How to become a marketing researcher

  • Marketing
    • 10 Psychological Tactics for Impactful Marketing
    • BS Marketing Careers
      • How to Become a Digital Marketing Manager
      • How to Become a Market Research Analyst
      • How to Become a Marketing Manager
      • How to Become a Public Relations Specialist
      • How to Become a Sales Manager
      • How to Become an International Marketing Executive
      • What Can You Do With a Marketing Degree?
      • Why You Should Major in Marketing
    • BS Marketing Curriculum
    • Different Types of Marketing Degrees
    • Marketing vs Sales

    An increasing number of companies across varied industries rely on market research and statistical data to make informed decisions and carry out effective plans. Consequently, this has made the market research analyst role indispensable in many organizations.

    Students who are interested in how to become market research analysts should know that educational investment is crucial. In addition to completing the right degree programs, they also need to develop the right set of skills and gain sufficient working experience.

    How to become a marketing researcher

    What Does a Market Research Analyst Do?

    Market research analysts help companies understand target markets through in-depth studies of market trends, market conditions, and consumer buying behaviors. Comprehensive understanding of these areas allows companies to devise the right products and identify which consumers are likely to purchase those products at certain prices. Market research analysts may accomplish this through questionnaires, interviews, and market analysis, among other strategies. These professionals are also skilled in researching and analyzing competitors.

    Steps to Becoming a Market Research Analyst

    There are essential steps to becoming a market research analyst, including obtaining the right bachelor’s degree and considering a master’s degree for possible higher-level positions. Market research analysts also need several years of work experience to become certified as professional market researchers.

    Step 1: Earn a Bachelor’s Degree

    Students can begin their paths by earning a bachelor’s in marketing, bachelor of business administration, or bachelor’s in psychology. Each of these degrees, in different ways, provides valuable insights for market research analysts that they can later use to assess consumer buying behavior and preferences. Specifically, a degree in marketing is valuable since the coursework incorporates business theories and policies, marketing and consumer behavior. A bachelor’s in business administration provides a foundation in financial accounting, economics, business law, and statistics. A degree in psychology, on the other hand, allows students to study human nature and behaviors from perspectives that incorporate fundamental concepts such as cognition, multiculturalism, critical thinking, and development through the lifespan.

    Step 2: Build On-the-Job Experience

    Advancing to the role of market research analyst usually requires at least a few years of working in the industry in a role such as marketing assistant or account representative. This helps gain access to greater job opportunities – such as becoming a market research analyst ‑ as well as qualify for particular certifications. Market research analysts usually work full-time, although certain job demands, like time-sensitive marketing campaigns, may require them to work additional hours.

    Step 3: Earn a Master’s Degree (Optional)

    To qualify for higher-level positions, market research analysts should consider pursuing a master’s degree. There are degrees that focus specifically on market research analysis; however, professionals may also choose to get a Master of Business Administration (MBA).

    A master’s in business administration can also serve as a valuable tool in obtaining the Professional Researcher Certification, or PRC. It’s administered by the Insights Association and to qualify, applicants need to take and pass a test, complete up to 12 hours of courses, and possess at least three years of work experience.

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that certified researchers who plan to renew their credentials, which is required every two years, must obtain 20 hours of continuing education.

    What Skills Does a Market Research Analyst Need?

    In addition to obtaining the right education and building job experience, market research analysts need specific soft skills to succeed in the field.

    The ability to analyze huge amounts of data is a must, considering the research and analysis components of the job. In terms of choosing the right marketing strategies for any given company, critical-thinking abilities also come into play.

    Finally, market research analysts need to possess exceptional communication skills. Those interested in becoming market research analysts need to develop oral and written communication skills for client interactions and corporate presentations.

    Market Research Analyst Salaries and Job Outlook

    According to the BLS, the median salary for a market research analyst is $63,230. Several factors contribute to the precise salary that can be attained, such as a person’s overall professional experience and location of the position. In addition, the BLS projected 23 percent growth for this job from 2016 to 2026. This rate is significantly higher than the 7 percent average employment growth for all other occupations within the same 10-year period. By 2026, the BLS estimates that as many as 138,300 additional market research analyst jobs will be created.

