How to be prudent

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How to Be Prudent and Productive

How to be prudent

How to be prudent

In uncertain times when chaos appears to be the only thing in sight, do your best not to panic.

Instead, be prudent.

Saint Thomas Aquinas said this:

“Prudence is right reason in action.”

That’s why being productive with prudence in mind is something you want to practice as often as possible.

Panicked productivity leads to a drop in quality. When you’re doing for the sake of doing rather than doing the right things it does little to ease overwhelm.

Prudent productivity may move slower, but it’s more deliberate. You’re going to do more of the right things at the right time. You’ll make fewer mistakes. You’ll feel like you have more control.

Here are three ways you can start practicing more prudent productivity practices:

1. Use forward-thinking

In uncertain times you need to have as many certainties at top of mind. When you think ahead you can put yourself in a better position to understand what’s best to do right now.

For example, let’s say that there are only certain things you can do from your place of work. It’s possible that you won’t have access to that location as often as you would like. A wise thing to do is create a filter in your to-do list that allows you to see all the tasks you can only do at your workplace location. In my TimeCrafting methodology, you would use the resource-based mode of “workplace” (or something similar) and ask that mode to filter all tasks that can only be done at your place of work. Then instead of looking at your to-do list through the lens of a due date or by the projects you’re working on, you can view the tasks you can only do while in workplace mode.

It’s ideal to have more than one way to look at your to-do list. By using different modes as filters, you can give yourself one of those ways and do more of your tasks in the right place at the right time.

2. Get your team on the same page

Do you run a team that is shifting to offsite work out of necessity or desire? Then it would be prudent for you to create alignment across the team so that there are some common elements to your remote workflow.

This could come in the form of using the same project management or to-do list app. Better still, you could create some cohesiveness among your team members.

How could you do this?

Try creating a set of ground rules that apply to how you use this app. You can do this through commonplace tags or labels that are to be used across the team as a whole, for example. You could create a series of guidelines that allow for objectives to be met and yet enable your team members to use the tool somewhat subjectively as well. (If you need help with this sort of thing, it’s one of the things I do. I help businesses that are working to adopt a remote working scenario — or are trying to adapt to it quickly. You can connect with me via my Contact page and ask about my coaching offerings there.)

3. Slow down

You cannot tap into prudence if you’re moving too fast. Doing things too quickly can lead to reckless action, which is not at all what you’re looking for here.

Here’s a tip: when you’re stuck trying to figure out what to do, instead of rushing in take twenty seconds to just wait. Think about the day and review your list in a reasoned manner. If you’ve started theming your time or using modes as a way to filter your tasks then tap into those elements. Twenty seconds can feel like an eternity when you’re letting it happen or focusing on a single task (like washing your hands). Take that short break now and it will save you from having to course-correct later.

You can apply these tactics anytime you want to be productive with prudence as your guide. Whether you’re feeling overwhelmed by uncertainty or just the sheer amount of things you need and want to do, using any or all of what I’ve shared can help you do the most productive thing you can do: put right reason into action.

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How to be prudent

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About Mike Vardy

Mike Vardy is a writer, speaker, productivity strategist, and founder of Productivityist. He is the author of The Front Nine: How to Start the Year You Want Anytime You Want, The Productivityist Playbook, and TimeCrafting: A Better Way to Get the Right Things Done, coming soon from Mango Publishing.

In California, being a trustee is a major responsibility. People who are willing to accept it are often surprised at its complexity. To be sure, trust administration can be confusing and worrisome, especially when it comes to making investments to benefit the trust and its beneficiaries. Since there is significant freedom granted to a trustee, it is imperative to understand the law when it comes to handling financial considerations and making decisions that are in the interest of managing the trust in an effective and evenhanded way. A firm grasp of the law when it comes to trusts is critical.

Trusts and the Uniform Prudent Investor Act

The Uniform Prudent Investor Act sets out the requirements a trustee is expected to adhere to when making investments. The trust itself must be considered with its terms, how funds are distributed, the requirements in the trust and its basic circumstances. It is expected that the trustee will follow reasonable care, caution and skill. The entire trust must be considered when making investments. It is not to be done in an isolated way and the final goal is to serve the interests of the trust.

