How to cook fish on a barbecue

How to cook fish on a barbecue

There are all sorts of clever tricks to achieve perfect fish on the barbecue – we’re talking melt-in-the-mouth flakes with a gorgeous smoky flavour and perfectly crispy skin. So next time you’re lighting the coals, make sure you put fish on the menu and use our five top tips to really impress your guests.

    First up, never place your fish over a searing high heat. Barbecued fish needs to be cooked on a medium-hot part of the grill so that you don’t risk burning the skin before the middle is cooked. More: Totally brilliant barbecue seafood

Go big on flavour. You can stuff a whole gutted fish with any of your favourite flavours – think fresh herbs, lemongrass, ginger or chilli. Or go for something a little more punchy, like Jamie’s super-spicy Cajun rub , inspired by the flavours of New Orleans.

How to cook fish on a barbecue

  • If you’re grilling fillets (rather than a whole fish), start off cooking skin-side down. Only turn the fish over when the skin is crisp and golden. If fish skin is properly cooked on the barbecue it’s amazingly tasty and crispy! Jamie says it can be as good as pork crackling when it’s done well.
  • Wrapping a whole fish in newspaper will keep it extra soft and juicy. The trick is to wrap your fish in several layers of paper and then soak the whole parcel in water, so that the smoking paper adds even more flavour to your dish, but doesn’t catch fire.
    How to cook fish on a barbecue
  • You can test if your fish is cooked with the ‘flake test’: simply push apart a piece of the flesh and if it separates easily into natural flakes, is piping hot in the middle, and has changed colour throughout, then it’s ready to eat.
  • How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Serve your barbecued fish with a delicious salad, watch Jamie make one here:

    Check out the rest of our barbecue recipes here.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Cooking fish on the barbecue can be tremendously rewarding, and is a little more special than simply grilling burgers and sausages. Served whole or in fillets, there are a range of different fish that suit the smoky, robust flavour that comes from barbecuing – in fact, if you take care over cooking, practically any fish can be cooked in this way.

    Because of the wide range of fish available, there are a few considerations to take. The barbecue you use will have an impact – if using a barbecue with wide-set grill bars, cooking small, delicate fish fillets will be very tricky indeed, unless you wrap them in foil or place them in a fish basket. A finer mesh-type grill will make it easier to cook fish fillets, but always remember Nathan Outlaw’s advice – only cook fish on a very high heat and oil the fish prior to cooking so that the skin doesn’t tear. Cleaning the grill rack before cooking will also help prevent sticking.

    How to barbecue fish

    If cooking fillets directly on the grill, choose fish where the skin and flesh is fairly robust and can stand up to the heat – think salmon, halibut or monkfish. Make sure the skin of any fish that you use for this method is generously oiled and seasoned with salt – this helps to prevent sticking and gives the skin a wonderfully crisp, tasty finish. A good way of cooking more delicate fillets, such as sea bass or plaice, is to wrap them in foil with a splash of liquid and aromatic herbs. This helps to protect the flesh and lightly steams the fish during cooking, ensuring you have wonderfully moist flesh.

    For something a little different, fish can be marinated, diced and threaded onto a skewers to form fish kebabs or used to make burgers – a particularly good trick for making fish more appealing to young children.

    One of the best and most simple ways of barbecuing fish is to leave them whole – a whole sea bass or bream makes an impressive main, and the bones help to impart flavour and moisture into the flesh. Sardines, mackerel, trout or red mullet are generally the best fish for cooking whole. Not only are they affordable and widely available, they also suit a lot of tasty rustic flavours and don’t require too much preparation.

    Leaving them whole also allows you to stuff the cavities, a wonderful way to add more flavour to the flesh of the fish. To help keep the stuffing inside the fish, and the flesh intact, fish baskets are one of the most handy gadgets you can buy for the barbecue season. These are made up of two attachable, metal racks (often in the shape of a fish) that you then place directly onto the barbecue. The heat that travels through the metal also gives nice char lines as they are in direct contact with the skin of the fish. You can also wrap whole fish in tin foil, which will add moisture but not produce a crispy skin.

    Throw the catch of the day on the barbecue with our fantastic fish recipes. Try meaty steaks, seafood skewers, spicy prawns and stuffed whole fish.

    Showing items 1 to 24 of 37

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    BBQ sardines with chermoula sauce

    Serve sardines with a delicious lemon, chilli and herb chermoula sauce for the ultimate taste of summer. Perfect for a lazy afternoon barbecue

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Soy & butter salmon parcels

    Make these tasty soy, honey and butter salmon parcels on a barbecue for the taste of summer. Serve with a refreshing cucumber and sesame salad on the side

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Fiery prawn & pepper skewers

    Fire up the barbecue and make these easy, tasty spicy prawn skewers with pickled cherry peppers. They’re delicious when served with our saffron aïoli

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Barbecued bream with spring onions, lemon & chilli

    Cook outdoors and make our barbecued sea bream, with chilli, spring onions and lemon. For children to enjoy, flake the fish onto plates and check for bones

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Fish tacos with green jalapeño salsa & chilli cream

    Cubed white fish is marinated, skewered and barbecued in this easy Mexican recipe – pile onto corn tortillas with spicy mango salsa

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Seafood, pineapple & coconut kebabs

    Thread a mixture of prawns, white fish, salmon and pineapple onto wooden skewers and barbecue to perfection

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Grilled mackerel with escalivada & toasts

    Escalivada is a punchy make-ahead Spanish dish of grilled peppers, aubergines and onions. It works really well with grilled or barbecued fish

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Skewered sardines with tartare dressing

    Try this superhealthy fish dish when you fancy something different for the BBQ

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Barbecued mussels

    Serve this rustic take on moules marinière in its foil package fresh from the barbecue. Partner the mussels with crusty bread to mop up the creamy sauce

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Prawn bruschetta skewers

    Enjoy a lazy lunch in the garden with these low-fat, prepare-ahead skewers – perfect for sharing

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Smoky chermoula salmon

    Heart healthy and a good source of omega-3, chermoula will make an exotic addition to this barbecued fish

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Hot tea-smoked trout with new potato & rocket salad

    Impress everyone with James Martin’s home-smoked barbecue recipe

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Fullerene / Getty Images

    Cooking fish can be stressful for beginners. It seems fragile, delicate, it’s expensive (at least relative to, say, hamburger), it has bones, it has a face—whatever it is, there’s an intimidation factor for sure.

    And the same is true for learning to grill. So when it comes to grilling fish, it’s like a double-whammy. But with this beginner’s guide to grilling fish, we’ll break down everything you need to know, including prep, tools, tips and basic techniques.

    Start With a Clean Grill

    It’s probably worthwhile to remember that people have been catching fish and cooking them over a hot fire for at least 100,000 years. Not to diss the Neanderthals, but if they could do it, so can you.

    And the first thing to know is that a clean grill is everything when it comes to grilling fish. Because fish is delicate, and it can stick to your grill, making turning it difficult and leading to all kinds of other problems. And one of the reasons fish will stick is if the grill isn’t clean.

    All those little specks of burnt on crud that might be invisible to a steak or a burger will grab onto your fish the same way the tread on a tire grips the road. So take a few extra moments to thoroughly scrape, brush and oil your grill before putting the fish on it.

    Of course you should clean your grill anyway. But with fish it’s especially critical. Here’s more on taking care of your charcoal grill.

    The Best Fish for Grilling

    Your next decision will be what type of fish to grill. Basically any fish can be cooked on a grill, but some varieties and cuts are more forgiving of mistakes and thus preferable for a beginner.

    These fish have firm flesh that won’t fall apart on the grill, and they are available in steaks or thick fillets, which helps them stand up to the high heat of the grill.

    With that said, a medium fire is best for grilling, which if you’re using a gas grill means about 350 F. If you’re grilling over charcoal, 350 F corresponds with about half a chimney of coals. If you’re not familiar with using charcoal chimneys or how to control the temperature on a charcoal grill, here’s a start. Examples are:

    • Halibut
    • Swordfish
    • Salmon
    • Tuna
    • Mahi-Mahi

    What you’ll want to do is brush the steaks with oil, season them, and grill for 7 to 8 minutes per inch of thickness, turning once halfway through. In other words, for a steak one inch thick, grill for 3 to 4 minutes, turn and grill for another 3 to 4 minutes.

    And by the way, one inch should be the minimum thickness, especially when you’re first learning how to grill fish. The thicker the steak, the more forgiving it will be.

    A lot of folks get hung up on marinating, like it’s going to be the answer to everything, but the reality is that marinade only penetrates a couple of millimeters into the flesh, and if you leave a piece of fish in the marinade too long (like more than 30 minutes), it will start to suffer from unwanted texture changes.

    You would do just as well to simply dip your fish in the marinade, let any excess drain, and then grill it. Or you could just brush your marinade on while it cooks.

    One last thing to remember is that you should let your fish come to room temperature before grilling it. That means leave it on the counter for 30 to 60 minutes. That doesn’t mean leave it in the sun for 30 to 60 minutes, however. If you’re outside, make sure it’s covered and in the shade.

    Grilling Fish on a Plank

    The easiest method of all is to grill your fish on a plank. A plank is simply a slab of wood, usually cedar, but sometimes oak, maple, cherry or apple. After soaking the plank for a couple of hours, simply brush the top with oil, lay it on the hot grill grate and place the fish on top. Cover the grill and cook for about 12 minutes for an inch thick steak (about 50 percent longer than when cooking directly on the grill). You don’t even need to turn the fish.

    One advantage to this technique is that the plank will start to smolder (although it shouldn’t actually ignite), which will add a wonderful smoky flavor to the fish that you can’t obtain when grilling directly on the grate. And you can use a plank on a gas or charcoal grill. Here’s more about grilling fish on a plank.

    1. How to Smoke Salmon Fillets
    2. How to Use Wood Chips in a Smoker
    3. How to Use a Smoker Box for Gas Grilling
    4. How to Grill Rock Fish
    5. How to Bake Lingcod

    You can use wet wood chips and foil or a special smoker box to smoke fish on your gas grill. This method will impart similar smoky tones to fish as charcoal grills and smokers achieve.

    Advance Preparation of Fish and Wood Chips

    Mix 1 gallon of water, kosher salt and sugar in a large plastic bowl to create a brine solution. Place the fish in the brine solution. Cover the container with plastic wrap, place it in the refrigerator and allow the mixture to soak overnight.

    Add the second gallon of water to the large mixing bowl or bucket and soak the wood chips for at least an hour before beginning the smoking process. Wet wood burns longer and produces more flavor-enhancing smoke than dry wood.

    Place a handful or two of the saturated wood chips inside the smoker box or in the center of the aluminum foil sheet. If you are using foil, fold it over the wood chips several times to create a foil pouch. Use a fork to create about a dozen vent holes in the pouch.

    The Smoking Process

    Light one gas burner on the extreme left or right of the grill. Leave all other burners off.

    Adjust the lit burner to medium-high and place the smoker box or foil pouch underneath the cooking grate on or near the lit burner. Close the grill lid and allow the box or pouch to heat until the chips start to smoke.

    Reduce the heat to medium-low or low to achieve a grilling chamber temperature of 140 to 160 degrees F.

    Place the brined fish on the cooking grate above the unlit burners and close the lid tightly.

    Check the smoker box or foil pouch every 30 minutes to ensure smoke continues to billow. Replace old chips with fresh wet chips if smoking ceases.

    Continue to smoke the fish for about two hours between 140 and 160 degrees, depending on the size of the fillet. Keep in mind that smoking your fish for too long will result in dried-out, tough fish.

