How to do a basketball hop step

Two questions that really need clarification.

1.) Can a player, after taking two steps towards the basket (supposedly to take a shot), stop and begin to pivot? Basicaly, can the player, after initiating the two-step count, stop and reastablish their pivot?
(I think I see Shaq do this all the time.)

2.) If a player does a “hop-step” and jumps into the air, must they land with two feet and go back up or can they land with one foot (then the other) and go back up? Basicaly, does a “hop-step” require both feet to simultaneously hit the ground?

Thanks for the help.

1) NBA rules are different with regards to jump stops and pivoting. I’m not going to even attempt to address it.

2) The player cannot land on one foot and then another. He can only land on one foot or land on both feet simultaneously. He cannot pivot.

I have seen #2 happen quite often in High school boys games. Player will end dribble with a big hop then take a step and shoot or pass. It looks odd and out of control sometimes. I dont call it because the player has not returned the pivot foot to the floor on the step motion. Quite often you will hear the coaches or fans crying for a travel.

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Two questions that really need clarification.

The NBA rules make it very clear that a player can pivot even after he lands at the 2nd count of a jump-stop. NBA rules do not assign a pivot foot in this jump-stop move until the player pivots.


2.) If a player does a “hop-step” and jumps into the air, must they land with two feet and go back up or can they land with one foot (then the other) and go back up? Basicaly, does a “hop-step” require both feet to simultaneously hit the ground?

Thanks for the help. [/QUOTE]

if a player execute a 2-count jump-stop, he should land both feet simultaneously.

if it is not a 2-count jump-stop, he can land both feet simultaneously on the 1st count, or one after another.

but not sure if the “hop-step” is the same move but a different name of “jump-stop”.

[Edited by ysong on May 31st, 2005 at 04:50 PM]

When the jump stop came into fashion on the court my coach had several refs come in to discuss rule changes. They showed us that the jump stop has to be done like this.

1- The jump can not happen after the first step.
2- You must basiclly jump during your last dribble, land with two feet.
3- You can not pivot after landing. This would be a third step resulting in a travel call.
4- You also must jump off of both feet. Not lean toward basket and leave off of one foot.

Am I correct in this?

1- The jump can not happen after the first step.
2- You must basiclly jump during your last dribble, land with two feet.
3- You can not pivot after landing. This would be a third step resulting in a travel call.
4- You also must jump off of both feet. Not lean toward basket and leave off of one foot.

Kind of. There are actually two different plays that are commonly called a jump-stop and that’s why there’s so much confusion about it.

The first kind of jump-stop is when a player jumps, then catches the ball, then stops by landing on both feet simultaneously. In this case, the player is allowed to pivot and can use either foot as the pivot foot. This is the simpler case, obviously.

The second kind of jump-stop (some of us have taken to calling it a hop-stop to avoid confusion ) is when an airborne player catches the ball, then lands on one foot, then jumps off that foot and stops by landing on both feet simultaneously. In this case, the player may not pivot at all; he has no pivot foot. The player may jump again to pass or shoot, but I don’t think there’s any requirement that both feet leave the ground simultaneously. The rule simply says that there is no pivot foot.

Table of Contents

Does a hop step count as two steps?

Starts here4:55Hop Travel vs Jump Stop | January 23, 2014 | NBA 2013-14 SeasonYouTubeStart of suggested clipEnd of suggested clip59 second suggested clipHe was in the wrong traveling. Called on Lance. And Joe take us through it. So once again in realMoreHe was in the wrong traveling. Called on Lance. And Joe take us through it. So once again in real time let’s look at the cadence to Lance.

What is a hop in basketball?

Hops is a slang term in basketball used for someone who can jump extremely high with ease. The term “hops” describes the player’s vertical jumping ability and athleticism. Players with hops are even able to dunk the ball seemingly without effort.

How does hop step work?

Starts here0:58Hop Step Move Tutorial | Basketball Scoring Drills | Dre BaldwinYouTubeStart of suggested clipEnd of suggested clip58 second suggested clipNow. Both feet may not land exactly. The same time as you see that one was a little bit ahead of theMoreNow. Both feet may not land exactly. The same time as you see that one was a little bit ahead of the other. But as long as it’s not a 1 – like you’re trying to take two steps.

Why is a hop step not an up and down?

With a hop step, you’re getting in position to score. With an up and down, you jumped up trying to score after coming off your pivot foot, but failed to let go of the ball and came back down with it.

Is a hop step legal?

However the case of so-called ‘Hop step’ has become violation as it is also a violation in the NBA. This means: A player may not touch the floor consecutively with the same foot or both feet after ending his dribble or gaining control of the ball.

Is a hop step considered one step?

