How to breed chihuahuas

Howe Farms
owego , NY 13827
United States
ph: 607-687-5637
randeerh owe @yahoo .com

“I WANT TO BREED MY CHIHUAHUA”

I am contacted at least weekly by people saying they want to breed there chihuahua, or even become a chihuahua breeder. this is not a horrable idea, obviously, i do it, and LOVE IT!

having said that, there are so many things to consider befor you decide to breed.

you need quality breeding stock. this is not optional. you need to have a female with great genesics, that really represents the breed standards. most breeders i know do not stud out there males, i too have stopped doing this. there are alot of legal issues to consider, what if the female is injured(or dies) in your care? what if your male is injured by an unwilling female? what if there is an undetected sexually transmitted disease that gets transmitted( dident know dogs has sexually transmitted diseases?) ok, so with all of that, you will probably need to buy your own male or set up artifical insemination with your vet.

so, now you have spent alot of money getting your first breeding pair, if you bought them as puppies you need to wait about 2 YEARS to breed them. your male will become sexually mature at around 6-8 months of age, your female, at around 18 months -2 years. your male will “spray” urine around your home to mark his teritory. he will need to be keep far away from your female while she is in heat , starting at around 6 months, then every 6 months after. he wil be very agravated about being kept away from his female. he will be very vocal, possably driving you crazy for up to 3 weeks, untill your female is out of her heat. while she is in heat she will bleed from the vagina, some dogs clean them selves well, others make a real mess. she will also try everything in her power to get to her male, while she is in heat.

if you bought your male as a puppy, his testicals may have not been decended yet. if one or both fail to decend( pretty common problem) he will need to be fixed and you will need to start over.

now, lets say, your female is 2 years old, your male is sexually mature, with both testicals. ready to breed? not yet. they both need to be tested to see if they are carriers of any genetic diseases common to the breed. if either tests positive, that dog will need to be spayed/ nutered, and you need to begin again.

ok, so you have 2 healthy, mature, disease free, wonderful examples of the breed, so lets breed. sometimes, nature just takes its course, sometimes, it needs some help. your male will probable need a few dozen practice runs, befor he gets it right, but when he does, your dogs will “tie” during the tie, you will need to be “hands on” to be sure they do not injure each other. the tie can last up to an hour.i bred my dogs at least once every other day while the female is in heat.

you can get an ultrasound done at about 8 weeks to determine pregnancy. the ultrasound can not usually count how many pups there are(very important to know with a chihuahua) so you will need an xray around day 52. dogs are pregnant for about 63 days. as you can see the vet bills are adding up.

during the last week of her pregnancy,you will need to be with your female all of the time. many chihuahuas die from having an unattended birth go wrong. by the time the owners are home, the litter is lost and sometimes even the dam. most first time (and some times second and third time) mom’s do not know to remove the puppy from the birthing sack. if the puppy is not quickly removed , they sufficate. an over eager dam can chew the ambilical codr too close and the puppy can bleed to death. you need to be there when your puppies are born.

an average chihuahua litter is 3 pups.if there are less, the puppies can become to big in utero, and your female may need a c-section.

LOTS OF CHIHUAHUAS NEED C-SECTIONS! after waking up from sedation, a chihuahua may refuse to take her pups, they may kill and eat the pups. you need to be with her every second during this time, you may have to introduce the pups over and over to her.

C-sections in my area run from 700.00- 1,200.00. thee are lots or reasons for a section. i have had A large chihuahua, that “should” have been able to whelp naturally, but needed a secion, even though her pups were small. i have a chihuahua that had had 3 litters naturally, in her 4th litter , a puppy was bent sideways, and got stuck in the birth canal. she needed a section, her litter died and she had to be spayed. i have had several singleton litters, they almost always need a section, because the puppy is just to big. i had a female that went into premature labor, and srarted bleeding vaginally, she needed a section, her litter died and she needed to be spayed.. you need to have the money for a c- section, with every litter you bred, because you WILL need it eventually. if the female needs a c section, she may needs one the second breeding also, if she does, she will need to be spayed and you will need to start over.

ok, so the puppies are here.