    How to cook fish on a barbecueGrilling fish can be tough since it’s much more delicate than chicken or steak. It can fall apart as it cooks or gets stuck to the grate. The uneven heat of a grill can also make parts of it tough and dry while other parts are just barely cooked. Grilling fish in foil is the best solution. It keeps the fish intact, locks in moisture and helps the heat distribute evenly. It also allows you to add in herbs and aromatics to perfectly season your grilled fish fillets.

    Choosing Fish to Grill

    If you are placing fish directly onto the grill, it’s best to stick with hearty fish like salmon or tuna. When you grill fish in foil, you can cook any type of fish that you like from flounder or cod to snapper or Mahi-Mahi.

    Preparing Fish for the Grill

    1. Pat the fillets down with a paper towel to remove any water on the outside. This will help the fish to brown perfectly.
    2. Tear off 10” by 10” sheets of aluminum foil (they should be 5 – 6 inches longer the fillet when it is on it). Lightly grease the dull side of each foil sheet with oil or butter. The shiny side of the foil should be facing down.
    3. Place one fillet in the center of each greased sheet of foil. If the fish has skin on one side, that side should be facing down.
    4. Turn up the edges of the foil to create a bowl-like shape.
    5. Squeeze a quarter of a lemon or half of a lime over the fillet. Lightly sprinkle with salt and pepper. Then add any herbs or aromatics that you would like such as garlic, rosemary, paprika or dill. You can also toss in vegetables like onions, bell pepper, and carrots.
    6. Bend the foil over the fish and fold each edge so that it becomes a pouch. Use a fork to poke a few holes in the top to release steam as it cooks.
    7. Place the foil packets on the grill. Grill over medium-high for 5 to 7 minutes (depending on the size of the fillet) on a gas or charcoal grill.
    8. Remove the foil packets from the grill with either a long-handled metal spatula or long-handled grilling tongs.

    Grilled Fish with Lemon Recipe

    If you’re looking for a recipe to make smoked fish over a wood fire, we recommend this grilled lemon fish recipe from LiveStrong.com.

    Ingredients

    4 fish fillets, thick-cut

    4 lemons, sliced in half

    4 Tablespoons butter

    Dried dill weed

    Coarse sea salt

    Fresh ground black pepper

    2 handfuls of dry cherry wood chips

    Natural lump charcoal

    2 – 3 sheets of newspaper

    Long-handled grilling spatula or tongs

    Instructions

    1. How to cook fish on a barbecuePlace the cherry wood chips into the small bowl. Fill the bowl with enough water to cover the wood chips and let soak.
    2. Open the grill, remove the cooking grate and open the grill’s vents.
    3. Fill the bottom of the grill with natural lump coal. It has a better flavor than briquettes and lights faster.
    4. Place the sheets of newspaper either in the lower chamber of the charcoal starter or on top of the charcoal. Light the newspaper and wait for all the coals to ignite (about 20 minutes).
    5. Once the coals are glowing, drain the water from the wood chips. Throw the wood chips on top of the coals.
    6. Put the grate back onto the grill over the charcoal.
    7. Place the fish fillet packets (prepared according to the instructions above) onto the grate.
    8. Close the grill lid. Cook for 10 – 20 minutes depending on the thickness of the fillets.
    9. Remove the foil packets from the grill with either a long-handled metal spatula or long-handled grilling tongs.

    Let us know in the comments if you have any grilling tips or favorite recipes! If you’re looking for a trustworthy fish market that offers the best seafood in Connecticut, stop by City Fish Market!

    July 4th Weekend Hours
    City Fish Market will be CLOSED Sunday & Monday for both Retail Counter and Kitchen

    Retail:
    Tues – 9am-5pm
    Wed – Fri 9am-6pm
    Sat – 8am-5pm
    Sun – CLOSED
    Mon – CLOSED

    Kitchen:
    Tues & Sat 10am-5pm
    Wed – Fri 10am-6pm
    Closed Sunday & Monday

    Dining Room OpenHow to cook fish on a barbecue

    If you love having backyard barbeques with friends and family, then a meal of grilled salmon should be on your list. It’s healthy, nutritious, versatile, and super easy to make!

    In this article, we’ll cover everything you need to know about cooking salmon on your Napoleon grill. From the best salmon cuts for grilling, the most creative ways to season your fish, how to get an accurate salmon cooking temperature, to why you should leave the salmon skin on, and more!

    Tips for Salmon Shopping

    For delicious results, we highly recommend using steak and fillet cuts for cooking salmon on the grill. Make sure the salmon skin is still on because this effectively prevents the fish from crumbling to pieces or from sticking on the grill. It’s not impossible to grill skinless salmon but it is definitely going to take a lot of hard work to keep the fish from falling to pieces, which becomes more challenging when it’s time to flip.

    Additionally, when you’re learning how to BBQ salmon, buying your fish from sustainable sources will be kinder for the environment. Ask your fishmonger for in-season and wild-caught options. There are always several varieties of salmon available either fresh or frozen at your local farmer’s market or grocery store.

    Choose from the following types of salmon:

    King Salmon (Chinook): high in fat, rich flavor, and big fish.

    Sockeye Salmon (Red): vibrant red color, outstanding flavour, low in fat, leaner meat.

    Chum Salmon (Dog/Keta/Silverbrite): smaller in size, lower in fat content, slightly paler flesh.

    Steelhead Salmon: pinkish to orange flesh color, affordable option.

    Atlantic Salmon: mild in flavor, cheap, farmed.

    Contrary to popular belief, the flesh color is not a reliable indicator of your salmon’s nutritional value since this is essentially dictated by variety. A far better metric of salmon quality would be meat appearance and smell. Choose cuts of salmon that are glossy and firm to the touch. Do not accept salmon with brown spots or holes. Despite being fishy, there should also be no sour or foul odor from your meat.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to Season Your Salmon

    The great thing about BBQ salmon is that it’s going to taste amazing even with a simple seasoning of salt and pepper. But, if you want to be more creative with your flavorings, you can also try the following savory seasoning combinations that are sure to make your mouth water.

    Lemon Salmon: lemon, kosher salt, pepper, butter.

    Cilantro Lime Salmon: chopped cilantro, lime, kosher salt, pepper, honey, chopped cloves.

    Spicy Sriracha-Glazed Salmon: sriracha, lemon juice, honey.

    Soy-Glazed Salmon: soy sauce, honey, mustard, and lemon juice.

    Salmon with Homemade Barbecue Sauce: lemon, garlic, brown sugar, soy sauce, water, and olive oil.

    How to Grill Salmon Like a Pro

    Now that you’ve selected the perfect cut of salmon and seasoned it, it’s time to heat up the grill! The best method to barbecue salmon can be broken down into a few simple steps:

    Preheat your grill to medium to high temperature around 400 ℉ /205 ℃.

    Season the salmon thoroughly and oil the cooking grids. Be sure to fully preheat the grill to prevent sticking.

    Put the skinless side of your salmon fillet first to get beautiful grill marks. On the other hand, if you prefer crunchy and crispy salmon skin, you can do that side first. Ensure that there is an ample amount of space between each salmon piece when placing them on the grill to make sure they are cooked evenly.

    Leave your salmon alone for 5 to 6 minutes and avoid poking, touching, or flipping them just yet. Let your Rogue® XT 625 SIB work its magic!

    When the salmon is about 60 percent cooked, flip it to let the other side cook. Use a stainless steel wide spatula to get underneath the fish and tongs to support it while you flip. If the salmon does not release easily from the cooking grids, leave it alone for another minute or two and try again. Cooking the other side will take less time.

    Salmon Cooking Temperature and Rest Time

    How long does it take to cook salmon on the barbeque?

    It is a general rule that it takes about 6 to 11 minutes to fully cook a piece of salmon on a properly preheated grill, like the Rogue® XT 625SIB. This is an excellent measure for a salmon that’s an inch-thick. If you have a thicker cut of salmon, fillet or steak, leave it on the grill for a couple of minutes longer. White, milky beads forming on the salmon’s surface mean that it’s nearly cooked through and should be watched carefully to ensure that it doesn’t dry out.

    There is nothing wrong with eyeballing the finished temperature of salmon – when it flakes easily, it’s pretty much there – it can take time to master the technique of grilling fish. To have consistently perfect salmon, invest in a digital barbecue thermometer, like the Napoleon ACCU-PROBE Bluetooth Digital thermometer, to ensure that your salmon is cooked perfectly each time. This would make you more in control of cooking time and an expert on whether your salmon is cooked according to your desired doneness by checking the appropriate internal temperature.

    120 degrees Fahrenheit for rare salmon.

    125 degrees Fahrenheit for medium-rare salmon.

    130 degrees Fahrenheit for medium salmon.

    135 degrees Fahrenheit for medium-well salmon.

    140 degrees Fahrenheit for well-done salmon.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    A digital barbecue thermometer will ensure that you can leave the lid closed on the grill while ensuring perfectly prepared salmon. Remember to allow the fish to rest for at least five minutes before serving. It does extend your wait for dinner but assures a more succulent meal in the end.

    Go crazy with your choice of sauces and sides for your grilled salmon. Rice, quinoa, and grilled vegetables are just some of the perfect pairings that make our mouths water but the choices are endless!

    Do you have advice on how to BBQ salmon? We’d love to hear any tips that you might have and how your salmon recipes turned out. Let us know on our social media pages, like Facebook and Instagram!

    Keep calm and get grilling.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Think grilling fish is beyond your skills? Psh – you can totally handle this! We include recipes for lots of different fish, but some of our grilling go-tos are tuna, salmon, halibut, salmon, and swordfish. Of course, shrimp is also a fantastic option!

    Looking for great grilled fish recipes? We’ve got them. Try out our amazing grilled fish dinners.

    The challenges when grilling fish are twofold. Your first intent is to sear the fish so that you achieve a crispy outside while ensuring that the fish will be cooked all the way through. The end goal? A nicely charred exterior that envelops the smooth and luscious texture of the fish. Fish such as tuna, salmon, halibut, and swordfish, whose texture is more like beef or pork, should be grilled directly on the grate. (More delicate fish, such as tilapia, sole, and flounder, sometimes fare better when grilled in a foil packet or grill basket.)

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    The challenges when grilling fish are twofold. Your first intent is to sear the fish so that you achieve a crispy outside while ensuring that the fish will be cooked all the way through. The end goal? A nicely charred exterior that envelops the smooth and luscious texture of the fish. Fish such as tuna, salmon, halibut, and swordfish, whose texture is more like beef or pork, should be grilled directly on the grate. (More delicate fish, such as tilapia, sole, and flounder, sometimes fare better when grilled in a foil packet or grill basket.)

    Your second challenge, and perhaps the trickiest, is figuring out how to keep the fish from sticking to the grill — every fish flipper’s nightmare. The solution is a well-prepped grill, dry product, and the proper level of grill heat, which is usually medium-high.

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    Your second challenge, and perhaps the trickiest, is figuring out how to keep the fish from sticking to the grill — every fish flipper’s nightmare.

    The solution is a well-prepped grill, dry product, and the proper level of grill heat, which is usually medium-high.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Wrap the fish in paper towels or a kitchen towel, to get rid of excess moisture, and place on a large plate in the fridge until your grill is ready. If the fish is wet, it will steam not sear.

    2. Turn the heat on the grill to high and get ready to prep the grill grate. You’ll want to ensure first and foremost that your grill grate is as clean as possible. As you’re heating up the grill, cover the grate loosely with aluminum foil. The intense heat will cause any debris to break down and dissolve. This also minimizes sticking. At its highest heat, this should only take about 10-15 minutes.

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    Turn the heat on the grill to high and get ready to prep the grill grate. You’ll want to ensure first and foremost that your grill grate is as clean as possible. As you’re heating up the grill, cover the grate loosely with aluminum foil. The intense heat will cause any debris to break down and dissolve. This also minimizes sticking. At its highest heat, this should only take about 10-15 minutes.

