How to clean plastic eyeglasses

How to clean your glasses

Cleaning your eyeglasses daily is the best way to keep them looking great and avoid scratched lenses. But there’s a right way — and plenty of wrong ways — when it comes to how to clean glasses.

Follow these tips to clean your eyeglass lenses and frames to keep your glasses in top condition. These cleaning tips will also help you keep your sunglasses, safety glasses and sports eyewear in great shape.

1. Wash and dry your hands.

Before cleaning your eyeglasses, wash your hands thoroughly. Use lotion-free soap or dishwashing liquid and a clean, lint-free towel.

2. Rinse your glasses under a gentle stream of tap water.

This will remove dust and other debris, which can help avoid scratching your lenses when you’re cleaning them. Avoid hot water, which can damage some eyeglass lens coatings.

3. Apply a small drop of lotion-free dishwashing liquid to each lens.

Most dishwashing liquids are very concentrated, so use only a tiny amount. Or apply a drop or two to your fingertips before touching the lenses. Use only lotion-free brands.

4. Gently rub both sides of the lenses and all parts of the frame.

Make sure you clean every part of your glasses, including the nose pads and the temples of the frame. Also, clean the area where the edge of the lenses meet the frame — dust, debris and skin oils frequently accumulate here.

5. Rinse both sides of the lenses and the frame.

Failing to remove all traces of soap will cause the lenses to be smeared when you dry them.

6. Gently shake your glasses to get rid of most of the water on the lenses.

Inspect the lenses carefully to make sure they are clean.

7. Carefully dry the lenses and frame with a clean, lint-free towel.

Use a dish towel that has not been laundered with a fabric softener or dryer sheet (these substances can smear the lenses). A lint-free microfiber cloth is also a good choice. Make sure the cloth is perfectly clean. Dirt or debris trapped in the fibers of a towel can scratch your lenses. Also, any cooking oil, skin oil or lotion on the towel will smear your glasses.

8. Inspect the lenses again.

If any streaks or smudges remain, remove them with a clean microfiber cloth — these lint-free cloths are available at most optical shops or photography stores.

For touch-up cleaning of your eyeglass lenses, use disposable lens cleaning wipes. These are formulated specifically for use on eyeglass lenses.

Which brings us to a very important topic — what NOT to use to clean your glasses. [See below .]

Cleaning glasses: Don’ts

DON’T use your shirttail, blouse or other clothing to clean your glasses, especially when the lenses are dry. This can scratch your lenses.

DON’T use saliva to wet your lenses.

DON’T use household glass or surface cleaners to clean your eyeglasses. These products have ingredients that can damage eyeglass lenses and coatings.

DON’T use paper towels, napkins, tissues or toilet paper to clean your lenses. These can scratch or smear your lenses or leave them full of lint.

DON’T try to “buff away” a scratch in your lenses. This only makes the situation worse.

Eyeglass cleaners and cleaning cloths

Spray eyeglass lens cleaners are available where you purchase your glasses and at your local drug or discount store. These can be helpful if you are traveling or don’t have dishwashing soap and clean tap water available.

If tap water isn’t available, use plenty of the spray eyeglass cleaner to flush away dust and other debris from your lenses before wiping them dry.

If your lenses have anti-reflective (AR) coating, make sure the eyeglass cleaner you choose is approved for use on anti-reflective lenses.

When using disposable lens cleaning wipes, first inspect the lenses for dust or debris. To avoid scratches, blow any debris off the lenses before wiping them.

Microfiber cleaning cloths are ideal for cleaning glasses. These cloths dry the lenses very effectively and trap oils to avoid smearing.

But because they trap debris so effectively, make sure you clean the cloths frequently. Hand-wash the cloth using lotion-free dishwashing liquid and clean water; allow the cloth to air dry.

How to remove scratches from glasses

Unfortunately, there is no magic cure for scratched lenses. Once your glasses are scratched, they are scratched.

Some products are designed to make the scratches look a little less visible. Most of these products are just waxy substances that wear off easily. Results with these products are mixed, depending on the location and depth of the scratches. Also, they often will smear anti-reflective lenses.

Besides reflecting light and interfering with vision, scratches can affect the impact resistance of your eyeglass lenses. For optimum vision and safety, replace your lenses if they become scratched.

When purchasing lenses, choose those that have a durable scratch-resistant coating. And ask your optician if your purchase includes an anti-scratch warranty — especially if scratched lenses have been an issue in the past.

Professional eyeglass cleaning

If your lenses are in good shape but the nose pads or other parts of the frame have become impossible to keep clean, return to where you purchased your glasses.

An eye care professional may be able to deep-clean your glasses with an ultrasonic cleaning device. They also can replace yellowing nose pads with clear new ones.

Store your glasses in a case

Eyeglass lenses can easily get scratched if you fail to store them somewhere safe. This includes when you take them off at bedtime.

Always store your eyeglasses in a clean storage case, and NEVER place them on a table or counter with the lenses facing down.

If you don’t have a glasses case handy, place your glasses upside down with the temples open — somewhere safe, where they won’t get knocked off a table or countertop.

