How to become a mason

Understandably, one of our most-read guides on the website is how to become a Freemason.

For all those interested in becoming a Freemason one day, today we want to take it a step further and share with you 10 requirements you need to “check” before you ASK12BE1.

If you’re interested in joining the world’s oldest fraternity, be sure to read this guide very carefully.

How to become a mason

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How to become a mason

Table of Contents

Must Believe in a Supreme Being

The Freemason Book of Constitutions clearly states:

‘A Mason is oblig’d by his Tenure, to obey the moral law; and if he rightly understands the Art, he will never be a stupid Atheist nor an irreligious Libertine…to be good Men and True, or Men of Honour and Honesty by whatever denominations or persuasions they may be distinguished; whereby Masonry becomes the Center of Union…’

In the middle ages, Freemasonry was restricted to Christianity. As the craft progressed and travels to different parts of the world became extensive, Freemason slowly opened its doors into accomodating people from different religions.

Therefore, belief in a supreme being cuts across different denominations and religious backgrounds. Masons currently believe that even though there is only one God, people can employ various methods to seek Him.

All members of a lodge will conciliate under similar beliefs and authentic brotherhood.

Must-Have Attained Required Legal Age

This varies from one jurisdiction to another. Generally, it ranges from the ages of 18-25 years. For instance, the United Lodge of England’s minimum age requirement is 21 years.

The set age limit is highly dependent on the laws constituted by the state in general.

Nevertheless, a lodge can appeal to a Grand Lodge to initiate someone below the legal age. This is common in university lodges where it’s ordinary to initiate members below 18 years with the dispensation.

Even though lower age restrictions are enforced, there are no upper age limits. The person must, however, be mentally and still possess cognitive abilities to engage in Masonic ceremonies and to execute his duties.

Must Be Recommended by Two Freemasons

For you to submit a petition to join the craft in a particular lodge, you must get approval from two existing members.

They should be part of the lodge you’re petitioning to. Without this, your application is deemed null and void.

Before obtaining a petition, a person should also ask a member to sponsor his application. You can connect with existing members on different online platforms.

Must Join Out of Your Own Freewill and Accord

Freemason prohibits existing members from inviting outsiders into the craft. Solicitation, even if your family member is highly disapproved of.

A father cannot talk to his son regarding joining the craft. The same applies to uncles, grandfathers, and other relatives in general.

The decision to be part of the brotherhood should sprout from personal interests and preferences.

Must Be Able To Support Yourself and Family

Quite frankly, Freemasons aren’t concerned with someone’s wealth and social status. The brotherhood openly welcomes everyone.

However, an applicant should prove that he is financially stable to cater to his needs and those of his family.

This requirement extends to existing members. If you lack financial independence, the craft considers you a liability.

How to become a masonYou may also want to learn about the benefits of becoming a Freemason.

Not Restricted To Any Gender

Today both men and women are admitted into the craft. Male and Female lodges coexist separately.

Due to the rise of the LGBTQ community, lodges altered their policies to be more inclusive. Some lodges are also open to people who have undergone gender reassignment procedures.

In 2018, the United Grand Lodge of England (UGLE) published the first gender reassignment policy based on the Gender Recognition Act of 2004 and the Equality Act of 2010.

The policy opened its doors to the transgender community. It further elaborates that should a person cease to be a man after becoming a Freemason, he still has the right to remain a member of the craft.

It also clearly states that a member should not be subjected to any form of questioning about their gender. Similar policies are applied to different lodges across the world.

Must Concede To Moral Standards

Freemasonry emphasizes the importance of high moral values. Morality is based on what is considered right or wrong – the craft’s teachings on morality are quite thorough. Members are taught principles pertaining to honor and individual decency.

People who uphold moral values care for one another and do not engage in uncouth behavior.

Also, the craft believes that morality breeds understanding between one another. It sprouts goodwill, kindness, and charity translating to appropriate actions as per the Masonry standards.

Must Not Have Any Mercenary Motives

People with unprecedented motives are prohibited from joining the craft. The same applies to anyone who is biased by friends and families. Freemasonry cannot be used to get you out of criminal activities. Neither is it a networking arena.