The trustee must consider various circumstances including the economic situation across the nation; how changes to the economy with issues such as inflation could impact the trust; tax concerns; what an individual investment might mean to the trust as a whole; what the return on the investment is expected to be; if liquidity is needed; if there are concerns about income and capital; if there is special value to beneficiaries with a certain asset; the facts of the investment in terms of trust management; and the determination of what will be invested in as long as it follows the rules of serving the trust.

Trusts can be difficult and trustees should be protected

The estate, income and beneficiaries take precedence with investments from a trust and the trustee should be aware of this. It is unfortunate that conflicts sometimes arise with trust administration and questions about investments and their wisdom are a common reason why. When the decision to take on the role of a successor trustee is made, it is useful to be fully cognizant of all it entails. With this or any other estate planning concern, having experienced advice can be essential.

King James Version (KJV)

How to be prudent

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1 Samuel 16:18 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Then answered one of the servants, and said, Behold, I have seen a son of Jesse the Bethlehemite, that is cunning in playing, and a mighty valiant man, and a man of war, and prudent in matters, and a comely person, and the LORD is with him.

Proverbs 12:16 | View whole chapter | See verse in context A fool’s wrath is presently known: but a prudent man covereth shame.

Proverbs 12:23 | View whole chapter | See verse in context A prudent man concealeth knowledge: but the heart of fools proclaimeth foolishness.

Proverbs 13:16 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Every prudent man dealeth with knowledge: but a fool layeth open his folly.

Proverbs 14:8 | View whole chapter | See verse in context The wisdom of the prudent is to understand his way: but the folly of fools is deceit.

Proverbs 14:15 | View whole chapter | See verse in context The simple believeth every word: but the prudent man looketh well to his going.

Proverbs 14:18 | View whole chapter | See verse in context The simple inherit folly: but the prudent are crowned with knowledge.

Proverbs 15:5 | View whole chapter | See verse in context A fool despiseth his father’s instruction: but he that regardeth reproof is prudent .

Proverbs 16:21 | View whole chapter | See verse in context The wise in heart shall be called prudent : and the sweetness of the lips increaseth learning.

Proverbs 18:15 | View whole chapter | See verse in context The heart of the prudent getteth knowledge; and the ear of the wise seeketh knowledge.

Proverbs 19:14 | View whole chapter | See verse in context House and riches are the inheritance of fathers: and a prudent wife is from the LORD.

Proverbs 22:3 | View whole chapter | See verse in context A prudent man foreseeth the evil, and hideth himself: but the simple pass on, and are punished.

Proverbs 27:12 | View whole chapter | See verse in context A prudent man foreseeth the evil, and hideth himself; but the simple pass on, and are punished.

Isaiah 3:2 | View whole chapter | See verse in context The mighty man, and the man of war, the judge, and the prophet, and the prudent , and the ancient,

Isaiah 5:21 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Woe unto them that are wise in their own eyes, and prudent in their own sight!

Isaiah 10:13 | View whole chapter | See verse in context For he saith, By the strength of my hand I have done it, and by my wisdom; for I am prudent : and I have removed the bounds of the people, and have robbed their treasures, and I have put down the inhabitants like a valiant man:

Isaiah 29:14 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Therefore, behold, I will proceed to do a marvellous work among this people, even a marvellous work and a wonder: for the wisdom of their wise men shall perish, and the understanding of their prudent men shall be hid.

Isaiah 52:13 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Behold, my servant shall deal prudent ly, he shall be exalted and extolled, and be very high.

Jeremiah 49:7 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Concerning Edom, thus saith the LORD of hosts; Is wisdom no more in Teman? is counsel perished from the prudent ? is their wisdom vanished?

Hosea 14:9 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Who is wise, and he shall understand these things? prudent , and he shall know them? for the ways of the LORD are right, and the just shall walk in them: but the transgressors shall fall therein.

Amos 5:13 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Therefore the prudent shall keep silence in that time; for it is an evil time.

Matthew 11:25 | View whole chapter | See verse in context At that time Jesus answered and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, because thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent , and hast revealed them unto babes.