Glasses don’t last forever

All eyeglass lenses will eventually get a few scratches. Eyeglasses lenses are scratch resistant, not scratch-proof.

When purchasing glasses, ask about anti-scratch warranties for your lenses. This is especially important for children’s eyeglasses or if you wear glasses in dusty conditions.

Following the above tips is the best way to keep your glasses clean and scratch-free for as long as possible.

If your lenses are badly scratched and your eyeglass prescription has expired — or you simply want new glasses — schedule an eye exam with an eye doctor near you.

How to clean your glasses

Cleaning your eyeglasses daily is the best way to keep them looking great and avoid scratched lenses. But there’s a right way — and plenty of wrong ways — when it comes to how to clean glasses.

Follow these tips to clean your eyeglass lenses and frames to keep your glasses in top condition. These cleaning tips will also help you keep your sunglasses, safety glasses and sports eyewear in great shape.

1. Wash and dry your hands.

Before cleaning your eyeglasses, wash your hands thoroughly. Use lotion-free soap or dishwashing liquid and a clean, lint-free towel.

2. Rinse your glasses under a gentle stream of tap water.

This will remove dust and other debris, which can help avoid scratching your lenses when you’re cleaning them. Avoid hot water, which can damage some eyeglass lens coatings.

3. Apply a small drop of lotion-free dishwashing liquid to each lens.

Most dishwashing liquids are very concentrated, so use only a tiny amount. Or apply a drop or two to your fingertips before touching the lenses. Use only lotion-free brands.

4. Gently rub both sides of the lenses and all parts of the frame.

Make sure you clean every part of your glasses, including the nose pads and the temples of the frame. Also, clean the area where the edge of the lenses meet the frame — dust, debris and skin oils frequently accumulate here.

5. Rinse both sides of the lenses and the frame.

Failing to remove all traces of soap will cause the lenses to be smeared when you dry them.

6. Gently shake your glasses to get rid of most of the water on the lenses.

Inspect the lenses carefully to make sure they are clean.

7. Carefully dry the lenses and frame with a clean, lint-free towel.

Use a dish towel that has not been laundered with a fabric softener or dryer sheet (these substances can smear the lenses). A lint-free microfiber cloth is also a good choice. Make sure the cloth is perfectly clean. Dirt or debris trapped in the fibers of a towel can scratch your lenses. Also, any cooking oil, skin oil or lotion on the towel will smear your glasses.

8. Inspect the lenses again.

If any streaks or smudges remain, remove them with a clean microfiber cloth — these lint-free cloths are available at most optical shops or photography stores.

For touch-up cleaning of your eyeglass lenses, use disposable lens cleaning wipes. These are formulated specifically for use on eyeglass lenses.

Which brings us to a very important topic — what NOT to use to clean your glasses. [See below .]

Cleaning glasses: Don’ts

DON’T use your shirttail, blouse or other clothing to clean your glasses, especially when the lenses are dry. This can scratch your lenses.

DON’T use saliva to wet your lenses.

DON’T use household glass or surface cleaners to clean your eyeglasses. These products have ingredients that can damage eyeglass lenses and coatings.

DON’T use paper towels, napkins, tissues or toilet paper to clean your lenses. These can scratch or smear your lenses or leave them full of lint.

DON’T try to “buff away” a scratch in your lenses. This only makes the situation worse.

Eyeglass cleaners and cleaning cloths

Spray eyeglass lens cleaners are available where you purchase your glasses and at your local drug or discount store. These can be helpful if you are traveling or don’t have dishwashing soap and clean tap water available.

If tap water isn’t available, use plenty of the spray eyeglass cleaner to flush away dust and other debris from your lenses before wiping them dry.

If your lenses have anti-reflective (AR) coating, make sure the eyeglass cleaner you choose is approved for use on anti-reflective lenses.

When using disposable lens cleaning wipes, first inspect the lenses for dust or debris. To avoid scratches, blow any debris off the lenses before wiping them.

Microfiber cleaning cloths are ideal for cleaning glasses. These cloths dry the lenses very effectively and trap oils to avoid smearing.

But because they trap debris so effectively, make sure you clean the cloths frequently. Hand-wash the cloth using lotion-free dishwashing liquid and clean water; allow the cloth to air dry.

How to remove scratches from glasses

Unfortunately, there is no magic cure for scratched lenses. Once your glasses are scratched, they are scratched.

Some products are designed to make the scratches look a little less visible. Most of these products are just waxy substances that wear off easily. Results with these products are mixed, depending on the location and depth of the scratches. Also, they often will smear anti-reflective lenses.

Besides reflecting light and interfering with vision, scratches can affect the impact resistance of your eyeglass lenses. For optimum vision and safety, replace your lenses if they become scratched.

When purchasing lenses, choose those that have a durable scratch-resistant coating. And ask your optician if your purchase includes an anti-scratch warranty — especially if scratched lenses have been an issue in the past.

Professional eyeglass cleaning

If your lenses are in good shape but the nose pads or other parts of the frame have become impossible to keep clean, return to where you purchased your glasses.