The urge to join the craft should arise from a pure place within oneself. The decision shouldn’t be weighed in by anyone whatsoever.

Recruits are often asked a couple of questions to gauge their intention to be part of the craft. If mercenary motives are detected, your application is denied.

Must Be a Rule Follower

Freemasonry is characterized by numerous rules that members should abide by. For example, Masons are prohibited from talking about the craft’s activities to outsiders. You are not allowed to discuss any political affiliation in a lodge etc.

The rules are implemented to align Masons to the requirements of the craft.

People who cannot be diligent rule followers cannot fit into the organization.

It is a common misconception that the guidelines are full of demonic rituals accompanied by horrific requests. This is not true. They are pinpointers that guide people into following Freemasonry ways.

Must-Have a Favorable Opinion

It is necessary to have a commendatory opinion before joining Freemasonry.

This touches on the sincere love and desire to be associated with the craft. It is wrong to become a Mason due to underlying curiosity or wanting to discover what goes on behind the organization’s closed doors.

Freemasonry prides itself on having genuine members who are utterly concerned with doing good according to the organization’s requirements.

Even though the requirements may vary from one lodge to another depending on the jurisdiction you are in, most of them are universally applicable.

How to become a mason

Masons use bricks, stones, and cement to build structures like houses, walls, and pathways. Humans have practiced masonry for thousands of years, and the techniques and materials used in the trade have evolved over time. Masons may work with brick, concrete blocks, cement, fire- and heat-resistant materials, and stones like marble and granite.

Masons can specialize as bricklayers, marble or tile setters, cement masons, block masons, or stone masons. Some masons specialize in finishing while others specialize in cleaning, caulking, and pointing.

What kind of training is required to become a mason?

Most new masons receive their training through an apprenticeship. Apprenticeship programs are offered by technical and community colleges, professional mason’s and builder’s associations, and masonry unions. In most cases, to enter an apprenticeship you must be at least 18 years old and have a high school diploma or GED. Prospective apprentices may also be required to pass an aptitude test.

Apprenticeship programs in masonry last three to four years and include classroom instruction and on-the-job training. Apprentices are sponsored by an employer or union and paid on a scale during training; as they progress in their program, apprentices earn a higher wage and additional job benefits like health insurance and vacation time. They also attend classes, typically at night, to learn knowledge related to their trade.

The classroom learning in a masonry apprenticeship includes instruction in reading blueprints, construction math, and the history of the trade. Apprentices also learn about the tools and materials used in their trade. The specifics covered in on-the-job training depend on the type of masonry the apprentice is studying. Cement mason apprentices spend a significant amount of time learning how to set forms, establish grades, spread and finish cement, and create steps and trim, for example. Bricklayer apprentices learn how to clean and repair existing masonry, perform waterproofing, and construct walls, arches, columns, and decorative brick patterns.

Apprentices who complete their program may start work as journeyman masons.

Are there any certification or licensure requirements?

Each state sets requirements for the licensing of building contractors and subcontractors, and some masons may be required to have a license to offer their services. A mason who owns a business and contracts directly with clients is typically required to have a license, and those who subcontract on projects managed by a contractor may be required to have a license if the project costs more than a certain amount set by the state. Obtaining a contractor or subcontractor license may involve passing a licensing exam, submitting financial records, and providing references and proof of insurance.

Associations like the Mason Contractors Association of America offer voluntary certifications for masons who want to show potential customers that they have a high level of knowledge and experience in their field. Earning certification involves completing training courses and passing a certification exam.

How long does it take to become a mason?

It takes three to four years to complete a masonry apprenticeship. Those who complete an apprenticeship can begin working as journeyman masons.

What does a mason earn?

The median yearly pay for brickmasons and blockmasons in the United States was $46,440 in 2012. Stonemasons earned a median pay of $37,350, and cement masons earned a median pay of $35,760 that year.

What are the job prospects?

The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects that employment of brickmasons, blockmasons, and stonemasons in the United States will grow by 34 percent between 2012 and 2020, and that employment of cement masons will grow by 29 percent during that time. This projected growth for each trade is much faster than the average for all other occupations.

The BLS predicts that employment of masons will be driven by an increased demand for new buildings due to population growth as well as a need to repair the masonry in existing structures.