    Several factors contribute to this impressive growth in market research analyst jobs. Companies are relying more on data and research to effectively target consumers. The ability to reach the right customers results in the development of more effective marketing and advertising strategies, leading to an increase in business profits.

    The BLS furthermore reports that job applicants with strong backgrounds in statistics and data analysis, as well as those with a master’s degree in marketing or business administration, are likely to have better employment opportunities.

    Start Your Journey to Becoming a Market Research Analyst Today

    There is no better time than now for students to invest in their futures. A bachelor’s degree in business or psychology and an MBA all serve as steps in the right direction to becoming a market research analyst.

    For students with a passion for learning marketing research, statistical data, and human psychology, a career as a market research analyst might be a good choice. Maryville University offers an online Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing, an online Psychology Bachelor’s Degree, and an online Master’s in Business Administration. These rigorous academic degree programs fit into students’ busy lifestyles, which may include family obligations and full-time jobs. The best way to start a journey toward an exciting career as a market research analyst is to take the first step today.

    • Bachelor of Arts in International Studies
      • International Studies Careers
        • How to Become a Disaster Relief Worker
        • How to Become a Foreign Correspondent
        • How to Become a Foreign Service Officer
        • How to Become a Market Researcher
        • How to Become a Political Analyst
      • Online BA in International Studies Curriculum
      • What Is International Studies?

      Almost every product and service that hits the market exists as a result of research. From the earliest seed of an idea to final production, research helps companies create what their audience most needs. Market research, in particular, is invaluable for connecting products with people and companies with consumers.

      How to become a marketing researcher

      Odds are you’ve seen market research in action in television, movies, or real life. A group of diverse individuals sit in a room inspecting a product before providing their honest feedback. There’s typically a leader guiding the discussion, sometimes with an assistant taking notes, as well as a one-way mirror to allow for the product’s design team or the CEO to watch the proceedings. This scenario reflects a business strategy that industries have benefited from since the early 20th century, according to global consulting agency Kelton. This powerful strategy developed around the same time newspapers, magazines, radio, and television made marketing a nationwide industry.

      These days, with many markets going global, it’s even more important for market researchers to command diverse skill sets so they can clearly understand what their research means in markets domestically and abroad. If you’re intrigued by the idea of directly impacting the nature of the products and services that hit the market, explore how to become a market researcher.

      What Does a Market Researcher Do?

      Market researchers do in-depth research on a product or service’s target audience to determine if there’s sufficient consumer interest. They help businesses forecast what buyers want in a particular product or service and potential market size, which in turn helps businesses determine whether to invest in it. For example, before launching a smartphone gaming app, market researchers may study how a test group interacts with the game — how long they spend playing it, any glitches they run into, their indicated level of enjoyment, and how much they’d spend to purchase the app.

      In some instances, this research will look similar to that of the previously mentioned in-person focus group, but often this research takes shape in other ways. Phone calls, one-on-one interviews, surveys, and consumer behavior data analysis all represent different market research applications. Some market researchers spend most of their time interacting with customers, working directly with test groups and interviewing early testers. Others organize, analyze, and interpret the data that this sort of research produces. Still others create data visualizations to share with the rest of the marketing team, thus combining interpretation and interaction.

      Market researchers can work in-house for corporations, becoming familiar with a product or product line and conducting research on it over a long period of time. They can also work for market research and consulting companies, which corporations hire for a specific period of time or a certain project. Freelance market researchers must first typically develop their reputations and abilities within companies. Professionals may specialize in a certain area, such as political marketing or research, or a specific industry, such as healthcare or fashion.

      How to Become a Market Researcher

      Market research represents a critical step for any business. It’s important work that can help determine a product or service’s success. As such, study and certification go a long way to help aspiring market researchers gain the necessary skills to help their companies thrive.