Once you stop dribbling, the foot that first hits the floor doesn’t count because you were dribbling while it was moving. After this step you can either do two steps with one foot or you can take one step and then jump off that foot and land with two feet at the same time, that is a hop step.

How do you hop step by step?

Starts here1:34How to Do a Hop Step Move | Irish Step Dancing – YouTubeYouTube

Is a hop step in basketball a travel?

This is normal basketball movement and without using slow motion replay it is difficult to realise whether the foot touches the floor before taking the 2 steps or not. However, according to the current rules it is a travelling violation.

Is a hop step legal in the NBA?

Is a hop step travel?

Hop travel: When a player is taking their two steps, but doesn’t goes left-right or right-left steps. Instead it’s an awkward left-left or right-right. This is a travel. LeBron d idnt jump stop or hop step when he was called for a travel.

Is a hop step a post move?

Starts here10:48All Post Moves: Dropstep, Hopstep, Spins, and more – YouTubeYouTube

Do you have to shoot after a hop step?

A progressing player who jumps off one foot on the first step may land with both feet simultaneously for the second step. If a player, with the ball in his possession, raises his pivot foot off the floor, he must pass or shoot before his pivot foot returns to the floor.

How to Do a Basketball Hop Step in 2022

One of the most basic and essential moves in basketball is the hop step. Though it may seem simple, nailing the hop step can make a big difference on the court. In this post, we’ll break down how to do a proper hop step so you can take your game to the next level. Read on to learn more!

Part 1. Mastering Footwork and Stance

The basketball hop step is an advanced move that can create space for a shot, get around defenders, or change direction on the court. To do a successful hop step, you need to master your footwork and stance.

Footwork: To execute the hop step correctly, you need to have good footwork. You should be able to move quickly and smoothly on the court. To improve your footwork, practice shuffling, crossover steps, and quick direction changes.

Stance: Your stance is also essential for doing a successful hop step. You should be in a low stance with your knees bent and your weight evenly distributed between your feet. It will allow you to move quickly and easily in any direction.

1. Familiarize yourself with the right landing stance

Your landing stance is critical when doing a basketball hop step. You want to be in a low stance with your knees bent and your weight evenly distributed between your feet. It will allow you to move quickly and easily in any direction.

2. Bend your knees and stay low

When you’re doing the hop step, you want to stay low so you can move quickly. It would be best to bend your knees when you jump to get more height and power.

3. Keep your head up

It’s essential to keep your head up when you’re doing the hop step. It will help you stay focused and avoid getting hit in the head.

4. Practice small hops first

Before you try doing the basketball hop step, practice doing small hops. It will help you get used to jumping and landing in a low stance.

5. Land with both feet

When you land after the hop step, make sure to land with both feet. It will help you stay balanced and in control.

6. Limit your pivot

When you do the hop step, you want to limit your pivot. It will help you stay in control and make it harder for defenders to block your shot.

Part 2. Practicing With the Ball

1. Dribble the ball slowly down the court

When you’re practicing the hop step, start by dribbling the ball slowly down the court. It will help you get comfortable with the move.

2. Jump into the hop step with restraint

When you jump into the hop step, don’t jump too high. You want to jump just high enough to get past your defender.

3. Land with both feet simultaneously

When you land after the hop step, make sure to land with both feet. It will help you stay balanced and in control.

4. Practice your single pivot

Once you’ve mastered the essential hop step, start practicing your single pivot. It will allow you to make a quick move in any direction.

5. Finish with a pass or a shot

Once you’ve completed the hop step, finish with a pass to a teammate or a shot at the basket.

Part 3. Practicing Without the Ball

1. Jog slowly down the court

When you’re practicing the hop step without the ball, start by jogging slowly down the court. It will help you get comfortable with the move.

2. Drive with your leading foot

When you drive to the hoop, use your leading foot to take your defender off balance. It will create more space for a shot or a layup.

3. Land on both feet simultaneously

When you land after the hop step, make sure to land with both feet. It will help you stay balanced and in control.

4. Pivot once

When you pivot, make sure to do it in a controlled manner. It will help you stay in control and make it harder for defenders to block your shot.

Part 4. Receiving a Pass with the Hop Step

1. Get a friend and a ball

You may use this hop step to make several good shots in a row. You can practice passing by yourself or with a partner. By doing this, you will be able to get more comfortable with the hop step.

2. Coordinate movement with the teammate in possession

Your teammate in possession must be aware of your movement and coordinate with you. If the player dribbling down the court cannot see you, they will not be able to pass you the ball.

3. Drive with your leading foot into a small hop

When you drive to the hoop and receive the pass, use your leading foot to take your defender off balance. It will create more space for a shot or a layup.

4. Catch the ball and land with both feet

Take a look at yourself and have your work evaluated by your buddy. Have you landed on both feet at the same time? Are your legs bent, and are you low to the ground? If so, you’re doing great! Make sure you keep practicing.

