How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

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Top Five Surf Fishing Tips

At first, you may believe you’ll be restricted when it comes to surf fishing since you’ll be casting from dry land, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. Aside from deep sea game fish, there’s a surprisingly wide variety of fish you can catch right off the shoreline, including Flounder, Rockfish and Mackerel. This makes it easy for saltwater anglers to catch good game fish without having to leave land at all, so if you’re saving up for a new boat and casting platform to get out on the water you can still get a feel for saltwater fishing and be primed for when you’re ready to go out and land even bigger strikes.

1. Surf Casting for Beginners

Surf fishing is an easy fishing method to learn, with your tactics changing depending on factors such as location, seasons, tides, weather conditions, and the type of fish you’re hoping to get on your line; but, just starting out there are simple basics that will get you started off on the right track. If you’re new to surf fishing, the first thing you need to do is understand how to surf cast. Surf casting is actually a lot like regular casting, but with more emphasis on distance and accuracy to land your bait in the surf. Generally speaking, you’ll do well with a basic overhand cast straight out. For an overhand cast, hold the rod in your hand, bend your arm up into a 90 degree angle and quickly flick out the pole, straightening your arm to launch the bait into the water. The trick to surf casting is learning the exact speed and power you need to perfect both your distance and accuracy when tossing out the line.

Once you have the cast you can start to learn different tactics, such as using different bait or fishing at a different time of year, that will help you target specific fish species. For example, while shrimp will attract most species of fish, you may want to use live bait like Mullet for Flounder or Herring for Mackerel. It also helps to understand the habits of your target fish species based on the seasons, tides and weather conditions.

2. Changing Tactics: Reading the Beach

Seasoned surf anglers know how to read the beach and find the features that make a good fishing spot, but the ocean is an intimidating expanse to beginners. To increase your odds of finding fish, there are several things you can look for:

3. Deciding When to Go Surf Fishing: Weather and Tides

Reading the beach will become easier as you become more experienced with surf fishing, but as you learn there are a few other things to consider as well. With the changing of the weather and tides, you will also see changes in the behaviors of fish. Perfect fishing conditions are difficult to achieve, so having a general idea of when the fish should be biting can make the difference between a successful day of surf fishing and a disappointing one. Every surf angler is going to have their own opinion and experiences when it comes to the best conditions for surf fishing, but there are a few general rules of thumb most can agree with:

  • Overcast and rainy days can help minimize shadows from your line, making the bait more appealing. ( Note: While rainy days may increase strikes, your safety should always come first when surf fishing. Keep an eye on the weather at all times and be prepared to seek shelter in the event of a thunderstorm or unexpected foul weather, like high winds that create dangerous waves and conditions.)
  • More fish will come in to feed during high tide, especially at dawn or dusk, as there will be more water in your fishing hole, but certain species will prefer low tide.
  • Take advantage of low tide to read the beach and locate sand banks, dips, hollows, and other structures.

4. How to Fish from the Beach: Surf Fishing Gear

When conditions are right and you decide to head to the beach for surf fishing, make sure you are adequately prepared. For a typical surf fishing excursion on the beach, you will need the following gear:

  • Saltwater Fishing Rod and Feel
  • Cast Net
  • Tackle and Bait
  • Surf Fishing Rigs (Fish-Finder and Drop)
  • Marine Hook and Rig Holder (for tool organization)
  • Knife
  • Bait Bucket and Air Pump
  • Spare Spool of Line
  • Pliers or Disgorger
  • Tape Measure
  • Umbrella and Rain Gear
  • Sunscreen and Sunglasses
  • First Aid Kit
  • Fishing License

5. Remember Knowledge Comes from Experience

Having proper gear will make your surf fishing experience easier and far more enjoyable, especially as you learn how to read the beach and what conditions are best for getting the strikes. Remember that knowledge comes from experience. While guides can help establish a foundation as you learn the art of surf fishing, actually casting your rod from the sands of the beach will teach you what you need to know to become a seasoned surf angler.

Posted on Sep 06, 2019

Learning how to cast a surf and beach rod is a skill that you need to learn. Technique over trying to muscle a cast is the key to success. So today we are just casting some small metal lures, like so. I’m using a 10 foot rod with just a 4000 size reel.

So, generally when you are casting these lures you really want to hold firm to the rod and also have the line under control, under that finger.

So when you actually shoot forward you can actually let go on time and always focus on where you cast as well. So when casting you want to swing the lure back and bring it forward.

Push and Pull

So you want a pull and push motion. With a pull from underneath the rod and also a push from the top so you get that good swing.

Once you load the rod up the lure should go flying out there and should get you fishing. So with the pull and push motion, how you want to do it is.

You want to have one arm on the bottom, one arm up the top and you want to pendulum your lure outwards. Once it is out you pull down with your left hand or if you are casting on the other side, it will be your right hand.

And then you want to push forward. So i’m just going to demonstrate this for you. So, as you can see I gave a pull and then a push forward and that will help you load up the rod properly.

How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

With extensive experience within Daiwa’s Service Department Dave is the go-to man when it comes to the in’s and out’s of Daiwa reels. A skilled, highly technical angler, Dave loves nothing more than chasing Sydney EP’s under the cover of darkness or tempting Hunter Valley’s lake bass with a skirted jig or jerkbait.

Posted on Sep 06, 2019

Learning how to cast a surf and beach rod is a skill that you need to learn. Technique over trying to muscle a cast is the key to success. So today we are just casting some small metal lures, like so. I’m using a 10 foot rod with just a 4000 size reel.

So, generally when you are casting these lures you really want to hold firm to the rod and also have the line under control, under that finger.

So when you actually shoot forward you can actually let go on time and always focus on where you cast as well. So when casting you want to swing the lure back and bring it forward.

Push and Pull

So you want a pull and push motion. With a pull from underneath the rod and also a push from the top so you get that good swing.

Once you load the rod up the lure should go flying out there and should get you fishing. So with the pull and push motion, how you want to do it is.

You want to have one arm on the bottom, one arm up the top and you want to pendulum your lure outwards. Once it is out you pull down with your left hand or if you are casting on the other side, it will be your right hand.

And then you want to push forward. So i’m just going to demonstrate this for you. So, as you can see I gave a pull and then a push forward and that will help you load up the rod properly.

How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

How to cast with a surf rod on a beach

With extensive experience within Daiwa’s Service Department Dave is the go-to man when it comes to the in’s and out’s of Daiwa reels. A skilled, highly technical angler, Dave loves nothing more than chasing Sydney EP’s under the cover of darkness or tempting Hunter Valley’s lake bass with a skirted jig or jerkbait.