How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter

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How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter

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How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter

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About Cisko

How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter

Welcome to my site, my name is Gil Guerra Jr, AKA Cisko Master Gunfighter. I have been in the sport of shooting since I can remember. I began competing from the age of 14 and I have never looked back. I am passionate about what I do and I enjoy putting on a show for my FANS! Over the years, I have gained crucial skills through hours of practice and hard work with all types of firearms. One of my specialties is the fast-draw, with emphasis on speed and pinpoint accuracy, I have accumulated many awards and won many championships.

Action movie watchers often do not know the correct technique that is supposed to be used in the scenes of a movie. They might even be watching actors use incorrect technique and think that is the correct way to do it. Wouldn’t it be better to watch a movie where the actors are shooting the guns the way they are supposed to be shot? I would think so!

That’s where I come in. I specialize in speed shooting with western guns and most other firearms as well. I also have knowledge and experience with fencing, swordplay, shooting a bow and arrow, knife throwing, and have a martial arts background.

I would like to train actors to shoot guns or at least teach them the correct form and motions. I also want to play acting roles in movies. Example roles that I could qualify for are: a cowboy, pirate, modern Hispanic man, and many others. I am a Hispanic man with long dark hair and facial hair so that would play into many roles for action movies.

Achievements

With thousands of hours under my belt, I can list many achievements over the years, here are just a few of many:

    40 years of fast draw competition experience 10 Time Fast Draw World Champion Five Seasons on Impossible Shots TV Show
    Numerous Other Shooting Titles Instructional Fast Draw DVD Continues to Compete at World Class Level
    Branching Into Tactical Firearms on Impossible Shots Worlds Fast Draw Association Fastest Gun Alive Title Cowboy Fast Draw Association Fastest Gun Alive Title

Handguns are designed to be held in one hand and for easy carry. Handguns can be worn on the hip, slipped into a purse or in some cases even in pants pockets.

Handguns come in a variety of sizes; some are so small they can fit in the palm of your hand, while others are large enough that you wouldn’t dream of slipping it into your pocket.

Consumers can choose from single shot handguns, revolvers or semi-automatics. A single-shot is just that, a bullet is placed in the chamber and once fired another bullet must be placed in the gun before it is ready to fire, if you are in to guns you might ask yourself of what is the best beginner airsoft sniper rifle? contact Technomono, this is a piece you will enjoy even as a hobby.

Revolvers consist of a revolving chamber meant to hold several bullets at once, meaning the gun can be fired more than once without the need to reload after each fire. A semi-automatic means part of the mechanism used to fire one shot, puts the next shot into position and ready to fire.

Shooters use Colts and other single-action originals, copies and clones.

From across the town square in Springfield, Missouri, James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok and Davis Tutt chose to settle an argument that had begun the previous night at a card game. Both men entered the square with holstered revolvers when suddenly both men pulled and fired. Tutt’s shot went wild as the ball from Hickok’s Navy Colt slammed into his opponent’s heart. It was July 21, 1865, and what had taken place was pretty much the only example of a Hollywood-style gunfight in the real Wild West.

Today’s competitive sport of Cowboy Action Shooting uses the ammunition and firearms of the Old West but, fortunately, does not allow participants to face each other. In fact, trained safety personnel strictly supervise the loading, unloading and staging of the guns. And though Westerns no longer dominate the big or small screen, the 92,000-plus members of the Single Action Shooting Society (SASS) dress up in period clothes to compete with cowboy-era guns on combat-style ranges. But Cowboy Action Shooting wasn’t conceived until 1981, and SASS wasn’t founded until 1987. Three decades earlier came Fast Draw, a shooting sport in which a participant could pretend to beWild Bill, the fictional Marshal Matt Dillon or even Davis Tutt.

When the so-called adult Westerns (referring to grown-up interest, not obscene material) debuted on TV in 1955 with The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp and Gunsmoke, it kicked off a colossal demand for six-shooters and the holsters to carry them. During the 1930s the sale of Colt Single Action Army “Peacemakers” (aka Model Ps) had fallen to 300 a year, and during the war years production ceased altogether. But in 1955 Colt followed the lead of Great Western Arms, which was making a Colt copy, and Bill Ruger, who created his powerful single-action Blackhawk revolver. At the height of the Fast Draw craze in the late 1950s Colt was selling 3,000 of its Model P six-shooters a week, or about 150,000 a year.

