How to crochet the bullion stitch

There are a few crochet stitches out there that prompt exclamations of amazement and the baffling questions of, “How did they do that?”

How to crochet the bullion stitch

One of those stitches for me has always been the bullion stitch. This intriguing stitch creates spirals of yarn and great texture to a crochet pattern.

The construction of the bullion stitch is really quite simple with a little bit of practice. In no time you will be whipping out fabulous projects like the Bullion Beach Blanket by Donna Kay Lacey (at right) and the Art Nouveau Bullion Necklace (below). Sharon Zientara, Interweave Crochet’s Assistant Editor Sharon Zientara, joins us to walk you through the steps of creating a bullion stitch and offer a few helpful tips.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

1. MULTIPLE YARN OVERS

The bullion is a series of yarn overs that are drawn together in the final stitch. The best hook to complete the bullion stitch effectively is a long, slender, in-line hook. The best yarn to use is a tightly plied one.

To begin the stitch, loosely yarn over the number of times called for in the pattern. Working the yarn overs loosely is key to easily drawing the hook through all the loops. If you can’t get your loops loose enough, hold the handle of another smaller crochet hook alongside your hook and wrap the yarn over both. Slide the second crochet hook out after wrapping before completing the stitch.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

2. YARN OVER AND PULL UP A LOOP

Yarn over and draw through all the loops on the hook. As you draw the hook through, firmly hold the loops in place with the hand that is not holding the hook. If the loops do not slide easily, pick up each loop and pull it off the hook as you draw through.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

3. FINISHED BULLION

To close the bullion, yarn over and draw through the last loop on the hook before working the next stitch.

How to crochet the bullion stitch Art Nouveau Bullion Necklace by Donna Kay Lacey

If you get this right away, that’s terrific! Most people new to the stitch have to do a bit of ripping out before getting it right. The key to the bullion stitch is to practice it until your hands become familiar with the tension required when making the yarn overs and drawing the hook through.

Grab some yarn and a hook and practice a few of your own bullion stitches before beginning one a beautiful textured bullion crochet project. Subscribe today to Interweave Crochet for more great how-to articles on unique crochet stitches and in-depth articles on crochet techniques and project construction. Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to continue your crochet education.

February 11, 2015 · Rhelena · 3 Comments

A Photo Tutorial

The crochet bullion stitch, also known as the roll stitch, may seem daunting at first, but it’s really not that hard to learn. All it takes is a bit of patience and a few tips & tricks and you’ll have this stitch mastered in no time. I promise. Of course, you’ll have to find your own way of doing it, but I promise you that you can do it. I still havn’t quite mastered this stitch, but it does get better with practice. I find the hardest part now is to keep the stitches at the same tension and height.

One of the keys to making a bullion stitch lies in the yarn. You don’t want to practice with a yarn that frays easy. This tutorial was done with a yarn that frays easy, but I have found that Red Heart Comfort, Red Heart Super Saver and Loops and Threads Impeccable work fairly good in making the stitch. I’m sure there are many other yarns that will work great, but those are a few that I’ve experimented with.

Okay, so let’s get started:

To begin your row or your round, make a series of chains. The number all depends on how many times you decide to wrap your yarn. In this case, I made 3 chains. Another option is to fasten off the previous row or round. Make a slip knot and place it on your hook. Then finish the stitch as normal from step two and onward. This way you don’t get that visible seam left from the chains.

How to crochet the bullion stitchCrochet Bullion Stitch – Step 1

Step 2: Wrap your yarn around the hook loosely. Depending on how high you want the stitch, you can wrap it anywhere from 4 to 10 times, or whatever the pattern calls for. In this case, I wrapped the yarn 6 times, for a total of 7 loops on the hook.

How to crochet the bullion stitchCrochet Bullion Stitch – Step 2

Step 3: Hold your finger down on the loops so they don’t move as you insert your hook into the designated stitch or space. (As you can see, I had an awkward moment as I took the picture and ended up pulling the loops tight. This is a BIG NO-NO because you’ll never pull anything through those tight loops. You want to keep them loose as pictured in Step 2.)

How to crochet the bullion stitchCrochet Bullion Stitch – Step 3

Step 4: Wrap the yarn over the hook and pull through. You now have 8 loops on your hook. And as you can see, all the loops are nice and loose.