What are the long term career prospects for masons?

Journeyman masons who gain experience can eventually become master tradesmen and train new apprentices. Masons with business skill can open their own contracting or subcontracting companies.

How can I find a job as a mason?

Journeyman masons may continue working with the same employer that facilitated their apprenticeship, but others find new work through their union or by responding to job postings in their area.

How can I learn more about becoming a mason?

You can learn more about becoming a mason through a masonry union or association. The The International Union of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers represents masons in the United States and Canada, but you should be able to consult a local union for advice specific to your area as well.

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Learn about the tradition of Freemasonry and how to become a member of this esteemed brotherhood.

How to become a mason

Who are Freemasons?

Masons, or Freemasons, are members of the largest and oldest fraternity in the world, with more than two million active members. Freemasonry originated in the late 16th century, and its members have included kings, presidents, scholars, and religious figures.

Preparing to become a member of Freemasons

Learn Freemasonry basics. Freemasonry was established by men who shared a commitment to supporting each other in friendship and fellowship. For thousands of years, men have found spiritual and philosophical fulfillment as members of the fraternity, which still operates on the same core values. In order to become a member of Freemasons, it is necessary to meet these requirements:

  • You must be a male.
  • Your must have a sound reputation, and be well-recommended by your peers.
  • In most freemasonry jurisdictions, you must believe in a Supreme Being, regardless of your religion.
  • You must be over the age of 18 years.

You should be interested in character building and morality. The Freemason motto is “better men make a better world.” Freemasonry stresses honor, personal responsibility and personal integrity.

Separate the hype from the truth. Books like The Da Vinci Code have perpetuated the notion that Freemasonry is a secret society with designs on taking over the world. Hidden symbols are said to be scattered around Washington, DC and other cities. The truth is that Freemasons are not part of any such conspiracy, and people who attempt to join Freemasonry hoping to gain access to secrets are not approaching the fraternity with the right intentions.

Requesting Membership to the Masonic Fraternity

The easiest way to begin your membership initiation process is to contact your local Masonic, District or Provincial Lodge. Do some web search about Masonic, District or Provincial Lodges and say you are interested in joining. There are a few other ways to start the process depending in which part of the world you’re applying to, it’s probably best if you start locally. The process will start from there:

Find an active Freemason. Many Freemasons proudly display the Masonic symbol on bumper stickers, hats, and clothing or ring. They are happy to talk to people who wish to find out more information.
Some jurisdictions require that potential members approach the brotherhood of their own accord, but others allow members to issue invitations. If you have been invited to become a Freemason by a known member, feel free to take the next steps.

Accept an invitation to meet with the Freemasons. After your petition has been reviewed, you will be called to the Lodge for an interview with a group of Freemasons who form an Investigative Committee. You will be asked questions concerning your reasons for wanting to become a Freemason, your history, and your character.

Becoming a member of Freemasons

To become a Freemason, you must proceed through the process of obtaining three symbolic degrees. The Entered Apprentice is the first degree, and introduces candidates to the basic principles of Freemasonry.

The second, Fellow Craft degree continues to teach candidates the principles of their new membership, especially their close association with the arts and sciences.

The Master Mason degree is the highest degree a Freemason can earn, and the most difficult.

  • Candidates must demonstrate proficiency in the values of Freemasonry.
  • Completion of the degree is celebrated with a ceremony.
  • In the US, the average time elapsed from the initial petition to the Lodge to receiving the Master Mason degree is four to eight months.

The path to Masonic membership is fairly straightforward, however there are several points to consider before you join the fraternity.

Masonry Does Not Seek, It Must Be Sought:

  • Freemasonry does not solicit new members. Men interested in joining the fraternity must inquire of membership of their own free will. This is because Freemasonry believes men who truly desire membership and seek it out will become much stronger and useful Freemasons than those who join by invitation.

Have an idea of what you’re getting into:

  • Potential members should have a general idea of what Freemasonry is all about. Freemasonry is often cited as being a “peculiar system of morality, veiled in allegory and represented by symbols.” This vague description means Freemasonry is a system of guidelines by which to live life—striving to be a better and useful man to yourself, your family, and your community. It is worth talking to a Freemason at length to discuss the ins and outs of the Fraternity and if its a good fit for you.