5. Pivot and shoot or pass

If you have successfully caught the ball and landed with both feet, take a quick pivot on your leading foot. It will give you more power to shoot or pass the ball.

6. Practice receiving a pass on your own

It is a simple change for most skilled individuals, but the mechanics involved make it tough to do correctly. Playing catch on your own as follows:

  • Jumping into the air
  • Landing and then pivoting on one foot
  • Finishing with a pass or shot

You will develop muscle memory and be able to execute this move in a game setting better.

1. What is a basketball hop step?

A basketball hop step is a move that allows a player to get around an opponent by jumping off one foot and landing on the other. The player gains more space to shoot or drive to the basket by doing this.

2. How do you do a basketball hop step?

You can get closer to the basket by doing a basketball hop step while taking less steps. It is done by jumping off of one foot and then hopping onto the other foot, pushing off the ground with the ball of your foot to get closer to the basket. You can then shoot or pass the ball.

3. What are the benefits of doing a basketball hop step?

There are a few benefits of doing a basketball hop step. One is that it can help you get around defenders more easily. It can also help you create more space for yourself when you’re shooting or trying to drive to the basket. Finally, it can also help you maintain your balance better when you’re dribbling the ball.

4. When is the best time to use a basketball hop step?

There is no definitive answer, as the best time to use a basketball hop step will vary depending on the situation. However, one general guideline is to use a basketball hop step when you want to create space between you and your defender to get an open shot.

5. Are there any other steps that can be used in place of a basketball hop step?

A few other steps can be used in place of the basketball hop step. One is a crossover step, which is used to change direction quickly. Another is the jump stop, which is used to stop quickly and maintain balance.

Conclusion

That’s it! You now know how to do a proper hop step. As we mentioned earlier, this move can make a big difference on the court, so be sure to practice and perfect it. And if you’re looking for more tips and tricks on how to improve your basketball game, be sure to check out our other posts. Thanks for reading.

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  3. Can you take a step after hopstepping?

DlSTURBED4282 posted.
You can take another “step” as long as you keep your pivot down, but what you’re doing sounds like a travel.

This. As long as your pivot foot is down you can “step” out of your stance.

Now that I watch it, it doesn’t even look like a hopstep >_>

_SenorCardgage_ posted.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRUeOdaTwic

Now that I watch it, it doesn’t even look like a hopstep >_>

that’s a legal move when you do it off the bounce like that, it’s not really a hop-step, its more of a gather step, but its still legal.

hamdog43 posted.
_SenorCardgage_ posted.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRUeOdaTwic

Now that I watch it, it doesn’t even look like a hopstep >_>

that’s a legal move when you do it off the bounce like that, it’s not really a hop-step, its more of a gather step, but its still legal.

That’s definitely a hop step. And the move in the video is definitely a travel. His first two steps are his “gather,” then he hop steps and then switches pivot feet and takes off on his other foot.

Not very debatable. If this is the move that the TC was talking about I’d be annoyed as **** if someone kept doing it in a pick up game.

BrownBearKing posted.
Idk about the gather thing. But It looked like you took a hop step but landed on your 2 feet separately. Which is a travel, both feet have to land at the same time.

yeah this is correct; it was 3 steps, I thought your feet hit at the same time on your initial move but it was a walk.

That move in the video is not a travel. He gathered his dribble taking two steps. Then he shot the layup lifting off of one of his foot without taking another step.

Taking a step after hopstepping sounds really weird even if it isn’t a travel. Usually, when you do a hopstep, you should be fairly close to the basket. So you would hopstep and either finish at the rim with a layup/dunk/fadeaway or if you are heavily guarded, pivot on a chosen pivot foot to kick the ball back out.

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Home » Guides » NBA 2K20: How to Hop Step (Eurostep)

There are few feelings more satisfying in NBA 2K20 than driving to the paint and hammering the ball home. While there are certainly a number of ways to get the job done, the hop step is certainly the most efficient way to make room near the bucket. Here is everything you need to know about how to hop step (Eurostep) in NBA 2K20.

A staple of European basketball in the ’80s, the Hop Step, also known as the Eurostep, helps players essentially jump into the paint.

How to Hop Step (Eurostep) in NBA 2K20

To pull the move off in NBA 2K20, press R2 to drive to the hoop with the ball in your right hand, holding the right thumb stick down left all the while.

You can also double tap Square/X/Y while driving with R2 and holding the left thumbstick toward your player’s offhand.

The most important thing to keep in mind is that, like most movements in the game, you’ll need the right spacing and attributes to pull this move off.

It will take some time to get used to the movement, but adding the hop step to your arsenal will make you as dangerous as the Greek Freak himself, Giannis Antetokounmpo.