      Earn a Bachelor’s Degree

      Everything that a market researcher does involves thinking analytically about data, as well as approaching research objectively and with an eye for detail. It involves strong communication skills because market researchers often find themselves not only conducting research and interacting with research subjects, but also presenting the findings to those who commissioned the study.

      If you go into international market relations, a bachelor’s degree in a field such as an online bachelor of arts in international studies may offer the cultural and global economic background you need, as well as help you hone your communication and research skills.

      Obtain Professional Certification

      Professional certifications aren’t always required for market research careers; however, they can be indicators of expertise within the industry. The Insights Association — the main U.S. professional association for market researchers — offers Professional Researcher Certification (PRC), which requires aspiring market researchers to work for three years in the market research and analytics industry as assistants or interns. They then must register for the PRC and undergo 12 extra hours of industry-related education accrued within two years prior to taking the test. The PRC credential requires 20 hours of continuing education every two years.

      Market Researcher Salaries

      The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that the median annual salary for market research analysts was $63,120 in 2018. Publishing industries (excluding internet) had the highest-paying jobs, with a median annual salary of $74,360. Company or enterprise management ($73,490) and finance and insurance ($69,680) were next, followed by wholesale trade ($61,410) and management, scientific, and technical consulting services ($60,870).

      Employment Outlook for Market Researchers

      The BLS projects the future job market for market research analysts to be strong between 2016 and 2026, which is good news if you’re interested in what a market researcher does. During the time period, the BLS projects 138,300 new market research analyst jobs, a 23% jump over the 595,400 jobs in 2016. Professional, scientific, and technical services will add 55,700 market research analyst jobs, the most of any sector.

      Discover How You Can Become a Market Researcher

      If you’re intrigued by an engaging career conducting detail-oriented research that lets you learn from global consumers, then a career as a market researcher might be the right fit for you. Check out how Maryville University’s online Bachelor of Arts in International Studies could give you the background needed to start down that rewarding path.

      Find The Best Marketing Researcher Jobs For You

      Where do you want to work?

      Working as a Marketing Researcher

      If you have a knack for numbers and enjoy doing research, a career in marketing research might be the vocation for you. Market researchers do just that, they research, gather and analyze data on consumers and business competitors, and they also study market conditions to examine potential sales of a product or a service. Companies hire marketing researchers to find out about what products and services customers want, and what they’re willing to pay for them. A position in this field usually entails working in an office setting during a regular workweek.

      A marketing researcher also monitors and predicts market trends, analyzes the effectiveness and profitability of marketing practices using statistics, and prepares consumer reports for upper management and clients. Individuals in this field are skilled in gathering data, in doing research, and the research that they do helps companies to determine markets and pricing for particular products and services, by providing data on consumer demographics, buying habits, and preferences.

      Marketing researchers gather much of their information from questionnaires, interviews, focus groups, surveys, and opinion polls. Market researchers should be familiar with computers, and statistical software that can generate graphs and charts, and other visual representations of data. Although an advanced degree is not necessarily required in this field, most market researchers have at least a bachelor’s degree in economics, marketing, communications, or business. The median income for a market researcher is about $64,000 per year, and US job growth by 2026 is forecast at 18%.

      There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a marketing researcher. For example, did you know that they make an average of $42.26 an hour? That’s $87,910 a year!

      Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 20% and produce 139,200 job opportunities across the U.S.

      What Does a Marketing Researcher Do

      There are certain skills that many marketing researchers have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed analytical skills, communication skills and detail oriented.

      When it comes to the most important skills required to be a marketing researcher, we found that a lot of resumes listed 18.5% of marketing researchers included market research, while 14.9% of resumes included research projects, and 9.7% of resumes included facebook. Hard skills like these are helpful to have when it comes to performing essential job responsibilities.