Luke 10:21 | View whole chapter | See verse in context In that hour Jesus rejoiced in spirit, and said, I thank thee, O Father, Lord of heaven and earth, that thou hast hid these things from the wise and prudent , and hast revealed them unto babes: even so, Father; for so it seemed good in thy sight.

Acts 13:7 | View whole chapter | See verse in context Which was with the deputy of the country, Sergius Paulus, a prudent man; who called for Barnabas and Saul, and desired to hear the word of God.

1 Corinthians 1:19 | View whole chapter | See verse in context For it is written, I will destroy the wisdom of the wise, and will bring to nothing the understanding of the prudent .

Synonyms & Antonyms of prudent

Synonyms for prudent

  • discreet ,
  • intelligent ,
  • judgmatic
  • ( or judgmatical ) ,
  • judicious

Words Related to prudent

  • cautious ,
  • chary ,
  • circumspect ,
  • cozy
  • forehanded ,
  • foresighted ,
  • foresightful ,
  • forethoughtful
  • discerning ,
  • discriminating ,
  • sage ,
  • sane ,
  • sapient ,
  • senseful ,
  • sensible ,
  • wise
  • canny ,
  • provident
  • astute ,
  • perspicacious ,
  • sagacious ,
  • shrewd

Near Antonyms for prudent

  • careless ,
  • heedless ,
  • incautious ,
  • rash
  • improvident ,
  • shortsighted
  • foolish ,
  • unwise

Antonyms for prudent

  • imprudent ,
  • indiscreet ,
  • injudicious

Synonyms for prudent

  • advisable ,
  • desirable ,
  • expedient ,
  • judicious ,
  • politic ,
  • tactical ,
  • wise

Words Related to prudent

  • advantageous ,
  • beneficial ,
  • profitable
  • useful ,
  • utilitarian
  • feasible ,
  • possible ,
  • practicable ,
  • practical
  • opportune ,
  • seasonable ,
  • timely
  • opportunistic ,
  • self-seeking

Near Antonyms for prudent

  • impractical ,
  • profitless ,
  • unfeasible ,
  • unprofitable
  • inopportune ,
  • unseasonable ,
  • untimely

Antonyms for prudent

  • impolitic ,
  • imprudent ,
  • inadvisable ,
  • inexpedient ,
  • injudicious ,
  • unwise

Synonyms for prudent

  • discerning ,
  • insightful ,
  • perceptive ,
  • sagacious ,
  • sage ,
  • sapient ,
  • wise

Words Related to prudent

  • acute ,
  • penetrating ,
  • percipient ,
  • perspicacious
  • experienced
  • discriminating ,
  • discriminative
  • brainy ,
  • bright ,
  • brilliant ,
  • clever ,
  • intelligent ,
  • keen ,
  • nimble ,
  • quick ,
  • quick-witted ,
  • smart
  • cerebral ,
  • erudite ,
  • knowledgeable ,
  • learned ,
  • literate ,
  • scholarly
  • astute ,
  • clearheaded ,
  • piercing ,
  • sharp ,
  • shrewd
  • contemplative ,
  • reflective ,
  • thoughtful

Near Antonyms for prudent

  • dense ,
  • dull ,
  • obtuse ,
  • purblind ,
  • woodenheaded
  • brainless ,
  • dumb ,
  • feebleminded ,
  • foolish ,
  • idiotic
  • ( also idiotical ) ,
  • imbecile
  • ( or imbecilic ) ,
  • knuckleheaded ,
  • moronic ,
  • silly ,
  • simple ,
  • slow ,
  • slow-witted ,
  • stupid ,
  • thoughtless ,
  • unintelligent ,
  • witless
  • undiscriminating

Antonyms for prudent

  • unperceptive ,
  • unwise

Frequently Asked Questions About prudent

How is the word prudent distinct from other similar adjectives?

Some common synonyms of prudent are judicious, sage, sane, sapient, sensible, and wise. While all these words mean “having or showing sound judgment,” prudent suggests the exercise of restraint guided by sound practical wisdom and discretion.

a prudent decision to wait out the storm

Where would judicious be a reasonable alternative to prudent?

In some situations, the words judicious and prudent are roughly equivalent. However, judicious stresses a capacity for reaching wise decisions or just conclusions.

judicious parents using kindness and discipline in equal measure

In what contexts can sage take the place of prudent?