An eye care professional may be able to deep-clean your glasses with an ultrasonic cleaning device. They also can replace yellowing nose pads with clear new ones.

Store your glasses in a case

Eyeglass lenses can easily get scratched if you fail to store them somewhere safe. This includes when you take them off at bedtime.

Always store your eyeglasses in a clean storage case, and NEVER place them on a table or counter with the lenses facing down.

If you don’t have a glasses case handy, place your glasses upside down with the temples open — somewhere safe, where they won’t get knocked off a table or countertop.

Glasses don’t last forever

All eyeglass lenses will eventually get a few scratches. Eyeglasses lenses are scratch resistant, not scratch-proof.

When purchasing glasses, ask about anti-scratch warranties for your lenses. This is especially important for children’s eyeglasses or if you wear glasses in dusty conditions.

Following the above tips is the best way to keep your glasses clean and scratch-free for as long as possible.

If your lenses are badly scratched and your eyeglass prescription has expired — or you simply want new glasses — schedule an eye exam with an eye doctor near you.

December 6, 2017

How to clean plastic eyeglasses

Oxidation has discolored my favorite pair of eyeglass frames, leaving them clouded by a filmy white layer. I’ve managed to restore the frames using household items. Here’s how I did it.

I have a beloved pair of eyeglasses I’ve worn for about 6 years now. I have a very narrow head and this pair measures 50-14-135. Finding adult frames with a narrow bridge and small lens size (but normal, adult ear positioning) is nigh impossible. Most “petite” frames still have as wide a bridge as larger sizes, which makes no sense to me. And children’s frames don’t have long enough arms.

But in the last year or so my rare unicorn frames have developed a hazy white film. It almost looks like they’re perpetually smudged with make-up. Various sources online claim that this discoloration is due to interactions with hair products, but I suspect this is a half-truth. The only area affected is the outside, on the front and on the part of the arms that see sunlight. Not where you’d expect hair products or make up to do damage.

How to clean plastic eyeglassesI didn’t take a proper before picture. Here’s a recent pic I took after some very daring hair color experimentation. (And YES, that is lamb’s ear behind me.)

Most plastic frames are cellulose acetate. While in itself this plastic is transparent to UV, in the presence of surface contaminants it can oxidize–growing pitted and, eventually, brittle. This oxidation is almost certainly the source of the cloudiness.

I’ve struggled to replace my frames. Three times now, I’ve bought a new pair only to decide they just don’t fit right. Meanwhile I assumed the white discoloration was permanent. I even vaguely wondered if I should try painting them.

I finally decided to do some digging online and I found several different remedies crop up. Some are chemical: renew your frames the same way you renew the plastic in a car, like with Armor All. Some are home remedies: toothpaste, peanut butter, lip balm, and baking soda have all featured. And some advise that the only way to really fix the problem is to gently scrape away the damaged surface layer.

I managed to restore my frames. The story is below, but here’s the punchline. The oxidized layer needs to be removed–it’s the only permanent fix. I recommend using a 4-way nail buffing block. Then, for additional shine, following up by massaging in a thin coating of Vaseline or lanolin.

Brush your glasses…with toothpaste

Well, it works on teeth after all.

My first attempt was the home remedy route. It was evening and toothpaste was something I had on-hand. The advice I found was to gently rub on and off the toothpaste, avoiding the lens. In principle, it works for the same reason it works on your teeth: the paste is mildly abrasive. The grit scratches off the oxide layer.

I followed up with baking soda, which I mixed into a paste with a little water. Again, abrasion is at work here. Then I washed with soapy water. The final result is below. Definitely an improvement, but still cloudy.

How to clean plastic eyeglassesWhite oxidation is reduced by wiping with toothpaste and then baking soda. But still some remains.

Buff to a shine

Next I broke out my nail buffer. I have a well-used 6-stage buffer. Stage 1 and 2 are grittier, for shaping nails, and 3-6 are for polishing the top. I used stage 3, the roughest polishing stage, to attack the oxidation. Even this level of grit feels soft to the touch. Whenever one of the actual gritty sides of the buffer would contact the frame, it would scratch, so if you try this, be careful! A gentle hand is key.

Because of the shape of my buffer, I could only really get the center well. The top and bottom ridges were tough to reach while avoiding the rougher parts of the buffer. And by time I got to the sides, the grit was basically worn away! I was pretty shocked, since I’d been using this buffer on my nails for months and months without it wearing so much as it did with the frame.

How to clean plastic eyeglassesMy frames after removing the white oxidation with a nail buffing block.

Shine on

As a final step, I took another home remedy piece of advice and rubbed in a thin coat of lanolin. It evened out the result and added some shine, as you can see below.

How to clean plastic eyeglassesRubbing in a little lanolin helped even out the color of the frames, and add a little shine.

However, only two days later, I’m finding the parts I didn’t buff as well are looking hazy again. The center still looks nice. I’m going to pick up a new buffer and, in the meanwhile, I’ve shined them again with Vaseline. It gives a little more glossy finish than the lanolin. Hopefully it lasts a little longer.

