How to calculate severance pay

Losing a job, especially one you loved, can be painful and difficult. If you were recently let go for no fault of your own, you may be offered severance pay. If you’re encountering the topic of severance pay for the first time, you may have questions, like:

  • What is severance pay?
  • How does severance pay work?
  • Will severance affect unemployment?

In this guide, we will explain what severance pay is and the elements a severance agreement might include. Although this may be a stressful time, understanding your severance pay can help you successfully move toward recovering from sudden job loss.

What is severance pay?

Severance pay is a payment package an employer offers to an employee who is discharged from service. The conditions for receiving a severance package often involve an involuntary layoff of the employee for any number of reasons.

For example, if your company was recently acquired by another business, there may be duplicated responsibilities as the two teams merge. As a result, layoffs may be required to eliminate extraneous roles. A company may also decide to switch to a new automated technology that may put the jobs of certain groups of employees at risk.

Whatever the reason, if you do receive severance, it will likely be offered during a meeting between you and a Human Resources representative or manager. Your severance may either be a result of your employment contract or a goodwill gesture from your company as you transition into unemployment and back onto the job market.

How does severance pay work?

When you receive your layoff notice, your employer may offer you severance as a result. Severance pay varies by company, but the process may work like this:

The employer notifies the employee of a coming layoff.

The employer schedules a meeting with the employee to discuss the next steps.

The employer offers a severance package, often contingent upon signing a “severance agreement.”

The employee may or may not try to negotiate for a higher severance package, depending on the company.

Upon signing the severance agreement, the employee will receive a severance package in the form of a one-time payment or multiple payments over the course of a specified number of months. Severance packages may also include a continuation of benefits, such as health insurance or other forms of payment that are agreed upon and formalized in the severance agreement.

This may not be the exact process for you, as each company handles severance differently. However, if your company does offer severance, some of those steps may be involved.

What is a severance agreement?

A severance agreement is a binding contract that outlines benefits you will receive after your last day, along with any rules or outlines you will be asked to follow upon leaving the company. While each company’s process is unique, severance agreements often also include the length of time you’ll receive those benefits.

A severance agreement may also come with certain restrictions or rules. For example, as part of receiving a severance package, your company may require you to wait a set period of time before applying for work with competitors (often known as a Noncompete Agreement).

There is no legal requirement for companies to provide a severance package, and there is no legal requirement for you to sign it. Nevertheless, if a severance agreement is formalized through signed documents, it does become a legal document by which both parties must abide.

If your company asks you to accept a severance agreement without formal documentation, be sure that you ask for the agreement in writing.

Is severance pay taxable?

Regardless of how much you receive in severance pay, it will be taxed. Any additional compensation you receive from unused vacation time or sick leave is also taxable.

For more information on severance pay taxes, view this IRS document (PDF) on the tax impact of job loss.

Severance pay and unemployment

Whether or not severance pay will affect your unemployment benefits options depends on your state laws.

In Maryland, for example, you cannot claim unemployment benefits during the time period you’re receiving severance pay. If you receive a lump-sum severance check, the Maryland Department of Labor also determines a set time before you can apply for unemployment.

In New Jersey, however, you can still receive unemployment even if you get severance pay. The only stipulation is that your severance package must not extend your employment with the company.

Check with your state’s unemployment benefits office to determine the full extent a severance package will have on your potential for unemployment benefits.

Calculating severance pay

A typical severance package may calculate compensation based on the length of time you’ve been employed by the company. One method for this is to give one or two week’s pay for every year of service to the company. So if you’ve been employed for 5 years, for example, you could receive anywhere from 5 to 10 weeks of severance pay.

While this is a common practice for calculating severance, there is no set standard and companies will determine their own methods as they see fit.

What is the average severance pay?

Every severance agreement is a unique document between an individual employee and the company that hired them. How much you receive will be based on your company’s severance policies. However, while 97 percent of businesses in the US claim to have a severance policy in place, only 55 percent of businesses state that they have a written policy. If your company does not have a written policy, you may have the option to negotiate your severance.

How to negotiate a severance

If your employer already has written policies in place, especially those that you signed when you accepted the job, the option for severance package negotiation may be unavailable.

However, if your company has no written policy, you may have the option to negotiate. Consider the following practices when preparing to negotiate your severance package:

  • Gather relevant information regarding your length of employment, past rewards for successful service, current earnings, and any other relevant information necessary to exhibit your value to the company.