but. mom doesent want to take care of them(sometimes the case with first time moms and moms who have had a c section) the puppies need moms colustrum, its not negotiable, so you need to either “milk” mom, hand stripping colustrum one drop at a time into the puppies mouths or into a container to bottle feed them. or hold mom still so the puppies can nurse, every 1 1/2 – 2 hours. the puppies must be kept warm. they can not regulate there own temps. so you buy a whelping nest, 150.00-300.00 depending on the set up.

finally after a few days mom starts taking over, feeding , cleaning, ect. but, chihuahuas are a very small dog, feeding puppies can cause them to loose huge amounts of calcium. “eclampsia” is common to small breeds. it is caused by loosing to much calcium through nursing. it can come on quickly and cause your female to die. she will need constant monitering to be sure this is not happening. if this happens your chihuahua will need to see a vet, it can cause rapid heart beat, shaking, seisures and death. breeders take alot of time off from work during the whelping season. if your female suffers from eclampsia she may need to be spayed and you will have to start over again.

so finally you have a healthy mom and 3 healthy pup. but you notice that suddenly one doesent look “right” its not eating like the others, it doesent move as much, and it cries more.( you need a scale to weigh your pups twice daily. i have found large postal scales work best. 30.00-50.00) the puppy has Fading Puppy Syndrome, (happens very often)it needs too be removed from mom, kept warm ( yeah another whelping nest 150.00- 300.00) you try to bottle feed it ,(puppy formula 15.00-30.00) but it does not suck well. you take the puppy to the vet, it needs sub q fluid every 2 hours around the clock, (you have to do this at home, your vet wont keep a newborn puppy) so you buy all of the supplies, your vet shows you how to administer the fluids, and you go home. it takes 4 days of round the clock feeding, sub q fluids, constant temperature checks, but finally the puppy is maintaing weight.(it is my experience that these pups usually die. there is a 20 % mortality in healthy litters, fading puppies make up most of the percentage)

so say your female finally has a healthy litter of 3 pups, but she needed a c-section. the money you will get for the first pup, goes to cover the vet expences for your female , check ups for your puppies, shots, cost of registering the litter ext.

the money you get from the second puppy (and part of the 3rd) will go toward the c-section bill. and the remaning money for the 3rd ,will go to cover some your supplies, even if all of your puppies sell, you are in the hole. but, what if they dont sell? can you keep them? can you afford to give them away? people are hesitant to but from inexperienced breeders, you need to put some real thought into what you will do with your puppies if they dont sell.

so, with all of that, if you still want to breed chihuahuas, give me a call.

Fox: What is a good age to start breeding a male chihuahua?
I’m getting a puppy and my girlfriend has a female chihuahua that is 4 years old. How old is a good age for male chihuahua’s to breed?

How to breed chihuahuas
Photo Credit: http://www.petsadviser.com/Flickr

Answers and Views:

Answer by lilcslilhottie
at least 1yr or 2 old that way the dog don’t got any problems

Answer by MamaB
Okay – questions back. Have you looked into the pedigrees of these two? How closely/not closely are they related?

Another question – since there isn’t a dog that doesn’t have faults, conformation-wise, are you and your girlfriend experienced enough to know whether these two have similar faults, or whether they have faults the other will help to correct (given you haven’t actually bought your puppy male yet!!)

Are you intending to test this pair for any problems that might be in Chihuahuas?

Finally in answer to your question, males are able to mate as soon as 7 months (been there, done that!). I suggest your girlfriend gets her female spayed as soon as she can. Four years, for a first litter (and it will be closer to 5 before she might have these puppies now), is TOO OLD.

Get this pair neutered, and love them for what they are – your pets.

Answer by ♥Pitbull love
Dont breed your dogs, theres already too many unwanted dogs in the shelters, dont add to it.
And besides, the female is too old, by the time the male is fully grown, the female will be too old to breed.

Dont add to the unwanted dogs in shelters.

Answer by Stacey S.
do not do that.. leave it to professionals, get them fixed as it could also cause complications with the female after and/or during birth..