How to crochet the bullion stitchCrochet Bullion Stitch – Step 4

Step 5: Wrap the yarn over again and pull it through all the loops on the hook. This is the tricky part, but it doesn’t have to be hard. My trick is to hold the hook so the point faces down and the hook is held at a downward angle.

How to crochet the bullion stitchCrochet Bullion Stitch – Step 5

Step 6: I continue to hold the hook at a downward angle as I move the left thumb and middle finger around the loops to hold them. I then gently push the loops down to the end of the hook, BUT I don’t push them off. I let the hook do the work.

My trick is to twirl the hook in the direction of the yarn and gently tug and twirl until it’s through. Most times 2-3 twists in the hook is all you need, but sometimes it can go up to 4-5 times.

How to crochet the bullion stitchCrochet Bullion Stitch – Step 6

This is the image that was used in Step 2, but it best depicts the direction of the yarn. The trick is to twirl the hook so it travels back up in the same spiral direction of the yarn. And if the loops are loose and neatly on the hook, you’ll have no problem pulling it through.

How to crochet the bullion stitch Bullion Stitch

Step 7: This is what it looks like after you’ve pulled it through all loops. This technically completes the stitch, but you can always make a chain 1 to secure the stitch. Always refer to pattern whether to make the chain or not.

How to crochet the bullion stitchBullion Stitch – Step 7

Here is what the stitch looks like after it’s secured with a chain:

How to crochet the bullion stitchBullion Stitch – Complete

To join the bullion stitch in a round, you want to make the join at the top of the first bullion stitch, and not into the ch-3 or ch-1.

How to crochet the bullion stitchBullion Stitch – Joining the Round

Here the join is complete. I pulled the loop open a bit so you can see the join was made directly above the the stitch and all three chains are left untouched.

How to crochet the bullion stitchBullion Stitch – Join Complete

When designing Squish, a fab one skein cowl, I came up with a brand new stitch – at least, it’s new to me! It creates a ton of texture, and a light, springy, but solid fabric. And I’m calling it the Split Bullion Stitch!

How to crochet the bullion stitchDisclaimer: This post includes affiliate links.

How to Crochet the Split Bullion Stitch (Right Handed)

How to Crochet the Split Bullion Stitch (Left Handed)

As Seen In This Video (click for more info!)

  • Clover Amour US – M/N, 9.00 mm hook
  • Lion Brand Scarfie (Bulky/5) in Cream/Black
  • Squish – one skein cowl pattern

As described in the Squish pattern, the Split Bullion, abbreviated spbs is made as follows:

Yo 6 times, insert hook in first indicated stitch, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through 4 loops (5 loops remain on hook), yo, insert hook in next indicated stitch, yo and pull up a loop, yo and pull through all 7 loops on hook.

So like a regular Bullion Stitch, you start with a whole bunch of yarn overs, and pull through several of them at once. But this stitch splits the yarn overs into two parts, worked into two different stitches or spaces, finishing as one stitch. In order to avoid decreasing, the “legs” of the stitch share space with the stitches before and after, and a ch-1 is worked between each spbs.

If you’d like to play with this stitch in your own creations, or make Squish longer or shorter, you can start with any multiple of 2, plus 1 for the turning chain. So if you’re starting with foundation stitches, just a multiple of 2!

I hope you enjoy this tutorial! As you can see, the stitches can be a little fiddly – particularly when slowed down for the camera. But with a bit of practice and determination, you too can make Squish!

Thanks so much for watching! Get Moogly on your favorite social media sites: Facebook, Twitter, G+, Pinterest, Instagram and Tumblr, and sign up for the free Newsletter so you don’t miss a thing!

The crochet stitch that we are going to show you today is a little different. Its texture is a little similar to a stitch with bobbles but denser (that is why it is perfect to crochet blankets for babies). To crochet this stitch we will need another tool, so apart from the crochet hook and the yarn we need to prepare another crochet hook or knitting needle. Try to find something that has a similar size to the crochet hook because that will make everything a lot easier.

Ready to try out the bullion stitch?

To crochet this stitch you can cast on any number of stitches. It is not reversible.

