How to become a famous dancer

How to become a famous dancer

Dancing as a career from time immemorial dance has dependably been a piece of Indian festivals. Be it wedding or honor services, the occasion can’t be finished without the shaking of a leg.

Moving is a characteristic piece of Indian culture. There are some outstanding established and society moves. These move frames are ordinary to specific parts of the nation and have gone up against the tone and surface of that area.

The two primary divisions of the movie are traditional and society frames. There are more frames regular to specific parts of the nation and these move shapes depend on antiquated move teach. Among the most mainstream traditional styles of movement seen in front of an audience is Bharatnatyam of Tamil Nadu, Odissi of Orissa, Kathakali of Kerala, Kuchipudi of Andhra Pradesh, Kathak of Lucknow and Jaipur and Manipuri of Manipur. There are a few different types of moves that fall into the classification of semi-established, people, show and hand to hand fighting adding to the scene of move in India.

There are a few different types of moves that fall into the classification of semi-established, people, show and hand to hand fighting adding to the scene of move in India.
Preparing for Dance can be begun from early age – five or six. Professions in this field can be that of an entertainer, instructor, and choreographer. On the off chance that you try to a profession in

On the off chance that you try to a profession in the movie, you ought to have an innate ability which can be honed with preparing and direction. There is no particular age to get the hang of moving. All you require is the self-control to ace the craftsmanship.
(Dancing Eligibility Criteria)
One needs an innate ability; preparing and direction can just sharpen these gifts. Preparing in move should begin as right on time as age six or less. The fundamental necessity for preparing in the move is 10+2. Be that as it may, for post graduate level courses, graduation in the subject is obligatory.
The term of courses: while endorsement course is one year, Bachelor courses are of three years and Diploma and Post Graduate level courses are of 2 years.

Individual properties: Main aptitudes required for this inventive calling are flexibility, feeling of musicality, beauty, arrange nearness notwithstanding an expressive facial and non-verbal communication and physical stamina.
(Dancing Career Roles)
Choreography:– Movement implies move creations, the gathering of artists and building up the grouping of moves. For this particular part, artists with extraordinary imaginative forces with the aptitude to translate music regarding moving are required. Choreographers work in films, in front of an audience, for TV and video music appears. Future prospects are brilliant for a choreographer as more stage and TV demonstrates are being sorted out nowadays.

Teaching:- This field requires a bent for educating, activity and tolerance. A Dance Teacher must have careful information of down to earth and hypothetical parts of the move. Artists who take up educating as a calling can discover occupations in schools, universities, colleges, move organizations.

Performing: – A performing craftsman must have the appealing appearance, outward appearance, ability to translate parts and in particular stage nearness. They should likewise be tuned into the enthusiasm of the overall population. Various roads are open for performing craftsmen. Other than shaping their own particular troupes they can invest significant time for training as well.
BULLA ENTERTAINMENT

18 June 2009 | By admin

How to become a famous dancer

(Helpful tips from ballet fiction)

1. Get yourself orphaned
Every reader of ballet fiction knows that becoming an orphan is the critical first step in a professional dancing career. The most convenient scenario is if they simply died when you were very young, like Drina’s parents in Jean Estoril’s popular Drina series from the ‘50s and ‘60s. But better still if you can …

2. Get yourself impressively orphaned
The mother of the mute main character of Clair-de-Lune, Cassandra Golds’ exquisite novel from 2004, was a famous ballerina herself and – can you believe it – actually died onstage, while dancing the role of a dying swan. Tragic, yes. But also a pretty cool detail for Clair-de-Lune’s future bio.

3. Get a horrid cousin
The next step after getting yourself orphaned is to obtain a horrid cousin. In Lorna Hill’s beloved Sadler’s Wells series, Veronica is forced to go and live with her aunt, uncle and horrid cousin, Fiona, after her father dies. Horrid cousins are integral personalities for the beginner dancer to be exposed to, as their backstabbing and bitchiness help prepare the novice for the professional dance world.