If you give the buffing method a try, I recommend a 4-stage buffer, with sides that extend right to the edge in order to reach little corners and parts near the eye glass. I’ve read that melamine foam (such as Magic Erasers) also work well for buffing eyeglass frames.

If you give it a go, or have your own tricks for refreshing eyeglass frames, let me know in the comments!

Incidentally, I’ve just made my fourth frames purchase and I’m hoping this one is the charm. They are made of buffalo horn–no more cellulose acetate!–from the Cuthbert & Chen line by RetroSpecs. Although they are listed as 45-18, the bridge fit looks and feels more narrow. (How high they sit on your bridge plays a role in this.) They’ve also got my husband’s stamp of approval and he’s got something of a discerning eye.

More Articles

  1. How to Remove Logos From Glasses
  2. How to Find New Frames to Fit Old Lenses
  3. How to Repair Skin Discoloration Caused by Hair Removal Products
  4. How to Repair a Scratch on Eyeglass Lenses With Anti-Reflective Coating
  5. How to Remove Lenses From Eyeglasses

White discoloration on the frame of a pair of plastic eyeglasses results from the plastic reacting to acids and chemicals in perspiration, facial grease or cosmetics on the face of the person wearing the eyeglasses. Since any chemical strong enough to remove the discoloration from the frame will also damage the frame, the only solution is to use sandpaper to scrape off the white mark. You can do this yourself at home using some purchases from a home supply store.

Remove the screws holding the plastic frame to the lenses using the jeweler’s screwdriver, and take out the lenses.

How to Remove Logos From Glasses

Hold the plastic frame in one hand. With the other hand, gently but firmly rub the 100 grit sandpaper against the white discoloration on the frame.

Repeat the process of rubbing the 100 grit sandpaper against the discoloration on the frame until most of the white has been removed.

How to Find New Frames to Fit Old Lenses

Use the 200 grit sandpaper to rub gently but firmly against the remaining white discoloration on the plastic frame. Continue rubbing the discoloration until all of the white is gone.

Turn on the jewelry polishing wheel. Hold the plastic frame against the polishing wheel at the area where the white discoloration was. Remove the plastic frame from the polishing wheel once the plastic frame has been polished.

Reattach the plastic frame to the lenses by replacing the screws using the jeweler’s screwdriver. Wipe off the plastic frames, which should now be free of the white discoloration, with a soft cloth.

Frequently inspect the progress of the sandpaper while using it to sand off the white discoloration. If you do not have access to a jewelry polishing wheel, try polishing the frames with a new nail buffer.

Warnings

Too much pressure applied to the polishing wheel can damage the plastic frame.

December 6, 2017

How to clean plastic eyeglasses

Oxidation has discolored my favorite pair of eyeglass frames, leaving them clouded by a filmy white layer. I’ve managed to restore the frames using household items. Here’s how I did it.

I have a beloved pair of eyeglasses I’ve worn for about 6 years now. I have a very narrow head and this pair measures 50-14-135. Finding adult frames with a narrow bridge and small lens size (but normal, adult ear positioning) is nigh impossible. Most “petite” frames still have as wide a bridge as larger sizes, which makes no sense to me. And children’s frames don’t have long enough arms.

But in the last year or so my rare unicorn frames have developed a hazy white film. It almost looks like they’re perpetually smudged with make-up. Various sources online claim that this discoloration is due to interactions with hair products, but I suspect this is a half-truth. The only area affected is the outside, on the front and on the part of the arms that see sunlight. Not where you’d expect hair products or make up to do damage.

How to clean plastic eyeglassesI didn’t take a proper before picture. Here’s a recent pic I took after some very daring hair color experimentation. (And YES, that is lamb’s ear behind me.)

Most plastic frames are cellulose acetate. While in itself this plastic is transparent to UV, in the presence of surface contaminants it can oxidize–growing pitted and, eventually, brittle. This oxidation is almost certainly the source of the cloudiness.

I’ve struggled to replace my frames. Three times now, I’ve bought a new pair only to decide they just don’t fit right. Meanwhile I assumed the white discoloration was permanent. I even vaguely wondered if I should try painting them.

I finally decided to do some digging online and I found several different remedies crop up. Some are chemical: renew your frames the same way you renew the plastic in a car, like with Armor All. Some are home remedies: toothpaste, peanut butter, lip balm, and baking soda have all featured. And some advise that the only way to really fix the problem is to gently scrape away the damaged surface layer.

I managed to restore my frames. The story is below, but here’s the punchline. The oxidized layer needs to be removed–it’s the only permanent fix. I recommend using a 4-way nail buffing block. Then, for additional shine, following up by massaging in a thin coating of Vaseline or lanolin.

Brush your glasses…with toothpaste

Well, it works on teeth after all.

My first attempt was the home remedy route. It was evening and toothpaste was something I had on-hand. The advice I found was to gently rub on and off the toothpaste, avoiding the lens. In principle, it works for the same reason it works on your teeth: the paste is mildly abrasive. The grit scratches off the oxide layer.