    1. Press R2 to drive with the ball in your right hand, holding the left thumbstick

You can also double tap Square/X/Y while driving with R2 and holding the left thumbstick toward your player’s offhand.

Note that you’ll need the right spacing and attributes to pull things off.

That is everything you need to know about how to hop step (Eurostep) in NBA 2K20. For more helpful tips, tricks, and guides, be sure to check out our official wiki guide. We’ve got you started with a few of our favorites here below.

How to do a basketball hop step

The hop step was the euro step of 2004, meaning how popular the euro step has become, the hop step trended the same way. Kids were practicing it at every park and every gym trying to be the first to use it amongst their friends. A move that has been around for awhile, some also call it a pro hop or a jump stop, made its wave throughout the world in a more creative way.

How to do a basketball hop step

The move became really popular when NBA Live 2004 added it to their realm of moves along with the new control layout that included freestyle dribbling. A big improvement towards trying to make the game more realistic, gamers enjoyed the new additions. Although personally, I remember the hop step giving the offensive player way too much of an advantage because it made it way too easy to score in that game.

The hop step is a lethal move if used correctly. It’s mainly used when trying to split two defenders on the way to the basket or in other instances just to gain a base for liftoff when driving. What makes it a great move is the options you have once the move is performed. You can either hop step and go straight up or when you feel that defender on your hip, you can hop step, pump fake and get the defender in the air and step through to go up to the basket.

The move has gained some controversy in past years because many players started doing it wrong. When executing the move, it’s a must that you land on two feet simultaneously or else it is deemed a travel. Due to so much confusion when it’s considered a travel and when it’s not, NBA Head of Referees Joe Borgia gave his insight on when this movie is a violation.

Many guys in the league have adopted this move today and we see it from players like LeBron James and Derrick Rose. However, Jamaal Crawford may be one of the craftiest at the move as he puts the ball behind his back making his defender look silly. We all know he’s a wizard with the ball but when he’s coming at you full speed and hits you with his “shake and bake”, there is nothing you can do. The hop step really puts the offensive player in a great position to score and it’s a move that all players looking to be a top scorer should master.

Table of Contents

How many steps is a pro hop in basketball?

Hop travel: When a player is taking their two steps, but doesn’t goes left-right or right-left steps.

What is a hop in basketball?

Hops is a slang term in basketball used for someone who can jump extremely high with ease. The term “hops” describes the player’s vertical jumping ability and athleticism.

Why is a pro hop not a travel?

When ur performing a Pro hop in Basketball, y isn’t it considered a travel? When You begin the jump off one leg that leg becomes your pivot. So y is it that when U follow up by landing on both feet(Which includes ur pivot) a travel isn’t called? It’s known as a jump stop and it’s legal.

Can you take a step after pro hop?

You can take another “step” as long as you keep your pivot down, but what you’re doing sounds like a travel. This. As long as your pivot foot is down you can “step” out of your stance.

Why is a Hopstep not a travel?

A hop step is clearly jumping and landing with the ball. A eurostep is two steps(picking up pivot foot). Why aren’t these manuvers considered a traveling violation? Because you are allowed two steps when coming to a stop.

Why is a hop step not up and down?

With a hop step, you’re getting in position to score. With an up and down, you jumped up trying to score after coming off your pivot foot, but failed to let go of the ball and came back down with it. “**** you, Gumby!”

Is the hop step legal?

However the case of so-called ‘Hop step’ has become violation as it is also a violation in the NBA. This means: A player may not touch the floor consecutively with the same foot or both feet after ending his dribble or gaining control of the ball.

How do u hop step in 2k21?

Just like the Euro step, hop steps can be done with and without the shot stick. The first way is to tap the shoot button while driving to the basket. Easy enough. The second way is to hold the shot stick diagonally down left or down right while driving to the basket.

Can you hop step in NBA?

Is the pro hop a travel?

This is normal basketball movement and without using slow motion replay it is difficult to realise whether the foot touches the floor before taking the 2 steps or not. However, according to the current rules it is a travelling violation.

When to take a hop step in basketball?

At random intervals or at the signal of a whistle, combine the footwork you learning with the dribbling and take your hop step. Jump into the hop step with restraint. Jumping too high will throw off your balance or add to your momentum, which can lead to an unnecessary step and a traveling call.

What’s the best way to jump on a basketball?

Push the ball upward with your shooting hand. As your hips rise up and you start your jumping motion, move the ball in a smooth motion from your dip to eye level. It should all be one smooth motion. Your hips rise as your elbow rises with the ball, and you should turn anywhere from 20-90 degrees towards your off hand.

What’s the best way to do the hop test?

Hop forward as far as possible for three consecutive hops. Measure and record the distance you hopped in centimeters. Repeat the test two times for both legs, recording the distance hopped each time. For diagonal triple hopping, mark a line on the floor about six meters long. (Using adhesive tape here is a good idea.