Filmmakers needed someone to teach gun handling to actors, and they found that expertise in two very fast shooters. Rodd Redwing was a Chickasaw Indian who started in Hollywood with Cecil B. DeMille in 1931 and was an outstanding exhibition shooter in the style of Annie Oakley and Ed McGivern. Redwing taught Alan Ladd for the classic 1953 Western Shane and Glenn Ford for the 1956 film The Fastest Gun Alive. Even faster was Arvo Ojala, whose family emigrated from Finland to Washington state. In 1950 Ojala opened a leather shop in Los Angeles, across the street from Universal Studios, and began making holsters. He designed and patented a metal-lined Buscadero-style rig that tied down to one’s leg. Ojala’s holster hung from a slot in the gun belt and was constructed of two pieces of stiff saddle leather with a piece of steel in between. This meant almost no friction on the gun when drawn from the holster. Ojala taught stars to thumbcock the gun while in the holster, so all one had to do was level the gun and pull the trigger. By the late 1950s you would be hard-pressed to find a Western star not trained by Ojala and not wearing one of his holsters.

I bought my Arvo Ojala Fast Draw holster in 1958 and paid about $50 for it. That was twice what I had paid for my Crosman Arms pellet gun, which started me out in Fast Draw. I had to have the best gear, since I needed to face the TV screen whenever Matt Dillon (played by James Arness) stepped out onto Dodge City’s Front Street at the start of each weekly episode of Gunsmoke to meet that man in black. That man was none other than Arvo Ojala. Arvo was fastest each week, but we all figured he missed and Matt didn’t.

By that time Fast Draw had taken off as a sport, and clubs were forming nationwide. Soon there were thousands of clubs whose members coveted the title of “Fastest Gun Alive.” From the beginning it was understood that live ammunition would not be safe with this sport. Two types of shooting emerged. One used blank ammo fired close range at balloon targets, and the other used bullets made from wax propelled by shotgun primers at man-shaped silhouette targets of wood or metal.

Dee Woolem was the “Father of Fast Draw.” While working as a stuntman at Knott’s Berry Farm amusement park in Anaheim, Calif., he wanted to see how fast he was with the Colt he was using to rob trains. Soon the other stuntmen at Knott’s wanted to see if they were faster than him. So Woolem invented a clock that timed the draw speed in hundredths of a second. The sound of the blank turned off the clock. The first Fast Draw contest was held at Knott’s Berry Farm in 1954 and included 12 shooters, with the winner getting two chicken dinners.

The new sport attracted the attention of celebrities, with Jerry Lewis and Sammy Davis Jr. climbing on board. The longtime president of Continental Airlines, Bob Six, even paid Arvo Ojala $500 to teach him and five other executives how to shoot like Marshal Dillon. They called themselves “The Six-Shooters” and traveled on airplanes wearing cowboy outfits that included guns. Air travel is a bit different these days.

Fast Draw contests certainly were fun and challenging, calling for considerable athletic skill, but it was a narrow niche. And it wasn’t a good spectator sport, as every shooter walked to the firing line and repeated what the shooter before had done. Unless you had a chance to win or knew the shooter personally, it wasn’t much fun to watch. But those of us who grew up on Westerns still loved the history, the look and the guns that made the Old West famous. In 1982 a group of Southern California shooters calling themselves “The Wild Bunch” held a shooting competition at a local range. That contest, which they called End of Trail, drew 65 registered shooters. Soon hundreds of men, and some women, wanted to play this new game.

In 1987 these shooting enthusiasts formed the Single Action Shooting Society [www.sassnet.com], the governing body of Cowboy Action Shooting. The game is played much like a police or military combat course and requires two single-action handguns, a lever-action rifle and a shotgun, all based on weapons used prior to 1900. Shooters may use original firearms, but most opt for clones or copies of antique guns. Several European firearms companies now import close copies of Colt, Winchester, Remington, Smith & Wesson and other period weapons. The contests are scored by time, and misses are penalized by an extra five seconds. At the end of the event the shooter with the lowest time wins.