Go into the severance agreement meeting with a calm but confident demeanor. Exhibiting anger during the meeting may have negative results.

Once the severance package is offered, look for any areas where the package might be increased. For example, ensure it includes payment for unused paid time off.

Once the HR representative or manager has delivered the entire package in detail, ask if the package can be increased. If there’s a Noncompete Agreement or Clause in the package, you may be able to use that as leverage to get the package amount increased. Remember, you are not legally required to sign a severance package.

If the company is unwilling to offer a larger amount in severance, ask if you can receive an extension of benefits.

If your request is denied, politely accept and move on. Treat the conversation with sensitivity while maintaining confidence in what you need from the company.

If you do successfully negotiate for more severance pay or an extension of severance in your package, be sure to get the agreement in writing as soon as possible.

Severance pay laws

While severance pay laws tend to vary, your state may have laws defining what severance pay is and protecting severance pay agreements as legal documents. Check with your state’s unemployment department to determine if there are any severance pay laws where you work.

Please note: The information in this article is provided as a courtesy. Indeed is not a career or legal advisor.

March 20, 2014 By Tom McKinney

How to calculate severance payWith so many jobs disappearing due to cut backs and downsizing, severance packages are becoming more and more common. As a result, workers who are laid off are wondering what their severance package should look like. The most common question about severance packages is how much money should I be getting?

Much like salaries, severance payments have widely varying scales. The amount you actually receive could depend on many factors.

  • Are you an hourly or salaried employee?
  • Are you a worker bee or part of upper management?
  • Perhaps somewhere in between?
  • What are the circumstances of your dismissal?
  • How long have you worked for your company?

The answers to all of those questions will help determine the amount of severance pay your employer will offer.

While your final number will vary from other employees receiving severance, most companies do use a pretty standard formula for calculating the amount each worker will be paid.

For hourly employees, the typical calculation looks like this:

# of years with company X 1 week of regular pay = Severance Pay $ Total

So if you typically make $800 per week, and have worked at your company for 5 years, your severance pay would be $4,000. (5 years X $800 = $4,000)
For salaried employees, the typical calculation looks like this:

# of years with company X 2 weeks of regular pay = Severance Pay $ Total

Let’s say your salary is $80,000 per year. That works out to about $1600 per week, or $3200 for two weeks. If you have been with your company for 5 years, your severance pay would be $16,000. (5 years X $3200 = $16,000)

Both scenarios usually have a cap at about 25 or 26 weeks of pay. If you are part of upper management, however, your severance pay could be much higher. Severance packages for management can range from 6 months to a year of pay, or even higher.

The most important thing to remember when being offered a severance pay amount is that nothing is set in stone. While HR will tell you they have a set calculation, you should always ask for more. If they cannot offer you more in money, be sure to request additional perks like extended healthcare benefits, job placement services, or even equipment like your company cell phone and laptop.

No matter what you are offered, consider having a severance lawyer review your agreement for you before you sign. There may be more room to negotiate than you know.

What is Severance Pay?

Severance pay is a form of compensation that an employee receives when they are let go by a company Corporation A corporation is a legal entity created by individuals, stockholders, or shareholders, with the purpose of operating for profit. Corporations are allowed to enter into contracts, sue and be sued, own assets, remit federal and state taxes, and borrow money from financial institutions. . In other words, it is money or benefits that an employer pays an employee who loses their job through no fault of their own. It is frequently required by employment law, but employers may also voluntarily give severance pay even when not required by law to do so. If an employer terminates an employee’s contract for just cause, the employer may not be obligated to provide severance pay.

How to calculate severance pay

The amount of severance pay typically depends on the employee’s length of service and may include stock options Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) An Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) refers to an employee benefit plan that gives the employees an ownership stake in the company. The employer allocates a percentage of the company’s shares to each eligible employee at no upfront cost. The distribution of shares may be based on the employee’s pay scale, terms of , retirement account benefits, payment for unused holiday pay or sick leave, etc. The pay is intended to provide financial protection for the newly unemployed and is typically offered to employees who are laid off or are retiring. It also acts as a safeguard for employees and as a disincentive for employers to let their employees go

How to Qualify for Severance Pay?