What’s the best way to improve your basketball shot?

You should reinforce your new set point by daily form shooting close to the basket. In fact, you should rebuild your shot slowly by stepping back one step at a time as you establish consistency from a given range, using the new set point. Shooting after the Top of your Jump.

When to use the pro hop in basketball?

A pro hop is used to beat a defender under control and get a quality shot at the basket. Alright, using the pro hop, so you’re driving to the basket, just beat your primary defender, or you could be in transition. Make sure you’re low, make sure you’re balanced, make sure you’re eyes are on the rim.

What’s the best way to do a hop step?

Bend your knees and stay low. This improves your balance, stability, and response. Keep your head up. Court awareness is often the deciding factor in whether or not you will be able to drive to the hoop and make a shot. Practice small hops.

What do you need to know about portable basketball hoops?

But once you find the right portable hoop and get it home, don’t forget the most important step: filling the base. It’s crucial to properly fill the base to help increase the hoop’s stability during play, as well as in windy weather.

Do you jump into the hop step with both feet?

Jump into the hop step with restraint. Jumping too high will throw off your balance or add to your momentum, which can lead to an unnecessary step and a traveling call. Land with both feet simultaneously. This is the key point of the hop step.

The jump-stop is an important footwork fundamental that all players must learn. The jump stop is executed by the player, who is on the run, taking one small step and then landing on both feet simultaneously in balance (not leaning forward). The jump stop can be used at the end of a dribble. At the end of a speed dribble, young players sometimes stop, fall forward from their momentum, and get a traveling call. Ending the speed dribble with a jump stop will prevent this.

The jump-stop can be used when receiving a pass, to get into triple threat position, or by a post player catching the ball in the low post. When receiving a pass with a jump stop, either foot can be used as the pivot foot. This is especially helpful for the low post player.

Sometimes there is confusion about what is or is not traveling, and when do you still have a pivot allowable after a jump stop. See the jump-stop and traveling rules from the National Federation of State High Schools website. My interpretation is this – it depends on whether you already have possession of the ball or not (as in receiving a pass), and whether or not you have already used up the one-step that you are entitled to.

When receiving a pass with a jump-stop, you can pivot after the jump-stop and either foot can become the pivot foot. A perimeter player can catch the ball with a jump-stop, and the pivot into triple-threat position if necessary and use the non-pivot foot for executing jab-step fakes or a drive step.

Now let’s take a player who already has possession of the ball on the outside. He/she makes a dribble move into the lane, picks up the dribble, takes one step, and then lands a two-footed jump-stop. So far, so good. But after landing the jump-stop, he/she cannot move either foot and has no pivot foot since the one step was already used prior to the jump-stop. He/she could jump upward, but must either shoot or pass the ball before either foot touches the floor again.

Jump Stop Drill #1

Here is a drill for teaching the jump stop. First demonstrate the jump stop to your players. All players lineup on the end-line, with adequate spacing. Start the drill at slow speed initially. Have the players jog down the floor slowly. When you blow your whistle, they come to a jump stop. Yell “go” and they start again.

Every-time you blow the whistle, they jump-stop. Do this back and forth, up and down the court. When they look like they are getting the hang of it, have them sprint and do the drill. Then give everyone a ball, and dribble slowly down the floor, doing jump stops. Eventually work up to the speed dribble and jump stop.

Jump Stop Drill #2, receiving the pass with a jump stop

Form two sets of lines, one at an end-line, the other at half court, with the lines facing each other (see diagram A). This drill is good for learning to receive the pass with a jump stop, and is also a good passing and conditioning drill.

How to do a basketball hop step

Passers make good chest passes. Make sure they don’t lob these passes. Passes should have “zip”, speed. The passer then follows his pass and sprints to the rear of the opposite line.

The receivers move toward the ball and receive it with a jump stop, and hold the triple threat position briefly, and then make the pass to the next player in the opposite line, follow the pass, and get into the opposite line.

Make sure passes are crisp, and the receivers are coming to the ball and are jump stopping. Check their triple threat position. Players should be sprinting to the opposite line, for conditioning.

You can also use this drill to teach the one-two step stop.

Jump Stop Drill #3, Jump Stop and Pivoting Drill

Here is a simple drill for teaching the jump stop and pivoting. Players pair up together on a side or endline. One player dribbles forward about 10 feet, stops with a two-footed jump stop, and then pivots several times and finally passes back to his/her partner, who repeats this procedure, while the first player returns to the endline.

See this clip of a good jump stop – pivoting drill:

HOW TO HOPSTEP IN NBA 2K20 w/HANDCAM! HOW TO HOPSTEP DUNK IN NBA 2K20! HOW TO HOPSTEP DRIBBLE 2K20!