When I joined SASS about 25 years ago, there were 2,000 members, and now we are closing in on 100,000. Our love of the Old West and the gunfighter legend is far from dead. Even Fast Draw remains active, promoted and preserved by the World, Ohio and Cowboy Fast Draw associations. Every once in a while Hollywood even makes a Western, and we are glad they do, but it is SASS and the many club shoots that allow some of us to live in a cowboy fantasy world.

Originally published in the October 2013 issue of Wild West. To subscribe, click here.

Old Pueblo Gunfighters Club was established in 2010, however Cowboy Fast Draw has been around a long time.
How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter
What is Cowboy Fast Draw ?

Cowboy Fast Draw shooting is a way for people, who enjoy the old west genre, to get together and experience the “Old West”. We take you back to the Gunfighter days when you are called out to the street at high noon to trade lead with the fastest lead slingers! Peruse the website and let us know if you would like to come out and see what we’re all about! We will provide all the gear for people trying out for the first time!

Cowboy Fast Draw is one of the fastest growing cowboy shooting sports in the world. Shooters dress in the 1800’s period clothing and shoot .45 caliber western style single action pistols. Instead of lead, we use shotgun primers with wax bullets. Our targets have a light in the center that controls the action. When the light comes on, the shooters draw their pistols and shoot at the target while being timed to the thousandths of a second. We compete against other shooters for best time and hit accuracy. The target blinks on and off for the winner!

Our guns are real single action .45 caliber six shooters with a minimum barrel length of 4.5 inches just like the ones used in the old west; Although these guns are made for and can shoot live ammunition, we shoot a wax bullet propelled by a 209 shotgun primer – still quite a bang!. Our holsters are pre-1900’s style.

How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter

On this page, you will find not only the best western gun rigs available anywhere, but some of our chaps and chinks as well.

Gordon was part of the founding of SASS and his love of old west history and gun leather are reflected in the period correct rigs we can build. We can make just about any style of historical holster and belt you might want.

The Andy Anderson gun rigs were made popular by a number of movies and the fast draw craze of the 50’s and 60’s. Gordon spent some time with Andy in his Hollywood Gunfighter Shop and not only learned how the rigs were made, he was allowed to bring the patterns with him to his own shop. We made quite a few of these rigs when Gordon and I worked together. While I never got to meet Andy, I have spent hours studying several of Andy’s original rigs and discovering the genius of his methods. Now I can say that if you want a rig that really matches those that used to come from his shop, you have come to the right place.

Single Action Shooting Society, Cowboy Fast Draw Association, Mounted Shooting sports and field use all have different specific needs. I have enjoyed these sports, either as a participant or an avid spectator. I am a member of SASS and a Life member of CFDA. I can build you a rig that will do the job and have the look you want. I have made many of the favorite movie rigs and offer those as well. They are as exact as I can make them from watching the movies over and over. Magnificent Seven, Once Upon a Time in the West, Tombstone, John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Gunsmoke, and even some of the old “B” westerns have provided patterns for customers’ rigs.

Click on the thumbnails below to see a larger photo and description.

Shooters use Colts and other single-action originals, copies and clones.

From across the town square in Springfield, Missouri, James Butler “Wild Bill” Hickok and Davis Tutt chose to settle an argument that had begun the previous night at a card game. Both men entered the square with holstered revolvers when suddenly both men pulled and fired. Tutt’s shot went wild as the ball from Hickok’s Navy Colt slammed into his opponent’s heart. It was July 21, 1865, and what had taken place was pretty much the only example of a Hollywood-style gunfight in the real Wild West.

Today’s competitive sport of Cowboy Action Shooting uses the ammunition and firearms of the Old West but, fortunately, does not allow participants to face each other. In fact, trained safety personnel strictly supervise the loading, unloading and staging of the guns. And though Westerns no longer dominate the big or small screen, the 92,000-plus members of the Single Action Shooting Society (SASS) dress up in period clothes to compete with cowboy-era guns on combat-style ranges. But Cowboy Action Shooting wasn’t conceived until 1981, and SASS wasn’t founded until 1987. Three decades earlier came Fast Draw, a shooting sport in which a participant could pretend to beWild Bill, the fictional Marshal Matt Dillon or even Davis Tutt.