Qualifying for severance pay depends on existing regulations. Each country, province, or territory adheres to different rules. In addition, the final amount also depends on the employee’s employment contract, the length of employment with the company, and a union’s collective bargaining agreement (if applicable).

For example, in the province of Ontario, Canada, an employee qualifies for severance pay if:

  1. The employee is severed and they have worked for the employer for five years or more; and
  2. Their employer has a payroll Labor Force KPIs How can we monitor the labor force? Governments and economists usually refer to three main key performance indicators (KPIs) to assess the strength of a nation’s labor force of at least $2.5 million or has severed the employment of 50 or more employees within a six-month period.

When Does Severance Occur?

An employee is considered “severed” when:

  • The employer dismisses or stops employing the employee due to factors such as bankruptcy or insolvency of the company
  • The employer constructively dismisses the employee, and the employee responds by resigning within a reasonable timeframe
  • The employer lays off the employee for 35 or more consecutive weeks
  • The employer lays off the employee due to the business’ permanent closure

How to Calculate the Amount of Severance Pay?

Calculating the amount of severance pay depends on regulations in the respective countries, provinces, and territories. For example:

Ontario Severance Pay

In the province of Ontario, Canada, the maximum amount of severance pay is 26 weeks. The final amount is calculated as follows:

Regular wages for a week x (No. of completed years + No. of completed months / 12 for an employment year that is incomplete)

Severance Pay – British Columbia

In the province of British Columbia, Canada, the maximum amount of severance pay is eight (8) weeks. The total amount is calculated as follows:

  • After three (3) months – One week
  • After 12 months – Two weeks
  • After Three (3) years – One week for each completed year

Sample Calculation

Jennifer has been employed with a car manufacturing company in Ontario for 10 years and 8 months. Recently, due to tariffs Ad Valorem Tax The term “ad valorem” is Latin for “according to value,” which means that it is flexible and depends on the assessed value of an asset, product or service. on steel and aluminum, the company decides to do a mass layoff to alter its cost structure. Unfortunately, Jennifer receives notice that she is one of the 500 employees who will be laid off and her exit interview will be conducted in a month’s time. In this situation, under the Employment Standards Act, Jennifer is entitled to severance pay.

Assume that Jennifer makes $25 an hour and works 40 hours a week. A week’s wage for Jennifer would be $1,000. The amount of severance pay Jennifer is entitled to would be:

$1,000 x (10 + 10/12) = $10,833.33

Had Jennifer been employed in British Columbia, the amount of severance pay she is entitled to would be:

$1,000 x 8 = $8,000

Note: The maximum amount of severance pay in British Columbia is 8 weeks.

Related Readings

Thank you for reading CFI’s guide to severance pay. CFI offers the Financial Modeling & Valuation Analyst (FMVA)™ Become a Certified Financial Modeling & Valuation Analyst (FMVA)® certification program for those looking to take their careers to the next level. To learn more about related topics, check out the following resources:

  • Cliff Vesting Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) An Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) refers to an employee benefit plan that gives the employees an ownership stake in the company. The employer allocates a percentage of the company’s shares to each eligible employee at no upfront cost. The distribution of shares may be based on the employee’s pay scale, terms of
  • Golden Parachute Golden Parachute A golden parachute, in mergers and acquisitions (M&A), refers to a large financial compensation or substantial benefits guaranteed to company executives upon termination following a merger or takeover. Benefits include severance pay, cash bonuses, and stock options.
  • Remuneration Remuneration Remuneration is any type of compensation or payment that an individual or employee receives as payment for their services or the work that they do for an organization or company. It includes whatever base salary an employee receives, along with other types of payment that accrue during the course of their work, which
  • Sweat Equity Sweat Equity Sweat equity refers to the non-monetary contribution that the individuals or founders of a company make towards a business venture. Cash-strapped startups

FMVA certification program

Advance your career in investment banking, private equity, FP&A, treasury, corporate development and other areas of corporate finance.

How to calculate severance pay

Get certified as a financial analyst with CFI’s FMVA® Program Become a Certified Financial Modeling & Valuation Analyst (FMVA)® .

How to calculate severance pay

You may get severance pay when you quit your job, are laid off, or fired. You also might get severance later if you sue and settle. Whether or not your pay is labeled “severance,” and regardless of when it is paid, the IRS generally views severance like any other pay. It’s taxed as wages, so is subject to withholding and employment taxes. If your employer hands you a severance check as you walk out the door, you may well expect it to have all the payroll deductions you’re used to seeing on your regular paycheck.