I followed up with baking soda, which I mixed into a paste with a little water. Again, abrasion is at work here. Then I washed with soapy water. The final result is below. Definitely an improvement, but still cloudy.

How to clean plastic eyeglassesWhite oxidation is reduced by wiping with toothpaste and then baking soda. But still some remains.

Buff to a shine

Next I broke out my nail buffer. I have a well-used 6-stage buffer. Stage 1 and 2 are grittier, for shaping nails, and 3-6 are for polishing the top. I used stage 3, the roughest polishing stage, to attack the oxidation. Even this level of grit feels soft to the touch. Whenever one of the actual gritty sides of the buffer would contact the frame, it would scratch, so if you try this, be careful! A gentle hand is key.

Because of the shape of my buffer, I could only really get the center well. The top and bottom ridges were tough to reach while avoiding the rougher parts of the buffer. And by time I got to the sides, the grit was basically worn away! I was pretty shocked, since I’d been using this buffer on my nails for months and months without it wearing so much as it did with the frame.

How to clean plastic eyeglassesMy frames after removing the white oxidation with a nail buffing block.

Shine on

As a final step, I took another home remedy piece of advice and rubbed in a thin coat of lanolin. It evened out the result and added some shine, as you can see below.

How to clean plastic eyeglassesRubbing in a little lanolin helped even out the color of the frames, and add a little shine.

However, only two days later, I’m finding the parts I didn’t buff as well are looking hazy again. The center still looks nice. I’m going to pick up a new buffer and, in the meanwhile, I’ve shined them again with Vaseline. It gives a little more glossy finish than the lanolin. Hopefully it lasts a little longer.

If you give the buffing method a try, I recommend a 4-stage buffer, with sides that extend right to the edge in order to reach little corners and parts near the eye glass. I’ve read that melamine foam (such as Magic Erasers) also work well for buffing eyeglass frames.

If you give it a go, or have your own tricks for refreshing eyeglass frames, let me know in the comments!

Incidentally, I’ve just made my fourth frames purchase and I’m hoping this one is the charm. They are made of buffalo horn–no more cellulose acetate!–from the Cuthbert & Chen line by RetroSpecs. Although they are listed as 45-18, the bridge fit looks and feels more narrow. (How high they sit on your bridge plays a role in this.) They’ve also got my husband’s stamp of approval and he’s got something of a discerning eye.

How to clean plastic eyeglasses

If you wear glasses, the first thing you learn is how to clean eyeglasses. Glasses are far from cheap. When buying eyeglasses, there is the cost of the frames and prescription lenses to consider, but there are numerous extras people opt for as well.

Most of us choose special lens coatings to help us see better, such as anti-reflective, UV coatings, anti-scratch, not to mention the sought after transition feature. People fail to realize there are right and wrong ways to clean eyeglasses. Cleaning eyeglasses incorrectly damages and sometimes even destroys your lenses.

Nobody wants to ruin their lenses by cleaning, as that is just a waste of money. Daily cleaning, when done correctly, protects your lenses, keeps your glasses looking and working like new, and aids in preventing scratches and other types of damage.

Special coatings on lenses are pretty durable and provide a fair amount of protection, but nothing is ever 100% effective. The anti-scratch coating doesn’t protect lenses from all scratches but works well at preventing minor ones.

How to clean plastic eyeglasses(sihasakprachum/123rf.com)

  1. Quick and Easy Ways to Clean Eyeglasses
    • Things to Avoid When Cleaning Eyeglasses
    • How to Clean Eyeglasses at Home
    • Best Ways to Clean Eyeglasses throughout the Day or on the Go
    • Cleaning the Nose Pads of Your Glasses
    • Tips for Cleaning Plastic Glasses Frames
    • Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner with Alcohol
    • Best Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner for Plastic Lenses
    • How to Prevent Steam from Building on Your Glasses
    • Tips for Cleaning Metal, Hipster, and Vintage Frames
    • Keeping Glasses Cleaner Longer

Quick and Easy Ways to Clean Eyeglasses

Combining regular cleaning of eyeglasses with special protective coatings extends the life of your glasses. Following our recommended cleaning tips ensures your frames and lens are clean without the risk of damage. These quick and easy cleaning methods are safe to use on safety glasses, sunglasses, and sports eyewear, in addition to prescription eyeglasses and reading glasses.

Things to Avoid When Cleaning Eyeglasses

When cleaning your prescription glasses, there is the right way to clean them, and there is the wrong way. Cleaning your glass lenses incorrectly is detrimental as it causes the lenses’ coatings to break down, so the coatings no longer provide the intended protection.

Never exhale on your lenses or use your shirt to clean them as the fabric leaves behind tiny scratches. The same theory applies to paper towels and tissues.

In terms of cleaner, avoid using vinegar, bleach, toothpaste, lemon juice, ammonia, window cleaner, or commercial glass and mirror cleaner. The chemicals found inside these cleaning agents break down the protective coatings, scratch lenses, and otherwise create a mess rather than clear lenses.

