How to become a medical device sales representative

Medical sales jobs will always be in demand. The job of a medical sales representative is to supply the medical field with medical equipment and pharmaceuticals. In this article, we discuss what a medical sales representative does, how to become one and answers to frequently asked questions about this role.

What does a medical sales representative do?

A medical sales representative sells medical supplies to doctors, clinics, facilities and hospitals. The job includes contacting potential customers, explaining the features and benefits of the product, answering questions about the product and negotiating the final deal.

Average salary

A medical sales representative with a tenure of one to three years makes an average of $63,996 per year. Salary varies according to area of expertise, geographic location, employer and experience.

How to become a medical sales representative

If you are interested in becoming a medical sales representative, consider following these steps:

1. Pursue an education

Medical sales representatives need at least a high school diploma or its equivalent, but most have bachelor’s degrees. A Master’s of Business Administration will make you an attractive candidate in this demanding and competitive field. Your major may determine what you specialize in. For example, a drug company representative might major in pharmacology. MedReps reports that 98 percent of pharmaceutical sales representatives have a four-year degree or better. Degrees in demand include business, marketing, pharmacology and pharmaceutical business.

2. Consider earning certifications

In addition to a degree, you can increase your employment prospects by getting certified by the National Association of Medical Sales Representatives or the Independent Medical Distributors Association.

To specialize in pharmaceutical sales, you will need to contact the National Association of Pharmaceutical Sales Representatives to become a Certified National Pharmaceutical Representative or CNPR. This will give you the medical terminology background you’ll need. The certification exam is two hours long and requires a minimum score of 80 percent to pass.

3. Choose a specialization

First, ask yourself what you’re interested in. If you’re interested in mental health, a pharmaceutical sales job might be right for you. If you’re into sports medicine, then medical device sales might be your chosen career path. You should have a personal and professional interest in your specialization and a passion for the field. You have the potential for a highly-rewarding career if you follow your passion and do what you love.

4. Gain field experience

Once you’ve decided on a specialty, find a way to gain relevant experience. If you’re going to specialize in psychiatric pharmaceutical sales, you may want to volunteer with the National Alliance on Mental Illness. If possible, you should shadow a medical sales representative in your niche, or get an internship with a medical sales company. Volunteer work at a hospital or doctor’s office can also be invaluable.

5. Complete training

Before you begin training, identify what your learning style is. If you learn by doing something, sitting in a classroom will not be the best way to gain knowledge. If you learn best through lectures, on-the-job experience is not the best option for you. Find a medical sales training program that fits your lifestyle. In-person learning has the advantage of networking, while online learning is more flexible when it comes to your schedule.

Regardless of which decisions you make, employers will expect you to be able to sell within your first week, so you must be able to absorb a large amount of information and understand it quickly. Consequently, experience doing this is helpful in obtaining your first medical sales job. You can get training by signing up for MedReps, which will alert you to opportunities. Other ways include signing up for courses through MedSalesCareer or Sales Momentum. You should also learn the acronyms in your niche, which can be done through internet research. Finally, stay updated on technological developments.

Employers sometimes provide on-the-job training and frequently have recommendations for continuing education.

6. Network

Professional networking is important in any field, but essential to success in medical sales. You can start networking while in college by getting to know your professors, working in relevant jobs, asking your employers for recommendations, attending networking events and using online professional profiles. You should get to know people and network whenever possible.

7. Grow an online presence

MedReps reports that 76 percent of recruiters view candidates online before making a decision on whether or not to reach out to a prospect, so it is important to have a strong online presence. You should have professional social media accounts and a personal website to show recruiters your seriousness in the industry.

How to become a medical device sales representative

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Medical device salespeople work for manufacturers or wholesalers and sell goods to hospitals, doctor offices, clinics, government facilities and nursing homes. They are responsible for contacting potential customers, explaining the features and benefits of their products, answering questions and negotiating the final sales price. The route to a medical device sales rep position involves education, training, experience and networking.

Earn Basic Training

The requirements for working as a medical equipment sales rep depends upon the company, but sales representatives for technical products typically must possess at least a bachelor’s degree. A degree in engineering or biology can be useful to sell the highly technical equipment and understand its medical applications. In addition to a college degree, you could earn a certification from the National Association of Medical Sales Representatives that will increase your knowledge of the field, highlight your commitment to your career and help you land an interview.