      When it comes to searching for a job, many search for a key term or phrase. Instead, it might be more helpful to search by industry, as you might be missing jobs that you never thought about in industries that you didn’t even think offered positions related to the marketing researcher job title. But what industry to start with? Most marketing researchers actually find jobs in the technology and education industries.

      How To Become a Marketing Researcher

      If you’re interested in becoming a marketing researcher, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We’ve determined that 61.1% of marketing researchers have a bachelor’s degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 20.2% of marketing researchers have master’s degrees. Even though most marketing researchers have a college degree, it’s possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

      Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a marketing researcher. When we researched the most common majors for a marketing researcher, we found that they most commonly earn bachelor’s degree degrees or master’s degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on marketing researcher resumes include associate degree degrees or high school diploma degrees.

      You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a marketing researcher. In fact, many marketing researcher jobs require experience in a role such as internship. Meanwhile, many marketing researchers also have previous career experience in roles such as marketing internship or sales associate.

      What is the right job for my career path?

      Tell us your goals and we’ll match you with the right jobs to get there.

      Find The Best Market Researcher Jobs For You

      Where do you want to work?

      Working as a Market Researcher

      A market researcher carries out surveys and collects and analyses data on behalf of organizations such as businesses, government bodies, and charities.

      They generally collect and interpret data and information to present to their clients as a market researcher. The information they provide helps them to make informed political, social, and economic decisions. A career in market research operations can give them a fast-paced and rewarding career.

      Most entry-level market research professions, such as market or survey researcher, require a bachelor’s degree in marketing or business administration with coursework in marketing, psychology, social sciences, mathematics, and statistics. The average market researcher salary is $60,047 as of December, but the range typically falls between $53,389 and $67,669. Salary contents can vary widely depending on many important factors, including education, certifications, additional skills, and the number of years spent in their profession.

      There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a market researcher. For example, did you know that they make an average of $30.54 an hour? That’s $63,521 a year!

      Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 20% and produce 139,200 job opportunities across the U.S.

      What Does a Market Researcher Do

      There are certain skills that many market researchers have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed analytical skills, communication skills and detail oriented.

      When it comes to the most important skills required to be a market researcher, we found that a lot of resumes listed 11.4% of market researchers included market research, while 9.7% of resumes included data analysis, and 5.4% of resumes included research projects. Hard skills like these are helpful to have when it comes to performing essential job responsibilities.

      When it comes to searching for a job, many search for a key term or phrase. Instead, it might be more helpful to search by industry, as you might be missing jobs that you never thought about in industries that you didn’t even think offered positions related to the market researcher job title. But what industry to start with? Most market researchers actually find jobs in the professional and technology industries.

      How To Become a Market Researcher

      If you’re interested in becoming a market researcher, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We’ve determined that 49.9% of market researchers have a bachelor’s degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 20.8% of market researchers have master’s degrees. Even though most market researchers have a college degree, it’s possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

      Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a market researcher. When we researched the most common majors for a market researcher, we found that they most commonly earn bachelor’s degree degrees or master’s degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on market researcher resumes include high school diploma degrees or associate degree degrees.

      You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a market researcher. In fact, many market researcher jobs require experience in a role such as cashier. Meanwhile, many market researchers also have previous career experience in roles such as internship or customer service representative.

      What is the right job for my career path?

      Tell us your goals and we’ll match you with the right jobs to get there.

      If you want to become a market research analyst, the first step is to determine if this occupation is a good fit for you.

      If you’re interested in a well-paying career within an office setting, that offers you the ability to work independently towards an overall team goal, and you’re interested in analyzing data and preparing reports based on your findings, then a career as a market research analyst is probably right up your alley!

      Below we’ve outlined what you’ll need to succeed in a career as a market research analyst. We’ve also included helpful occupational information, such as a general job description, a list of typical job duties, an overview of salary expectations, a list of possible employers and much more!

      Education Needed to Become a Market Research Analyst

      Although educational requirements to become a market research analyst vary by employer, market research analysts typically need a bachelor’s degree in marketing, market research, economics or a related field.