Freemasonry is not for everyone:

  • Being a good Freemason requires work in self reflection, self discipline, and service to others. Freemasonry is not a social club nor a civic organization. Members are held to high standards and are expected to be productive members of society.

Understand Freemasonry’s time and financial obligations:

  • Becoming a Master Mason can take many months. Initiation requires the memorization and recitation of a catechism as well weekly or biweekly meetings.
  • Initiation and membership carry certain financial obligations. Though fees vary from lodge to lodge, a man should understand he will be required to pay initiation fees upon his election to membership, annual membership dues, and charity requests. These time and financial obligations should not be a burden on a man’s duty to his family, occupation, or community.
  • While there are no attendance requirements of a Mason, a man will not obtain the full benefits of membership if he does not have the time to attend and participate in a reasonable number of meetings and other activities without neglecting his family and other duties. A man should examine his own lifestyle and determine if it will suit him to be a Freemason.

Taking good men and making them better:

  • Freemasonry recognizes the inevitability of human frailty and harbors no illusions about finding or creating perfect men. It only hopes to make good men better men.
  • A man would probably not be rejected from membership simply because he is known to take an occasional drink, but he will be rejected if he is known to be an alcoholic or that his occasional drink is cause for unseemly behavior.
  • The fact that a man is divorced is not, in itself, cause for rejection, but if he has abused his wife or their children he will be rejected from membership.
  • If a man has, at some point, fallen behind in his financial or other obligations, that fact likely will not be held against him; if he failed to meet his obligations when capable of doing so he will be rejected by Masonry.
  • Freemasons will not knowingly elect bad apples into their fraternity. They wish new members to be better men than themselves—at least as good. Masons do not claim to be, or wish to be, reformers, but they do believe a good man coming into the fraternity will become a better man as a result of his membership.

Petitioning for membership:

  • Once a man decides to seek Masonic membership he must be recommended by members of the lodge, and submit to a background investigation. Following a prescribed waiting period his petition will be balloted upon during a regular meeting of the lodge. The vote is by secret ballot, and the election of a petitioner requires a unanimously favorable ballot.
  • The man who decides to seek Masonic membership need only to convey his desire to someone close to him who is a Mason. That Mason will take care of the process from there.

Freemasonry is the oldest, largest Fraternity in the world. Freemasonry is always ready to welcome good men in the Fraternity, if within your heart you can answer yes to a few questions:

Do you believe that there is such a thing as honor, and that a man has a responsibility to act with honor in everything he does?
Masonic lessons teach principle. Masons believe that a life not founded on honor is hollow and empty, and that a man who acts without honor is less than a man.

Do you believe in God, or an everliving Deity?
No atheist can be a Mason. Freemasonry does not concern itself with your individual faith, as this is a question between only you and your God; however, we do require that a that a man believe in a Supreme Being.

Are you willing to allow others the same right to their own beliefs that you insist on yourself?
Freemasonry insists on toleration, and on the right of each person to think for himself in religious, social and political matters.

Do you believe that you have a responsibility to leave the world a better place than you found it?
Freemasonry teaches that every man has a duty not only to himself, but to the whole of mankind. Masons must do what they can to make the world a better place. Whether that means cleaning up the environment, working on civic projects, or helping children to learn, read or see. The world should be a better place because Masons have passed through it.

Do you believe that it is more important to give than to receive?
Freemasons are involved in many civic and Masonic charities because we are obligated to help others in need. Much of our help is given anonymously, as Masons are not seeking fame or accolades. Gratitude comes from helping others overcome adversity to improve their lives.

Do you feel that there’s something more to life than financial success?
Freemasonry regards no man for his worldly wealth or possessions. Masons know that self-development is more precious than money in the bank, social position, or political power. Those things often accompany self-development, but they are no substitute for it. Masons work at building their lives and character, just as a carpenter works on building a house.

Do you believe that a person should strive to be a good citizen and that we have a moral duty to be true to the country in which we live?
freemasons believe that a country is strong as long as freedom, equality, and the opportunity for human development is afforded to all. A Mason is true to his government and its ideals. He supports its laws and authority when both are just and equitably applied. Masons uphold and maintain the principles of good government, and oppose every influence that would divide it in a degrading manner.