But payroll deductions may be a big surprise if you’ve sued, and several years later are settling. You might be expecting a big check without tax withholding. Many people are surprised that a former employer can withhold taxes when you no longer work for them. How can a payment be “wages” subject to withholding, you might ask, if you haven’t been an employee for years? If you sue for wrongful termination and settle many years later, isn’t there a time limit?

As it turns out, timing doesn’t matter. Whether you get a gross check for the full amount or one with payroll tax deductions depends on several variables. They include how careful your employer is about its tax obligations, and how it agrees to resolve your case. Most employment disputes are settled, and it is common to split a settlement between severance (treated as wages) and non-wage income. The employer might agree that some of the settlement is pay for discrimination, emotional distress, or other non-wage income. The severance pay is subject to withholding and employment taxes. The rest would be paid on a gross check with no withholding and reported on a Form 1099. This is one of the many things to know about taxes on legal settlements.

There are two parts to the tax puzzle, income tax withholding and employment taxes. Income tax withholding is simply the employer deducting tax money according to withholding tables, and sending it to the IRS under your Social Security number. Then, in January of the following year, the company will issue you an IRS Form W-2 showing your total income and the taxes withheld. While you might regard the income tax withholding part of the equation as mere timing, the employment tax gets expensive. The employer and employee each pay half the employment tax.

For some years, there was a controversy in the courts over whether all severance pay should be subject to employment taxes. Arguably, severance pay isn’t for services that have been rendered, but for services that will never be rendered. Even so, the IRS position is that any severance pay is subject to employment taxes, and in 2014, the Supreme Court agreed , reversing a key taxpayer win in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals . What’s more, the Court voted 8-0 in favor of the IRS.

The Court ruled that severance is subject to tax under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax. FICA consists of Social Security tax and Medicare tax. Employers pay Social Security tax of 6.2% and employees also pay 6.2%, or 12.4% total. Add to that the 1.45% employers pay for Medicare and another 1.45% for the employee. With over 15% of pay at stake up to the wage base of $127,200, and 2.9% thereafter, employers and employees both care. Severance pay is sometimes defined as gap pay to cover a period after the employee finishes rendering services. Severance can be paid by company policy, required by state or federal law, or by agreement.

It could be paid willingly or only after a lawsuit. It’s best and safest to assume that any pay labeled as “severance” will face employment taxes. The same is true for pay that looks like it might be severance, regardless of how it is labeled.

What is Severance Pay?

Severance pay is compensation paid to an employee whose employment has been severed by their employer. It is meant to compensate long-term employees for losses upon termination. Although severance pay is commonly conflated with termination pay, which is given in place of the required notice of termination of employment, they are two different things. To learn more about the difference between termination and severance pay click here

When Does Severance Pay get Paid?

Severance pay is pay is for severed employees. An employee is “severed” when their employer:

  • dismisses or stops employing the employee, including when the employer is bankrupt.
  • constructively dismisses the employee and the employee resigns in a reasonable amount of time.
  • lays the employee off for 35 weeks or more within a period of 52 consecutive weeks.
  • lays off the employee because the business closes permanently.
  • The employee resigns after receiving written notice of termination from the employer and the employee has given two weeks’ notice.
    • example: an employee who has been given a notice of termination can resign and keep the right to severance pay. To keep this right the employee must give two weeks’ written notice to the employer of their resignation and the resignation must also take effect during the statutory notice period – the period of written notice that is required to be given by the employer
    • à Employee has worked 7 years, entitled to 7 week’s notice of termination under the ESA. Employer gives 10 weeks’ notice. Employee must give at least 2 weeks’ written notice of her resignation. As long as the employee’s resignation takes effect during the statutory notice period the employee continues to be entitled to severance pay

Who Qualifies for Severance Pay?

An employee qualifies for severance pay if their employment is severed and:

  • the employee has worked for the employer for 5 years or more and
  • the employer has a payroll in Ontario of at least $2.5 million OR severed the employment of 50 or more employees in a 6-month period because all or part of the business permanently closed.

How Many Days Does It Take to Get Severance Pay?