    3. Remove the aluminum foil from the grate. Using a stiff-wired grill brush, scrape the grate clean. Fold a couple of sheets of paper towel into a small square or pad. Grasping the paper towels with tongs, dip the paper towels in oil, then rub over the bars of the grate. Continue to wipe the grate with the oiled paper towels until the grate is somewhat glossy. Plan on doing this about 5 times. It’s a good idea to re-dip the paper towels in oil for each application.

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    Remove the aluminum foil from the grate. Using a stiff-wired grill brush, scrape the grate clean. Fold a couple of sheets of paper towel into a small square or pad. Grasping the paper towels with tongs, dip the paper towels in oil, then rub over the bars of the grate. Continue to wipe the grate with the oiled paper towels until the grate is somewhat glossy. Plan on doing this about 5 times. It’s a good idea to re-dip the paper towels in oil for each application.

    4. Remove the fish from the fridge and lightly brush both sides with oil. Season simply with coarse salt and cracked black peppercorns. Position the fish skin-side down diagonally on the grate. This not only creates those masterful grill marks you see in restaurants, it actually makes it easier to flip the fish because it’s on an angle.

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    Remove the fish from the fridge and lightly brush both sides with oil. Season simply with coarse salt and cracked black peppercorns. Position the fish skin-side down diagonally on the grate. This not only creates those masterful grill marks you see in restaurants, it actually makes it easier to flip the fish because it’s on an angle.

    5. Reduce the heat to medium, cover the grill, and let cook! Don’t try to move the fish until you see that the skin side has a nice sear and looks crisp. If you’re not sure when to check the fish to see this, try gently lifting with a fine-edged spatula after a few minutes. If it doesn’t lift off the grate easily, let it cook a bit longer and check at 20-second intervals until it does.

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    Reduce the heat to medium, cover the grill, and let cook! Don’t try to move the fish until you see that the skin side has a nice sear and looks crisp. If you’re not sure when to check the fish to see this, try gently lifting with a fine-edged spatula after a few minutes. If it doesn’t lift off the grate easily, let it cook a bit longer and check at 20-second intervals until it does.

    6. To flip the fish easily, here’s a great trick that not every Grill Master knows about. Using two fine-edged spatulas, lift the fish fillet underneath from both sides and flip the fish. Then cover and cook until the fish has reached desired doneness. If you don’t have two spatulas handy, simply try using a fork. You can work the fork tines between the grill bars and gently lift up the fillets, then turn over. When cooked properly, the meat will be firm to the touch, flake easily with a fork, and appear opaque all the way through.

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    To flip the fish easily, here’s a great trick that not every Grill Master knows about. Using two fine-edged spatulas, lift the fish fillet underneath from both sides and flip the fish. Then cover and cook until the fish has reached desired doneness. If you don’t have two spatulas handy, simply try using a fork. You can work the fork tines between the grill bars and gently lift up the fillets, then turn over. When cooked properly, the meat will be firm to the touch, flake easily with a fork, and appear opaque all the way through.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    One of the original smoked meats is, of course, fish! Humans have been smoking fish for hundreds of years and grilling fish for just as long. While most people use their pellet grills for brisket and ribs, your Z Grills grill will cook anything you like – from brisket and burgers to fish and sweetcorn, so it’s definitely worth experimenting with!

    If you’re ready to grill fish on your pellet grill, read on this definitive guide.

    Table of Contents

    Can You Grill Fish on a Pellet Grill?

    Of course! You can grill anything on a pellet grill, you just need the right knowledge and the right equipment. Because fish can be so different, it can take a little trial and error, and if you’re following a recipe, follow the cooking times that they recommend.

    You don’t need to use whole fish, either, whether you’re grilling or smoking. While grilling whole fish makes for fast preparation, don’t serve it to your faint of heart guests. Instead, opt for fish steaks or fillets for easy eating. If you’ve caught the fish fresh yourself, you’ll likely want to do your normal preparation, but if you want to buy prepared fish from the supermarket, go for it.

    All you need to prep your fish is rinse it off (unless it has been seasoned), remove excess moisture, remove any bones you can see (if necessary), and season.

    What Temperature Do You Cook Fish on a Pellet Grill?

    While this will vary depending on the fish you’re cooking and your recipe, but if you just want to grill your fish, turn up the heat. Set your pellet grill to a temperature of 350F and wait for it to reach temperature before you add your fish.

    If you want to smoke your fish, then smoking rules apply – set the temperature low, at about 225F, and allow your fish to cook for 1-3 hours until it reaches the desired texture.

    How Long to Grill Fish on a Pellet Grill?

    Again, this depends on what you’re cooking. Remember to go by the internal temperature of your food, so you’re looking for an internal temperature of at least 145 °F to ensure it’s safe to eat and cooked through. If you’re grilling your fish, this generally takes 10-15 minutes.

    If you’re smoking your fish, leave it to cook for 1.5-3 hours depending on your preferred texture and the size and type of your fish.

    How to Grill Fish on a Pellet Grill?

    Once you’ve chosen your fish and prepared it as desired, let it sit out for 15 minutes or so, so that it will reach room temperature. This will ensure the fish cooks evenly on the pellet grill.

    If you’re grilling small fish, we recommend using a grill plate or grill mat to prevent the fish from sticking to the grate or falling through, so place that on your grill if needed. Then, follow the following steps:

    1. Preheat your pellet grill to 350 °F.
    2. Add your fish once it reaches the right temperature.
    3. Close the lid, and allow it to cook for 2-4 minutes (2 minutes for fillets, 4 for steaks).
    4. Open the lid, flip your fish, and close the lid. Again, wait for 2-4 minutes.
    5. Use a temperature probe to check the internal temperature of your fish. It should be at least 145 °F.
    6. If it is at temperature, remove the fish from the pellet grill and serve. For best results, allow it to sit for 5 minutes before serving.

    If you’re grilling a large, whole fish, you can use the same process, you just may need to increase the cooking time to 5 minutes or longer for each side, depending on the size of the fish you’re cooking.

    As a general guide, you should allow 8-10 minutes of grill time total per inch depth of fish. So, if you’re cooking 1-inch tuna steaks, give them 4-5 minutes on each side. For a 2-inch steak, give it 8-10 minutes on each side.

    What Are the Best Fish to Grill on a Pellet Grill?

    You can experiment and try out different recipes and kinds of fish, but some of the most popular fish to grill on a pellet grill are:

    • Catfish
    • Halibut
    • Mackerel
    • Mahi-Mahi
    • Salmon
    • Snapper
    • Swordfish
    • Tuna

    What Fish Should I Avoid Grilling on a Pellet Grill?

    If you’re using a grill plate or grill mat to prevent your food from falling between the grates, then you can grill anything you like. However, if you don’t have those to hand, then try to avoid fish that become flaky, such as:

    • Flounder
    • Tilapia
    • Sole

    Regardless of what fish you choose to grill on your pellet grill, try not to flip it more than once. Fish is flaky by nature, and so a lot of handling can cause it to fall apart, even if you cook it correctly.

    What Are the Best Fish for Smoking?

    If you plan to smoke your fish, choose fish with more fat so it absorbs more of that smoky flavor. Some of the best fish for smoking are:

    • Mackerel
    • Mahi-Mahi
    • Salmon

    Don’t forget other forms of seafood, too, like oysters, crab, shrimp, and similar foods all produce incredible results when smoked.

    What Pellets Should I Use for Fish?

    Sticking with your normal wood pellets is a good place to start, and once you’ve tried that, experiment with apple, hickory pellets, or your favorite pellets. Generally, the lighter flavors are best, unless you like a heavy, smoky flavor.

    Grilling fish on your pellet smoker is a great way to put your pellet grill to work and expand your skills. We’ve got a wide range of seafood recipes for you to try on your pellet grill, so head over here next for inspiration!

    Chef Eric Gephart fires up the Kamado Joe Classic III Ceramic grill for a Simple Grilled White Fish that he describes as, “hands down, the best way to cook fish!” This simple technique combines searing, poaching and grilling and can be utilized on any number of different white fish!

    • 2 each (6-8oz) fillets Black Cod or similar white fish
    • 1 tbsp Plowboys BBQ Fin and Feather Seasoning

    Poaching Liquid (amounts will vary depending on size of cooking pan. Liquid should come 1/4 of the way up the fish):

    • 1/4 cup white wine
    • 1/2 cup water
    • 1 each lemon, juiced
    • 1/2 cup white wine
    • 3 tbsp heavy cream
    • 1 tbsp unsalted butter, room temperature

    Stabilize your Kamado Joe Classic III Ceramic Grill at 500ºF. Place your searing surface on the grill and allow it to come to temperature. Today I have chosen a Kamado Joe Soap Stone and I love this accessory for searing and cooking fish.

    Season the fish with Plowboys BBQ Fin and Feather Seasoning and slightly oil your cooking surface. Drag the seasoned fillet over the surface, if it sticks the surface is not ready for searing. IF the fillet glides over the surface without sticking, place it presentation side down and season the other side of the fish. Cook for roughly 90 seconds.

    While the fish is searing, combine the water, wine and lemon juice in a shallow grill safe pan and place the pan on the indirect side of the grill.

    Once you like the golden caramelization of the seared side, gently flip it into the poaching liquid with the sear side up. (The liquid should come 1/4 of the way up the sides of the fish. Ensure the fillet is not submerged.) Close the dome and allow the fish to cook until it comes to an internal temp of 145ºF.

    Using a slotted spatula, remove the fish from the pan and transfer it to the presentation plate.

    Examine the liquid left in the pan. If it is mostly reduced and evaporated, add a touch more white wine. Stir the liquid mixture to ensure you get the fond off the bottom of the pan and add the heavy cream. Move the pan to the soap stone and allow to reduce and slighly thicken. Take the pan off the heat and mount in the butter using a whisk. Pour the sauce over the fish and enjoy!

    It’s an undeniable fact that Sea Bream is one of the tastiest fish! Especially when grilled. For many people (including me) it even beats a Sea bass in flavor.

    How to cook fish on a barbecueGrilled Sea Bream With Lemon & Oregano

    What Does Sea Bream Fish Taste Like.

    It’s a fatty fish, with a taste similar to that of a Sea Bass. But even more flavorful. Its flesh is white and very light in texture, unlike tuna or salmon that have a more dense texture.

    Best Way To Cook A Sea Bream

    If you have never yet tasted a grilled Sea Bream you don’t know what you’re missing. Seriously! The best way is to grill this fish on a charcoal bbq. Because it adds so many aromas to the fish, that it’s going to be one of the best things you’ll ever taste!

    I can say this for a fact since whenever we serve this fish at our restaurant cooked this way, everyone loves it. Not that cooking it on a gas grill is not good enough (we do serve it this way also). But grilling it on charcoal is just top of the top. So keep this in mind for you next bbq, if you own a charcoal grill or even a fireplace. I don’t know if people actually do this in other countries, but grilling on the fireplace is a very common Greek thing. I mean if you do have a wood fire lit, then why not take advantage of it? By placing a grilling basket and grilling some Souvlaki for example? It’s a pity wasting all the coal from the burned woods.

    Right way to grill on the fireplace (advice especially for men): Place a big piece of aluminum foil to cover the surface of the fireplace you’re going to grill on, before creating a greasy mess!

    By the way, did you know that the best way to clean a greasy grill is by using ashes? Yes, you’ll be amazed at how easily burned grease is removed by using ash. Just dip a grill brush in the ashes and brush the grill with it (without adding water).

    How to cook fish on a barbecueWhole, Fresh Grilled Sea Bream Fish

    Preparing A Whole Sea Bream For Grilling

    I’ve been meaning to write a guide on how to clean a fresh fish but until I do, you can see how to clean and gut a fresh fish in this video given below. (skip to 3:40 to see how it’s cleaned, unless you also want to know how to check if your fish is fresh).