To hop step in 2K20, hold down the left trigger and then press the A button. You’ll then need to press the left trigger again to jump and then press the A button again to hop step.

First, make sure you have the “Hop Step” Dunk package selected in your offensive playbook. Then, when you have the ball and are near the hoop, press and hold the “X” button to start your hop step. While holding “X”, use the left stick to move towards the hoop. When you get close, release “X” and press it again to jump and dunk.

To hop step 2k22 Xbox, you will need to first open the console. Next, locate the white wire that is sticking out of the back of the console and disconnect it from the motherboard. Next, take the white wire and connect it to the black wire. Finally, reattach the cover to the console and turn it on. You should now be able to hop step 2k22 Xbox.

To hop step in NBA 2k21, hold down the L2 button on your controller and then press the X button. You’ll then want to use the left analog stick to move your player in the direction you want to go.

The hop step is a dance move that is used to travel across the dance floor. It is done by hopping on one foot and then stepping onto the other foot.

Ankles can be broken in NBA 2K20 by performing an ankle break move. To do this, hold down the left trigger and then press the right joystick in the direction of the player you want to break their ankle.

A hop step layup is a basketball move in which the player takes a hop step towards the basket before shooting. This move allows the player to get closer to the basket and increase their chances of making the shot.

Hop step is a travel in basketball. This move is used to create space between you and your defender, but it also puts you in a vulnerable position if you’re not successful.

There are a few different ways to side step in 2k. One way is to hold down the right trigger and then move the left joystick in the direction you want to go. You can also hold down the left trigger and then move the right joystick in the direction you want to go.

You need the following badges:
-Contact Dunk
-Dunking Machine
-Towering Dunk
-Posterizer
-Flashy Passer
-Pick Pocket
-Acrobat

There are numerous moves new basketball players will attempt to master when they step onto the court.

One of the most important is the jump stop.

“Coming to a jump stop is one of the first fundamentals all players must learn in the game of basketball,” former college basketball player Kristin Ronai says. “Coming to a jump stop allows you to stop and control [by] landing on both feet simultaneously so you don’t travel.”

HOW TO

To practice the jump stop:

  • Start by dribbling the basketball forward.
  • As you pick up your dribble, you’ll jump forward and land on both feet simultaneously.
  • You should land on the balls of your feet, shoulder width apart. You’ll want your knees bent, hips down, back straight, eyes up and the ball resting in your shot pocket. Your shot pocket is when you have the ball in front of your body to one side. You should have your hand, elbow and arm behind the ball with your off hand on the ball to help protect it.

In this position, you’re now ready to make a basketball play.

“It is important to learn the jump stop before advancing to more footwork off the dribble so that you can pivot off of either foot,” Ronai says.

Players new to basketball will need to work on a variety of skills to help avoid traveling calls. In addition to the jump stop, players should also work on front pivots.

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thrillhouse

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Retroballer

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mco85

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lightweight champion

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durden7

But if you take a step going into the hop step (which most people do), then you cant pivot from the hop step.

You cant step, hop step then pivot.

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10 piece nuggets

Isnt the whole point of a hop step to jump off two feet into it? Then you can pivot yeah.

Atleast thats how I think of it.

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wcghost

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Hank Scorpio

I’ve always wondered this and another thing–Is it a travel when you do a hesitation move, cross over and then take a few dribbles and then do a hop step to penetrate into the paint and go up for the lay up.

When I do the hesitation move, I’ll lift the side of my leg thats on the same side of the ball (I.E. if the ball is on the right hand, I’ll hesitate to the right), but I’ll keep the other foot planted so both my feet don’t really leave the ground. It’s a pretty effective move if you’re quick enough and strong enough to get through into the paint, but every time I do it and score people call travel. I never understood this.

Is this because people think both my feet go up when I hesitate?

Profit Project

  • What is a FieldLab
  • Results
  • Hop, step and jump into the future
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To measure physical activity people now wear devices with sensors and have all kind of apps on their mobile phones. This gives us the opportunity to take the ideas of the FieldLabs into the general population. The city becomes the FieldLab. We now can collect big data and learn so much about participation levels, about the health of populations and about what interventions can be put in place to help these populations become more physical active, and thus more healthy.

Steve Haake, Director of the Centre for Sports Engineering Research at Sheffield Hallam University

How to do a basketball hop step

The ProFit project ended in March 2015 with a final conference called Triple Jump Event. Not only the partners in the project participated, but also individuals and representatives of (local) governments, (public and semi-public) organisations, knowledge institutions and companies from other cities that have been involved in establishing international cooperation in sports innovation within the European Union over the last years.