Do you agree that man should show compassion for others, that goodness of heart is among the most important of human values?
Freemasons believe in a certain reverence for all living things and a tenderness toward people who suffer. A loving kindness for our fellow man, and a desire to do right because it is a matter of principle. Freemasonry teaches that although all men are fallible and capable of much wrong, when they discover the goodness of heart, they have found the true essence of virtue. Masonry helps men see their potential for deep goodness and virtue.

Are you willing to give help to a fraternal Brother when he needs it, and to accept their help when you need it?
Freemasonry teaches and requires mutual help and understanding among its Brothers. Help comes in many forms, including financial; however, making yourself available to fellow Brothers by offering compassion, support, a sympathetic ear, or warning of approaching danger are all supported by Freemasonry.

Do you believe that men should strive to live a Brotherly life?
Masons see Brotherhood as a form of wisdom and a bond that holds men together. It is a private friendship that requires us to be just in our dealings, and to refuse to speak evil of each other. Freemasons believe a man should maintain an attitude of good will, and promote unity and harmony is his relations with others, his family and community. Masons term this as a way of believing in the Brotherhood of Man. It means that every Mason makes it his duty to follow the golden rule. This is why Masonry has been called one of the greatest forces for good in the world.

Becoming a Freemason

How to become a mason

Freemasonry is the oldest, largest Fraternity in the world. Its members have included Kings, Presidents, Prime Ministers, Statesmen, Generals, Admirals, Supreme Court Chief Justices, corporate CEOs, opera stars, movie stars, and probably, your next door neighbor. Freemasonry is always ready to welcome good men in the Fraternity, and the Grand Lodge of Florida, if within your heart you can answer yes to a few questions:

Do you believe that there is such a thing as honor, and that a man has a responsibility to act with honor in everything he does?
Masonic lessons teach principle. Masons believe that a life not founded on honor is hollow and empty, and that a man who acts without honor is less than a man.

Do you believe in God, or an everliving Deity?
No atheist can be a Mason. Freemasonry does not concern itself with your individual faith, as this is a question between only you and your God; however, we do require that a that a man believe in a Supreme Being.

Are you willing to allow others the same right to their own beliefs that you insist on yourself?
Freemasonry insists on toleration, and on the right of each person to think for himself in religious, social and political matters.

Do you believe that you have a responsibility to leave the world a better place than you found it?
Freemasonry teaches that every man has a duty not only to himself, but to the whole of mankind. Masons must do what they can to make the world a better place. Whether that means cleaning up the environment, working on civic projects, or helping children to learn, read or see. The world should be a better place because Masons have passed through it.

Do you believe that it is more important to give than to receive?
Freemasons are involved in many civic and Masonic charities because we are obligated to help others in need. Much of our help is given anonymously, as Masons are not seeking fame or accolades. Gratitude comes from helping others overcome adversity to improve their lives.

Do you feel that there’s something more to life than financial success?
Freemasonry regards no man for his worldly wealth or possessions. Masons know that self-development is more precious than money in the bank, or social position, or political power. Those things often accompany self-development, but they are no substitute for it. Masons work at building their lives and character, just as a carpenter works on building a house.

Do you believe that a person should strive to be a good citizen and that we have a moral duty to be true to the country in which we live?
freemasons believe that a country is strong as long as freedom, equality, and the opportunity for human development is afforded to all. A Mason is true to his government and its ideals. He supports its laws and authority when both are just and equitably applied. Masons uphold and maintain the principles of good government, and oppose every influence that would divide it in a degrading manner.

Do you agree that man should show compassion for others, that goodness of heart is among the most important of human values?
Freemasons believe in a certain reverence for all living things and a tenderness toward people who suffer. A loving kindness for our fellow man, and a desire to do right because it is a matter of principle. Freemasonry teaches that although all men are fallible and capable of much wrong, when they discover the goodness of heart, they have found the true essence of virtue. Masonry helps men see their potential for deep goodness and virtue.

Are you willing to give help to a fraternal Brother when he needs it, and to accept their help when you need it?
Freemasonry teaches and requires mutual help and understanding among its Brothers. Help comes in many forms, including financial; however, making yourself available to fellow Brothers by offering compassion, support, a sympathetic ear, or warning of approaching danger are all supported by Freemasonry.