When the so-called adult Westerns (referring to grown-up interest, not obscene material) debuted on TV in 1955 with The Life and Legend of Wyatt Earp and Gunsmoke, it kicked off a colossal demand for six-shooters and the holsters to carry them. During the 1930s the sale of Colt Single Action Army “Peacemakers” (aka Model Ps) had fallen to 300 a year, and during the war years production ceased altogether. But in 1955 Colt followed the lead of Great Western Arms, which was making a Colt copy, and Bill Ruger, who created his powerful single-action Blackhawk revolver. At the height of the Fast Draw craze in the late 1950s Colt was selling 3,000 of its Model P six-shooters a week, or about 150,000 a year.

Filmmakers needed someone to teach gun handling to actors, and they found that expertise in two very fast shooters. Rodd Redwing was a Chickasaw Indian who started in Hollywood with Cecil B. DeMille in 1931 and was an outstanding exhibition shooter in the style of Annie Oakley and Ed McGivern. Redwing taught Alan Ladd for the classic 1953 Western Shane and Glenn Ford for the 1956 film The Fastest Gun Alive. Even faster was Arvo Ojala, whose family emigrated from Finland to Washington state. In 1950 Ojala opened a leather shop in Los Angeles, across the street from Universal Studios, and began making holsters. He designed and patented a metal-lined Buscadero-style rig that tied down to one’s leg. Ojala’s holster hung from a slot in the gun belt and was constructed of two pieces of stiff saddle leather with a piece of steel in between. This meant almost no friction on the gun when drawn from the holster. Ojala taught stars to thumbcock the gun while in the holster, so all one had to do was level the gun and pull the trigger. By the late 1950s you would be hard-pressed to find a Western star not trained by Ojala and not wearing one of his holsters.

I bought my Arvo Ojala Fast Draw holster in 1958 and paid about $50 for it. That was twice what I had paid for my Crosman Arms pellet gun, which started me out in Fast Draw. I had to have the best gear, since I needed to face the TV screen whenever Matt Dillon (played by James Arness) stepped out onto Dodge City’s Front Street at the start of each weekly episode of Gunsmoke to meet that man in black. That man was none other than Arvo Ojala. Arvo was fastest each week, but we all figured he missed and Matt didn’t.

By that time Fast Draw had taken off as a sport, and clubs were forming nationwide. Soon there were thousands of clubs whose members coveted the title of “Fastest Gun Alive.” From the beginning it was understood that live ammunition would not be safe with this sport. Two types of shooting emerged. One used blank ammo fired close range at balloon targets, and the other used bullets made from wax propelled by shotgun primers at man-shaped silhouette targets of wood or metal.

Dee Woolem was the “Father of Fast Draw.” While working as a stuntman at Knott’s Berry Farm amusement park in Anaheim, Calif., he wanted to see how fast he was with the Colt he was using to rob trains. Soon the other stuntmen at Knott’s wanted to see if they were faster than him. So Woolem invented a clock that timed the draw speed in hundredths of a second. The sound of the blank turned off the clock. The first Fast Draw contest was held at Knott’s Berry Farm in 1954 and included 12 shooters, with the winner getting two chicken dinners.

The new sport attracted the attention of celebrities, with Jerry Lewis and Sammy Davis Jr. climbing on board. The longtime president of Continental Airlines, Bob Six, even paid Arvo Ojala $500 to teach him and five other executives how to shoot like Marshal Dillon. They called themselves “The Six-Shooters” and traveled on airplanes wearing cowboy outfits that included guns. Air travel is a bit different these days.

Fast Draw contests certainly were fun and challenging, calling for considerable athletic skill, but it was a narrow niche. And it wasn’t a good spectator sport, as every shooter walked to the firing line and repeated what the shooter before had done. Unless you had a chance to win or knew the shooter personally, it wasn’t much fun to watch. But those of us who grew up on Westerns still loved the history, the look and the guns that made the Old West famous. In 1982 a group of Southern California shooters calling themselves “The Wild Bunch” held a shooting competition at a local range. That contest, which they called End of Trail, drew 65 registered shooters. Soon hundreds of men, and some women, wanted to play this new game.