Get Sales Experience

While you’re in school, get as much hands-on sales training as possible because medical device companies are not interested in providing basic sales training techniques to recruits. A new employer may provide you with in-depth product training to ensure you’re familiar with the extremely technical aspects of the medical devices and how they’re used, but they won’t be teaching you how to overcome objections or how to close a sale. Sales experience is vital to landing a sales rep position in the medical device industry.

Research Potential Employers

To successfully land a sales position with a medical device company, you need to know what kind of equipment a company sells, who are its primary customers and where you’ll find prospects. Tailor your job search to those companies that sell products you are most familiar with. For example, if you are trying to get into a company that sells surgical supplies, you can rely on your stint as a receptionist in a surgeon’s office or the fact that you did marketing for a plastic surgery practice. Look for companies that sell products that relate to your previous experience. Medical device companies rely on reps to sell in large geographic territories, too, so look for companies that operate in areas where you have built a reputation with area health care providers.

Build Industry Relationships

Even while you’re still in school, you can start building industry relationships through your professors and professional organizations that cater to your industry. Join a professional association such as the National Association of Medical Sales Representatives or the Independent Medical Distributors Association to take advantage of the networking opportunities at conventions and seminars. Sit on a committee and seek career services they might offer. You could find a lead for a good job while keeping up with industry changes and garnering support from your peers and industry leaders.

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Linda Ray is an award-winning journalist with more than 20 years reporting experience. She’s covered business for newspapers and magazines, including the “Greenville News,” “Success Magazine” and “American City Business Journals.” Ray holds a journalism degree and teaches writing, career development and an FDIC course called “Money Smart.”

To start your career as a medical device sales representative, you need a high school diploma or equivalent. Though most jobs only require a bachelor’s degree in business or health sciences, an MBA may make you an attractive candidate for medical device and pharmaceutical sales rep jobs. The key to success in medical sales is to gain the skills and qualification you need to stay competitive. These include product and medical knowledge, public speaking, sales and business skills, interpersonal skills, communication skills, networking, and a self-motivated work ethic. You can also join the National Association of Medical Device Sales Representatives (NAMSR) to network with and learn from other medical sales reps.

Table of Contents

  • Is Medical Device Sales a Good Career?
  • Medical Device Sales Representative Job Description Sample
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  3. How to Become a Medical Device Sales Representative

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Many medical sales jobs lie at the happy intersection of three robust industries: healthcare, sales, and biotechnology. If you’re considering a medical sales career path, you may be motivated knowing that there’s great potential to earn a lucrative salary and enjoy a rewarding, long-term career.

Medical sales jobs can also offer tremendous work flexibility. As with other careers in sales, medical sales professionals often work from a home office and enjoy latitude to set their own work schedules. Far from being a desk-bound, traditional office job, a medical sales job can offer travel, a varied schedule, and opportunities to interact with a variety of other professionals in related fields.

FlexJobs is a subscription service for job seekers that features flexible and remote jobs. With an A+ rating from the Better Business Bureau, the monthly subscription costs allow us to fully vet and verify all of the jobs on our site—ensuring that customers have a safe and positive job searching experience.

How to Get Into Medical Sales

For the most part, jobs in medical sales require a college degree. There’s often a high level of knowledge required to succeed in medical sales in fields including science, health, math, biotechnology and, of course, medicine and healthcare. Medical sales professionals often interact with doctors and high-level corporate executives, making an advanced degree an asset employers seek for many job openings.

Overall, education requirements depend on the specific field of interest in many cases. For example, a medical engineering degree may be the perfect credential if you’re looking for jobs with companies offering medical products that use cutting-edge technology.

If you’re breaking into medical sales and have a proven sales track record in another profession or in business-to-business (B2B) sales, all the better. Entry-level sales jobs, including internships, can be your best bet if you have the personality traits employers seek in sales professionals. Knowing your personality is a key part of a successful job search. In sales, your personality can play a serious role in meeting and exceeding your sales goals.

Types of Medical Sales Jobs

As with many sales careers, travel can be a significant part of the job. Medical sales professionals may be on the road offering products to physician’s offices, medical centers, hospitals, and at conferences or other gatherings of medical professionals.