Do you believe that men should strive to live a Brotherly life?
Masons see Brotherhood as a form of wisdom and a bond that holds men together. It is a private friendship that requires us to be just in our dealings, and to refuse to speak evil of each other. Freemasons believe a man should maintain an attitude of good will, and promote unity and harmony is his relations with others, his family and community. Masons term this as a way of believing in the Brotherhood of Man. It means that every Mason makes it his duty to follow the golden rule. This is why Masonry has been called one of the greatest forces for good in the world.

If you answered YES to all of these questions, you should consider becoming a Freemason within the Jurisdiction of Florida. Freemasonry offers to its members the opportunity to grow, the chance to make a difference, and to build a better world for our children. It offers the opportunity to be with and work with men who have the same values and ideals. It’s easy to learn about Freemasonry in Florida. Simply locate a Lodge within your community, contact the Lodge Secretary and schedule a convenient time to visit the Lodge. If you experience any difficulty finding a Lodge, or contacting the Lodge Secretary, contact the Grand Lodge of Florida and we’ll be happy to help!

Freemasonry is the oldest, largest Fraternity in the world. Freemasonry is always ready to welcome good men in the Fraternity, if within your heart you can answer yes to a few questions:

Do you believe that there is such a thing as honor, and that a man has a responsibility to act with honor in everything he does?
Masonic lessons teach principle. Masons believe that a life not founded on honor is hollow and empty, and that a man who acts without honor is less than a man.

Do you believe in God, or an everliving Deity?
No atheist can be a Mason. Freemasonry does not concern itself with your individual faith, as this is a question between only you and your God; however, we do require that a that a man believe in a Supreme Being.

Are you willing to allow others the same right to their own beliefs that you insist on yourself?
Freemasonry insists on toleration, and on the right of each person to think for himself in religious, social and political matters.

Do you believe that you have a responsibility to leave the world a better place than you found it?
Freemasonry teaches that every man has a duty not only to himself, but to the whole of mankind. Masons must do what they can to make the world a better place. Whether that means cleaning up the environment, working on civic projects, or helping children to learn, read or see. The world should be a better place because Masons have passed through it.

Do you believe that it is more important to give than to receive?
Freemasons are involved in many civic and Masonic charities because we are obligated to help others in need. Much of our help is given anonymously, as Masons are not seeking fame or accolades. Gratitude comes from helping others overcome adversity to improve their lives.

Do you feel that there’s something more to life than financial success?
Freemasonry regards no man for his worldly wealth or possessions. Masons know that self-development is more precious than money in the bank, social position, or political power. Those things often accompany self-development, but they are no substitute for it. Masons work at building their lives and character, just as a carpenter works on building a house.

Do you believe that a person should strive to be a good citizen and that we have a moral duty to be true to the country in which we live?
freemasons believe that a country is strong as long as freedom, equality, and the opportunity for human development is afforded to all. A Mason is true to his government and its ideals. He supports its laws and authority when both are just and equitably applied. Masons uphold and maintain the principles of good government, and oppose every influence that would divide it in a degrading manner.

Do you agree that man should show compassion for others, that goodness of heart is among the most important of human values?
Freemasons believe in a certain reverence for all living things and a tenderness toward people who suffer. A loving kindness for our fellow man, and a desire to do right because it is a matter of principle. Freemasonry teaches that although all men are fallible and capable of much wrong, when they discover the goodness of heart, they have found the true essence of virtue. Masonry helps men see their potential for deep goodness and virtue.

Are you willing to give help to a fraternal Brother when he needs it, and to accept their help when you need it?
Freemasonry teaches and requires mutual help and understanding among its Brothers. Help comes in many forms, including financial; however, making yourself available to fellow Brothers by offering compassion, support, a sympathetic ear, or warning of approaching danger are all supported by Freemasonry.