    Two things I do differently from the cook in the video are 1). I use a fish scaler. It’s much easier and quicker this way. And 2). I make only one incision right in the center of the fish (lengthwise), following the main bone. Because this is the thicker part of the fish, that takes the most time to cook and is more difficult to season. So making the incision there, you season the fish properly and help the heat reach all the way through to the bone.

    How To Grill A Sea Bream

    To prepare the Sea Bream for grilling, first tap dry with a paper towel. Leaving water on the fish will make its skin stick to the surface of the grill.

    Secondly, rub plenty of olive oil all over the fish with your hands or a pastry brush. Season with plenty of kosher salt adding some in its belly, in the incision, and inside the head. Keep in mind that fish needs more salt than meat does.

    Heat your grilling surface very well (IMPORTANT). Whether you use a charcoal grill, a gas grill, or a grill pan, it’s really important to heat well before adding the fish. Otherwise, the skin will stick on it, leaving the flesh free to dry and fall apart.

    So start over high heat until the skin gets cooked. Takes 5-6 minutes on charcoal and gas grill, 2-3 minutes on a grill pan. Then flip the fish to cook the skin on the other side as well for the same amount of time. It’s easier to do this using a grill basket since you don’t have to flip the fish itself. But if you use a gas grill or grill pan then use flat tongs to turn the fish and grab it from its head. This way you won’t destroy its delicate skin.

    NOTE: When grilling on charcoal and gas grill the fire will get stronger once you add the fish. That’s because like I said, its a very fatty fish and until most of the fat drains from it, you’ll have to pay attention to keep the flames in check so they won’t blacken the fish. To do this we use a plastic squeeze bottle filled with water (in some grill houses they use lemon juice) to put off the fire here and there when needed.

    After the skin is cooked on both sides, you may drop the temperature to medium-low. Overall cooking time for a charcoal grill is 10-15 minutes, on a gas grill is about 15 minutes, and on a stovetop grill pan is 10 to 12 minutes.

    How to cook fish on a barbecueFresh Grilled Sea Bream Served On Lettuce Leaves

    How To Check If A Grilled Fish Is Cooked

    To see if your Grilled Sea Bream is done, grab hold of the fish from its head and hold it to face down. If water has stopped coming out from its mouth completely, then the fish is done. Another way is to take a peek inside the incision you made right where the center bone is located, by pressing the incision to open slightly using your tongs.

    And if for whatever reason you took the fish off the grill too quickly, and is still a little pink in the center, then microwave for about 1 minute uncovered.

    “Must-Adds” When Serving Grilled Sea Bream

    To a Greek, it is almost sinful not to serve a grilled fish or meat drizzled with Ladolemono and oregano. Ladolemono is a lemon and olive oil dressing that’s poured over grilled fish and meat right as they come off the heat (it’s absorbed while the food is still hot). Just mix together 1 part freshly squeezed lemon juice with two parts extra virgin olive oil and pour a generous amount of it all over.

    And on top of this, plentiful of dried Greek oregano is added. If you want to try the real thing, try this Greek oregano in batches!

    If you love having backyard barbeques with friends and family, then a meal of grilled salmon should be on your list. It’s healthy, nutritious, versatile, and super easy to make!

    In this article, we’ll cover everything you need to know about cooking salmon on your Napoleon grill. From the best salmon cuts for grilling, the most creative ways to season your fish, how to get an accurate salmon cooking temperature, to why you should leave the salmon skin on, and more!

    Tips for Salmon Shopping

    For delicious results, we highly recommend using steak and fillet cuts for cooking salmon on the grill. Make sure the salmon skin is still on because this effectively prevents the fish from crumbling to pieces or from sticking on the grill. It’s not impossible to grill skinless salmon but it is definitely going to take a lot of hard work to keep the fish from falling to pieces, which becomes more challenging when it’s time to flip.

    Additionally, when you’re learning how to BBQ salmon, buying your fish from sustainable sources will be kinder for the environment. Ask your fishmonger for in-season and wild-caught options. There are always several varieties of salmon available either fresh or frozen at your local farmer’s market or grocery store.

    Choose from the following types of salmon:

    King Salmon (Chinook): high in fat, rich flavor, and big fish.

    Sockeye Salmon (Red): vibrant red color, outstanding flavour, low in fat, leaner meat.

    Chum Salmon (Dog/Keta/Silverbrite): smaller in size, lower in fat content, slightly paler flesh.

    Steelhead Salmon: pinkish to orange flesh color, affordable option.

    Atlantic Salmon: mild in flavor, cheap, farmed.

    Contrary to popular belief, the flesh color is not a reliable indicator of your salmon’s nutritional value since this is essentially dictated by variety. A far better metric of salmon quality would be meat appearance and smell. Choose cuts of salmon that are glossy and firm to the touch. Do not accept salmon with brown spots or holes. Despite being fishy, there should also be no sour or foul odor from your meat.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to Season Your Salmon

    The great thing about BBQ salmon is that it’s going to taste amazing even with a simple seasoning of salt and pepper. But, if you want to be more creative with your flavorings, you can also try the following savory seasoning combinations that are sure to make your mouth water.

    Lemon Salmon: lemon, kosher salt, pepper, butter.

    Cilantro Lime Salmon: chopped cilantro, lime, kosher salt, pepper, honey, chopped cloves.

    Spicy Sriracha-Glazed Salmon: sriracha, lemon juice, honey.

    Soy-Glazed Salmon: soy sauce, honey, mustard, and lemon juice.

    Salmon with Homemade Barbecue Sauce: lemon, garlic, brown sugar, soy sauce, water, and olive oil.

    How to Grill Salmon Like a Pro

    Now that you’ve selected the perfect cut of salmon and seasoned it, it’s time to heat up the grill! The best method to barbecue salmon can be broken down into a few simple steps:

    Preheat your grill to medium to high temperature around 400 ℉ /205 ℃.

    Season the salmon thoroughly and oil the cooking grids. Be sure to fully preheat the grill to prevent sticking.

    Put the skinless side of your salmon fillet first to get beautiful grill marks. On the other hand, if you prefer crunchy and crispy salmon skin, you can do that side first. Ensure that there is an ample amount of space between each salmon piece when placing them on the grill to make sure they are cooked evenly.

    Leave your salmon alone for 5 to 6 minutes and avoid poking, touching, or flipping them just yet. Let your Rogue® XT 625 SIB work its magic!

    When the salmon is about 60 percent cooked, flip it to let the other side cook. Use a stainless steel wide spatula to get underneath the fish and tongs to support it while you flip. If the salmon does not release easily from the cooking grids, leave it alone for another minute or two and try again. Cooking the other side will take less time.

    Salmon Cooking Temperature and Rest Time

    How long does it take to cook salmon on the barbeque?

    It is a general rule that it takes about 6 to 11 minutes to fully cook a piece of salmon on a properly preheated grill, like the Rogue® XT 625SIB. This is an excellent measure for a salmon that’s an inch-thick. If you have a thicker cut of salmon, fillet or steak, leave it on the grill for a couple of minutes longer. White, milky beads forming on the salmon’s surface mean that it’s nearly cooked through and should be watched carefully to ensure that it doesn’t dry out.

    There is nothing wrong with eyeballing the finished temperature of salmon – when it flakes easily, it’s pretty much there – it can take time to master the technique of grilling fish. To have consistently perfect salmon, invest in a digital barbecue thermometer, like the Napoleon ACCU-PROBE Bluetooth Digital thermometer, to ensure that your salmon is cooked perfectly each time. This would make you more in control of cooking time and an expert on whether your salmon is cooked according to your desired doneness by checking the appropriate internal temperature.

    120 degrees Fahrenheit for rare salmon.

    125 degrees Fahrenheit for medium-rare salmon.

    130 degrees Fahrenheit for medium salmon.

    135 degrees Fahrenheit for medium-well salmon.

    140 degrees Fahrenheit for well-done salmon.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    A digital barbecue thermometer will ensure that you can leave the lid closed on the grill while ensuring perfectly prepared salmon. Remember to allow the fish to rest for at least five minutes before serving. It does extend your wait for dinner but assures a more succulent meal in the end.

    Go crazy with your choice of sauces and sides for your grilled salmon. Rice, quinoa, and grilled vegetables are just some of the perfect pairings that make our mouths water but the choices are endless!

    Do you have advice on how to BBQ salmon? We’d love to hear any tips that you might have and how your salmon recipes turned out. Let us know on our social media pages, like Facebook and Instagram!

    With irresistible smoky flavor, grilled fish is a delish addition to barbecues. Sometimes we need a break from brats, burgers, and steaks. When you know how to cook fish on the grill in a grill basket, directly on the grate, or in a foil pack, you can enjoy your favorite seafood all grilling season. We’ll cover that plus share handy grilling charts for both direct-grilling and indirect-grilling processes that tell you how long to grill fish so the cooking process is even easier. You don’t need a recipe (though we’ve got plenty of recipes for you as well)—just follow our instructions with your favorite fillet.

    Prep Your Fish for the Grill

    Before you fire up the grill, make sure your fish are prepped. Thaw your seafood if it’s frozen; rinse fish only if it’s necessary to get rid of a few lingering scales. To get the best grill marks, pat your fish and seafood dry with a paper towel, then season as desired. If you’re cooking fish fillets, place them in a well-greased grill basket. To grill whole fish or fish steaks, grease your grill rack and grill directly on the grates. For small seafood pieces like shrimp and scallops, the best way to grill is on skewers. Thread scallops or shrimp onto skewers, leaving a ¼-inch space between each piece.

    Direct-Grilling Fish

    When using the direct grilling method, you place your fish or seafood directly over the heat source and grill with the lid closed. This method works best for foods that grill in 30 minutes or less. Most fish and seafood cook quickly, so direct grilling is most common. Since your fish will be directly over the heat source, flip it halfway through to guarantee even cooking.

    For a charcoal or a gas grill, grill fish and seafood, covered, over medium heat. To determine how long to grill fish, use our direct-grilling fish chart, turning once halfway through. You can also tell that fish is done if it flakes easily. Seafood should look opaque. For a little extra flavor, you can brush your fish with vegetable oil or melted butter after turning.

    Indirect-Grilling Fish

    To indirectly grill fish or seafood, position food on the grill rack with a drip pan underneath, with the heat source to the side and the cover on. This method is meant to work like an oven with the heat circulating around your food, so turning isn’t necessary. Usually, you’ll use indirect grilling for larger foods like a whole fish or large roasts, but we’ve included times for fish fillets, scallops, and shrimp in our indirect-grilling fish chart.

    First, prepare your grill for indirect cooking. For a gas grill, follow the manufacturer’s instructions for indirect grilling. For a charcoal grill, use long-handled tongs to arrange coals around the edge of the grill bottom (or to one side). Place a disposable foil drip pan in the middle (or on the other side). Place your fish or seafood over the drip pan. Grill, covered, over indirect medium heat. To know how long to grill fish indirectly, follow the time listed on our indirect-grilling fish chart. If you want, you can turn the fish halfway through cooking and brush it with vegetable oil or melted butter (but it’s not a required step).

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    The American Heart Association recommends you aim for two servings of fish a week for better health. Grilling fish in foil with lemon is an easy and delicious way to add more of the nutritious protein to your diet.

    Video of the Day

    The Benefits of Fish

    Fish is an excellent source of protein, being also low in calories and considered a very healthy addition to your diet. The American Heart Association recommends weekly consumption of fish, especially fatty fish such as salmon or albacore tuna, because it’s an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids. This essential fat is linked to a lower risk of heart disease, is important for brain health and may even protect you from dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

    According to the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS), most Americans get their omega-3 fatty acids from non-fish sources, such as nuts, seeds and oils. However, all the known health benefits are based on studies of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish.