How to Clean Eyeglasses at Home

No matter if you are cleaning prescription glasses or sunglasses, the best way to clean them at home is with liquid dish soap such as Dawn, lukewarm water, and a microfiber cloth. Begin by running the glasses under a gentle stream of lukewarm water. Avoid hot water as it reduces some coatings’ lifespan.

Wash and dry your hands before cleaning your eyeglasses to ensure all traces of lotion, dirt, and grime are gone. Failure to clean your hands increases the risk of transferring dirt onto the glasses while cleaning. Squirt a drop or two of liquid dishwashing soap onto your fingertips and gently rub the nose piece and both sides of the lenses.

Most opticians and optometrists recommend dish soap as being the best cleaner for glasses lens. Rinse the dish soap away with warm water. Lightly dry the lenses with a microfiber cloth. Even plastic lenses get perfectly clean when using microfiber as the fabric doesn’t leave lint behind.

If you don’t have a microfiber cloth, use a cotton dish towel in its place. Don’t use any towels laundered with fabric softener or dried with dryer sheets as it smears while drying.

Best Ways to Clean Eyeglasses throughout the Day or on the Go

We don’t always have access to warm water and dish soap, but our glasses still require cleaning as directed by the American Optometric Association. For cleaning glasses on the go or throughout the day, invest in some pre-moistened lens wipes for eyeglasses.

Find these wipes at several big-box stores, as well as optometrists offices. Before using the wipes to clean your lenses, gently blow away any loose dirt or debris. Spray lens cleaner works for cleaning while traveling or in place of dish soap and tap water.

Use a lot of sprays to rinse away loose debris and dirt. Gently dry with a microfiber cloth or clean, lint-free cotton towel. Ensure the lens cleaning spray is safe to use with an anti-reflective coating, if necessary.

Cleaning the Nose Pads of Your Glasses

Nose pads are prone to grimy buildup as sweat and body oil from where they sit on our noses attracts various dirt and debris. Nose pads won’t come clean with just your fingertips and some liquid dish soap, nor does eyeglass cleaner do the trick.

Cleaning the nose pads requires warm water, dish soap, and a cotton swab or old soft-bristle toothbrush. Use the soapy residue from cleaning your eyeglass lenses to clean the nose pads.

Apply light pressure to the nose pads, as well as the crevices around them and your frames. Use only a cotton swab to clean any buildup between the frame and lenses, never let the toothbrush come into contact with your lenses. Even a soft-bristled toothbrush scratches lenses.

Tips for Cleaning Plastic Glasses Frames

Like your plastic lenses, cleaning your plastic eyeglass frames is best done with warm water and mild dish soap. Plastic frames only require cleaning once a week, where the glass lenses require daily cleaning.

To clean the plastic frames, rinse them under running water; no worries if the lenses get wet. Get your hands wet, add some soap, and then rub together to create a bunch of suds.

Using the suds on your fingers, wipe down the plastic frames, including the area where the frame meets the lenses. Rinse with tap water and then dry with a soft, cleaning cloth.

Dip a cotton swab into some isopropyl alcohol and wipe down the plastic frames. The rubbing alcohol removes any hairspray and oil buildup. Only use rubbing alcohol occasionally, as it makes the plastic frames brittle with extended use.

Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner with Alcohol

Sure, you can buy eyeglass cleaning products at drug stores and many other locations, but why waste your money? Homemade eyeglass cleaner works as well as store-bought ones for a fraction of the price and doubles as a whiteboard spray.

Do you wear glasses and want to make sure the lenses are clean? Clean lenses can enhance your vision clarity and extend the life of your glasses. Discover the best methods on how to clean your lenses.

To clean plastic and glass lenses:

  1. Rinse with cold water from the tap.
  2. Wash with lens cleaner or hand soap.
  3. Rinse again with cold water to remove cleaner or soap.
  4. Dry and remove streaks using a microfiber cloth.

Plastic lenses require extra care beyond glass lenses. Read on to learn more about cleaning and caring for your glasses.

How to Clean Plastic Lenses

Plastic lenses have a special type of lens that features three different coatings in one.

  • Clean Coat
  • Anti-reflective coating
  • Anti-static coating
  • hardening

Because plastic lenses have different layers of coatings, they do require special care and maintenance. These coated lenses tend to cost more than basic lenses, so you want to ensure that you clean them frequently and properly to lengthen their lifespan.

How to clean plastic eyeglasses

Do not use harsh cleansers, such as glass cleaner, on your glasses in general. Because the surface of the frame could be damaged too. Also, do not use rough cloths like regular washcloths or paper towels to remove streaks. Make sure you know exactly how to clean your glasses to avoid damage.