Since 2008 networks like the European Platform for Sport Innovation (EPSI) have been created (Hop). Through the ProFit project FieldLabs were set up and international cooperation was brought into practice (Step). The focus of the Triple Jump Event was on extending and expanding the ideas and contacts into the future (Jump). The contours of this next step are already visible: a program that reaches a bigger, critical mass by creating a transnational cluster of partners in different European countries. Together these Vital Cities, with a lively network of fans and observers, will stimulate enterprise innovations that make more people move more. This requires an interdisciplinary approach, combining behavioural sciences, health, design, high tech & engineering and business & economics. The existing network welcomes newcomers and is already expanding to other cities like Cologne (Germany), Leuven (Belgium) and Birmingham(UK).

How to do a basketball hop step

A great jump shot is one of the best things you can add to your game. The best part? You can practice this tip by yourself. Mastering this skill is all about technique, balance, and repetition but the most imperative part is your will to succeed. The greatest basketball players to ever play the game started just where you are now and worked hard to master this skill. Now it’s your turn. Here are a few jump shot tips, that are commonly taught at Nike Basketball Camps, to help take your game to the next level.

Before the shot
The first step in improving your jump shot technique is keeping your eyes on the rim throughout the whole shot. This will keep your form compact and will lead to a straighter shot. When you get ready to shoot, make sure your feet are shoulder width apart facing the basket and your knees are bent (much like a spring ready to release). Next, you will move the ball into what is called the ‘shot pocket’. This means that you hold the ball just above your waist lined up to the basket. The final thing you do before you are ready to shoot is to find the right grip. In order to do this, you should place the ball’s air hole between your middle and index finger while spreading your fingers enough to feel like you can balance the ball. Let the ball sit on your shooting hand and get ready to begin your release.

During the shot
After completing all of the pre-shot prep, you will be ready to move on to the next phase: during your shot. Make sure your other hand or “non-shooting hand” is on the side of the ball. This hand should not affect the ball’s spin and should not move upon release. Begin to bring the ball directly up from the balanced position you had it in keeping your shooting hand’s elbow underneath the ball. Keep the ball in front of you and all at once begin your jump, releasing all of your power loaded up in your bent knees and bent arms at once. Release the ball at the highest point your hands can go and keep your shooting hand pointing at the basket in a straight line. The ball should be in a backspin and you’re on your way to scoring a bucket.

After the shot
After the ball is released try and land in the same spot you jumped to make sure you are balanced. In your follow through your wrists should be relaxed on the way down and your fingers still pointing at where you wanted to shoot. Hold this position until the ball hits the basket.

If you can practice these steps consistently you will begin to see a major upgrade to your jump shot technique and results. Remember: practice makes perfect. Check out more basketball shooting tips and get better this summer at a Nike Basketball Camp near you.

A jump shot starts way before the arms are even involved. It all begins with your lower body; your feet and legs need to be set and ready to start the upward motion of your shot.

Ray Allen, one of the greatest shooters in the history of basketball, told NBA TV , “Shooting, for me, is not about my upper body. It’s really about my lower body. So when I’m shooting the ball like I need to, I jump and it’s one motion.”

Basketball players are almost universally taught, at an early age, that stepping into your shot one foot at a time, or a “1-2 step,” is the proper way to use your lower body in setting up a catch-and-shoot jump shot.

The 1-2 step is the traditional and still most widely used footwork for shooting, however, some players at higher levels will utilize “the hop” instead of the 1-2 step, at times, to get their feet set for their shot. Many great shooters in the NBA, from Kevin Durant to Bradley Beal to JJ Redick, will use the hop to get into their shot depending on the situation.

Let’s break down both of these techniques to see which one might benefit you best, and illustrate how to perform the hop should you want to give it a chance.

1-2 Step

For right-handed shooters , when using the 1-2 step, you will step with your left foot first, and after that foot is planted you will simultaneously catch the ball and step with your right foot to align your feet (either square to the basket or angled to the left or right). Left handed shooters will use the right foot first and then follow with the left.

Spot up

If you are spotting up, or catching and shooting from a standstill, you can start with your first foot already planted. The shot will then only require one step into your alignment, catch and shoot, and will thus be quicker.

Moving

On the move, the 1-2 step will require you to set up your feet as you move to the desired spot so that the proper first foot is down on the catch, then turning your body to face the basket and into your shot as the ball is caught. To get into the 1-2 step on the move you may have to alter your stride as you run.

After the catch

Once the ball is caught after a 1-2 step, if you decide not to shoot, you can only jab step or begin a drive with the second foot that was used to step into the shot, once the ball was caught.

Your decision to either shoot, drive or pass will be made as you are stepping into your shot and reading the defense.

The Hop

To use the hop, you will start by jumping just 2 to 3 inches off the ground once the pass is thrown and the ball is in the air. While you are briefly in the air you will catch the ball and align your hips and feet for your shot, so the hop, catch and alignment will take place all in one motion. You will land on the balls of your feet and quickly spring back up for your jump shot.