Often, a medical sales professional may be assigned a territory and expected to build a pipeline of customers that help their employer meet revenue goals. Here are a few broad categories in the medical sales sector:

  • Pharmaceutical Sales. Pharmaceutical sales representatives sell pharma-industry products to doctors’ offices, medical centers, and hospitals, often in a designated territorial area.
  • Medical Device Sales. This specialized field often requires a medical or technical background, and can involve presentations, demonstrations, and a successful track record in a medical or clinical sales setting.
  • Medical Supply Sales. This is usually a transactional sales role that may involve selling more general (versus specialized) medical equipment supplies, often at a fairly high volume, to a steady and growing customer base.
  • Healthcare and Medical Management Services. This broad category may include selling healthcare services in the areas of billing, marketing, and day-to-day office management. Sales professionals in this area may represent an employer whose products help doctors offices and medical centers run more smoothly and efficiently.

Medical Sales Salary

An annual survey of medical sales salaries by MedRep.com, a website for professionals seeking medical and pharmaceutical sales jobs, shows the industry’s tremendous earning potential and career growth potential. A medical sales salary pays an average base of $95,296 a year, the report found. With additional earnings including commissions and bonuses, the average total income reaches $156,785.

Generally, medical sales jobs that are focused on outside sales trend toward the higher end of the salary spectrum. These jobs usually involve more travel, and in some cases (a surgical sales representative, for example), may entail observing product use in a clinical or even surgical setting.

Enhancing Your Medical Sales Career Path

Medical sales careers are built largely on relationships, which means that networking can play a huge role in growing your medical sales career. Forging strong relationships with your customer base (e.g., doctors, hospitals, and healthcare companies) can be a good way to land your next job.

And, as with any position in sales, having a documented, successful track record can be the make-or-break asset in advancing to a management position in medical sales or finding another job that builds on your proven sales prowess. You’ll also need to show, by your resume and during any job interview, that you’re hungry for success, competitive, and ready to take on the next career challenge.

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For healthcare organizations to run efficiently, their storage closets need to be stocked with the medical devices clinicians need. Thousands of different medical devices are used across healthcare specialties to treat patients with various conditions. These include defibrillators, cochlear implants, insulin pumps, pacemakers, artificial joints, ultrasound machines, and sterilizers to just name a few. Healthcare facilities rely on medical device sales representatives to purchase this much-needed equipment at the most competitive prices. Reps are responsible for attracting new clients and nurturing current contracts with excellent service. As the title suggests, medical device sales representatives are selling experts who influence clients’ buying decisions by detailing unique product features and benefits. Sales representatives market their company’s devices to hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, surgical centers, physicians, and more.

Salary

The 2016 Medical Sales Salary Report surveyed 4,000 representatives across the United States who earned an average yearly salary of $145,147, with a mean base of $88,038. Medical sales representatives working in pharmaceuticals earn below-average income at $122,107, but those selling surgical devices bring home considerably more at $163,654 per year. The highest paid reps are employed in biotechnology for $165,028 on average.

Beginning Salary

Medical device sales representatives with less than two years of experience reap an average annual base wage of $66,516 with $33,394 in bonuses or commissions. Medical sales salaries increase exponentially with experience. Late-career sales reps with 20+ years of experience report an average yearly total compensation of $165,735. Those who advance to medical device sales director or VP can make over $209,082 yearly.

Key Responsibilities

Like other sales jobs, the daily tasks given to medical device sales representatives vary based on clients’ needs. Significant time is spent recruiting new business while setting up meetings, emailing, and speaking on the phone with current clients. Medical device sales reps are the main contact point for sending out product proposals and quotes that persuade purchase. They’ll conduct presentations for doctors or health executives about their company’s medical device offerings. Other duties for medical device sales representatives include maintaining contract records, taking orders, surveying client option, staying abreast of clinical data, and monitoring competitor activity. It’s their main goal to build positive working relationships with medical staff to reach or exceed sales targets.

Necessary Skills

Medical sales is a competitive field where performing well is crucial to avoid being replaced. To stay successful, medical device sales representatives must have exceptional interpersonal skills to establish positive, productive client relationships. Being a good listener and communicator is important to gain clients’ trust. Medical sales requires having clinical knowledge to know exactly what you’re selling and its benefits in healthcare. Sales skills are a must for reps to passively or aggressively persuade physicians for purchases. Medical device sales representatives should be confident, outgoing, persistent, and self-motivated. Analytical skills will help plan which healthcare organizations should be targeted for medical sales.