Severance must be paid either 7 days after employment is severed or on what would have been the employee’s next pay day – whichever is later. Employers also have the option of paying in installments. An installment plan requires the written consent of the employee or approval from the Director of Employment Standards at the Ministry of Labour. Installment plans can be no more 3 years and if the employer fails to make a payment, all the employee’s severance becomes due immediately.

How to Calculate Severance Pay

The Employment Standards Act sets out how to calculate severance pay: multiply the employee’s regular wages for a regular work week by the sum of the number of completed years of employment and the number of completed months of employment divided by 12 for a year that is not completed.

However, the formula set out in the ESA sets only the minimum requirements for severance, known as the statutory entitlement. An employee’s statutory entitlement is 1 week of severance pay per year of employment, with a maximum of 26 weeks.

Employees may also be entitled to common law severance pay. Common law severance is typically more money than the statutory minimum. However, accessing these entitlements generally requires a lawyer to assist with negotiating or litigating for the maximum amount. Employees are not entitled to common law severance if they have an employment contract that stipulates a different calculation of their severance package or limits their entitlements to their statutory minimums.

There are several factors involved in calculating common law entitlements including age, length of employment, position, and more. These factors can affect the amount of severance pay owed to an employee. For example, older employees are typically entitled to larger notice periods and associated payouts, as are those who held more senior or managerial positions. Even the availability of new employment, and the possibility of mitigation, is a factor that must be taken into consideration by employers.

The bottom line is that determining severance pay is not as simple as plugging numbers into a calculator. The basic ESA formula for calculating severance can give you a rough estimate of the amount to which you are entitled, but you could be entitled to much more. Determining the full amount of severance pay to which you are entitled requires a careful assessment of your employment, any agreements or contract, and the consideration of several complex factors. To get the maximum amount rightfully owed to you it is important to get the right legal help and assess your situation fully.

MilitaryBlake

Well-Known Member
  • May 14, 2020
  • #1
  • Sorry for how obvious this question sounds. In a nutshell, I get the formula. Base pay*2 times years in service. Got it.

    However, just completed my Capstone ending interview (to complete SFl-TAPS) and it was noted I had 13 years of service. I thought I only had 10. I have ten in terms of when I began AD service. However, i did obtain a military scholarship while in school for which I received pay. Scholarship was three years which obviously brings me to 13.

    Does this mean that all 13 years will be used to calculate my severance?

    PEB Forum Regular Member
    • May 14, 2020
  • #2
  • As you have read, Disability severance pay is a one-time lump sum payment. The amount equals 2 months of basic pay for each year of service which includes active service and inactive duty points, but the total service years cannot exceed 19 years. Additionally, the minimum number of years required for computation purposes is six years for a disability incurred in the line of duty in a combat zone, or 3 years in the case of any other member. Prior to January 28, 2008, a maximum of 12 years and minimum of three years creditable service was used.

    The question is actually does a military scholarship while in school for which I received pay count as part of the service time used for retirement purposes?

    USAR assignment status and administrative jurisdiction Notes: * ROTC cadets participating in the Simultaneous Membership Program (SMP) are credited retirement points. All other cadets, upon commissioning, will not be credit retirement points. In computing length of service for any purpose, an officer appointed through the ROTC program may not be credited with enlisted service for the period covered by his or her advanced training (10 USC 2106(c) and 10 USC 2107(g)).

    How to calculate severance pay

    You may get severance pay when you quit your job, are laid off, or fired. You also might get severance later if you sue and settle. Whether or not your pay is labeled “severance,” and regardless of when it is paid, the IRS generally views severance like any other pay. It’s taxed as wages, so is subject to withholding and employment taxes. If your employer hands you a severance check as you walk out the door, you may well expect it to have all the payroll deductions you’re used to seeing on your regular paycheck.

    But payroll deductions may be a big surprise if you’ve sued, and several years later are settling. You might be expecting a big check without tax withholding. Many people are surprised that a former employer can withhold taxes when you no longer work for them. How can a payment be “wages” subject to withholding, you might ask, if you haven’t been an employee for years? If you sue for wrongful termination and settle many years later, isn’t there a time limit?