    Fish are also a natural source of vitamin D. This essential fat-soluble vitamin is found in very few foods, and most Americans don’t get enough of the vitamin from the food they eat, according to ODS.

    You need adequate amounts of vitamin D to keep your bones healthy and strong. It’s also needed for immune health, neuromuscular function and reducing inflammation. While your body can make vitamin D through sun exposure, the sun carries its own health risks (skin cancer), and depending on where you live, it may not be possible for you to get the sun exposure you need due to inclement weather.

    Grilling Fish in Foil

    Despite the many benefits fish offers, fewer than one-third of Americans eat seafood weekly, and most only eat it on occasion, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. While taste preferences are certainly a factor when it comes to fish consumption in the U.S., many people don’t include fish in their diet because they don’t know how to prepare it.

    Grilling fish in foil seasoned with a little lemon is so easy that even the most inexperienced cook can make it into a tasty meal. The keys are to make sure your fish portions are consistent (for even cooking) and your grill is preheated.

    For example, for flounder in foil on a grill, you want to start by preheating your grill to medium-high heat. Then, assemble your fish by placing a 6-ounce portion of flounder onto a large square of foil. Season with salt and pepper, add a drizzle of olive oil and cover your fish with two to three slices of fresh lemon. Fold the foil to create a packet that keeps the flavor and juices inside.

    Cook your flounder in foil on grill for 10 to 12 minutes or until the fish is cooked through. Then let your packets rest for 5 minutes before serving.

    Fish Foil Packets

    Once you’ve mastered grilling fish in foil with lemon, it’s time to begin experimenting with flavors and creating your own healthy fish foil packets.

    Consider BBQ fish in foil topped with red onions, red peppers and corn. Season with a little paprika, cayenne pepper, salt and pepper, and then drizzle with olive oil. Grill over medium-high heat until your fish is cooked through.

    You can even make your fish foil packets in a 450-degree Fahrenheit preheated oven. Try baked fish in foil with potatoes and sliced leeks, seasoned with rosemary and thyme. Cook your fish foil packet in the oven for 12 to 15 minutes, or until the fish is cooked through. Be sure to let the fish rest for 5 minutes before serving. Because fish cooks quickly, your potatoes need to be precooked and cut in small pieces, suggest the experts at the Food Network.

    A fish and rice foil packet can also make a tasty and complete dinner. Just add some julienned carrots, salt and pepper and a drizzle of oil. Like potatoes, your rice should be precooked before assembling your fish packet.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Monkfish is sometimes hailed as “the poor man’s lobster,” which might not sound like much of a recommendation at first glance. However, the nickname is an apt one given that both monkfish and lobster both have a subtly sweet flavor—and the fact that monkfish is usually available at a fraction of the cost.

    If you’ve never tried monkfish before, don’t be put off by the creature’s decidedly hideous appearance. While it’s widely regarded as one of the ugliest fish in the sea, the taste of the flesh more than makes up for its lack of aesthetic value. Besides, you’ll be able to remove the head before you eat it—that is, if this step hasn’t already been taken care of in advance (see Ingredients, below).

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Here, we’ve provided our favorite recipe for grilled monkfish. The mild, lean flesh pairs especially well with the brightness of lemon, with the anise undertones of the dill providing a warm counterbalance. We recommend serving this dish with grilled asparagus and jasmine rice.

    Tips On How To Grill Monkfish

    • Be sure to buy the freshest fish available. The flesh should be firm, with no noticeable fishy odor.
    • Monkfish can sometimes give off a milky fluid when it’s cooked, which could cause flare-ups on the grill. Marinating the fish will help to alleviate this problem. Alternatively, you can thoroughly salt the flesh or soak it in brine for up to one hour before cooking.
    • The flesh is a natural partner for the grill because it doesn’t flake or fall apart easily. It can even be cubed and skewered for kebabs.
    • To check whether the monkfish is fully cooked, carefully slide a sharp paring knife into the thickest portion of the fillet. If the blade is hot to the touch when it comes out, the fish is ready to come off the grill. You can also press lightly on the top of the fillet—it should be firm and slightly springy beneath your fingers.
    • Always allow the cooked fish to rest for at least five minutes before serving.

    Grilled Monkfish with Lemon and Dill

    Ingredients

    • 2 pounds monkfish fillets, cleaned*
    • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
    • 2 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped and divided
    • 1 clove garlic, smashed
    • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • Lemon wedges, for serving

    *Be sure to remove the membranes from the monkfish fillets before you start to cook. If you’d prefer, you can start with a whole monkfish and do the filleting yourself. This should provide you with plenty of leftovers to freeze for later use. Take a look at this video tutorial for a visual guide on how to skin and fillet a monkfish.

    Directions

    1. In a medium nonreactive bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, garlic, salt, pepper, and 1 tablespoon dill. Slowly whisk in the olive oil in a steady stream until the mixture is well-blended.

    2. Place the fish in a wide, shallow container. Pour the marinade over the fillets and turn them once to ensure that they’re fully coated.

    3. Marinate the fish in the refrigerator for two hours, turning the fillets over after the first hour. It’s important not to leave it in the marinade for too long, or the fish will be have an unpleasantly mushy texture when it’s cooked.

    4. Remove the monkfish from the marinade and allow the excess to drip off. Sprinkle the fillets with most of the remaining dill, reserving about 1 teaspoon for garnish.

    5. Prepare a medium fire in a charcoal grill, or preheat a gas grill to medium-high. If you opt to use a pellet grill, the temperature should be set at about 400 degrees.

    6. Grill the fillets, turning once and basting occasionally with the marinade, for about 10-12 minutes total. Be careful not to overcook it—because monkfish is so lean, the flesh dries out easily.

    7. Remove the fish from the heat and arrange on a serving platter. Let rest for 5 minutes while you assemble the side dishes.

    8. Garnish the monkfish fillets with the remainder of the fresh dill and serve with lemon slices.

    And there you have it—the ideal recipe for grilled monkfish with lemon and dill. Enjoy!

    Use an extra-sharp knife–you want sashimi cuts not mangled flesh. Cover the fish with a sheet of foil and fold in the sides to enclose.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue
    Grill Baskets For Fish Veg On Your Bbq Grill Cooking Bbq Fish Grilling Recipes

    Slice at an angle all the way to the bone repeating every 1 12.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to cook whole fish on weber bbq. Only flip your fish once. Rub fish over with green curry paste brown sugar Fish sauce lime slices Kaffer leaves Basil a can of coconut cream and what ever other touches you like. How to cook fish on the BBQ First up never place your fish over a searing high heat.

    The general rule is ten minutes per inch of thickness. Only turn the fish over when. Drizzle both sides of the fish with oil and season with pepper.

    Grilling may be one of our favorite ways to cook a whole fishthe intense direct heat does wonders for the skin crisping it up while the fish below impart. The cuts help distribute heat so the fish cooks evenly. If youre being extra scrupulous a meat thermometer should read 63C at the thickest part.

    Three more foil layers on top and seal. Remove from the bbq and carefully unwrap. The flesh should have turned from translucent to opaque and should easily flake.

    Remember this cooking-fish-whole thing is pretty forgiving. Doing so provides even cooking to both sides. For a one pound fish grill for approximately 15 minutes flipping the fish over every 5 minutes or so.

    I get some freshly caught snapper and prepare it from scratch. Cook for about 10 minutes per side on a 20-inch fish. Barbecued fish needs to be cooked on a medium-hot part of the.

    Place the fish on the BBQ grill for 10 minutes and turn over and cook for a further 8 minutes on the other side. Bake on moderate Indirect for 30-40 minutes. Test the fish is cooked using a fork seeing if it flakes apart easily.

    Dont worry you can see the flesh peaking out from under the skin. Carefully lift the fish with two spatulas or one long one and gently flip it over. If youre grilling fillets rather than a whole fish start off cooking skin-side down.

    The fish is done when the flesh begins to flake. Alternatively take a knife and check in the fattest fleshiest part of the fish. This is an easy to follow video showing you how to grill a whole fish on the BBQ.

    Gently pull back the skin. Also when you push down on the skin the cooked flesh should feel squishy. Score and place fish on foil.

    Wrapping a whole fish in. Then brush both sides of the fish fillets with oil and place them skin-side down on the grill. To cook fish on a barbecue start by oiling the grill grate and preheating the barbecue to high heat.

    If you have done everything correctly you will get little or no skin sticking to the grill.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue
    Recipe For Red Snapper Filets Grilled On A Weber Grill And Served With A Cajun Cream Sauce Over Grilled A Snapper Recipes Grilled Red Snapper Cajun Cream Sauce

    How to cook fish on a barbecue
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    How to cook fish on a barbecue
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    This rustic approach actually protects the delicate meat during cooking for a juicier result.

    There’s a general rule in barbecue and grilling that the thicker the protein, the easier it is to cook. Or perhaps that should be phrased as, the lower your chances of messing it up. It’s MUCH easier to cook a 2″ thick steak perfectly than it is to nail a thin cut one. The same logic applies to seafood. Big shrimp are going to grill better than teeny ones. And of course, whole fish is going to grill better than thin filets.

    As a bonus, keeping the fish gutted but whole allows you to both crisp the skin up, and introduce aromatic herbs and citrus by stuffing the cavity. And you still end up with that phenomenal grilled flavor. My favorite way to devour the finished product is to serve it up on a platter and stand around with some cold beers. Don’t be shy, just dig in! And don’t forget to eat that amazing cheek meat, too.

    The real secret to grilling whole fish:

    Honestly, the secret hero of grilling whole fish (aside from starting with a lovely raw product) is spray oil. Lots of spray oil. There are other methods that involve special tools or very specific steps that may or may not work, but this is the most foolproof one I have come across. The biggest peril of grilling fish is having it cling to the grill, and tearing the delicate flesh. Lubricating with plenty of oil lessens that risk. Significantly. I coat the fish in olive oil to start, then spray both the side of fish AND the section of grill grate I am about to flip on to. And I don’t just do it once – but every time I plan on moving or flipping the fish.

    Obviously, you will need to exercise a little caution when spraying pressurized oil near charcoal! If you’ve not done it before, it’s pretty much the same as spraying any aerosol directly in front of a lighter – you will get massive (although brief) flame flareups. So just use caution, short burst of spray, and keep your eyebrows removed from the action.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Set up two zone grilling for whole fish:

    Your grill will need to be set up with two distinct zones for cooking – hot and cold. You can create this on both a charcoal and gas grill, but honestly, please cook over charcoal. Your food and tastebuds deserve it and it’s NOT difficult at all. Basically, the idea of a two zone grill is to only have the heat on one side. You start by using the hot side to sear the fish, then move it to the cool side to finish cooking without burning the skin. You can read more about how to set up your grill for two zone cooking here.

    Best type of fish for grilling whole:

    My absolutely favourite fish to grill whole is Red Snapper. It’s a great size for grilling and has a clean, fresh taste without being “fishy”. The pinkish hue of the skin is also more appetizing for many folks than grey skinned fish. You can also use Dorade or Bronzini, too. I source my fish from Fulton Fish Market – it’s shipped fresh from New York and is premium quality. If you want to try some of their stuff, you can hit their website and use code JESSP at checkout to get 15% off any new order over $175 (excludes their bundles).

    How you know when the fish is ready:

    The best way to grill this fish is to get a great sear and color to start, then allow it to finish cooking gently until done. To tell when your fish is ready, you can use two indicators. First, keep an eye on the inside of the cavity, particularly at the thickest part. Since the fish is gutted, you will be able to visually see when the flesh turns from transluscent to a more opaque shade of doneness. To be completely sure, you can use a fast reading thermometer. When the fish reads 140f at the thickest part, it’s done.