Answer by LOVE4ALL
Please people be considerate. I do not believe that only the purest of breeds should be bred, as long as there are loving homes. Yes I do have a pure blood of impeccable temperament, and has been fully endorsed. However the belief that only the best and purest of breeding should be propagated went out with Hitler.

As for your question, and I will agree with personality and temperament make sure they are compatible, ask your vet. Your vet can give you the best information on each of the Chihuahuas in question.

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If you are seeking an apartment-dwelling, portable, and intelligent companion “with the courage of a lion,” the Chihuahua might be the dog for you. Officially recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1904, this dog breed ranks 30 th in popularity.

Characteristics of the Chihuahua

According to the AKC, “Inside each little Chihuahua is a miniature king or queen ready to rule their realms, so they need to be taught what is acceptable in human kingdoms.” As a pet parent, be prepared to work with this independent, intelligent dog to let him know the rules of the household. DogTime describes Chihuahuas as high sensitivity dogs. So, compared to other dogs who will accept a reprimand or a stern look, a Chihuahua will be highly sensitive to your emotional nuances.

Some additional breed features and characteristics:

1. Chihuahuas range in weight from three to six pounds and are typically no taller than nine inches.

2. You can find Chihuahuas with either long coats or short, smooth coats, and they can come in a variety of colors (fawn, black and tan, blue and tan, etc.).

3. Your Chihuahua can live up to twenty years. Keep this in mind for long-term pet planning and determining temporary/permanent guardianship.

4. Chihuahuas are highly portable because of their size.

5. Though they do not have any major breed-specific health issues, small breed dogs commonly suffer from patellar luxation and hypoglycemia, and congenital conditions such as pulmonic stenosis may be present.

6. The Chihuahua may not play well with others and should be supervised when around other dogs.

7. If your Chihuahua has grown up with toddlers in the household, they may be close companions. However, if you’re bringing an older Chihuahua into the family, he may get along better with older children.

8. Chihuahuas are not recommended for households with youngsters because they are a fragile, tiny dog and can be easily injured by a rambunctious toddler.

9. Chihuahuas are seasonal shedders, so there are certain times of the year when you will be busier running the vacuum cleaner to eliminate hair from your clothes, furniture and carpets.

10. They are ideal for apartment dwellers due to their size and their tendency to only bark when necessary.

Life with a Chihuahua

If you love seeing a dog in a sweater, then this fashionista breed is going to be ideal! Chihuahuas are prone to shivering and that could be because of a chill in the air, from nervous energy or from stress. Living in colder climates means you will have to embrace dressing your Chihuahua in a sweater to keep her warm and comfortable. These dogs don’t love cold, wet, snowy weather and that means that housebreaking your Chihuahua in the winter months could be a long process. Your Chihuahua will want to burrow under blankets and snuggle up next to you for your warmth.

It may seem counterintuitive with a dog of this size, but a Chihuahua can be an ideal watchdog. He may not chase down an intruder, but he will certainly raise a ruckus if he senses danger. His larger-than-life personality makes him ideally suited for alerting his humans to a potential threat.

Just because your Chihuahua is small, doesn’t mean he won’t benefit from a rousing game of fetch or simply a short run with his pet parent. You can easily tire your Chihuahua out, and help keep her healthy, with indoor games and this is important during the winter months. A bored puppy can be a destructive puppy and the same holds true for a Chihuahua as it does for a Chow Chow. Sure, your Chihuahua may not cause as much destruction with is little teeth as a Chow Chow, but it can happen.

These small but mighty dogs are active, but can happily thrive on mostly indoor activity. If you’re looking for a dog to accompany you on a long run, you may need to rethink the breed or you will want to invest in a dog carrier to bring your Chihuahua along with you.

Crate training your Chihuahua may be something you want to consider because being in a crate while you’re away will help keep her safe from harm. You don’t want her jumping off a couch and getting injured while you’re out running errands. Her crate should be her safe place and one in which she enjoys spending time; this is the case if you begin crate training when she is young.

Known for their quirky temperament, Chihuahuas love their family and the heat. You’ll often find them basking under the sun or snuggling under blankets.