4. If your parents insist on staying alive, it’s preferable that they try to suffocate your dance dream
Many mothers in real life tend to be hyper-enthusiastic and totally supportive of their children’s dance careers. Ballet fiction demonstrates that these ballet mums are definitely going about it the wrong way. Far more conducive to a successful ballet career is if your mother tries to foil your ambitions at every plot point.

In Edward Stewart’s popular 1979 book Ballerina, one of the main characters, Christine, comes from a rich family whose mother doesn’t consider dance a worthwhile profession. Which of course only makes her daughter all the more determined to do it.

5. Get adopted by someone eccentric
If you’ve followed Steps 1 and 2 correctly and lost both your parents in a most moving way, you’ll definitely be in the market for an eccentric guardian. This could be an aunt or uncle, but it’s better if you can find an eccentric archaeologist to adopt you, as exemplified most charmingly in Noel Streatfeild’s 1936 favourite, Ballet Shoes.

6. Avoid getting dramatically murdered
Once you finally succeed in joining a professional ballet company, expect to become entangled in criminal intrigue, as per the highly popular ballet crime spoofs of the ‘30s and ‘40s written by Carol Brahms and SJ Simon.

The first in the series, A Bullet in the Ballet, opens during a performance of Petroushka with the main dancer being shot, followed swiftly by the murder of his replacement. It goes without saying that surviving such professional mishaps are crucial if you expect to have a long and rewarding dance career.

So you want to dance?

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How to become a famous dancer

Tom Werner/DigitalVision/Getty Images

So you want to become a dancer. Here are six steps to help you get started.

1. Choose a Dance Style

If you’d like to become a dancer, you should first spend some time choosing a dance style. Each type of dance is made up of techniques that need to be practiced and mastered. Your goals as a dancer will help you to decide which style of dance is right for you.

Also ask yourself: Do you want to dance professionally? Or do you simply want to learn for fun?

2. Find a Dance Class

Once you have decided to become a dancer, it is important to carefully choose a dance class. Your choice of a dance teacher is critical, especially if you plan to pursue dancing professionally. It is easy to form bad habits in the beginning and extremely hard to correct them. Most importantly, choose a teacher who you admire as a dancer.

Learn more about picking your class (or dance group) and teacher with tips for dance team tryouts and examples of things to look for in a dance teacher.

Note: You may have to try a few dance classes and teachers before you find the dance style and environment that resonates with you the best.

3. Know What to Wear

Your wardrobe of dance clothing will be determined by the type of dancer you choose to become. Special dance shoes will be required for many dance styles, including ballet slippers and eventually pointe shoes for ballet and tap shoes for tap.

Your dance teacher will probably have a preference for clothing, such as a black leotard with pink tights for ballet, or black dance pants for jazz dance.

4. Know What to Expect

If you are enrolled in your very first dance class, make a point to tour the dance studio before your first day. Many dance studios are large and airy, with at least one full wall of mirrors. The floors of dance studios should be soft, as dancing on hard floors may cause injuries.

Class structures will vary for different dance styles. Expect a hip-hop class to be much more relaxed than a class of classical ballet.

5. Study the Terms and Phrases

Confused about a dance step? Check out a dance glossary to become familiar with the terms for various dance styles. Learn the names of basic ballet steps (often in French), ballroom dancer lingo and much more.

6. Get Connected to the Community

Get connected with other dancers and the dance community, both in person and online. Check out online dance forums and social media groups to share moves, ask for advice, talk about dancing and make new friends.

Also, sign up for other related free newsletters, like health and fitness, to enhance your knowledge about the the body, which will ultimately contribute to your success as a dancer.

Definition & Examples of Professional Dancer

How to become a famous dancer

A professional dancer is a paid performing artist who uses movement to convey stories and ideas.

Learn more about this career.

What Is a Professional Dancer?

Professional dancers perform dance numbers on stage, in movies, on television, in music videos, at theme parks, on cruise ships, and more. They usually have expertise in a particular type of dance, such as jazz, ballet, modern, ballroom, or tap, but some excel in more than one of these areas.

The median hourly wage for professional dancers was $17.49 in 2019. During that period, the lowest 10% of dancers earned less than $10.10 per hour, and the highest 10% earned more than $43.41 per hour.  