      Alternatively, having a degree in a field such as statistics, mathematics, or computer science can also help you get a job as a market research analyst, and provide you with the foundations to succeed in that job.

      Coursework in fields such as business administration, sociology, political science and psychology can also be quite helpful in this career.

      A master’s degree in a field such as economics, business administration (MBA) marketing or statistics is often required for leadership positions or positions that perform more technical research.

      Throughout my career, I’ve always had questions about what I do as a user researcher and how others can have a similar career journey. However, becoming a researcher is much more nuanced than just having conversations, and there are so many paths to having a career as a researcher. This series will share more about the context of who, what, and how of researching.

      With full-time research relatively new compared to design, product, or engineering, it’s an exciting opportunity to join and help influence an industry as it grows in maturity. One of my favorite parts about being a researcher is that there is so much diversity in researchers’ backgrounds, so I always feel like I am learning something new from whoever I meet.

      Anyone can (and should) be able to have research as a skill, but if someone has decided to take the vow of dedicating their life and career to analysis, there are two main ways you can become a researcher:

      Traditional path to research

      Generally, a conventional path will include someone who has experience in a related field that requires either a lot of work around analysis or understanding people such as user experience, design, consulting, psychology, information services, or innovation. Academically, someone may study anthropology, psychology, technology, design, or library studies.

      Researchers in these fields will generally transition from having part of their role focused on research, to having their full role dedicated to research. They also may get their foot in the door with more tactical or evaluative research (e.g. usability testing), before transitioning to more strategic or foundational research approaches.

      Non traditional path to research

      If someone decides halfway in their career that they are interested in pursuing research as a career and don’t have any (or a lot) of prior experience with the skillset, they will generally complete a short course. You can find these courses at General Assembly (e.g. in digital marketing or user experience) or another certification program (e.g. NN/g, post-grad certificates) to understand the theoretical skills and methodologies required to be a researcher, and give them credibility in the market.

      However, researchers going down the non-traditional path generally struggle with getting an industry job after graduation from these courses. Most hiring managers will look for some level of experience in hiring a researcher to show how they can practically apply methodologies to a problem or business challenge.

      Researchers will also look for opportunities to build up their portfolio by running projects for non-profits, startups, and small businesses; or doing ‘spec work’ by creating hypothetical problems and sharing how they would complete the project.

      Being a researcher

      Once someone gets a professional job as a researcher, they will own research within a domain or topic. Junior researchers will generally have a clearly defined scope (e.g. a specific product or UI) that doesn’t include any ambiguity in the space. If there are other researchers in the team, junior researchers may be delegated projects for managers or more senior researchers to execute.

      As researchers become more senior, they will be responsible for a broader work scope with more ambiguity. They will need to spend more time understanding the problem space(s) they are working in, determining stakeholder perspectives and priorities, and developing opinions on project sequencing.

      The primary responsibilities of a researcher generally include:

      Research projects: Planning, execution and synthesis of research activities.

      Stakeholder management: Building and managing stakeholder relationships to understand their explicit and implicit needs, roadmaps and priorities.

      Influencing product & design: Working with teams to leverage research for product decisions.

      Knowledge sharing & awareness: Building eminence of previous work with broader groups (e.g. presenting at all hands, lunch and learns) and ensuring that existing knowledge is stored and leveraged appropriately across the organization.

      Research operations: Managing all the work behind the scenes to get research done. Responsibilities include recruitment, participant management, incentive management, knowledge management, vendor and tool management, and equipment setup / maintenance. There may be a specific ‘research operations’ role or team in larger organizations to take over these responsibilities.

      Although the harder skill and craft research skills are essential, the more successful researchers will generally complement these with a robust soft skill set.

      As I have progressed through my career, the ability to communicate my findings through presentations and influence clients or stakeholders have become more critical to ensure that outcomes don’t become ‘shelfware’ or are never used or leveraged by stakeholders.