    Ingredients1.8kg to 2 kg whole snapper, scaled and guttered
    1 lime thinly sliced
    2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
    Mint leaves, chopped spring onion and lime wedges to serve

    Ingredients for dressing
    4 garlic cloves, chopped
    5cm piece of ginger, peeled & thinly sliced
    3 long red chillies, sliced
    1 /4 cup caster sugar
    1 / 3 cup fish sauce
    2 limes, juiced

    Method
    Pre heat the bbq grill on a medium heat. Rinse the belly cavity of the fish and clean any blood from the back bone area, as this can make the fish have a bitter taste. Dry it with some paper towelling. Score the fish every 2.5cm intervals on both sides of the thickest part of the snapper’s body to help it cook evenly.

    Place 3 sheets of foil on the bench that you are working from. Place the snapper in the middle and arrange the lime slices in the belly cavity.

    Drizzle both sides of the fish with oil and season with pepper. Cover the fish with a sheet of foil and fold in the sides to enclose.

    Place the fish on the BBQ grill for 10 minutes, and turn over and cook for a further 8 minutes on the other side. Remove from the bbq and carefully unwrap. Test the fish is cooked using a fork, seeing if it flakes apart easily.

    Place on a platter and let it sit for 4 or 5 minutes.

    For the dressing, place the ginger, garlic and chillies into a food processor and turn it into a paste. Transfer it to a saucepan.

    Add the sugar, fish sauce, 100ml lime juice and 2 tbsp of cold water. Bring to the boil and reduce it to a medium heat and allow it to simmer and reduce to become thick. Set aside and allow it to cool.

    With your snapper on the serving platter, pour over the dressing. Garnish with mint and spring onions, and serve with lime wedges.

    Best Wine Match for BBQ Snapper?

    If you’re looking for a great wine to match your BBQ whole snapper consider a Semillion from the Hunter Valley. We’d recommend the 2009 Semillion from 201 Estates as a great choice. Although Semillon is very much the overlooked white varietal in mainstream drinking circles, it is in fact the perfect match with any kind of grilled seafood in general and barbecued prawns in particular.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Unlikely Sauvignon Blanc (which has strong aromas that often overpower seafood), Semillon is only lightly aromatic and therefore lets the flavour of the food show through. Whilst some wooded Chardonnays are prefect for creamy seafood dishes, they are often too heavy for grilled seafood and again the flavour of the food is lost. On the other hand, Semillon is never oaked, it is light and crisp and has a slightly citrus flavour which complements the typical drizzle of lemon over any kind of grilled seafood.

    To order online or for stockists of the 201 Estates Semillion 2009 visit thier website.

    Win gourmet BBQ Pack from Wiltshire

    No gourmet bbq is complete without the right tools, and some of the best come from Wilthire Bar B. If you missed out on our great Wiltshire father’s day giveaway don’t dispair as we have two prize sets of some of the latest in BBQ gadgets from Wiltshire Bar.B – to help turn your BBQ into a gourmet experience!

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Perhaps the most exciting item is the Wiltshire Bar.B Pizza Stone Set, which enables traditional stone baked pizzas to be made on the BBQ! The set includes a pizza stone, serving rack and pizza cutter. Then there’s the Wiltshire Bar.B Mini Meat Thermometers that help you to produce your steak to rare, medium or well done.

    Also included is non-stick BBQ Basket which is the simplest and cleanest way to barbeque sliced vegies, prawns and those smaller items – it keeps them all together while you stir & cook and a set of the BBQ Egg Rings with handles. All these new products are available from Bunnings, if you miss out on our prize.

    Each prize set is valued at $79.95. Simply enter your name and email below before Midnight October 5 to go in the draw.

    * we take your privacy seriously. We will not spam you or sell your details.

    Learning how to grill fish in a grilling basket is easy breezy. Everyone wants to grill like a boss, but there’s no shame in using helpful tools like grilling baskets. You can grill and flip your food — from bulky burgers to delicate vegetables — without the worry of them sticking to the grate and falling apart. With that said, these hinged baskets are a total godsend when it comes to grilling your fish. Because the fillets don’t make direct contact with the grill, there’s no chance of them sticking. And because you get an easy and secure flip every time, your fillets won’t fall apart. These baskets are also fabulous for grilling and flipping seafood skewers.

    What you’ll need

    • Cooking oil
    • A few paper towels
    • Stainless Steel BBQ Grilling Basket

    To prepare

    Pre-heat your grill to high heat.

    Set your fish out on the counter for about 15 minutes so it can come to room temperature; this allows an even cook outside and within.

    In the meantime, grease up your grill basket by dabbing a paper towel in some cooking oil and wiping it all over the inside of the basket. Do this about three times. The purpose of using the grill basket is to keep your fish from sticking to the grates of the grill, but it can stick to the basket if you don’t grease it thoroughly, so let’s not defeat the purpose of our method 😉

    Before setting your fillets into the grill basket, pat them down with a paper towel. This keeps your fish from getting tough and mushy while it’s cooking; season them however you want them to be seasoned.

    Now let’s get these bad boys on the grill!

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Place the basket over the grill. You want to grill the fish for 10 minutes per inch, flipping halfway through. If your fillet is on the thinner side like these ones, measuring at approx. 1/4 inch thick at their thickest point, grill for approx. 2.5 – 3 minutes a side.

    As always, you want to cook the fish until it’s opaque and reaches an internal temperature of 140-145 degrees F.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Welcome!

    Hi! I’m Dana. Welcome to my food-centric space on the Internet where I share (mostly) wholesome, sustainable, and approachable recipes for home cooks that want to eat smart(er).

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    For most of history an open fire was the only way to cook and across the world people still gather around a fire to cook and mingle. For Chef Lennox Hastie, whose Firedoor restaurant in Surry Hills cooks everything over fire, the simplicity of cooking this way is a way of life.

    “It’s all about the experience,” Lennox tells Maeve O’Meara in this week’s episode of Food Safari Water. “About immersing yourself in that moment and enjoying it, you know? Fire’s what brings us all together.”

    Lennox cooks a grilled flathead with broccolini and chilli over an open fire on the beach, but a wood barbecue is just one way to master fire cooking. Here’s how cultures around the world make fire-cooked fish and seafood a hot experience.

    “[It’s] about immersing yourself in that moment and enjoying it, you know? Fire’s what brings us all together.”

    Sea bass grilled in banana leaves

    Protected by banana leaves

    Banana leaves have been used for centuries in Asian cooking and can be found fresh in most Asian food stores. They protect delicate food from fire and provide a parcel to gently steam seafood. Lay a banana leaf down on a barbecue before grilling fish. The leaf adds a smoky, sweet flavour to the fish and prevents it from sticking to the barbecue plate or grill.

    “When I cook seafood, I want to see the fire is like lava of the volcano.”

    To cook fish over fire, place firm-fleshed fish like flathead, ling, leather jacket or whiting on top of a banana leaf and add seasonings like fresh herbs, garlic or ginger. Wrap the leaf around and secure with string or foil.

    Chef Ben Nguyen’s tip for cooking seafood this way is to make sure you keep the heat down.

    “You don’t want [intense heat] to cook seafood, so you have to break it up,” says Nguyen. “When I cook seafood, I want to see the fire is like lava of the volcano.”

    Whole barramundi in banana leaves
    Source: Peter Kuruvita

    Charcoal grilling

    In Portugal, charcoal grills are fired up to cook sardines, grilled whole and seasoned with a little lemon. The sardines are heavily salted to provide a barrier between the unoiled, extra-hot grill and the fish, preventing sticking. The salt draws the moisture from the fish to crisp up the skin and develops a nice char that enhances the flavour of the fish.

    At a party or in a restaurant, a binchōtan box might sit in the centre of the table so everyone can grill their own fish.

    In Mexico’s Yucatan whole fish is rubbed with spices like cayenne pepper, coriander seed, achiote seeds and pepper then cooked in an “open” space on the grill, where the charcoal is adjacent, but not underneath the cooking area. Fish cooked like this often forms the basis of a dish like pescado zarandeado.

    In Mexico, marinated, grilled fish stars in pescado zarandeado – fish tacos.
    Source: Toufic Charabati

    The Japanese use a type of charcoal known as binchōtan, made from oak and almost 100% carbon. Binchōtan imparts a clean smoked flavour to food and is perfect for enhancing, not overpowering, the delicate taste of mild fish varieties. At a party or in a restaurant, a binchōtan box might sit in the centre of the table so everyone can grill their own fish. Robatayaki is another form of Japanese charcoal cooking, using a wide, flat open fireplace.

    Tandoor flamed, baked, steamed and smoked

    A tandoor is a cylindrical clay oven with a charcoal fire lit within for hours at a time. This method of cooking exposes food to intense heat in many forms: fire, radiant heat, convection cooking and smoking. Varying types of tandoor are found in regions around the world, including in India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Armenia (where it is known as a tonir), and Azerbaijan (tandir). In India, Tandoori prawns are a particular favourite, the intense heat of the tandoor cooks the prawns quickly and keeps all the juices intact.

    Tandoor cooking exposes food to intense heat in many forms: fire, radiant heat, convection cooking and smoking.

    It’s difficult to reproduce the true flavour of a tandoor at home (unless you have your own tandoor, of course), however, oven cooking followed by a chargrill can bring out a similar flavour.

    Wood fire not just for pizza

    Fish cooks lightning fast in a wood-fired oven, retaining its fresh flavour and colour. In Italy, whole fish is roasted standing up in a heavy cast-iron pan surrounded by vegetables, or baked Sicilian-style, slathered in a thick sauce.

    In Croatia, coals are heaped on top of a traditional one-pot dish with a domed lid (peka) to intensify the heat and flavour, as in this octopus peka recipe.

    The fireplace is the heart of the home in Croatia and the traditional one-pot dish (the peka) takes pride of place.
    Source: Kaily Koutsogiannis

    The Greeks are famous for their wood fired, slow-roasted lamb dishes, but fish baked whole in the wood-fired oven is also common throughout this coastal nation. Fish is often marinated in lemon and spices and baked in the marinade to keep the fish succulent.

    Back to the earth oven

    Fish and other seafood have been cooked underground for thousands of years, particularly in Pacific island nations and Indigenous Australia. An earth oven steams, roasts and barbecues all at once, resulting in a unique flavour and exceptionally juicy seafood.

    The Indigenous Australian kup murri method results in a smokier flavour than the hāngī.

    In the Māori hāngī, volcanic stones are heated for hours in a hot fire until visibly white with heat. They are then placed in a shallow pit and baskets of wrapped food are placed on top of the stones. Fish was traditionally wrapped in flax leaves, but these days cloth sacks or foil generally do the trick. Wet sacks are placed around the baskets before the earth is returned to the hole around the sacks, completely covering the hole to allow steam to build and cook the food.

    The Australian Indigenous earth oven, called a kup murri, uses a similar style except the fire is lit inside the oven and left to burn down. Charcoal, therefore, remains in the pit along with the hot stones, which retain the fire’s heat to do the cooking. In a kup murri, the wrapped food is placed directly onto the stones, not in baskets as in the Māori hāngī and large leaves (such as banana leaves) are layered on top of the food before the wet sacks are placed. With this method, the kup murri results in a smokier flavour than the hāngī.

    Paperbark barramundi and saltbush wild rice
    Source: Destination Flavour

    And that’s a paperbark wrap

    The bark of Melaleuca species has been widely used in traditional Aboriginal cooking for centuries. Sheets of paperbark are washed, then soaked in water before fish, meat or vegetables are laid on top. The bark is then wrapped around the food and tied with string. Paperbark protects fish from the heat of the coals or earth oven and adds an earthy, smoky flavour. If you haven’t got a handy Melaleuca tree nearby, you can buy paperbark on a roll from speciality retailers.