How Professional Dancers Work

Being a professional dancer is a physically demanding job that often takes a lot of hard work. Dancers must practice regularly and prepare for auditions and rehearsals. They also spend a great deal of time learning complicated routines and must be able to remember choreography. In some cases, working dancers must be able to perform multiple high-energy shows each day.

Dancers can perform solo or in a group. They may dance on stage in front of a live audience in a theatrical production or they may be filmed for TV, commercials, music videos, movies, internet productions, and more.

Dancers who work in theme parks or on cruise ships are sometimes required to do additional jobs off stage.

How to Become a Professional Dancer

The education and training required to become a professional dancer varies depending on the type and level of dance.

Many, but not all, professional dancers begin their training when they’re children or teens through after-school and summer dance programs and begin to pursue a career once they turn 18.

But regardless of when they began training, dancers must usually spend a great deal of time taking classes and practicing in order to begin doing it professionally.

A college degree isn’t necessary to become a professional dancer, but one is usually required for those who want to become dance teachers or choreographers. Many dancers, especially those who want a career in theater, also choose to grow their acting and singing skills, as well.

The National Association of Schools of Dance has accredited more than 80 educational programs for dance and dance-related disciplines.

Beyond being able to perform dance routines, professional dancers also need a number of soft skills in order to succeed in their career. They include:

  • Active listening: Dancers must be able to give their full attention to choreographers and directors.
  • Active learning: They need the ability to easily pick up new dance routines.
  • Creativity: Artistic ability allows them to convey ideas through movements.
  • Interpersonal Skills: Dancers often have to work as part of a team that may include other dancers, choreographers, and other types performers. They must be able to interact with them successfully.

Disadvantages of Being a Professional Dancer

Being a professional dancer may seem like a glamorous career to many, but it does come with some downsides. They include:

How to become a famous dancer

Jan 3, 2016 · 6 min read

In this post I will tell you the secret to becoming a massive DJ or electronic music producer that NO ONE IS TELLING YOU ABOUT. It’s actually quite simple.

This post is specifically for those people who have never really made music or DJed an event before, but who still want to reap the benefits of being exorbitantly successful.

Alright, are you ready for the secret? Here it is:

The secret to becoming a famous DJ/Producer in 6 weeks when starting from scratch is…

(Unless you have oodles of cash on hand and a network of people already in the scene that can hook you up with marketers, ghost producers, an audience of hungry fans…)

Because it’s unrealistic to press fast forward

The reason that an average person can’t dive headfirst into a career in music entertainment without skills and a wealthy person can is due to availability of the resources to compensate for the lack of skill or audience. In short: you don’t have to learn the skills if you can pay everyone on the planet to do it for you (there are exceptions though).

For the rest of us, here is a far more down-to-earth 6-week guide to getting started in electronic music:

Week 1: Get the tools and mess around with them

How to become a famous dancer

Are you going to be DJing? You’ll need to acquire some sort of controller or turntable (which usually comes with software). You can download the software without the hardware, but it doesn’t translate over to the physical world as nicely when you need to actually do some DJing with your hands. It’s best to start with the right tools.

Are you going to be producing? You’ll need to grab a copy of a digital audio workstation (DAW) software application. I use Ableton Live, but there are other popular choices like Pro Tools, FL Studio, Reason, and Cubase.

Take your tools and try them out without guidance. Let your brain get used to how the software/hardware feels. Think about what you want to happen and try to make it happen. You’ll probably feel frustrated at first because you don’t know the “landscape” but this is a normal part of the process.

Week 2: Make something from start to finish

How to become a famous dancer

In your first week you probably got a handle on the tools that you will be using. In your second week, you should make a full song (3 minutes of music) or DJ mix (30 minutes, perhaps) and immediately put it online (Soundcloud, YouTube, Facebook, whatever) so that a couple of your friends can critique it. Extra points if one of your friends is already making music or being a DJ.

Yeah, it will definitely suck. There’s a pretty good chance that it will suck a lot less than you expected, though.