The synonyms sage and prudent are sometimes interchangeable, but sage suggests wide experience, great learning, and wisdom.

the sage advice of my father

When would sane be a good substitute for prudent?

The words sane and prudent are synonyms, but do differ in nuance. Specifically, sane stresses mental soundness, rationality, and levelheadedness.

remained sane even in times of crises

When can sapient be used instead of prudent?

While in some cases nearly identical to prudent, sapient suggests great sagacity and discernment.

the sapient musings of an old philosopher

When could sensible be used to replace prudent?

The meanings of sensible and prudent largely overlap; however, sensible applies to action guided and restrained by good sense and rationality.

a sensible woman who was not fooled by flattery

When is it sensible to use wise instead of prudent?

While the synonyms wise and prudent are close in meaning, wise suggests great understanding of people and of situations and unusual discernment and judgment in dealing with them.

How to be prudent

Prudent, as defined by Cambridge Dictionary, means “careful and avoiding risks.”

Adam Prudent was anything but in the $214,000 Wellington Agricultural Services Grand Prix CSI4*.

The American rider took all the risks in the final grand prix of the 2021 Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) on Saturday and rode away with the first 4* Grand Prix victory of his mount’s career.

“I pushed it to the limit this time and really asked [Baloutinue] to perform the best he could. I knew I had a lot of fast people behind me so wanted to really lay it down and take every risk I could, and it worked out quite well,” said the 31-year-old rider.

Prudent’s development of the 11-year-old Hanoverian gelding, however, has been anything but hurried. Baloutinue has been in his string for nearly four years. The pair made their international debut in March 2019 at WEF, but only moved up to four and five-star level this season.

“He is very careful,” said Prudent. “I haven’t really had a chance to go fast yet since this is only my third grand prix jump-off with him.”

Of the 42 deep starting field, eight combinations posted clear first rounds over the 1.60m track designed by Olaf Petersen Jr. (GER), including proven speed specialists Kent Farrington (USA) and Gazelle and Nayel Nassar (EGY) and Lucifer V.

Going early in the jump off, Prudent and Baloutinue didn’t just execute the winning trip—they lay down a blistering track. The pair stopped the clock at 35.28 seconds, over a second faster than runner-up Jim Ifko and Un Diamant des Forests’s time of 36.54. Farrington and Gazelle took third in 37.37.

All three riders plan to give their strings a well-deserved—and prudent—rest in the coming weeks.

I keep hearing about the importance of virtue and being virtuous, but no one explains what virtue is. Why dont you do a column about this?

St. Paul, in his Letter to the Philippians, captured the idea of virtue and the living of a virtuous life: “My brothers, your thoughts should be wholly directed to all that is true, all that deserves respect, all that is honest, pure, admirable, decent, virtuous or worthy of praise” (4:8). With this in mind, the classic definition of virtue is a habit or firm disposition that inclines a person to do good and to avoid evil. Characterized by stability, a virtuous person not only strives to be a good person, but also seeks what is good and chooses to act in a good way. Aristotle defined virtue as “that which makes both a person and what he does good.”

Dr. Joseph Pieper, one of the great Thomist theologians and an expert on virtue, provided this explanation: “The doctrine of virtue . has things to say about this person; it speaks both of the kind of being which is his when he enters the world, as a consequence of his createdness and the kind of being he ought to strive toward and attain to by being prudent, just, temperate and brave. The doctrine of virtue is one form of the doctrine of obligation, but one by nature free of regimentation and restriction” (The Four Cardinal Virtues).

On one hand, an individual can acquire human virtues through his own effort under the guidance of reason. Through education, by deliberately choosing to do what is good, and through perseverence, a person acquires and strengthens virtue.

On the other hand, with the help of divine grace from God, the individual finds greater strength and facility to practice these virtues. Through these grace-assisted virtues, which we would now call moral virtues, he gains self-mastery of his weakened nature due to original sin. In sum, these virtues help to forge that Christian character and to motivate a person to become God-like, in the best sense of the term.