    Maeve O’Meara is back in Food Safari Water 7.30pm, Wednesdays on SBS and then you can catch-up on all episodes via SBS On Demand. Visit the program page for recipes, videos and more.

    This is a traditional Fijian seafood dish served as part of a shared meal though delicious by itself or with some steamed rice. It is similar to a “ceviche” where the fish is slightly cooked from the acidity of citrus. Food Safari Water

    This Malaysian family favourite uses a whole fish head for maximum flavour and visual impact. Food Safari Water

    Hot Stuff

    Steaks cut from firm, meaty fish like salmon, swordfish, tuna, and halibut are fantastic when grilled over live fire.

    Because they’re cross-cut–sliced perpendicular to the backbone like beef T-bones—they tend to be sturdier and less prone to sticking than more fragile fillets, which routinely strike fear in even the most intrepid griller’s heart.

    You can cook fish steaks directly on a hot, clean, well-oiled grill grate; on a plancha or griddle preheated on the grill grate; on a cedar or alder plank; or for easiest turning, in a well-oiled stainless steel fish basket. If the incomparable flavor of wood smoke is a goal–and we hope it is–cook the fish steaks over a wood fire or a fire (charcoal or gas) enhanced with hardwood chips or chunks.

    How to Grill the Perfect Fish Steak

    Here are the particulars to grilling the perfect fish steak:

    1. Start with the freshest possible fish.

    Extra points if you caught it yourself. The rest of us must depend on a trustworthy fish monger with impeccable sources and high turnover. For best results, buy steaks that are at least 1 1/4 inches thick: They tend to stay moist over the high, dry heat of the grill.

    2. Set up your grill for direct grilling and heat it to high.

    3. When ready to cook, brush the fish steaks with olive oil and season.

    When ready to cook, brush the fish steaks on both sides with extra virgin olive oil, melted butter, or even Thai-style coconut milk. Season generously with coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper, or use your favorite rub or mix of herbs. You can also marinate the steaks for up to an hour before grilling, if desired. Longer, and any citric acid in the marinade can begin to “cook” the fish, ceviche-like, affecting its texture.

    4. Prep your grill.

    If cooking directly on the grill grate, brush or scrape it clean once it is screaming hot and oil it well. Do this even if you’re cooking the steaks on a plancha, plank, or in a fish basket. It’s the professional thing to do. (If cooking on a plancha, heat it to high at the same time.)

    If working over a charcoal fire, add hardwood chunks or wood chips (soaked in water to cover for 30 minutes, then drained) to the coals. If working on a gas grill, place one or two hardwood chunks directly over the burner under the grill grate or place the chips in your grill’s smoker box.

    5. Arrange the fish steaks on the hot grate and grill on one side.

    Arrange the fish steaks on the hot grate, all facing the same direction. Grill on one side for 3 to 4 minutes for steaks that are about 1 1/4 inches thick; adjust the time for thinner or thicker steaks. If desired, rotate the steaks 90 degrees after 2 minutes using a thin-bladed spatula to create an attractive crosshatch of grill marks. (If cooking the steaks on a plank, see general directions for plank-roasted bluefish in the recipe below.)

    6. Carefully turn the steaks over and grill the other side.

    Carefully turn the steaks over—again, using a thin-bladed spatula—and cook the second side the same way. (Tongs have a tendency to tear the fish when you turn the steaks.)

    7. Cook until 145 degrees in the center.

    While sushi-grade ahi tuna can be served on the rare side, swordfish, salmon, and halibut should be cooked to 145 degrees in the center. The fish should flake easily when pressed with a fork. You can also insert a metal skewer through the side toward the center of the steak. Leave it for a few seconds, then touch it to your lip; it should be quite warm.

    8. Serve the fish steaks with fresh lemon or one of the sauces below.

    Serve the fish steaks with fresh lemon halves (preferably grilled), or pair them with one of the sauces below—raisin chimichurri, mango salsa, Cajun remoulade, Chilean tomato and onion salsa, pipian sauce, a drizzle of best-quality olive oil, or a simple vinaigrette.

    Grilled Fish Steak Recipes

    1. Grill-Blackened Tuna With Cajun Remoulade

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Tuna steaks served blood-red and rare, just like beef steak. This recipe is Cajun-style with blackening spices and a remoulade sauce. A beautiful rare tuna in the center with an electrifying, spicy crust.

    2. Grilled Tuna With Red Wine, Caper, And Olive Sauce

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    I first tasted this dish (or one very nearly like it) on the end of a barely inhabited island located a few miles off the Côte d’Azur. Raïto a sauce richly rooted in the Mediterranean, with a deep flavor that goes with grilled tuna.

    3. Grilled Swordfish Steaks With Golden Raisin Chimichurri

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    4. Cedar Planked Bluefish

    This is what I call millionaire grilling—about 5 minutes preparation time gives you million dollar results. You cook the fish on a cedar plank, which gives it a great flavor and eliminates the two drawbacks associated with grilling fish: its tendency to stick to the grill grate and to fall apart when turned.

    What’s your favorite grilled fish steak recipe? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

    The Spanish call it plancha. Argentineans call it chapa. I call it one of the best ways to marry the searing and crusting capabilities of a cast iron skillet with the intense heat and smoke flavor produced by your grill.

    A plancha is a sort of griddle—a thick, flat slab of cast iron you place on your grill for searing small or delicate foods like asparagus stalks, bay scallops, shrimp, fragile fish fillets, chicken livers, and yes, even diced poultry and thin steaks.

    The plancha gives you a different sort of sear and crust than you get with straight grilling. Sure, you can cook with a plancha on your stove. But the process gets a lot more interesting when you do it on your grill. Simply toss a handful of hardwood chips on the coals or in your grill’s smoker box half way through the cooking. You get the searing benefits of the plancha and the wood smoke produced by the grill.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Here’s how it works, for example, for barbecued scallops or shrimp:

    Set up your grill for indirect grilling and preheat to medium-high (400 degrees). Place the plancha in the center and preheat it to 400 degrees, too. To check the temperature, use our new point-and-shoot Infrared Thermometer. Or sprinkle a few drops of water on the plancha. If they evaporate in 2 to 3 seconds, you’re ready to go. Note: On some grills you may need to light the burner or rake the embers directly under the plancha, too.

    Now season the shrimp with your favorite barbecue rub (I’m partial to Best of Barbecue All-Purpose Rub or Mediterranean Herb Rub). Drizzle with a spoonful of melted butter or olive oil and toss to coat each piece.

    Pour 1 to 2 tablespoons olive or vegetable oil over the plancha and spread it evenly over the surface with a spatula. Arrange the shellfish on top and cook until the bottoms are seared and browned, 1 to 2 minutes, then turn over with a spatula.

    Now toss 1-1/2 cups unsoaked hardwood chips, like our new Best of Barbecue Cherry Wood Chips, on the coals (or place in the smoker box of your gas grill). Lower the grill lid to hold in the smoke and continue cooking for 1 to 2 minutes or until the shellfish is cooked and smoke-flavored. Turn once more with a spatula and you’re ready to serve.

    Another advantage: you can douse the shellfish with a shot of brandy, rum, or ouzo (light it with butane match) to flambé it at the end.

    The Best of Barbecue Plancha. Because sometimes a slab of cast iron can do an even better job than a conventional grill grate.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    The best way to eat fish

    Whether barramundi, red snapper, mulloway or trout – the larger the whole fish, the greater the distance from the embers it must be. This reduces the heat and protects the fish from direct, intense radiated heat and will be cooked on the inside as well. It takes time to prepare fine FRESH FISH on a grill.
    You can enhance the flavor with sprigs of herbs (thyme, rosemary, juniper) which you place on the edge of the fire. The sprigs should never be allowed to catch fire, just generate enough smoke to produce the aroma.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Ready-to-cook whole fish: scaled and gutted by FRESH FISH specialists. Rinse the abdominal cavity thoroughly under running water, then dry it carefully with paper towels both inside and outside

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Slashing: (Only large fish over 1 kg in weight) Slash the fish 4-5 times on both sides in intervals of 2-3 cm. With this method grilling the rear and tail take the same length of time.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Season the fish inside and out with freshly ground salt and pepper, cover liberally with the marinade and fill the abdominal cavity with a variety of fresh herbs (marjoram, rosemary, sage, thyme)

    Place the fish on the rack only when the embers are covered with a layer of gray ash and the flames no longer flicker. The grate must be clean and oiled. The distance between the grate and the embers must be as wide as possible.

    Grill fish for two people (600-800 g) for 15-18 minutes on each side (for 1-1.5 kg of fish about 20-24 minutes) and continually brush with the marinade. Lift the fish gently from the grill to turn it on its back.

    After 8-10 minutes (larger fish, after 10-12 min) grill the other side, pierce the back with the thermometer. The fish is done when a temperature of 65° C is reached, or alternatively, when the dorsal fin can be removed easily.

    A special bricklayer’s trowel is our most reliable “grilling tool”, flat, wide, thin. With it whole fish and fish fillets on the grill are easy to handle. always serve grilled FRESH FISH piping hot

    Grilling fish at home is easy, delicious, and costs so much less than going out. Follow these five easy steps using Kingsford® Charcoal for moist and flaky fish fillets.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    • How to cook
    • Ingredients

    Let’s get grilling

    For grilling fish fillets, you want to set up a direct heat, two-zone, medium-hot fire. Fire up a full chimney of Kingsford® Original Charcoal, or light a pile of about 100 briquettes. When the coals are ready, replace the top grate and allow it to heat up.

    The key to grilling fish fillets is a very clean and hot grate that’s been well oiled; otherwise the fillets will stick and fall apart. Scrub and oil the grate twice. Dip a folded paper towel in cooking oil and oil the entire clean grate using long-handled tongs.

    Rinse the fillet in cold water and pat dry with a paper towel. Run your fingers over the fish, feeling for bones, and remove them with kitchen tweezers. Very lightly oil both sides of the fillet with cooking oil, which will help prevent it from sticking to the grate. Season the fish as you like. Keep the fish refrigerated until the coals are ready — you don’t need to bring fish fillets to room temperature before grilling.

    If the skin is on one side of the fillet, place the fillet skin-side down first. You need to get a good sear on the fish to prevent sticking. Do not move or turn the fillets for the first two minutes. When it’s time to turn, be sure to use a wide spatula — or two spatulas facing each other — and gently roll the fillet over as opposed to flipping it. Like with most foods, only flip once. If you want to grill very delicate, thin fillets, lay some slices of lemon or orange on the grill first, instead of putting delicate fillets directly on the grates.

    Fish fillets have a very small window of doneness, so don’t walk away from the grill. The time it takes to grill a fish fillet varies greatly with thickness, but a general rule is 10 minutes per inch of thickness. Use a knife to check the center of the fillet when it’s nearing done. For thin fillets, when the meat is consistently opaque and flakes easily, it’s done. For thick fillets, you want to remove it when the middle is just slightly translucent, because thicker fillets will continue to cook for a few minutes after you remove them from the grill.

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    Where there’s smoke, there’s flavor. Smoking fish at home may sound intimidating, but it’s no more complicated than grilling. Just add aromatic wood to a charcoal grill and let the fragrant, flavorful smoke do its work.

    Gallery

    Recipe Summary

    Ingredients

    Make the brine: Combine water, sugar, and 1/2 cup salt. Place fish in a nonreactive dish; cover with brine. Refrigerate for 2 hours.

    Heat charcoal grill to medium, piling coals on 1 side to set up direct and indirect heat zones. Set a drip pan under the grill grate in the indirect heat zone.

    Soak wood trimmings in water for 30 minutes. Drain (if smoking whole trout or char, leave 1/2 cup wood in water); add to coals.

    Smoke the fish: Once smoke develops, place fish in a lightly oiled grill basket. Transfer to grill rack, and set over drip pan. Open lid vent, and position over fish. (This will direct smoke to impart maximum smokiness.)