Take careful consideration of your feedback. What this will do is give you focus points for next week…

Weeks 3 and 4: Use tutorials to work on focus points

How to become a famous dancer

At this point, you should start looking for guidance to help you through the things that stood out to those people who gave you feedback.

Perhaps you are choosing some songs in your DJ set that don’t transition well together. Why is that? Google “dj song transition basics”. Go on YouTube and learn about EQing your tracks so they blend better. Whatever you think you need to know, the info is out there.

For music production, you might have gotten feedback like “your drums need work” or “this mix is really quiet”. There are TONS of tutorials on the tools you may not have touched yet like compressors and limiters and EQ. Start learning more about the tools and watch other producers make music to see what types of things they are doing. You may not understand it all but it will start to make more sense as you practice.

Oh, and as you get educated, make more stuff. You should probably have two more songs/mixes done by the end of Week 4. Send them to your friends for feedback. Always. Get. Feedback.

Week 5: Think about your branding

How to become a famous dancer

At this point, you are in the habit of working on your skills and getting feedback. if you want to show these skills to the world, you’ll need to create a couple of outlets for people to find you, and you’ll need to create a personal brand to let people recognize you in the crowd of other people doing the same thing.

Branding is super hard. People get college degrees in branding, and companies hire whole teams to get branding right. Branding can make or break a business and their future opportunities. Luckily for you, no one knows who you are yet so you don’t have to nail it.

However, you need to pick a DJ/producer name that you are 100% sure that you won’t change anytime soon. If it’s your own name, it might be easier. Some people prefer to make something up. Whatever you do, consistency will be your strongest asset as you build an audience and changing the name makes things confusing. Fans really don’t care that much about band names unless they are offensive or overly long. I like to think about how silly the name “Apple” really is despite how successful they are. It’s an arbitrary object, like naming your company “Octopus” or “Elbow”.

Once you have that name, set up a page on Mixcloud, Soundcloud, Facebook, YouTube, Bandcamp, or whatever (or a combination of these). Basically, it will be a place to post your sets/songs for the world to see. Upload a cool photo and banner. Tell your friends that it exists. Try not to spam.

Week 6: Drop everything and do other stuff that isn’t music

How to become a famous dancer

Stop producing, stop mixing, stop listening to electronic music.

Read a book, do your laundry, hang out with friends and see a movie, eat at a restaurant you haven’t been to yet, get some exercise, listen to Norwegian folk music on Spotify, write a blog post on Medium (how meta!), play fetch with your cat, clean your kitchen, go to your actual day job and enjoy it.

If you are serious about having a career in music production or DJing (the kind that involves making your own way and not commercial music, like making theme songs for disney or DJing a wedding), then you’re going to be in for a long haul. Remember to take a break from the work and enjoy life. There is no guarantee that you will have that golden opportunity come your way, as with all things.

If you never get the chance to perform for a living, will all of the work be a waste of time? The answer to that is pretty important. Replace “perform for a living” with “get married” or “exercise” and you’ll see how it works.

How to become a famous dancer

For the future

Keep up the cycle of practice and feedback until you feel comfortable showing that music to strangers. Ask around for ways to get DJ or performance gigs in your local area and give it a try. You will definitely be an opener, but it will be a nice way to test your nerves and get some feedback from people you don’t know. Again, don’t spam. Exposure naturally takes time.

And that’s it really. Now that you’re rolling, you have a compass to follow. Create, learn, iterate. Be humble and thoughtful. Enjoy the ride while you’re on it.

How to become a famous dancer

Jan 3, 2016 · 6 min read

In this post I will tell you the secret to becoming a massive DJ or electronic music producer that NO ONE IS TELLING YOU ABOUT. It’s actually quite simple.

This post is specifically for those people who have never really made music or DJed an event before, but who still want to reap the benefits of being exorbitantly successful.

Alright, are you ready for the secret? Here it is:

The secret to becoming a famous DJ/Producer in 6 weeks when starting from scratch is…

(Unless you have oodles of cash on hand and a network of people already in the scene that can hook you up with marketers, ghost producers, an audience of hungry fans…)

Because it’s unrealistic to press fast forward

The reason that an average person can’t dive headfirst into a career in music entertainment without skills and a wealthy person can is due to availability of the resources to compensate for the lack of skill or audience. In short: you don’t have to learn the skills if you can pay everyone on the planet to do it for you (there are exceptions though).