      How to become a marketing researcher

      Market research is any organised effort to gather information about a target market. It is one field that has been an essential cog in the business machine, with researchers like you often helping create a business strategy. It is a lucrative profession to practice, one that pays as well as it does to developers, even in freelance opportunities .

      You can chose to freelance for many reasons. You can earn money working from home and lead a comfortable life, without having to sit at a desk in an office. However, you may have a different reason for opting to freelance, either on the side or full time. Extra income, the ability to work from home, and even the extra time you will have to spend with family, are all valid reasons. With the kind of growth in the field, you can rest assured that it is well-paid option.

      Freelance Market Researcher Jobs

      As a market researcher there are many duties that you will have to undertake. Sometimes your work responsibilities can be more complex than simply setting a business strategy to conduct a survey, or define a marketing research method. Some of the important responsibilities you will undertake during the course of your life as a freelance market researcher, include:

      • Liaising with clients to negotiate and agree research projects;
      • Preparing briefs and commissioning research;
      • Formulating a plan/proposal and presenting it to the client or senior management;
      • Writing and managing the distribution of surveys and questionnaires;
      • Liaising With researchers;
      • Liaising with and managing survey staff;
      • Organising Qualitative or quantitative surveys, which may involve field, interview or focus group assessments;
      • Using statistical software to manage and organise information;
      • Monitoring the progress of research projects;
      • Analysing and interpreting data to identify patterns and solutions, including surveys and focus group transcripts;
      • Writing detailed reports and presenting results;
      • Advising clients/senior management on how to best use research findings;
      • Managing budgets

      Finding Work:

      Finding work as a freelance market researcher can be a bit taxing initially. However, with the use of the all-knowing Google there aren’t many freelance opportunities you won’t be able to locate. Thus, to find freelance work you must register with and logon to websites like Elance, Odesk, Peopleperhour and Guru .

      These are but some of your obligations that you will have to fulfil as a freelance market researcher.

      Skills:

      As a freelance market researcher, you will need to develop the requisite skills to survive and thrive in any working capacity in research. Market researchers must be analytical and research oriented. However, what other skills should you develop to be an adept Market researcher? Some of the skills you should consider developing and honing include:

      • Strong analytical skills
      • People skills
      • Methodological and organized
      • Inquisitive
      • Oral and written communication skills
      • Client focused
      • An ability to handle data to work in quantitative research
      • The ability to take responsibility and handle pressure
      • Commercial awareness for work with corporate clients

      MRS , theUniversity of Georgia , eCornell and Researchrockstar offer many online training courses, certifications and e-Summer camps for you to learn all about Market research online.

      Being Successful As A Freelance Market Researcher:

      As a market researcher you can garner success and ensure that you stay among the top freelancers among your network, by taking certain steps and being open to learning new techniques and incorporate newer ways of conducting, setting up and executing research. Some of the things you can do to further your career in the field, include:

      • Being able to market your services and creating a Social Media presence
      • Creating a responsive network, one which you can leverage to find projects and extra work
      • Ability to work under pressure, and to strict deadlines
      • An understanding of the industry
      • Be able to look past stereotypes and clichés
      • Have an interest in psychology and behavioural science for qualitative research

      Market Researcher Salary :

      Usually freelance portals offer various kinds of payment models. In the fixed-price model, the price is usually pre-determined. The hourly model is the most popular and employers usually pay a predetermined sum per hour. Finally, in the project-budget based model, you often need to auction for such projects. Usually a fixed price model may range from $20- $200 and upwards, while you have to pitch for hourly projects, and budget payments, which usually range from $5- $35 an hour. Freelance Market researchers like you usually earn $21 an hour.

      Resources:

      As a market researcher, you will have many resources at your disposal. You can learn the skills needed online and learn about market research techniques and best practices online. MRS , the University of Georgia , eCornell and Researchrockstar offer many online training courses, certifications and e-Summer camps for you to learn all about Market research online and help you build the knowledge you need.

      Surveys consumer methods of purchasing, while analyzing and formulating consumer purchasing strategies.