Do you believe that men should strive to live a Brotherly life?
Masons see Brotherhood as a form of wisdom and a bond that holds men together. It is a private friendship that requires us to be just in our dealings, and to refuse to speak evil of each other. Freemasons believe a man should maintain an attitude of good will, and promote unity and harmony is his relations with others, his family and community. Masons term this as a way of believing in the Brotherhood of Man. It means that every Mason makes it his duty to follow the golden rule. This is why Masonry has been called one of the greatest forces for good in the world.

How to become a Shriner, the gateway is to become a Freemason first.

The Shrine serves as an organization requiring a certain membership of the Masonic Lodge, which is actually an organization that branched out of Freemasonry more than 100 years ago.

According to a recent survey, the data collected reported that today; there are over 411,000 Shriners universally who actively attend their neighboring temples with their main headquarters located in Tampa, Florida.

United States alone has around 195 temples and 340,000 Shriners which is a big number considering Freemasonry is not that famous.

Are The Shriners related to Islam?

This is one of the most significant questions that is asked by people interested in “how to become a Shriner” or who wants to join Freemasonry.

Although the concept of the Shrine looks similar, however they are not related at all.

Islam is a complete religion and although Freemasonry may have some ideals that are like that of Islam, but it cannot be said that they are linked in any way. The only connection between the two is if any Muslim person becomes a member of Freemasonry or the Shrine.

The basic idea of a Shriner is all about walking down the steps of the principles of fraternity. These laws include brotherly love, relief, truth, fun, and fellowship.

Simply speaking, you are still devoted to Masonic values. But, there are some added advantages which a freemason can’t enjoy which the Shriners can:

  • You can become a part of social activities with your family.
  • You are allowed to hold fundraisers for your own self or for different hospitals.
  • You are more socially active than the other members of Freemasonry.
  • It becomes easier to locate a unit that appeals to your self-interests.
  • You can entertain yourself in high-spirited fun activities like parades, golf, and trap shooting.

How to become a Shriner

Becoming a Shriner and becoming a Masonic Lodge member are exactly the same way. However, the catch is that you must show your expertise in the first three degrees of Freemasonry.

As a result, it is accurate to say that all Shriners are Freemasons, but not all Freemasons are Shriners.

So, as soon as you become a Master Mason and attain all three Masonic degrees, you can put forward a formal request to become a Noble of the Shrine. The most accurate method to put forward a petition is to request an in attendance Shriner to support and put forward your application.

Coming into contact with a Shriner assists you in allot of ways. For instance, a Shriner helps you throughout the application process and provides you with the facilitates to create links with other Shriners of your neighboring temple.

Moreover, the helping process works both ways. It isn’t just you looking for guidance but as a Shrineer it is their duty to work together and bring in new Nobles.

In reality, the motto of a Shrine membership is ‘Together We Can’. So we can say that the Shrine is all about unity, joint effort, and achieving goals together.

A point to remember is that even if you are a Master Mason, it is not mandatory that your petition will be accepted right away. There are some common rules which a Shrine follows.

The first thing they do is, check your previous record as a Master Mason.

If you are not that good in standing as a Master Mason in your lodge, or if you are incapable in following the duties diligently, there is a risk that your application will not be accepted.

It is extremely important for them to choose only those Master Masons, only who have proved the proficiency in their lodge.

Are women allowed to become a Shriner?

This is also a question that is frequently asked. However the answer is no. A woman can’t be a Shriner.

There are a lot of other organizations where women can freely join, such as Daughters of the Nile (DON), The Shrine Guilds of America and even the Order of The Eastern Star.

These organizations take part in supporting the Shrine, like providing astonishing care for children suffering from diseases or helping out in different activities and projects.

The Shrine Guilds of America provides the children with education, during their stay at the hospital, too. The women who are a member of this organization offer their help in various special projects for children and support them in other ways.

Generally, these women act as doctors, nurses, physical therapists, and teachers, to aid the purpose of a Shrine.

Final Thoughts

If you are a Master Mason, becoming a Shriner isn’t hard for you.

Nevertheless, it isn’t free. There are a number of upfront initiation fees that can range between $200 to $500. It all comes down to the offering and the requirement of the temple too.

In addition to that, if you have some other questions that you want to ask, you can contact them directly. All Shrines give you the chance to ask questions about the certain requirements before filling in the application.

You can also download their application online and understand their events, philanthropy, brotherhood, and fraternity as well.