For the rest of us, here is a far more down-to-earth 6-week guide to getting started in electronic music:

Week 1: Get the tools and mess around with them

How to become a famous dancer

Are you going to be DJing? You’ll need to acquire some sort of controller or turntable (which usually comes with software). You can download the software without the hardware, but it doesn’t translate over to the physical world as nicely when you need to actually do some DJing with your hands. It’s best to start with the right tools.

Are you going to be producing? You’ll need to grab a copy of a digital audio workstation (DAW) software application. I use Ableton Live, but there are other popular choices like Pro Tools, FL Studio, Reason, and Cubase.

Take your tools and try them out without guidance. Let your brain get used to how the software/hardware feels. Think about what you want to happen and try to make it happen. You’ll probably feel frustrated at first because you don’t know the “landscape” but this is a normal part of the process.

Week 2: Make something from start to finish

How to become a famous dancer

In your first week you probably got a handle on the tools that you will be using. In your second week, you should make a full song (3 minutes of music) or DJ mix (30 minutes, perhaps) and immediately put it online (Soundcloud, YouTube, Facebook, whatever) so that a couple of your friends can critique it. Extra points if one of your friends is already making music or being a DJ.

Yeah, it will definitely suck. There’s a pretty good chance that it will suck a lot less than you expected, though.

Take careful consideration of your feedback. What this will do is give you focus points for next week…

Weeks 3 and 4: Use tutorials to work on focus points

How to become a famous dancer

At this point, you should start looking for guidance to help you through the things that stood out to those people who gave you feedback.

Perhaps you are choosing some songs in your DJ set that don’t transition well together. Why is that? Google “dj song transition basics”. Go on YouTube and learn about EQing your tracks so they blend better. Whatever you think you need to know, the info is out there.

For music production, you might have gotten feedback like “your drums need work” or “this mix is really quiet”. There are TONS of tutorials on the tools you may not have touched yet like compressors and limiters and EQ. Start learning more about the tools and watch other producers make music to see what types of things they are doing. You may not understand it all but it will start to make more sense as you practice.

Oh, and as you get educated, make more stuff. You should probably have two more songs/mixes done by the end of Week 4. Send them to your friends for feedback. Always. Get. Feedback.

Week 5: Think about your branding

How to become a famous dancer

At this point, you are in the habit of working on your skills and getting feedback. if you want to show these skills to the world, you’ll need to create a couple of outlets for people to find you, and you’ll need to create a personal brand to let people recognize you in the crowd of other people doing the same thing.

Branding is super hard. People get college degrees in branding, and companies hire whole teams to get branding right. Branding can make or break a business and their future opportunities. Luckily for you, no one knows who you are yet so you don’t have to nail it.

However, you need to pick a DJ/producer name that you are 100% sure that you won’t change anytime soon. If it’s your own name, it might be easier. Some people prefer to make something up. Whatever you do, consistency will be your strongest asset as you build an audience and changing the name makes things confusing. Fans really don’t care that much about band names unless they are offensive or overly long. I like to think about how silly the name “Apple” really is despite how successful they are. It’s an arbitrary object, like naming your company “Octopus” or “Elbow”.

Once you have that name, set up a page on Mixcloud, Soundcloud, Facebook, YouTube, Bandcamp, or whatever (or a combination of these). Basically, it will be a place to post your sets/songs for the world to see. Upload a cool photo and banner. Tell your friends that it exists. Try not to spam.

Week 6: Drop everything and do other stuff that isn’t music

How to become a famous dancer

Stop producing, stop mixing, stop listening to electronic music.

Read a book, do your laundry, hang out with friends and see a movie, eat at a restaurant you haven’t been to yet, get some exercise, listen to Norwegian folk music on Spotify, write a blog post on Medium (how meta!), play fetch with your cat, clean your kitchen, go to your actual day job and enjoy it.