    As it turns out, timing doesn’t matter. Whether you get a gross check for the full amount or one with payroll tax deductions depends on several variables. They include how careful your employer is about its tax obligations, and how it agrees to resolve your case. Most employment disputes are settled, and it is common to split a settlement between severance (treated as wages) and non-wage income. The employer might agree that some of the settlement is pay for discrimination, emotional distress, or other non-wage income. The severance pay is subject to withholding and employment taxes. The rest would be paid on a gross check with no withholding and reported on a Form 1099. This is one of the many things to know about taxes on legal settlements.

    There are two parts to the tax puzzle, income tax withholding and employment taxes. Income tax withholding is simply the employer deducting tax money according to withholding tables, and sending it to the IRS under your Social Security number. Then, in January of the following year, the company will issue you an IRS Form W-2 showing your total income and the taxes withheld. While you might regard the income tax withholding part of the equation as mere timing, the employment tax gets expensive. The employer and employee each pay half the employment tax.

    For some years, there was a controversy in the courts over whether all severance pay should be subject to employment taxes. Arguably, severance pay isn’t for services that have been rendered, but for services that will never be rendered. Even so, the IRS position is that any severance pay is subject to employment taxes, and in 2014, the Supreme Court agreed , reversing a key taxpayer win in the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals . What’s more, the Court voted 8-0 in favor of the IRS.

    The Court ruled that severance is subject to tax under the Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax. FICA consists of Social Security tax and Medicare tax. Employers pay Social Security tax of 6.2% and employees also pay 6.2%, or 12.4% total. Add to that the 1.45% employers pay for Medicare and another 1.45% for the employee. With over 15% of pay at stake up to the wage base of $127,200, and 2.9% thereafter, employers and employees both care. Severance pay is sometimes defined as gap pay to cover a period after the employee finishes rendering services. Severance can be paid by company policy, required by state or federal law, or by agreement.

    It could be paid willingly or only after a lawsuit. It’s best and safest to assume that any pay labeled as “severance” will face employment taxes. The same is true for pay that looks like it might be severance, regardless of how it is labeled.

    Learn more about SupremeGold

    • Overview
    • SME Financing
    • Corporate and Commercial Financing
    • Trade Services
    • Cash Management Services
    • Investment and Insurance Services
    • Treasury Products
    • Greater Bay Area Services
    • Useful Tips

    What can we do for you?

    Learn more about Corporate Banking Services

    • Private Banking Services
    • Investment Solutions
    • Portfolio Management

    What can we do for you?

    Learn more about Private Banking Services

    • Insurance Services
    • MPF Services
    • Trust Services

    What can we do for you?

    Learn more about Insurance Products

    • BEA Securities Services
    • East Asia Securities Cybertrading
    • East Asia Futures Cybertrading
    • FX/Precious Metal Margin Trading Services
    • Derivative Warrants / CBBC

    What can we do for you?

    Learn more about Foreign Exchange Margin and Option Margin Trading Services

    • Background
    • Services
    • Network
    • Mainland Homepage
    • Macau Homepage
    • Taiwan Homepage

    What can we do for you?

    Learn more about Services

    • Services
    • Network
    • New York Homepage
    • Singapore Homepage
    • United Kingdom Homepage
    • Strategic Partners

    What can we do for you?

    Learn more about Services

    • Company Profile
    • Directors and Senior Management
    • Investor Communication
    • Corporate Governance
    • Regulatory Disclosures – Banking (Disclosure) Rules
    • News Room
    • Sustainability
    • Careers
    • Economic Research
    • Contact Us

    What can we do for you?

    Learn more about Sustainability

    Insurance, MPF & Trust

    • Latest News / Promotions
    • Insurance Products
    • Instant Quotation and Application
    • Loyalty Club
    • FAQ
    • Useful Information
    • Download Area
    • Unit Prices
    • Customer Enquiry / Opinion
    • Latest News and Promotions
    • Our Products
    • Fund Information
    • Investment Corner
    • Download Area
    • e-Application
    • e-Services
    • About Us
    • Find Us
    • MPF Corner
    • Automatic Exchange of Financial Account Information in Tax Matters
    • Default Investment Strategy
    • Trust Professionals
    • Comprehensive Trust Solutions
    • Resources
    • Free Consultation

    Long Service Payment / Severance Payment Calculator

    Reckonable years of service = Years

    This website uses cookies to improve your browsing experience. You give consent for cookies to be used if you continue to browse this website. To learn more about how our website uses cookies, please read our Privacy Policy Statement.