      Market Analyst, Market Researcher

      Table of Contents

      1. Career Description
      2. Salary
      3. Career Path
      4. Experience & Skills
      5. Education & Training
      6. Additional Resources
      7. References

      How to become a marketing researcher

      How To Become a Consumer Researcher

      Career Description

      Consumer Researchers are typically hired by the marketing or sales departments of record companies, and their main function is to research how consumers are actually purchasing albums. This enables marketing and/or sales to develop a better understanding of what consumers might be more apt to buy in the future, based on what they purchased in the past.

      Sometimes referred to as a Market Researcher, the Consumer Researcher may collect data directly from various record company departments. The type of information gathered includes the genres of records, the number of albums of each type of music that have been sold, and the actual geographic location each was sold as well.

      He or she might undertake the same type of research among other record labels as well, but this is obviously much more difficult as most labels are unlikely to disclose this type of sales information to competitors. But the Researcher can talk to distributors, Rack Jobbers, and record stores to gather the data they need.

      Another option for the Researcher is to put together a consumer survey, and then directly present the questionnaire to the consumers, or train others in other markets to carry out the survey process. Of course, it has also become quite popular to carry out surveying on the web. The Researcher can also use the phone to contact and interview consumers about their buying habits.

      After the data has been collected, it is pretty useless until the results are tabulated and analyzed. From this, the marketing and/or sales departments can determine what types of records are selling on the market, and where they are selling, thus facilitating planning of future releases.

      To do their job successfully, the Consumer Researcher must have a great working knowledge about records, markets, the recording industry, and the music business as a whole, in order to have an idea of the types of questions to actually ask of consumers in a survey.

      He or she works closely with the Marketing and/or Sales Manager and department staff. It is also within the realm of the Consumer Researcher’s responsibility to recommend test marketing of a certain record in a certain area, while also maybe advising against promotion of a record in a certain area as a result of the test marketing.

      These recommendations are not the final word, however, and department directors can choose to either listen or ignore.

      Want to find the perfect Music Career?

      Salary

      The average annual salary for Consumer Researchers is approximately $61,900. The salary range for Consumer Researchers extends from $40,000 to $101,000.

      Hey, what do you think about trying our new Music Career FinderMusic Career Finder really quick? It’s totally free and could help get your career moving fast! Give it a try. You have nothing to lose.

      Wonder which Music Career is best for you?

      Career Path

      Advancement for a Consumer Researcher could come in the form of taking on bigger projects. Or, he or she might become a supervisor in the research department, and can even become a member of the marketing staff as a Marketing Coordinator or Marketing Vice President.

      Because a Researcher needs specific skills in order to be successful, those who are qualified have a decent chance of obtaining a job. This is because marketing and/or sales departments are usually always looking to hire good Researchers.

      • Experience in consumer research in any field is great preparation.
      • Take on a position as a pollster for a new product, service, etc.
      • If you can further your education, it will definitely pay off when applying for a position like this.
      • These positions are highly advertised, which means they should be easy to find when searching classifieds.
      • The internet is your best friend in your search for this position, as new jobs can be posted any time.

      Singers and Songwriters can also be Music Producers.

      Experience & Skills

      A Consumer Researcher must be interested in and know how to dig deep into consumer buying habits. From there, they must also have a grasp on analysis and have the ability to make data and results understandable for those receiving the reports.

      To attain success in this position, a thorough knowledge of the music business and recording industry is necessary.

      Try our very own Music Career Finder.

      Education & Training

      As mentioned, specific skills are required, so a bachelor’s degree is usually required for this position. A master’s degree might even be preferred. Useful college majors include marketing or business administration. Helpful courses include computer technology or data processing.

      Music Producers can also be Songwriters.

      Additional Resources

      Consumer Researchers may belong to advertising associations, such as the American Advertising Federation (AAF) or the American Marketing Association (AMA). Both of these organizations provide information and assistance to people in this field.