Degree and Education Requirements

Before breaking into this six-figure job, you’ll need to attend an accredited post-secondary institution for at least a baccalaureate degree. Most medical device sales representatives choose an undergraduate major in health science, sales, business, or life science disciplines. Taking technical electives related to medical device sales, such as biomedical engineering and biotechnology, is recommended. Due to rising competition, many reps are returning to graduate school for further sales training. Obtaining a Master of Business Administration (MBA) with a concentration in health services management or sales management is often best. Some may choose a Master of Health Administration (MHA) to better understand clinical system structure.

Pros and Cons of the Position

Medical device sales is one of the “hottest” healthcare professions with a salary potential that rivals some doctors and surgeons. Pay scale only boosts higher with lucrative bonuses and commissions for sales. Reps earn the glamorous task of presenting to C-level healthcare executives and chairmen. When they’re not on sales calls, medical device sales representatives have great autonomy in working from home or hotel rooms. One survey found that 43 percent of reps drive company cars and get mileage reimbursement. There’s also big room for advancement. However, medical device sales representatives have poor work-life balance with extensive travel to meet with clients. The majority works beyond 40 hours per week in a stressful, high-pressure environment where satisfying quotas is paramount. Sales reps also have fast job turnover rates and can struggle to find employment during recessions.

Getting Started

Refining your selling skills is a crucial step to unlocking medical device sales jobs. During college, begin perfecting your resume with experience in the healthcare industry. Most universities will extend credit for completing internships and co-operatives. Basic sales training could begin in other avenues, such as retail or electronics, but sharpening your medical know-how is also important. For instance, interning in a hospital’s surgery ward could prepare you for selling surgical devices. Upon graduation, look for entry-level medical device sales rep positions with companies selling products you’re most familiar with. Networking is key to begin developing your industry relationships. Consider becoming a member of the National Association of Medical Sales Representatives. Here you can also take an examination for certification as a Registered Medical Sales Representative (RMSR).

Future Outlook

Job opportunities are opening for medical device sales representatives who are willing to compete in this dog-eat-dog profession. The United States has the world’s largest medical device market generating nearly $155 billion. Over 6,500 medical device companies are scattered across the nation, particularly in high-tech states like California, New York, and Texas. Increasing demand for healthcare from the aging “baby boomers” will spark growth in medical device sales. The advancing capabilities of medical technology will also fuel more cutting-edge innovations for being sold. However, the Bureau of Labor Statistics only predicts sales occupations will expand by 5 percent through 2024. Medical device sales representatives can find favorable prospects working for the industry’s manufacturers or distributors.

Medical device sales representatives are compelling, tenacious marketing gurus who travel to healthcare organizations in their assigned region to develop contracts. They play a pivotal role in keeping their companies profitable by landing large purchase orders for medical devices. Many focus on selling medical devices in a certain specialty, such as oncology, neurology, gynecology, or orthopedics. If you become a medical device sales representative, you’ll have the opportunity to promote potentially life-saving products that could help healthcare organizations improve patient outcomes.

Find The Best Medical Sales Representative Jobs For You

Where do you want to work?

Working as a Medical Sales Representative

Medical Sales Representatives promote and sell healthcare products to medical professionals. The products might include drugs, medicine, equipment, and the target customers are doctors, nurses, healthcare facilities, and pharmacists.

As a medical sales rep, you will most likely have a territory assigned to you, where you are expected to push a certain product, generally on a project basis. You will have to provide information about the products you are promoting and find a way to convince your customers that your product beats the rest.

You might do this in presentations organized for groups or in one-on-one meetings. It is up to you, as long as you meet your assigned sales quota.

There is more than meets the eye when it comes to being a medical sales representative. For example, did you know that they make an average of $43.89 an hour? That’s $91,292 a year!

Between 2018 and 2028, the career is expected to grow 2% and produce 35,400 job opportunities across the U.S.

What Does a Medical Sales Representative Do

There are certain skills that many medical sales representatives have in order to accomplish their responsibilities. By taking a look through resumes, we were able to narrow down the most common skills for a person in this position. We discovered that a lot of resumes listed customer-service skills, interpersonal skills and physical stamina.

When it comes to the most important skills required to be a medical sales representative, we found that a lot of resumes listed 11.6% of medical sales representatives included customer service, while 9.4% of resumes included territory, and 7.1% of resumes included product knowledge. Hard skills like these are helpful to have when it comes to performing essential job responsibilities.