In 1987 these shooting enthusiasts formed the Single Action Shooting Society [www.sassnet.com], the governing body of Cowboy Action Shooting. The game is played much like a police or military combat course and requires two single-action handguns, a lever-action rifle and a shotgun, all based on weapons used prior to 1900. Shooters may use original firearms, but most opt for clones or copies of antique guns. Several European firearms companies now import close copies of Colt, Winchester, Remington, Smith & Wesson and other period weapons. The contests are scored by time, and misses are penalized by an extra five seconds. At the end of the event the shooter with the lowest time wins.

When I joined SASS about 25 years ago, there were 2,000 members, and now we are closing in on 100,000. Our love of the Old West and the gunfighter legend is far from dead. Even Fast Draw remains active, promoted and preserved by the World, Ohio and Cowboy Fast Draw associations. Every once in a while Hollywood even makes a Western, and we are glad they do, but it is SASS and the many club shoots that allow some of us to live in a cowboy fantasy world.

Originally published in the October 2013 issue of Wild West. To subscribe, click here.

How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter

On this page, you will find not only the best western gun rigs available anywhere, but some of our chaps and chinks as well.

Gordon was part of the founding of SASS and his love of old west history and gun leather are reflected in the period correct rigs we can build. We can make just about any style of historical holster and belt you might want.

The Andy Anderson gun rigs were made popular by a number of movies and the fast draw craze of the 50’s and 60’s. Gordon spent some time with Andy in his Hollywood Gunfighter Shop and not only learned how the rigs were made, he was allowed to bring the patterns with him to his own shop. We made quite a few of these rigs when Gordon and I worked together. While I never got to meet Andy, I have spent hours studying several of Andy’s original rigs and discovering the genius of his methods. Now I can say that if you want a rig that really matches those that used to come from his shop, you have come to the right place.

Single Action Shooting Society, Cowboy Fast Draw Association, Mounted Shooting sports and field use all have different specific needs. I have enjoyed these sports, either as a participant or an avid spectator. I am a member of SASS and a Life member of CFDA. I can build you a rig that will do the job and have the look you want. I have made many of the favorite movie rigs and offer those as well. They are as exact as I can make them from watching the movies over and over. Magnificent Seven, Once Upon a Time in the West, Tombstone, John Wayne, Clint Eastwood, Gunsmoke, and even some of the old “B” westerns have provided patterns for customers’ rigs.

Click on the thumbnails below to see a larger photo and description.

How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighterSASS Cowboy Action Shooting could be for you! Have you ever thought about what it’s like to be a cowboy or cowgirl in the 19 th century Old West? If you’ve fantasized about it, then dream no more because somewhere in your locality is a Cowboy Action Shooting (CAS) association that you can join.

This exciting and fun sport has been featured in a Fox News article entitled Shoot Like a Real Cowboy. Want to learn how to shoot like a genuine Wild West gunslinger? Well, CAS offers you that opportunity.

How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter

The Fox News article mentions the main aspects of the sport including the re-enactment of the Old West lifestyle and competition target shooting using pistol-caliber firearms from that era. Dressing in period costume and assuming an alias based on a real or fictional Western character add an authentic touch to the experience.

SASS cowboy action shooting is relatively new. It was started in 1981 by Harper Creigh, later to be known by his CAS alias Judge Roy Bean (SASS #1). An administrative and regulatory body was needed as the sport progressed. The Single Action Shooting Society (SASS) was created in 1987 for this reason.

Who else wants to be a SASS cowboy?

Fox News also mentioned that members receive special badges and get to choose their desired character alias upon registration. It also mentioned the shooting competition setup as well as the firearms required. The article also includes pointers and tips from CAS members.

How to become a cowboy fast draw gunfighter

Shawn Goggin alias “Irish Billy Jordan”, CAS shooter

SASS cowboy action shooting is not just about knocking over steel targets with period firearms. It is also about reliving the spirit of the Old West, learning the Cowboy Way, and having a lot of fun doing it.

Need to dress the part? Visit our CAS Western Shop.