Materials You Will Need:

  • Running water
  • Lens cleaner or gentle hand soap
  • One microfiber cloths

If you want to know how to clean your glasses, follow the steps below:

  1. Wash your hands with soap and water.
  2. If you are using lens cleaner, read the instructions on the label. Check to see whether the cleaner recommends the use of water.
  3. Inspect to make sure no dirt is left on the glasses.
  4. Rinse lenses under lukewarm tap water. Rinse away the dirt.
  5. Apply lens cleaner or a small amount of gentle hand soap.
  6. Use a microfiber cloth or your fingers if you do not have an extra cloth to gently scrub the lenses and frames.
  7. Rinse away cleaner or soap under cold tap water.
  8. Lightly shake the glasses to remove excess water.
  9. Use the other microfiber cloth to dry your lenses.
  10. Hold glasses up to the light to inspect for streaks. If you find a spot, polish with the microfiber cloth.
  11. If streaks do not go away, you may need to apply more lens cleaner and polish with the cloth again.

If your lens cleaner does not require or recommend water, eliminate the steps concerning water and follow all other steps as written.

Additional Tips for Cleaning Your Glasses

Beyond the basics, here are some useful techniques to also keep in mind:

  • Avoid wiping your lenses while dry, especially if using a washcloth, paper towel, or shirt. These materials can scratch the lenses easily.
  • If your lenses have a special coating, check your lens cleaner to make sure it is safe.
  • If you cannot use water to rinse your lenses, use extra lens cleaner to remove dirt.
  • Keep your glasses in a case when not in use to avoid scratches and dirt.

How to Clean Nose Pads

The lenses are not the only part of your progressive glasses that can get dirty. The nose pads can build up grime as well, especially during the summer months or if you wear makeup. Clear or white nose pads can become dingy over time, tarnishing the look of your glasses.

To Clean Your Nose Pads:

  1. Start by washing your hands with soap and water.
  2. Use an alcohol wipe or a cotton swab dipped in alcohol to thoroughly clean the nose pads. Try to avoid touching the lenses.
  3. If the grime remains, you can fill a small bowl with warm water and add a small amount of dish soap. Use the soap that doesn’t have lotion added. Allow the glasses to soak for about 15 minutes to loosen the grime.
  4. Clean again with the alcohol wipe or swab.
  5. If the nose pads are still dirty, remove using the screwdriver found in a glasses repair kit.
  6. Soak the nose pads in a bowl of warm water with a little added dish soap.
  7. Rinse and dry the nose pads. Use the screwdriver to reattach to your glasses.
  8. If the nose pads are still not clean, you may want to purchase new nose pads.

How to Make Lens Cleaner at Home

You do not have to spend extra money on lens cleaner. You can make your own at home with materials you probably already have on hand. Follow these steps to make your own lens cleaner.

  1. You will need a small spray bottle. You can usually find these in the travel containers section of most stores.
  2. Do not use alcohol for your cleaner. It can damage your coatings over time.
  3. Squeeze in a couple of drops of gentle dish soap. Do not use the type with lotion added.
  4. Mix together gently. Do not shake.
  5. Follow the instructions above to clean your glasses. Use water to rinse.

Upgrade to an Ultrasonic Bath for Best Cleaning Results

Ultra sonic baths are a proven way to get your glasses clean. All the dirt and grime gets cleaned in a matter of seconds. Eyer professional optician uses one and if you want to clean your glasses in seconds you should get one too.

How to clean plastic eyeglasses

All you need to do is to fill it up with water and add a little dishwashing liquid or soap to it. After a few days, you need to replace this lotion. Seriously a lot of people love their ultrasonic baths. You just dip your glasses in the bath and as soon as they are underwater you can see the dirt removed from your glasses. Because it is swimming around in the bath.

But I think really the greatest benefit to an ultrasonic bath is you can clean parts of your glasses you could not without using a screwdriver and disassembling the whole frame.

Conclusion

Keeping your progressive lenses clean and sparkling is not a complicated task, but it does need to be done properly and frequently. As long as you know how to clean progressive lenses, you can enjoy your glasses for your prescription length.

How to clean plastic eyeglasses

I only wear glasses for reading, so I am constantly taking them on and off, and it seems like my glasses are constantly getting dirty. I’ll be having trouble reading something and notice that there is a big fingerprint right in the middle of my vision.

I’m probably not the only one with this problem, so we thought we would share what we have learned about keeping my glasses clean and how to make your own eyeglass cleaner very cheaply. Unfortunately, commercial eyeglass cleaners contain lots of preservatives and other chemicals that can be irritating to your eyes.

They are also expensive. So, we have experimented with ways to keep my glasses clean, and we are sharing what we have learned with you today. We hope these methods and recipes work for you as well as they did for me.

  1. How to Clean Eyeglasses
  2. Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner Recipes
    • Soapy Water
    • Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner Spray
    • Steam Prevention Eyeglass Cleaner
    • Vinegar Based Anti-Fog Cleaner – DIY Eyeglass Cleaner without Alcohol
  3. Don’t Do This!
  4. More Helpful Tips for Cleaning Your Glasses
    • Recipe for Homemade Eyeglass Cleaning Spray

How to Clean Eyeglasses

You’ve paid a lot of money for those glasses, so take the time and consideration to clean them properly. Know what materials your glasses are made of and the recommended way to clean them before you start.

Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner Recipes

Alcohol or other solvents can damage some glasses made of special materials or with a special coating, so check with your manufacturer for special instructions.