They might be the smallest dog breed in the world, but what Chihuahuas lack in size they make up for with a cheerful, agile and lively personality. They can also be feisty, saucy, and strong-willed. They become very protective of their owners, especially around strangers and children. They are incredibly loyal and devoted. In fact, their loyalty and quirkiness are known to convert many a ‘big dog’ fanatic to ‘chihuahuaism’.

They can be difficult to train (and house-train), but are ideal for older families and apartment living. Chihuahuas get along well with others pets in the household, but not dogs they don’t know. They prefer the company of another Chihuahua.

Fun fact: The Chihuahua is named after the state

of Chihuahua in Mexico.

With their large round eyes and sharp, erect ears, Chihuahuas make great watchdogs. However, they can be highly strung and they bark easily. If you let their cute-as-a-button size get the better of you they will display dominant behaviour. Socialise them early and train them firmly but gently, to bring out their most delightful selves. They can also live up to 20 years, so your little friend will be with you for a long time.

Although it’s tempting to carry these adorable dogs around, Chihuahuas like a daily walk. A game of fetch or Frisbee in a fenced-in yard is good, but a walk will not only satisfy their primal instinct, it will also prevent behaviour and neurotic problems.

There are two types of Chihuahuas: one with a smooth and short-haired coat that should be given a weekly gentle brush or wiped with a damp cloth, and the long-coat Chihuahua, which needs a daily brushing. Bath both types once a month, taking care that water doesn’t get into their ears. Clip their toenails regularly or you’ll find your dainty, loveable friend slipping on hard surfaces.

Scheduled six monthly health check visits with your vet are important to ensure that your dog is healthy and happy throughout all life stages. Common Chihuahua ailments include bone developmental issues, as well as eye and mouth issues. Together with your vet, you can determine and maintain a preventative health care program based on the individual needs of your canine companion.

How big do Chihuahuas get?

A Chihuahua is a toy-sized breed weighing between 1-3kgs, with a height between 15-23cms.

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How to breed chihuahuas

Some people are confused about how to pronounce the breed of these tiny and sassy doggos. The American pronunciation is Chuh-waa-wuh. Mexicans pronounce it as Chee-wa-wa. They say the Mexican pronunciation is the correct one especially since this breed of dogs originated from the ancient ruins in Chihuahua, Mexico sometime in the 1800s. No one can say exactly how these little dogs got there but since their sighting, many people took them to their own homes and named them after the state where they were from. Many historians believe that Chihuahuas are descendants of small companion dogs called Techichi. But the Techichis were double the size of Chihuahuas so they think that there had been cross breeding with other small dogs like the Chinese Crested. And that is how these lovely and adorable creatures came to be.

The word Chihuahua comes from the Nahuatl dialect of the indigenous Nahuan Aztecan people from Central Mexico. It literally refers to the place where 2 rivers meet. Chihuahua, the place, is where the Rio Grande and Rio Conchos meet. It quickly became a popular breed among Mexicans and later on, these charming doggos were sold to different parts of the world to become one of the most beloved dogs in history. They are bred or bought to be their owner’s loyal companion dogs while some groom them to be show dogs. Either way, it just goes to show how endearing Chihuahuas are.

If you look it up in the dictionary, you will learn that Chihuahua refers to a small breed of dogs that come in 2 varieties – short-coated or smooth coat and long-coated. Common colors of this breed are fawn, cream, red, brown, chocolate, black, white, or mixed. Some kennel clubs recognize Chihuahuas as the smallest breed among dogs. It usually weighs between 4 to 6 pounds and is around 6 to 10 inches tall. Breeders believe the smaller the Chihuahua the higher the selling price that’s why some breed tiny teacup Chihuahuas which only weigh 3 lbs and reach only 6 inches in height. The average lifespan of a Chihuahua is 12 to 20 years.