When it comes to searching for a job, many search for a key term or phrase. Instead, it might be more helpful to search by industry, as you might be missing jobs that you never thought about in industries that you didn’t even think offered positions related to the medical sales representative job title. But what industry to start with? Most medical sales representatives actually find jobs in the health care and pharmaceutical industries.

How To Become a Medical Sales Representative

If you’re interested in becoming a medical sales representative, one of the first things to consider is how much education you need. We’ve determined that 69.0% of medical sales representatives have a bachelor’s degree. In terms of higher education levels, we found that 14.7% of medical sales representatives have master’s degrees. Even though most medical sales representatives have a college degree, it’s possible to become one with only a high school degree or GED.

Choosing the right major is always an important step when researching how to become a medical sales representative. When we researched the most common majors for a medical sales representative, we found that they most commonly earn bachelor’s degree degrees or master’s degree degrees. Other degrees that we often see on medical sales representative resumes include associate degree degrees or high school diploma degrees.

You may find that experience in other jobs will help you become a medical sales representative. In fact, many medical sales representative jobs require experience in a role such as sales representative. Meanwhile, many medical sales representatives also have previous career experience in roles such as pharmaceutical sales representative or account executive.

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How to become a medical device sales representative

4 Degrees That Will Land You a Career In Medical Sales

Bachelor degree programs don’t come with a “Medical Sales Rep” category. Still, our Annual Medical Sales Salary Report consistently finds approximately 95% of medical sales respondents have four-year degrees or higher.

While most have college degrees, medical sales professionals have a variety of unique backgrounds, medical sales certificates, and work experiences. This diversity is a pro for sales rep hopefuls as they consider their own potential for a career in medical sales.

Unfortunately, it can also be confusing as they try to research if they have a medical sales-worthy degree. It’s especially challenging for college students who are deciding their future career paths based on their chosen majors.

To help you land a career in medical sales, we’ve compiled a list of potential degrees and the benefits of each:

1. B.A. in Business

The most successful medical sales reps will tell you soft skills are critical to building customer relationships. It’s their ability to communicate across all channels and relate to customers on a deeper level that helps them connect their products to customers’ needs.

A B.A. in Business prepares you for these strategic interactions. Coursework for this degree focuses on:

  • Communication
  • Social sciences
  • Humanities
  • Critical thinking
  • Reasoning

2. B.S. in Business

The difference between a B.A. in Business and a B.S. in Business is slight but critical. With this degree, you’ll earn a business-focused degree that zeros in on math, science, and statistics. This coursework helps medical sales reps hone their entrepreneurial and strategic thinking skills.

As a result, sales reps improve their ability to manage their sales as though it’s their own business. They develop skills to manage customer accounts, effectively use data to their advantage, and connect with customers based on the scientific details of their products.

With this degree, medical sales reps have an advantage in:

  • Math
  • Science
  • Statistics
  • Marketing
  • Finance
  • Entrepreneurial skills
  • Economics

3. B.A. in Biology

Some medical sales careers require in-depth knowledge of the human body. Take someone who sells medical device products, for example. Their role in understanding customers’ needs begins with knowing the physiological effects, patients’ pain points, and how their product solves those problems from within.

Those with a B.A. in Biology have advanced knowledge of genetics and cell biology. In many cases, they can field customers’ specific questions about a product and its effects on the body on the spot.

The added benefit of this degree is you still earn a typical liberal arts education. This means while receiving training in biology, you also acquire training in those critical soft skills. Here’s what you’ll have a deep understanding of:

  • Communication
  • Social sciences
  • Humanities
  • Critical thinking
  • Reasoning
  • Genetics
  • Cell biology
  • Evolution

4. B.S. in Biology

Those who earn in B.S. in Biology are known for moving on to pursue graduate work in biology or health sciences. However, the knowledge you gain in this undergraduate program is also beneficial for a career in medical sales.

This degree is similar to a B.A. in Biology but is even more science-based. In turn, you’ll be more equipped to excel in research or technical settings. Of course, with the constantly evolving nature of medical sales, this is a skill that will set you above competing sales rep candidates.

With this track, you’ll have an advantage in:

  • Genetics
  • Cell biology
  • Evolution
  • Human physiology
  • Biological chemistry
  • Physics
  • Problem-solving

As you can see, there is no one path for earning a career in medical sales. While any of these degrees could help you land a medical sales job, you may also consider a certificate from the Medical Sales College. As you evaluate each program, consider your natural strengths and your desired medical sales specialty. Then, decide which path will elevate you to new heights.