There are four primary moral virtues, which are called the cardinal virtues: prudence, justice, fortitude and temperance. The word cardinal derives from the Latin cardo, meaning “hinge.” Consequently, these four virtues are called “cardinal” because all other virtues are categorized under them and hinge upon them. The Book of Wisdom of the Old Testament states, “For [wisdom] teaches temperance and prudence, justice and fortitude, and nothing in life is more useful for men than these” (8:7).

Prudence, the “mother” of all of the virtues, is the virtue by which a person recognizes his moral duty and the good means to accomplish it. Actually, prudence is part of the definition of goodness. A person can be prudent and good only simultaneously. No other virtue can contradict what is prudent. Therefore, what is prudent is substantially what is good, and prudence is the measure of justice, temperance and fortitude.

A prudent person looks at the concrete reality of a situation with a clear, honest objectivity; references and applies the moral truths (e.g the Ten Commandments or the teachings of the Church); makes a moral judgment; and then commands an action. Moreover, prudence also seeks to accomplish the action in a good way doing what is good in a good way.

Clearly, prudence is essential for the formation and operation of ones conscience. To be a prudent person, one must know Gods truth, just as to have a good conscience, one must know Gods truth. One cannot do what is good if one does not know the principles of truth and goodness.

To prudently examine a situation and then to determine a course of action, one must keep in mind three aspects of prudence: memoria, docilitas and solertia. Memoria simply means having a “true-to-being” memory which contains real things and events as they really are now and were in the past. Everyone must learn from his past experiences. Remembering what is to be done or avoided from past experiences helps to alert us to the occasions and causes of sin, to prevent us from making the same mistakes twice and to inspire us to do what is good. Be on guard: the falsification or denial of recollection is a grave impediment to exercising prudence.

Docilitas means that a person must have docility, an open-mindedness, which makes the person receptive to the advice and counsel of other people. A person should always seek and heed the wise counsel of those who are older, more experienced and more knowledgeable.

Finally, the exercise of prudence involves solertia, which is sagacity. Here a person has a clear vision of the situation at hand, foresees the goal and consequences of an action, considers the special circumstances involved and overcomes the temptation of injustice, cowardice, or intemperance. With solertia, a person acts in a timely manner but with due reflection and consideration to decide what is good and how to do the good. With a well-formed conscience attuned to Gods truth, and with the proper exercise of memoria, docilitas and solertia, a person will act prudently.

Contrary vices to prudence include precipitance (acting impulsively), inconstancy (changing resolutions too quickly), negligence and losing sight of ones supernatural destiny, namely eternal life. Perhaps the last vice is most prevalent today: too many people act without regard to their eternal judgment and without setting their sights on Heaven. The prudent person seeks to always do what is good in the eyes of God so as one day to be joined to His everlasting goodness in Heaven. After all, Jesus asked, “What profit would a man show if he were to gain the whole world and destroy himself in the process?” (Mt 16:26).

Given this introduction to the cardinal virtues and to the virtue of prudence, next week we will continue the discussion on the virtues of justice, fortitude and temperance.

Saunders, Rev. William. “Prudence: Mother of All Virtues.” Arlington Catholic Herald.

This article is reprinted with permission from Arlington Catholic Herald.

How to be prudent

Prudent, as defined by Cambridge Dictionary, means “careful and avoiding risks.”

Adam Prudent was anything but in the $214,000 Wellington Agricultural Services Grand Prix CSI4*.

The American rider took all the risks in the final grand prix of the 2021 Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) on Saturday and rode away with the first 4* Grand Prix victory of his mount’s career.

“I pushed it to the limit this time and really asked [Baloutinue] to perform the best he could. I knew I had a lot of fast people behind me so wanted to really lay it down and take every risk I could, and it worked out quite well,” said the 31-year-old rider.

Prudent’s development of the 11-year-old Hanoverian gelding, however, has been anything but hurried. Baloutinue has been in his string for nearly four years. The pair made their international debut in March 2019 at WEF, but only moved up to four and five-star level this season.

“He is very careful,” said Prudent. “I haven’t really had a chance to go fast yet since this is only my third grand prix jump-off with him.”

Of the 42 deep starting field, eight combinations posted clear first rounds over the 1.60m track designed by Olaf Petersen Jr. (GER), including proven speed specialists Kent Farrington (USA) and Gazelle and Nayel Nassar (EGY) and Lucifer V.