In the example we have crocheted the bullion stitch on top of rows we crocheted in single crochet before but you can also use rows in double crochet if you prefer that. Once you are done crocheting these rows in single or double crochet, follow these instructions:

Row 1: *place the knitting needle on top of the crochet hook. After that, circle the thread around the needle and the crochet hook seven times in total. Without letting the thread slip off both, insert the crochet hook into the next stitch, circle the thread around it again and pull it out. Circle the thread around it again and then pull the crochet hook very carefully out of all the threads that were placed around it and around the needle. You will then have just one stitch on the crochet hook.* Repeat from * to * until the end of the row and then crochet a chain. Turn the project around.

Repeat this row as many times as you want to create the bullion stitch. You can crochet a number of similar rows or mix them with rows in single crochet.

As you can see this stitch forms little bobbles that are very close together. Depending on the material the project will be heavier or lighter.

Ready to start? What color will you choose? We used the cotton in natural and a 5MM crochet hook. Share your results with the hashtag #weareknitters!

Welcome on knitting blog from We Are Knitters with tips on how to knit and crochet plus useful tricks for beginners and advanced makers.

The crochet stitch that we are going to show you today is a little different. Its texture is a little similar to a stitch with bobbles but denser (that is why it is perfect to crochet blankets for babies). To crochet this stitch we will need another tool, so apart from the crochet hook and the yarn we need to prepare another crochet hook or knitting needle. Try to find something that has a similar size to the crochet hook because that will make everything a lot easier.

Ready to try out the bullion stitch?

To crochet this stitch you can cast on any number of stitches. It is not reversible.

In the example we have crocheted the bullion stitch on top of rows we crocheted in single crochet before but you can also use rows in double crochet if you prefer that. Once you are done crocheting these rows in single or double crochet, follow these instructions:

Row 1: *place the knitting needle on top of the crochet hook. After that, circle the thread around the needle and the crochet hook seven times in total. Without letting the thread slip off both, insert the crochet hook into the next stitch, circle the thread around it again and pull it out. Circle the thread around it again and then pull the crochet hook very carefully out of all the threads that were placed around it and around the needle. You will then have just one stitch on the crochet hook.* Repeat from * to * until the end of the row and then crochet a chain. Turn the project around.

Repeat this row as many times as you want to create the bullion stitch. You can crochet a number of similar rows or mix them with rows in single crochet.

As you can see this stitch forms little bobbles that are very close together. Depending on the material the project will be heavier or lighter.

Ready to start? What color will you choose? We used the cotton in natural and a 5MM crochet hook. Share your results with the hashtag #weareknitters!

Welcome on knitting blog from We Are Knitters with tips on how to knit and crochet plus useful tricks for beginners and advanced makers.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Bullion stitch is kind of unusual but cool stitch to play with. It is a special stitch formed by wrapping the yarn several times around the crochet hook.

The crochet bullion stitch is a neat technique. You will see this used in many vintage crochet patterns. It is made by wrapping yarn around a crochet hook numerous time, then pulling through. The wraps create a roll, spiral, or coil. The 3D look that is produced creates a lovely texture. Learn how to make this soft and beautiful stitch!

From this angle, you can really see how stunning the bullion stitch is. It’s nothing short of incredible really and when paired with a short color repeat variegated yarn like you see above…wow! Typically, the bullion stitch is used as an accent stitch or accent row. It can be easily worked in a flat piece or in the round and creates a relatively thick fabric.

Here are a few examples of ways to use the bullion stitch: Clothing accents, Hot Pads, Handbag/Purse accents, Afghan Borders, Headbands, and more.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Instructions

Step 1. Start with a row of Single Crochets to obtain a base.

Step 2. Here are what two Roll Stitches look like completed (pic 2)

Step 3. Wrap yarn around hook a desired amount.

Step 4. Insert hook into next chain. Yarn over and pull back through the chain.

Step 5. Yarn over again and pull through all of the chains.

Step 6. Yarn over and draw through the remaining loop.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

One of the many special crochet stitches is called the “bullion stitch”. This is a very decorative stitch, which can also be used to crochet flowers, jewelry or beautiful edges to projects.

In this post I’ will show you how to crochet the bullion stitch.

The bullion stitch step by step

For this tutorial I started with a small swatch in half double crochet (hdc).