Now you know a bit more about our little Chihuahua furry friends. Let’s show some love and appreciation for these tiny dogs!

by Susan Sullinger 1.6k Views

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How to breed chihuahuas

Some people are confused about how to pronounce the breed of these tiny and sassy doggos. The American pronunciation is Chuh-waa-wuh. Mexicans pronounce it as Chee-wa-wa. They say the Mexican pronunciation is the correct one especially since this breed of dogs originated from the ancient ruins in Chihuahua, Mexico sometime in the 1800s. No one can say exactly how these little dogs got there but since their sighting, many people took them to their own homes and named them after the state where they were from. Many historians believe that Chihuahuas are descendants of small companion dogs called Techichi. But the Techichis were double the size of Chihuahuas so they think that there had been cross breeding with other small dogs like the Chinese Crested. And that is how these lovely and adorable creatures came to be.

The word Chihuahua comes from the Nahuatl dialect of the indigenous Nahuan Aztecan people from Central Mexico. It literally refers to the place where 2 rivers meet. Chihuahua, the place, is where the Rio Grande and Rio Conchos meet. It quickly became a popular breed among Mexicans and later on, these charming doggos were sold to different parts of the world to become one of the most beloved dogs in history. They are bred or bought to be their owner’s loyal companion dogs while some groom them to be show dogs. Either way, it just goes to show how endearing Chihuahuas are.

If you look it up in the dictionary, you will learn that Chihuahua refers to a small breed of dogs that come in 2 varieties – short-coated or smooth coat and long-coated. Common colors of this breed are fawn, cream, red, brown, chocolate, black, white, or mixed. Some kennel clubs recognize Chihuahuas as the smallest breed among dogs. It usually weighs between 4 to 6 pounds and is around 6 to 10 inches tall. Breeders believe the smaller the Chihuahua the higher the selling price that’s why some breed tiny teacup Chihuahuas which only weigh 3 lbs and reach only 6 inches in height. The average lifespan of a Chihuahua is 12 to 20 years.

Now you know a bit more about our little Chihuahua furry friends. Let’s show some love and appreciation for these tiny dogs!

Chihuahua is a charming and graceful dog with a huge personality. They are the national symbol of Mexico and they are one of the oldest breeds in America. Their hallmark is rounded „apple-shaped“ head, erect ears, and luminous eyes.

FUN FACT: The Chihuahua is the world’s smallest dog breed.

2,2 – 6,6 lb (1-3 kg)

Breed History

Like so many modern dog breeds, most of the Chihuahua’s history and their exact origin is surrounded by mystery and speculation.

Canine historians continue to debate about Chihuahua’s exact origins, but they mostly agree that it is connected to the Mexican state by the name of Chihuahua. Chihuahua is the biggest of all Mexican states. Dog lovers and enthusiasts agree that the first modern-day Chihuahua dogs have been discovered in this historical Mexican state.

Around 1884, Mexican merchants started breeding and selling small dogs to tourists and people who lived near the United States border. Many of the sold dogs ended up living in American households as their pets and companions. At that time these dogs weren’t officially named yet. The practice was that these dogs were named after the region or province they have been seen and bought from. These early specimens of Chihuahuas ended up having many different names such as Mexico dog, Texas, or Arizona dog and of course, the Chihuahua dog. One of these names stuck and became the official name of this delightful and lovable dog breed.

There are many theories about their exact origin as we already said, but the most likely one and most canine historians agree and believe that it is the right one, is about the ancient Techichi dogs.

This theory says that these dogs are a direct descendant of the Techichi dogs. Techichi was a small, desert dog that was first domesticated by a few ancient Mesoamerican civilizations. They were also domesticated and loved by many native American tribes.

These dogs were twice as big as the modern Chihuahuas and twice as heavy. Even though there is a clear size difference, these ancient dogs share many physical features with the modern-day Chihuahuas. It is believed that Chihuahuas ancestor – the Techichi, was mute (couldn’t bark, unlike the Chihuahuas who can be pretty vocal) and only had one coat variety, unlike their descendant who has both long and short hair.

How to breed chihuahuas

If this theory is correct, it can be pretty safe to say that either the Mayans or the Toltecs were the first civilizations that managed to tame these small, semi-wild dogs called the Techichi. The Mayans had a deep and profound relationship with dogs and dogs played a big part in their legends, culture, history, and rituals. These ancient civilizations date back to 1800 BC so it clear that the dogs that were domesticated and part of their culture have long and colorful histories.