If you are serious about having a career in music production or DJing (the kind that involves making your own way and not commercial music, like making theme songs for disney or DJing a wedding), then you’re going to be in for a long haul. Remember to take a break from the work and enjoy life. There is no guarantee that you will have that golden opportunity come your way, as with all things.

If you never get the chance to perform for a living, will all of the work be a waste of time? The answer to that is pretty important. Replace “perform for a living” with “get married” or “exercise” and you’ll see how it works.

How to become a famous dancer

For the future

Keep up the cycle of practice and feedback until you feel comfortable showing that music to strangers. Ask around for ways to get DJ or performance gigs in your local area and give it a try. You will definitely be an opener, but it will be a nice way to test your nerves and get some feedback from people you don’t know. Again, don’t spam. Exposure naturally takes time.

And that’s it really. Now that you’re rolling, you have a compass to follow. Create, learn, iterate. Be humble and thoughtful. Enjoy the ride while you’re on it.

How to become a famous dancer

It’s a fact that will either depress you or make incredibly hopeful: You don’t have to be talented in order to become famous anymore. And now, The CW is cashing in on our fame-seeking culture with their new reality show Famous in 12. The series will follow the Artiaga family for 12 weeks in Los Angeles, Calif. as they attempt to become famous within their various industries.

From “normals” shooting to stardom through reality shows (think the entire wait staff on Vanderpump Rules) to YouTube sensations reaching star-status to one of the biggest names in Hollywood having absolutely no discernible skills other than marketing herself (Kim Kardashian, or her new married name, Kim Kardashian West) it’s no wonder that everyone is trying to get in on the fame game. After all, becoming famous seems kind of like a cake walk — who wouldn’t want to join the ranks of their favorite celebrities?

Aiding the Artiaga family in their endeavor is TMZ’s Harvey Levin (he’s now making fun of people before they become famous — that’s how you get a leg up on the competition) and some so-called “fame experts” who will have them participate in “social media challenges” in order to rank just how famous this family has become in their weeks in Hollywood.

One thing that this family has going for them is that the whole family is actually talented. (At least, they all think that they are talented. Time will tell.) This family isn’t looking to keep up with the Kardashians: they want to be famous because they actually have some skill that they want to pursue. Within this one family there is at least one aspiring dancer, singer, writer, DJ (don’t laugh, but it’s the dad), and model. Combine actual talents with the advice from these “fame experts” and I think we might have a Kardashian-level empire on our hands. (With any luck, it will be an empire that contributes more than branded glitter nail polish and Sears shift dresses to our universe.)

The family has the skills and a team schooling them in all things fame — but how exactly should these guys go about getting famous? Well, as someone with hundreds of Twitter followers (well, like, several hundred) and a face that has made people say, “I’m sorry, did we go to high school together? What’s your name, again?” I have some choice advice for the Artiaga family. Here are the steps you need to take in order to really become famous (in no particular order) straight from the girl who saw Pete Wentz in Pinkberry and played it cool.

We all know that there’s no set path to becoming a professional dancer. Aside from the years of training, dedication, and hard work, no two dancer’s career paths will be exactly the same.

As professional dancers, we get to flex our creative muscles and chart our own course, which means that the possibilities are endless.

Although the idea of creating your own path may sound exciting and adventurous, it can also be a little scary. Having huge dreams without a clear direction can even be downright overwhelming. Which is why I always recommend dancers have some type of plan when first starting out.

A dancer’s career journey is a lot like using a GPS system. You start where you are, plug in the destination, and then several different routes will populate. The only difference here is that your pathways aren’t pre-calculated for you. YOU get to decide that yourself.

Now back to this plan. Your career plan should include your specific dance interests, where you’ve seen the type of work you’d like to do, studio locations for training, and how you’ll make money while you build your career. The plan doesn’t need to be etched in stone. In fact, it should evolve as you do. The more you learn about what it takes to build a dance career, the more you may need to adjust your plan.

So, your starting point is here. ready to be a #workingdancer. Next, you’ll need to know where you’re going. Questions to consider are, what types of jobs would I like to have? What type of lifestyle do I want?