How to crochet the bullion stitch

1. Wrap the yarn loosely around your hook.How much time depends on how high you want the bullion stitch to be. Here I am making the bullion stitches in a hdc fabric, therefor I am wrapping the yarn seven times around my hook. When making bullion stitches in a double crochet fabric, wrapping 10 times may be better. It really depends on your individual gauge though.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

2. Insert the hook into the next stitch and pull up a loop.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

3. Make a yarn over …

How to crochet the bullion stitch

4. … and pull the yarn through all the loops on the hook. You will notice that this can be rather difficult when you have wrapped the yarn too tightly around the hook in step 1. This completes your first bullion stitch.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

And this is how it looks when you’ve made multiple bullion stitches in between normal (in this case) half double crochet stitches.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

As you may have noticed, it can be tricky to wrap the yarn loose enough around the hook in step 1. It can help to hold a thin knitting needle, crochet hook or yarn needle next to your hook while wrapping the yarn. Wrapping your yarn around both automatically means a looser wrap!

Also, use the right type of crochet hook! As you can see in the picture below, the tip of the green hook sticks out relative to the shaft of the hook. This makes it more difficult to pull a loop of yarn through multiple loops on the hook. With an in-line shaped hook like the bamboo one pictured below, both tip and shaft have the same thickness. This makes this type of crochet hook much better suited for making bullion stitches.

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In this post I want to teach you how to make the bullion stitch. The crochet bullion stitch is a beautiful texture stitch that personally I love to use for mandalas. However, you can also use this stitch for boarders, free form crochet, mofits, blankets, and many more projects. Trust me, you’ll be looking for reasons to use this stitch because it’s just so pretty!

The pros

This has a whimsical or elegant feel to it depending on the colors you use. The bullion stitch isn’t reversible, so it works really well in the round, like for a bag or head band. It is quite a warm stitch because it’s bulky and thick, as a result it would be excellent for making something insulating, like a trivet or a cup cozy. If I used a scrubby yarn, it would be great for a facial/body scrubby or dish scrubby

The downside

There are couple of cons to this stitch. Firstly, it is a bit of a yarn eater, second is that it takes some practice to get it down. Some crocheters don’t bother with this stitch because it can be fiddly, but I personally think the practice it takes is totally worth it!

Variations

How to crochet the bullion stitch

There are two main looks to the bullion stitch. The first, is to make the loops in a straight cylinder shape. You can accomplish this by making each loop about the same size around the hook.

The second, is to have a cone shape to the stitch. You can make this by looping the yarn around the hook more loosely at first and then making the loops slightly smaller as it goes. These tend to be better for working in the round.

Traditionally, both of these variations are done using only your crochet hook. However if you’re having a hard time, you can use a latch hook* instead.

*Latch hooks are usually used when making hook rugs, but crocheters can use them to make certain stitches a bit easier, like this one, or to weave in ends.

Abbreviations

  • Ins = insert
  • Ch = chain
  • Yo = yarn over
  • St = stitch
  • <> = total number of stitches in row

Supplies

  • Yarn any type
    • I’m using a variegated worsted weight yarn
  • Crochet hook
    • Size H/5mm hook
  • Snips
  • Yarn or tapestry needle
  • Latch hook (optional)

The Bullion Stitch Tutorial

You can do this stitch with any number of stitches, just add 3 to your number of stitches for your chain up.

Tip: If you’re using a latch hook in place of a crochet hook, simply follow the instructions using the latch hook instead. Make sure you keep the loops loose!

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Foundation row. Ch 16

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Row 1. Yo 7 times loosely, ins hook into the 4th ch from the hook, Yo once and gently pull through all of the loops on the hook, Yo, pull through the last loop. Repeat til you reach the end.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Row 2. Ch 1, turn, put 1 sc in each st.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Row 3. Ch 3, turn, Yo 7 times loosely, ins hook into the next st, Yo once and gently pull through all of the loops on the hook, Yo, pull through the last loop.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Repeat these steps til you reach the end of the row.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Row 4 – 7. Repeat rows 2 and 3.

How to crochet the bullion stitch

Once you’ve finished the last row, cut your yarn, tie off the end, and weave in the tail.

That’s it, you’ve finished your swatch!

Looking for more texture stitches? Try the 3D stitch, the Crunch Stitch, or one of my favorites the Alpine stitch!

I hope you found this helpful! Please like this post and following my blog, so you’re alerted when ever I make a new post!

Let me know if you are going to try any of these or of you have a tip of your own share them in the comments! I’d love you hear from you.??