Which degree best fits your medical sales needs? Let us know!

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The following is an outline of course material taught over the 12 weeks:

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All programs have been reviewed and approved through the Department of Higher Education. In non-degree vocational programs, approvals are awarded for contact hours versus traditional credit hours. In most instances, 16 contact hours are equivalent to 1 credit hour.

Spine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma

12 Weeks

The Spine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma Program is comprised of 12-Weeks, 440 Contact Hours, which includes comprehensive training in two of our specialties:

  • Spine
  • Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (ORT)

The following is an outline of course material taught over the 12 weeks:

  • Professional Representative Certification (PRC)
  • MDRepTrack
  • Regenerative Medicine/Biologics
  • Specialty Curriculum (Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma and Spine)
  • Dynamic Consultative Selling
  • Business Development & Placement Services

Spine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (Hybrid)

12 Weeks

The 12-Week Spine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma Program (Hybrid) consists of 3 weeks at home study and 9 weeks on campus. This 440 Hour Program provides 60 Distance Learning Hours and 380 Contact Hours, and includes comprehensive training of two of our Program Specialties:

  • Spine
  • Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (ORT)

The following is an outline of course material taught over the 12 weeks:

  • Professional Representative Certification (PRC)
  • MDRepTrack
  • Regenerative Medicine/Biologics
  • Specialty Curriculum (Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma and Spine)
  • Dynamic Consultative Selling
  • Business Development & Placement Services

Orthopaedic Extremities and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (Hybrid)

12 Weeks

The 12-Week Extremities and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma Program (Hybrid) is comprised of 3 weeks at home study and 9 weeks on campus. This 440 Hour Program provides 60 Distance Learning Hours and 380 Contact Hours, and includes comprehensive training of two of our Program Specialties:

  • Orthopaedic Extremities
  • Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (ORT)

The following is an outline of course material taught over the 12 weeks:

  • Professional Representative Certification (PRC)
  • MDRepTrack
  • Regenerative Medicine/Biologics
  • Specialty Curriculum (Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma and Spine)
  • Dynamic Consultative Selling
  • Business Development & Placement Services

Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (Hybrid)

12 Weeks

The12-Week Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma Program (Hybrid) is comprised of 3 weeks at home study and 9 weeks on campus. This 440 Hour Program provides 60 Distance Learning Hours and 380 Contact Hours, and includes comprehensive training of two of our Program Specialties:

  • Sports Medicine
  • Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (ORT)

The following is an outline of course material taught over the 12 weeks:

  • Professional Representative Certification (PRC)
  • MDRepTrack
  • Regenerative Medicine/Biologics
  • Specialty Curriculum (Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma and Spine)
  • Dynamic Consultative Selling
  • Business Development & Placement Services

Orthobiologics & Regenerative Medicine (Hybrid)

8 Weeks

The 8-Week Orthobiologics & Regenerative Medicine Program consists of 7 weeks of instructor led at home/online studying and 4 days at our Denver campus with training staff. The program is 20 hours/week with scheduled meeting times and due dates. Students make travel arrangements to be in Denver for the last 4 days of the program.

The following is an outline of course material taught over the 8 weeks:

  • Professional Representative Certification (PRC)
  • MDRepTrack
  • Regenerative Medicine/Biologics
  • Specialty Curriculum (Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma and Spine)
  • Dynamic Consultative Selling
  • Business Development & Placement Services

Spine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma

12 Weeks

The Spine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma Program is comprised of 12-Weeks, 440 Contact Hours, which includes comprehensive training in two of our specialties:

  • Spine
  • Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (ORT)

The following is an outline of course material taught over the 12 weeks:

  • Professional Representative Certification (PRC)
  • MDRepTrack
  • Regenerative Medicine/Biologics
  • Specialty Curriculum (Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma and Spine)
  • Dynamic Consultative Selling
  • Business Development & Placement Services

The Spine and Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma Program is comprised of 12-Weeks, 440 Contact Hours, which includes comprehensive training in two of our specialties:

  • Spine
  • Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma (ORT)

The following is an outline of course material taught over the 12 weeks:

  • Professional Representative Certification (PRC)
  • MDRepTrack
  • Regenerative Medicine/Biologics
  • Specialty Curriculum (Orthopaedic Reconstruction & Trauma and Spine)
  • Dynamic Consultative Selling
  • Business Development & Placement Services