The Mayans had many rituals that involved dogs and they believed that dogs were “mythical guardians to the afterlife”. That status probably wasn’t in these dogs’ best interests since they were ceremonially sacrificed, mummified, and buried alongside their owners. A common belief was that these dogs would join their owners in the afterlife. Ancient Mayans had 9 different words for dogs and each one referred to a specific breed. The exact number of dogs that the Mayans domesticated is unknown, but most of the canine historians agree that it is most likely that the Techichi and the Xoloitzcuintli were a part of these domesticated dogs.

Mexico is known for its rich archeology and some of the oldest civilizations in the world. One of the modern archeological expeditions to the city of Colima in Mexico revealed ancient burial shafts that depicted statues and other artifacts that had drawings of dogs that had remarkable similarities with the Chihuahua as we know it today. That same expedition leads to the discovery of ancient dog toys that have been dated to 100 AD. There, the archeologists found dog-shaped toys that showed two types of dogs – the one resembling the Chihuahua and one resembling the hairless Xolo. Some toys showed two versions of the Techichi that are believed to be selectively bred and evolved into a dog that resembles more to the modern Chihuahuas. These toys were dated back to 300 AD so that gives the Thechichi well over 2.000 years of selective Mayan breeding.

One of the oldest detailed written descriptions of the Chihuahua dog was made in 1888 when a Scottish immigrant by the name of James Watson migrated to the United States of America. He moved there in the 1870s. He was a writer and a dog enthusiast. In 1888 he decided to visit a dog show in San Francisco so he embarked on a voyage from New York to San Francisco. He heard many rumors about small Mexican dogs and their wonderful temperament so he decided to stop at El Paso and see what all the fuss was about. He met with a traveling Mexican merchant who bred these dogs and as soon as he saw them, he decided to buy one for himself. That dog was, of course, the Chihuahua which he named Manzanita.

In more recent times, dog owners kept dogs for their function and working ability. Dogs had a job and a clear function like hunting, herding, retrieving, or vermin control. The most popular dog breeds at that time were Terriers, Spaniels, or working Collies that were all-purpose dogs. Dogs were mostly owned by farmers and landowners and were primarily kept for working purposes. The Chihuahua is a toy dog breed that is above all, a companion dog breed. Keeping a companion dog wasn’t too popular at the beginning of the 20th century.

Everything started to change in the 60s when most of the farms switched to mechanical working machines and dogs switched their original purpose. They stopped being workers and started being companions instead. This dog started to become the perfect canine companion thanks to their lively temperament, low maintenance, and small size. Since then these dogs are always in the top 10 most popular breeds not only in the United States of America but also around the globe.

FUN FACT: Chihuahua became popular in the USA after an appearance in the series of Taco Bell commercials.

How to breed chihuahuas

  • Other names:
  • Minchi
  • Chi-Pin

Overview

The Chipin is the hybrid product of the Miniature Pinscher and the Chihuahua. They are best known for their high energy, attention-loving and social nature, and watchdog abilities. Members of this breed are low maintenance in every aspect except training (which may prove difficult). Chipins are indoor dogs that can live comfortably in small dwellings but are better suited for those with older children (if any). This breed is usually fine with other pets and visitors.

Chipin Breed Details

Breed Specs

Type Lifespan Height Weight
Hybrid 13-16 yrs. 7-12 in. 5-11 lbs
  • Friendliness
  • Overall
  • Family Friendly
  • Kid Friendly
  • Pet Friendly
  • Stranger Friendly
  • Maintenance
  • Easy to Groom
  • Energy Level
  • Exercise Needs
  • General Health
  • Shedding Amount
  • Behavior
  • Barks / Howls
  • Easy to Train
  • Guard Dog
  • Playfulness
  • Watch Dog
  • Ownership
  • Apartment Friendly
  • Can Be Alone
  • Good for Busy Owners
  • Good for Novice Owners
  • Intelligence

* The more green the stronger the trait.

