannot see it. The hope that you will find the light will help you spot opportunity in adversity.

Even if all the doors and windows are firmly shut, you have a way out – or rather, a way in. When you delve deep within, you will find all the answers you ever needed. Practice 20 minutes of meditation regularly to gain insight into yourself. Meditation can silence the incessant internal chatter, making it easier to think productively and positively. It also gives you the peace, strength and endurance to dig yourself out of your tunnel.

So, give up the negativity and be optimistic!

Believe in yourself

Faith moves mountains. But when you face the mountain, your heart inevitably sinks, right? It is when everything goes haywire that you need faith the most. Unfortunately, this is when it is difficult to have faith and this is the time when optimism will keep you afloat. When you are hopeful, then there is a chance of believing in yourself again, sooner or later.

But how can you be optimistic under any unfortunate circumstance? You can only strive to achieve anything when you feel energetic and you will feel energetic only when you have rested adequately.

Meditation gives you the much-needed rest to start afresh. Meditation will make you feel recharged and raring to go. You will be full of optimism and positivity. Just 20 minutes of meditation is as good as eight hours of sleep. So, when you feel fatigued mentally or physically, slip into meditation.

Before inventing the light bulb, Thomas Alva Edison, made no less than 1,000 unsuccessful attempts. But, can you imagine failing 1,000 times? How would you react to it?

After inventing the bulb, Edison said, “I didn’t fail 1,000 times. The light bulb was an invention with 1,000 steps.”

Such powerful was the spirit of optimism and perseverance in him.

Amidst everyday life, are you the one who strongly believes that every cloud has a silver lining, or do you look for pitfalls in every miracle?

It is easy to be happy and cheerful when life treats you well. But how do you react when bad things come your way? These are the times when being an optimist can help you sail through the crisis easily.

It is easier to persevere with hope in your heart when you can see the brighter side of things, when you are more positive. This helps you work towards seemingly impossible goals. That is the power of optimism.

Optimism isn’t losing sight of what is real. But it gives you the drive to face challenges, especially when you are down. You will be able to explore the realm of the extraordinary, by learning how to be optimistic. Just like Edison.

Let’s look at some unique ways of staying upbeat through the vagaries of life with meditation.

Make your mind your best friend

How to be optimistic

“Nothing in the world can bother you as much as your own mind. Others seem to be bothering you, but it is not others; it is your own mind!” – Gurudev Sri Sri Ravi Shankar

Have you ever noticed what happens when you have a fight with your family or friends? Hurtful words do the rounds. You hurl words at them, they give it back to you and then the words you label yourself with.

Though hard to digest, but the words that you say to yourself are usually the unkindest cut of all. No one can hurt you as much as you can hurt yourself. Once you realize that your mind is directly responsible for these words, you can easily resolve it.

Just be friend your mind. It can be your best friend, counsel and support, not only in good, but most importantly, in bad times.

How do you do that? How do you control and mentor your mind so that it supports you like a best friend? This is possible with knowledge and awareness. Meditation makes you aware. You let go of petty thoughts and doubts. Your mind naturally settles in equilibrium, giving you control over it. You can then steer it to optimistic thoughts and move ahead.

See the light at the end of the tunnel

“When one door closes, another opens, but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us.” – Alexander Graham Bell

Did you lose your job? Did your friends hurt you? Did you fail an exam? It is easy to get lost in the darkness surrounding you at these times. But this is when you most need to envision the light at the end of the tunnel, especially when you cannot see it. The hope that you will find the light will help you spot opportunity in adversity.

Even if all the doors and windows are firmly shut, you have a way out – or rather, a way in. When you delve deep within, you will find all the answers you ever needed. Practice 20 minutes of meditation regularly to gain insight into yourself. Meditation can silence the incessant internal chatter, making it easier to think productively and positively. It also gives you the peace, strength and endurance to dig yourself out of your tunnel.

So, give up the negativity and be optimistic!

Believe in yourself

Faith moves mountains. But when you face the mountain, your heart inevitably sinks, right? It is when everything goes haywire that you need faith the most. Unfortunately, this is when it is difficult to have faith and this is the time when optimism will keep you afloat. When you are hopeful, then there is a chance of believing in yourself again, sooner or later.

But how can you be optimistic under any unfortunate circumstance? You can only strive to achieve anything when you feel energetic and you will feel energetic only when you have rested adequately.

Meditation gives you the much-needed rest to start afresh. Meditation will make you feel recharged and raring to go. You will be full of optimism and positivity. Just 20 minutes of meditation is as good as eight hours of sleep. So, when you feel fatigued mentally or physically, slip into meditation.