To help you answer this question, I’ve created a list of 4 types of dance careers and how they make money. It’s important to note that the four career types I’m about to share are NOT the only types of careers you can have as a professional dancer. You can have any type of dance-related career you choose. You just need to put a plan in place, then get to work.

Here’s some insight to help you find your destination.

How to become a famous dancer

1. Commercial Dancer

Commercial dancers are freelancers who work on a project-by-project basis. They perform as back-up dancers for artists, in movies, industrials, cruise ships, musicals, commercials, and more. They audition or are directly booked for projects that offer contracts for a set period of time, and once those projects end, they’re out looking for the next one.

What I love about this type of dance career is the opportunity to work on different types of projects, to perform different dance styles, to consistently meet new dancers, and to consistently work with new choreographers. You get to work AND grow your network at the same.

On the other hand, being a commercial dancer comes with the challenge of enduring slow seasons or dry spells. Those moments when you’re in between gigs, the bills still need to paid, and that inconsistency can be stressful if you don’t set yourself up the right way.

Before I talk set up, let’s talk about getting paid. Commercial dancers are paid as independent contractors by the producing organization of a project. If you have an agent, the agent gets 10% – 20%.

And when it comes to set up, having an agent generally assures that you’re getting paid what you’re worth because agents work on your behalf for that. However, just be sure to read your contracts carefully so you understand how, when, and how much you’re getting in relation to what they’re getting. If you don’t have an agent, be sure to only accept work that pays you what you’re worth. Not sure what that means? Start by calculating your personal hourly rate.

2. Company Dancer

Company dancers consistently work with the same company for an extended period of time. They’re hired by a specific company to perform in their concerts and often times to teach their classes as well.

A pro to this type of dance career is the opportunity to have a more consistent income, depending on how established your company is. Not only can it be more stable, but some companies even offer the opportunity to move up in rank, and therefore, earn more money.

A con to this type of work, in my opinion, is that company members perform the same repertory and the same dance style over and over again. I personally enjoy moving in and out of different styles, but I understand that some dancers fall in love with one particular style, and stick with it (although more and more companies are now incorporating more than one style of dance into their work).

Company members are obviously paid by their company. Larger and more established companies, like ABT or Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre, are able to offer their dancers a salary, while smaller companies generally pay their dancers per show.

3. Primary or Secondary School Teacher

Becoming a dance teacher is a great way to keep dance in your life while also generating a steady income. Dance teachers get to dance daily, sow into their students’ lives, work a set number of hours per day, and earn a salary plus benefits.

Aside from perks I just mentioned, a pro of becoming a dance teacher is that it offers a more defined career path. To become an elementary, middle, or high school teacher, you’ll need a college degree and a certification to teach in your state. Once you’re qualified, you start applying to school districts, and then you’re on your way. pretty straight forward.

A con of this type of career is that the artistic integrity can sometimes be compromised when teaching at a school, unless you teach at an arts magnet or performing arts school. I often hear of public school teachers having issues with proper dance space, unsupportive administrators, and students who aren’t necessarily serious about dance.

Even with those challenges, the stability of year-round income is enough for many dancers to go this route.

4. College Professor

And last, but certainly not least, is the college professor. College professors teach technique and lecture courses at community colleges and universities, and enjoy some of the same benefits as primary and secondary school teachers.

The obvious similarities are consistent pay (with one exception that I’ll share in moment), hours, and sowing into the lives of the next generation of dancers. Other similarities can be the challenges of facilities, administrative support, and strength of the dancers or dance program.

The main difference is that college professors are required to earn a Master’s degree. Another difference is that there are different types of college professors, and the pay ranges for each. For instance, and here’s that exception I mentioned earlier, while all professors are paid consistently, adjunct professors are generally paid per course or hourly as well as on a part-time basis. While this saves the schools money, it makes it very difficult for adjunct professors to make a living.

Although this route can be much harder than it first seems, many dancers have gone on to have fulfilling careers as college professors.

Use this list to help you begin your career planning. Figure out where’d you like to go, then be open and creative in determining how you’ll get there.

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