Going early in the jump off, Prudent and Baloutinue didn’t just execute the winning trip—they lay down a blistering track. The pair stopped the clock at 35.28 seconds, over a second faster than runner-up Jim Ifko and Un Diamant des Forests’s time of 36.54. Farrington and Gazelle took third in 37.37.

All three riders plan to give their strings a well-deserved—and prudent—rest in the coming weeks.

Definition & Examples of the Prudent Investor Rule

How to be prudent

The prudent investor rule is a law that requires fiduciaries to act responsibly with funds entrusted to them. In other words, the prudent investor rule prevents financial advisors from acting too recklessly with their clients’ funds. Modern Portfolio Theory guides the prudent investor rule.

Keep reading to get a better sense of how the prudent investor rule affects your investments.

What Is the Prudent Investor Rule?

The prudent investor rule essentially means that, when a person is given discretionary control over another person’s assets, they must make investments that a person of reasonable intelligence, discretion, and prudence could be expected to make. This means choosing investments that give the overall portfolio a low risk of permanent loss.

  • Alternate names: Prudent person rule, prudent man rule

It’s fairly common to hear the prudent investor rule referred to as the “prudent man rule.” The court judgment that created this concept was written at a time when legal language defaulted to male pronouns and trustees were assumed to be men. Many organizations have updated the language to address these antiquated ideas, but the legal text and some organizations still call it the “prudent man rule.”

How Does the Prudent Investor Rule Work?

When it was originally written, the prudent investor rule applied to each investment individually. However, as more people began to understand the benefits of diversification, the rule was amended to reflect Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT).   MPT allows for greater risks on individual investments, as long as the risks are reasonable in the context of the overall portfolio. Therefore, risks are managed without sacrificing too much potential for gains.

While the rule was relaxed regarding individual investment risks, there are still limitations. For example, someone managing a trust fund or brokerage account under the prudent investor rule would not purchase short-term, out-of-the-money options, penny stocks, or junk bonds.

In general, you can expect a trustee following the prudent investor rule to:

  • Diversify assets to reduce risks
  • Maintain sufficient liquidity (including bonds and FDIC-insured deposits) to fund cash flow needs and avoid being forced to sell at an inopportune time
  • Judge each security or investment position in the portfolio on its own stand-alone merits and reject any that are deemed unreasonably risky
  • Remain loyal to the person for whom they are managing money by fully disclosing any decisions
  • Regularly monitor investments for fundamental changes in the nature or risks of the holdings

Legal Ramifications

If a fiduciary breaches the prudent investor rule, and you can prove that they purposely took an unreasonably risky position, you may be able to sue for damages. This potentially allows you to recover some of your losses by winning a court judgment. The bar is set high, so portfolio losses alone won’t help you win, especially during recessions (when most people are experiencing losses).

To win a case, you’ve got to prove not just that your investment did poorly, but that your fiduciary should have known that it would perform poorly. For example, you may have a strong case if your fiduciary used margin debt or put 50% of your assets in a single speculative biotech stock awaiting FDA approval for a new wonder drug.

Legal applications of the prudent investor rule will also depend on state law. Consult a legal professional if you feel like your fiduciary has breached this rule.

The History of the Prudent Investor Rule

Though the concept has been updated more recently, the prudent investor rule’s origins date back to the early 1800s and a wealthy man named John McLean. When he died, he left money in a trust that was meant to provide his wife with passive income. Upon her death, McLean instructed that the remaining funds were to be divided between two charitable beneficiaries, Harvard College and Massachusetts General Hospital.

However, when Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital finally received the donations, it was far less than they expected. They sued the trustee, pointing to evidence that the trust lost value because of investment choices.

The case made it to the Massachusetts Supreme Court, where, in 1830, Justice Samuel Putnam’s opinion included the now-famous passage, “All that can be required of a trustee is, that he shall conduct himself faithfully and exercise a sound discretion. He is to observe how men of prudence, discretion, and intelligence manage their own affairs, not in regard to speculation, but in regard to the permanent disposition of their funds, considering the probable income as well as the probable safety of the capital to be invested.”