Chipins can be lively, loving companions or alert watch dogs. They inherit a charming sassiness from the Chihuahua and a fun-loving feistiness from the Min Pin. Small and low maintenance, they make ideal indoor dogs for small living spaces. If you are considering a pet for your family and you have young, rambunctious children, consider other breeds. Also, if you have other pets, socialize them when your Chipin is a puppy for the most harmonious results. Here are a few quick facts for this hybrid:

  • Energetic, attention-loving companion
  • Ok for other pets if socialized early
  • Low maintenance grooming
  • Good watchdog
  • Exercise needs easily met
  • Usually friendly and social after getting used to a visitor
  • Not as needy as a purebred Chihuahua
  • Perfect size for apartments or small living quarters
  • Not the best choice for families with young children
  • Not hypoallergenic, sheds regularly
  • May suffer separation anxiety if left alone frequently for long periods
  • Not as much a cuddle buddy as the Chihuahua
  • Best if kept indoors
  • Not an exercise partner
  • Not a guard dog

Chipin Breed Description

These hybrids are small, compact dogs that usually weigh 5-11 pounds. The overall head shape is usually described as apple-shaped or deer-shaped with pointed little faces. The have characteristically large, bat-like ears that stand atop and round eyes that may or may not protrude like the Chihuahuas. The low maintenance, typically short coat comes in a plethora of colors but the most popular is the black and tan (like the Miniature Pinscher).

There is intelligence in those little bodies, to be sure, but they are not easily trained. Frequent repetitions and consistency are key and it is very important to treat them as pets and not babies, lest they develop the dreaded Small Dog Syndrome. Treats are best motivators for this hybrid.

She will be an alert watch dog that barks at the approach of strangers but isn’t as yappy as the Chihuahua; social and friendly at heart, they will warm up eventually. Most current Min Pin Chihuahua mix information is in agreement that this breed is best for older, well behaved children (if any children are in the household). Other pets are fine if they are socialized early.

Chipins will be active indoors and in the yard. They are easily exercised due to their small stature, making them great choices for the average owner.

Chipin Size

Members of this cross breed will be small sized dogs that fit very well into an apartment lifestyle. Min Pin Chihuahua mixes usually weigh 5-11 pounds but, of course, the best predictor or your potential pet’s size is the size of the parents. These little guys sometimes have weight issues and can fall at either end of the spectrum– some have a hard time keeping the weight on while others easily become obese. Both scenarios put them at a greater risk for more health problems so be sure to feed them as directed.

Average Adult Height

Average Adult Weight

Chipin Variations

Chipins, especially first generation crosses (F1s) will vary quite a bit from one puppy to the next. Even within the same litter some will be Chihuahua like while others will display more Miniature Pinscher traits, and there are those that seem an equal mixture.

Most potential owners for this crossbreed have questions about whether their pet will be long or short haired. The quick answer is while most will be short haired, they do have the potential for a longer coat. There are both short haired and long haired Chihuahuas so if your potential pet is a Min Pin x Long Hair Chihuahua mix, they may inherit the longer coat. Once again, this is easiest to predict when you have information about the mom and dad of your puppy.

Chipin Temperament

Chipin characteristics will vary based upon which parent this hybrid takes after the most; perhaps they will be charming (but sassy) like the Chihuahua or courageous and spunky like the Miniature Pinscher. These little dogs will certainly be energetic, playful and social; although not as needy as the Chihuahua, they still crave plenty of human interaction every day.

They will likely be alert, barking at strangers and even remaining cautious of visitors, however, they desire to be social and will probably warm up to the person after awhile. Older, well behaved children are best for this breed if they are entering into a family setting. If socialized early most do fine with other pets and another buddy may limit the separation anxiety (if any) they may experience in your absence.

Remember to never treat small dogs like babies, train them early and correct bad behaviors; Small Dog Syndrome is a real condition that manifests as nuisance behaviors like yapping, destroying furniture, going potty in the house, etc. Chipins are selectively intelligent– the smarts are there but they are energetic and easily distracted. It will take patience, firmness, consistency and plenty of praise and treats to do so.

Chipin Photos

Below are pictures and images of the Chipin dog breed.