    For the trout fillets: Smoke fish until cooked through but not dry, 12 to 15 minutes.

    For the whole trout: Smoke for 10 minutes. Flip basket. Drain remaining 1/2 cup wood; add to coals. Smoke fish until cooked through but not dry, 8 to 10 minutes more.

    For the side of arctic char: Smoke for 10 minutes. Drain remaining 1/2 cup wood; add to coals. Smoke fish until cooked through but not dry, 13 to 15 minutes more.

    Cook’s Notes

    Fish can be brined overnight for a deeper flavor. Pickled onions, tomatoes, capers, sour cream, and cream cheese all pair beautifully with smoked fish.

    Home » How To » How To Cook Tilapia On The Grill

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Because of its mild flavor, tilapia fish is very popular, and this allows any seasoning that has been added to stand out. This recipe is incredibly easy to make but incredibly tasty, and it’s a cinch to put together.

    In West Africa, tilapia fish is a delicacy. Artisanal fishing has long been important in West Africa, not just for local consumption but also to generate additional revenue and a means of subsistence. Because of the abundance of Tilapia Fish in Africa, we have developed various ways to prepare it, including frying, steaming, stir-frying, drying, and much more. Still, drilling saves time and is also a healthy method of preparing Tilapia.

    Tilapia Nutrition Facts

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    How To Cook Tilapia On The Grill

    • Author: Bobby

    Ingredients

    • Large tilapia Fish
    • Scotch Bonnet
    • Cloves of garlic
    • Cooking oil
    • Salt
    • Curry powder
    • Fresh Thyme
    • Small onion
    • Seasoning cubes
    • Black Pepper
    • Ginger Root
    • African Nutmeg

    Instructions

    Tips on getting the Tilapia Ready for Grilling

    1. Purchase tilapia from your local butcher or supermarket. The filet should be thick for the fish to be well. Fillets with vividly colored skin, clear eyes, clean gills, and no “fishy” odor should be avoided. If you’re buying a filet, be sure the packaging doesn’t include any surplus water. The flesh of the filet should be firm and spring back rapidly when pressed.
    2. Smelling the tilapia filets is the easiest way to tell if they are fresh. The aroma of most seafood should transport you to the sea. There is a distinction to be made between the fresh and fishy scent of the sea and the musky and overly-fishy smell of bad fish. The latter should be avoided. You can also use frozen filets if you are unable to get fresh tilapia. Tilapia should be unscented and stored in a moisture-resistant container when frozen. If any white or dark spotting appears on the filets, they were not wrapped properly and should be avoided. Dry or frosty places are the same way.
    3. Immediately after purchase, keep the fish refrigerated in a tightly wrapped package. If you want to eat your tilapia within the following one to two days, keep it refrigerated, otherwise, it should be frozen at the right temperature to store it.
    4. Thaw your tilapia fillets in the refrigerator for at least 24 hours before grilling if you choose to freeze your tilapia or purchase pre-frozen fish. This will make the food taste and feel fresher.
    5. Remove the tilapia from its packaging and wash it thoroughly. Using cold water, wash the fish. Warm or hot water can encourage the growth of bacteria and make you sick. Before seasoning the fish, make sure it’s completely dry.
    6. Season your fish with oil and salt and pepper. Just before cooking, brush each filet with a small amount of olive oil on both sides. Season the filets with the seasonings of your choosing, as directed by the recipe. Apply olive oil on tilapia before seasoning it with salt and pepper for a fresh, healthful meal. Some commonly used seasoning for tilapia include: lemon and garlic, olive oil or melted butter, and lemon juice are mixed together in a bowl. Add fresh or powdered garlic, as well as salt and pepper, to the mixture (season to taste.) The mixture should be applied to both sides of the fish.
    7. Mix equal parts soy sauce and brown sugar in a separate bowl. In a mixing bowl, combine the ingredients and marinate the fish.

    Instructions on Grilling the Tilapia

    1. Coat the cooking surface of the grill by using a nonstick cooking spray. This will keep the fish from clinging to the pan and crumbling while cooking.
    2. Before cooking, preheat the grill to medium heat. If you’re not sure how to get your grill to medium heat, err on the side of less heat rather than more to avoid charring the fish.
    3. Heat the grill and place the filets on it. Cook for roughly 3 to 5 minutes on the first side of the fish. Throughout the grilling procedure, use medium or conservative heat. Grill flames should never come close to touching the fish filets, as this will burn the delicate meat.
    4. Flip the filet over with a meat spatula. Lift the fish up and place it on the other side with the spatula carefully sliding underneath it to avoid tearing the flesh. Cook for 3 to 5 minutes longer. The fragile meat of the tilapia will fall apart if you flip it constantly while it’s grilling. Turn the filet only once to ensure even cooking.
    5. Double-check the filets for doneness. When the meat becomes opaque and white, you know it’s done. The juices from it should be clear. Slide a butter knife into the thickest part of the fish to examine if it’s cooked all the way through without leaving a large cut. It’s best if the flesh is translucent.
    6. Ready to serve.

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    Here we show you how to grill fish to perfection.?

    We hope you enjoy these tips to BBQ delicious fish on the grill!

    On this page we’ve highlighted:

    • Links to seafood

    • Tips to grilling fish

    • Marinate & Season

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    “Things to remember with Fish”

    Seafood and fish can be one of the best meats to cook on a grill.

    The direct high heat cooks the fish quick, which keeps it moist and soft.

    There are two reasons why you would love to BBQ fish and have it more often.

      It grills really quickly, most seafood is done within 20 minutes or less. (no waiting around to eat!)

  • Fish is really healthy and high in protein! It is the best meat for you! (no one can complain about that)
  • Let’s have a look at a few fish dishes.

    How to get great tasting shrimp right

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    If you like lobster, you’ll love lobster done off the grill.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    All you need to know to get great tasting BBQ clams.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    “How about a few Special Fish Dishes”

    Great tips and techniques for delicious barbecue Salmon!

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Competition tips from the experts.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Grilling Salmon Fillets

    Get great tasting salmon right off your grill.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Check out this grilling method.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    “Tips for Grilling Fish – How to Grill Fish!”

    • The first tip with how to grill fish is make sure the grill grid is well greased.

    Fish tends to stick really easily to the grid which makes maneuvering difficult.

    Fish fillets breakup very easily.

    On a charcoal grill just make sure you keep ‘cool down’ spot available on the grill grid. Incase the heat is too hot and the fish starts to burn.

    On a gas grill just turn the heat down!

    It can be difficult to know when fish is done.

    When the meat becomes flaky and opaque right the way through it’s done.

    Try not to over cook fish as it become dry and chewy.

    Fish needs to be served straight away after grilling.

    Make sure everyone is ready to eat and then start grilling.

  • Right off the grill is always the best way to serve fish.
  • “Marinating & Seasoning – How to Grill Fish!”

    • Don’t over marinate fish, rather keep its natural flavor and use ingredients that enhance it and not over power the meat.

    A small drizzle of olive oil, a bit of lemon juice and a pinch of salt will do wonders for your flavoring.

    Coriander and cumin are great on fish in small amounts. The spices seem to bring out the natural flavor and work great on almost all fish.

    Garlic and black pepper are another favorite of mine. Again use small amounts you still want to keep the natural fish flavor.

    Keep fresh lemon juice handy while you grilling. Drizzle small amounts over the fish to prevent them from drying out. Just before serving drizzle a small amount over to bring out the flavor.

    With stronger tasting fish like Salmon for instance, many grillers like to coat it with a dry rub.

  • Ingredients consisting of paprika, sugar, salt and chili powder are coated on the surface. This creates a tasty caramelized texture which keeps in the juices. Be sure to check out BBQ fish rub rub for great recipes!
  • “Fish Side Dishes – Grilling Fish!”

    Fish goes great with almost any side dish. Some favorites are rice, potatoes, chips, salad or even pasta. I personally don’t mind having my grilled fish on its own but you serve it the way you want!

    Great. you now know how to grill perfect fish! Get the grill out and cook some!!

    Everything you need to know, including how long to grill salmon.

    Related To:

    Tender, juicy salmon is perfect for grilling. While most fish are too lean and delicate to go directly on the grill, salmon is well-suited to high-heat cooking. But if you’re not careful, it could stick or fall apart. Learn to do it perfectly every time with these tips.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Which Type of Salmon Is Best for Grilling?

    A typical serving of salmon is 6 to 8 ounces per person. Look for steaks or center-cut, skin-on fillets. Center-cut pieces are thicker and more uniform, so they cook evenly. The skin will hold the fish together and protect it from drying out or sticking to the grill. It’s easy to remove after grilling if you don’t want to eat it.

    The Best Tools for Grilling Salmon

    Start with a charcoal or gas grill – and make sure to grab an inexpensive, flexible fish spatula. A fish spatula is key because it slips right underneath your salmon as it’s grilling without tearing the skin or flesh.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Peltex Fish Spatula – Stainless Steel with Wood Handle

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    Weber Original Charcoal Grill

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    OXO Good Grips Digital Instant Read Thermometer

    How to Marinate Salmon

    It isn’t necessary to marinate salmon before grilling it, but doing so can impart extra flavor and moisture to your finished fish. And you don’t have to let your salmon marinate for long – just 10 minutes will do. Make a simple marinade from a fat and acid in a 3:1 ratio, then add salt and an aromatic. We love Ina Garten’s Asian Grilled Salmon, which has hundreds of five-star reviews and leans on a marinade made from olive oil (the fat), Dijon mustard (the acid), soy sauce (the salt) and garlic (the aromatic). Drizzle the marinade on the salmon while you preheat the grill.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How Prep Salmon for the Grill

    For even cooking, you’ll want to let the salmon come to room temperature for 20 minutes before grilling.

    Set the salmon on a paper towel-lined pan and pat dry. A dry surface speeds up the searing process and prevents sticking. If it’s marinated, blot off as much marinade as possible before grilling.

    Right before placing it on the grill, lightly rub the salmon with olive oil on both sides, and sprinkle with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper. Always season fish just before grilling to avoid moisture loss and flare-ups.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to Clean and Heat the Grill for Salmon

    Start with a clean grill – while it’s still cold, brush any food residue from the grates. Then lightly coat a bunched-up paper towel with olive oil. Using tongs, wipe the oil onto the grill grates. Don’t use too much—dripping oil can cause flare-ups and excess smoke.

    Make two cooking zones: a hot zone for searing and another for lower, gentle cooking. For a gas grill, turn the burners on one side to high and the other side to low. If you’re cooking with charcoal, push the hot coals onto one-half of the grill. The two zones will allow you to sear the salmon on the high-heat side, then transfer it to the cooler side to finish cooking. Close the lid and preheat for 15 minutes. This will burn off the oil and make the grill nonstick and very hot, about 500 degrees. For a charcoal grill, keep the lid vents open for air circulation.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How to Grill Salmon

    1. Open the grill lid and place the salmon, skin-side down, on the hot zone. Most of the cooking will take place on the skin side. Allow 6 to 8 minutes, depending on the thickness.

    2. Use a fish spatula to gently flip the salmon over onto the lower-heat side. If it sticks, give it another minute or two. When it’s ready, it will release easily. (Note that you should never use tongs to flip delicate fish.) Cook for an additional 2 to 4 minutes on the other side, depending on the desired doneness.

    How to cook fish on a barbecue

    How Long to Grill Salmon

    Salmon cooks quickly on the grill (usually no more than 12 minutes total), so don’t walk away or get distracted. The salmon will be medium-rare when an instant read thermometer inserted into the thickest portion reads 120 degrees F. Let it rest for a few minutes before serving to allow for some carryover cooking.

    And there you go! Perfect grilled salmon, every time.