Soapy Water

If you have dropped your glasses, or otherwise gotten them dirty or gritty, you don’t want to start rubbing them. You could end up scratching the lenses and making the situation worse. In this case, washing with a soapy water mixture is the answer.

Add a couple of drops of liquid dishwashing detergent to a bowl of water and stir it to mix. Hold your glasses by the sides and gently drag them through the soapy water. Rinse them and gently dry with a clean cotton cloth.

Soapy water is also the best homemade eyeglass cleaner for coated lenses, especially anti-reflective, anti-fog, or anti-scratch coatings. With these coatings, the manufacturer often recommends that you avoid using alcohol or ammonia.

Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner Spray

This homemade lens cleaner works well to clean off grease, smudgy fingerprints, and the daily grime that seems to accumulate so quickly on your glasses. We like to mix homemade glasses cleaner up in a small spray bottle and keep it beside my reading chair.

This way we can clean my glasses before I get started on a good book. The recipe below is based on alcohol, the same as our homemade window cleaner recipe.

DIY Eyeglass Cleaner Spray

  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1/2 cup isopropyl alcohol
  • 1 drop liquid soap or dishwashing liquid

To use this cleaner, mix the ingredients in a small spray bottle and spray onto both sides of your dirty glasses. Polish them clean and dry with a microfiber cloth.

This alcohol solution is also an excellent recipe for cleaning a computer monitor screen. However, never spray anything directly onto the screen, as the liquid can seep into crevices in the monitor and damage the expensive electrical components.

Instead, spray the mixture on a microfiber cloth and apply to the dirty screen. Ensure that you dry it completely after cleaning to have a clear screen for your next computer project.

Steam Prevention Eyeglass Cleaner

If you’re constantly getting your glasses fogged up when cooking or exercising outdoors, this steam preventative homemade eyeglasses cleaner may be the answer. You can keep a travel sized spray bottle of this cleaner in your pocket whenever you are outdoors and reapply as needed.

Anti-Fog Eyeglass Cleaner

  • 1 quart distilled water
  • 1/4 teaspoon liquid dishwashing detergent
  • 1/2 cup rubbing alcohol
  • 2 tablespoons sudsy ammonia

To use this anti-fog cleaner, mix all the ingredients in a spray bottle, and apply it to both sides of the lenses. Wipe the cleaner off with a lint-free cloth.

Wait a minute before putting your glasses back on so that the glasses are completely dry. Be careful not to spray the cleaner in your eyes; it will burn.

Vinegar Based Anti-Fog Cleaner – DIY Eyeglass Cleaner without Alcohol

This simple solution cuts through grease to clean your glasses and also discourages condensation from forming on your glasses.

Vinegar Based Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner Recipe

  • 1 part water
  • 3 parts distilled white vinegar

This recipe couldn’t be simpler. Based on our glass cleaner recipe, this solution uses water and white vinegar in a spray bottle. Spray your glasses and buff them dry with a clean microfiber cloth or a cotton cloth. Reapply as needed.

Here is another recipe for a DIY eyeglass cleaner that uses vinegar as an anti-fog ingredient. Fill your spray bottle with one part vinegar, one part rubbing alcohol, and one part distilled water. Shake it up and start cleaning.

Don’t Do This!

I admit I used to be guilty of this one myself. So many people clean their glasses by exhaling onto the lenses then wiping the fog off on their shirt-tail.

This common practice easily scratches your glasses. One tiny scratch today, another tomorrow, and soon you see poorly again with no clue what happened. Take the time to clean your glasses properly to protect your eyesight and your investment.

More Helpful Tips for Cleaning Your Glasses

When cleaning your glasses, make sure that any cloth you use is completely clean. Do not use paper towels, newspaper, or other paper products, over time they will scratch your lenses.

Also, avoid cloth that has been dried with fabric softener, it can leave a film on your glasses and cause smudging. The best choice is to use a microfiber cloth, 100% cotton cloth, or an eyeglass cleaning cloth made specifically for that purpose.

The best eyeglass lens cleaner for you depends on what your glasses are made of and whether you have any added coatings. The best solution is to consult your glasses provider and follow their recommendations exactly. But you don’t need to buy their expensive eyeglass cleaning solutions, one of these recipes will work for any glasses or sunglasses.

If you are in doubt about what is allowed for your glasses, stick with the soapy water wash. You can’t go wrong cleaning your glasses with soapy water, as long as you use a clean microfiber cloth or a 100% cotton cloth to dry them.

Use distilled water if you live in an area with hard water and water spots are a problem, but if you buff them completely dry, this shouldn’t be a problem.

I hope one of these recipes works for you. I have tried them all and know that they work. It is just a matter of choosing the best solution for you and your glasses.

Do you have a different method that works for you? If so, please share it in the comment section so that others can learn from your expertise. When we share our tips and solutions, it makes life easier for everyone.

Recipe for Homemade Eyeglass Cleaning Spray

How to clean plastic eyeglasses

Homemade Eyeglass Cleaner

You’ll see clearly again after using this simple DIY spray.