Spot up

If you are spotting up with the hop, you can start with your feet in whatever stance is comfortable for you—square, staggered or angled. You will hop off of both feet, catch, align, land and shoot.

Moving

On the move you can be ready to hop and shoot at any time because as you move you can get into your hop by jumping off of either foot and quickly turning in the air to align your body. When running, shuffling or backpedaling into a shot, as the ball comes toward you, you will start your hop with whichever foot is currently planted. Then jump off of one foot, catch, align with the basket and land on two feet before shooting.

(It maybe be more comfortable to always start your hop with a certain foot when you are on the move, and in this case you will have to set up your steps similar to a 1-2 step.)

After the catch

Once the ball is caught after a hop, you can attack the defense with either foot because landing on two feet does not establish a pivot foot. So you can jab or begin a drive with either foot.

Your decision to either shoot, drive or pass must be made quickly as you are in the air, catching the ball and reading the defense.

Which is better?

Changing your footwork from the 1-2 to the hop is not going to drastically change your shot accuracy by itself. If you have been taught to use the 1-2 step and are considering adding the hop to your game, there are three main aspects of your shot you will want to consider when examining if the hop helps you or not. So as you are trying out the hop you should be asking yourself about:

  • Speed: Does using the hop compared to the 1-2 get my shot off quicker? Is my shot released faster from the time the ball is caught?
  • Balance: Does quickly landing on the balls of my feet give me more or less balance when compared to stepping into my shot, one foot at a time? Do I feel like my weight is distributed equally and I am jumping straight?
  • Rhythm: Does the hop give me more rhythm? Does hopping into my shot give my entire shooting motion more flow from my feet to my release point?

The video below makes the case for the hop but does a good job or comparing the two methods and providing visual examples of how both are done.

These questions should help you determine if using the hop would be good for you. You can obviously use either the 1,2 step or the hop exclusively or a combination of both depending on the situation of the game. What is most important is what makes your shooting motion the most comfortable and how it affects your shot.

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The traveling rule in the NBA rulebook has changed in a profound way.

It’s fallout from that surprising moment this early spring when the guy who oversees NBA officials told me that, in calling traveling, referees are instructed to ignore the rulebook.

When that happened, it was as if a thousand cranky old ex-NBA fans, in a thousand sports bars, had been vindicated. “See!” I could hear some imaginary Homer Simpson saying. “Told you. They threw out the rulebook years ago.”

The rulebook allowed for just one step after the “gather,” but NBA referees had long been instructed to allow two.

People have very strong feelings about whether one or two steps ought to be allowed. The two-step crowd insists that if you videotape a normal layup in any game anywhere, and watch it in slow motion, you’re very likely to see two steps after the gather. Magic Johnson did it. Bob Cousy did it. Pete Maravich did it.

The one-step crowd insists that the rules have always said one, and even if that’s hard to call perfectly, that’s basketball, and that’s a standard to shoot for now and forever. Change it at your peril.

I have no dog in that fight. (I play basketball expecting to be allowed one step. I watch the NBA expecting two. It’s one of a zillion differences between my game and the NBA, and I’m fine with it.) But I know in my gut that the rulebook ought to be consistent with what the referees are calling. And I know that no one involved in NBA officiating seemed to think they were anywhere close to just allowing one step.

Therefore, the rulebook surely had to be changed. Here, in its entirety, are the NBA’s new rules on traveling. Section “b” is where the action is:

a. A player who receives the ball while standing still may pivot, using either foot as the pivot foot.

b. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing or upon completion of a dribble, may take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing must release the ball to start his dribble before his second step. The first step occurs when a foot, or both feet, touch the floor after gaining control of the ball. The second step occurs after the first step when the other foot touches the floor, or both feet touch the floor simultaneously. A player who comes to a stop on step one when both feet are on the floor or touch the floor simultaneously may pivot using either foot as his pivot. If he jumps with both feet he must release the ball before either foot touches the floor. A player who lands with one foot first may only pivot using that foot. A progressing player who jumps off one foot on the first step may land with both feet simultaneously for the second step. In this situation, the player may not pivot with either foot and if one or both feet leave the floor the ball must be released before either returns to the floor.

c. In starting a dribble after (1) receiving the ball while standing still, or (2) coming to a legal stop, the ball must be out of the player’s hand before the pivot foot is raised off the floor.

d. If a player, with the ball in his possession, raises his pivot foot off the floor, he must pass or shoot before his pivot foot returns to the floor. If he drops the ball while in the air, he may not be the first to touch the ball. e. A player who falls to the floor while holding the ball, or while coming to a stop, may not gain an advantage by sliding.

f. A player who attempts a field goal may not be the first to touch the ball if it fails to touch the backboard, basket ring or another player.

g. A player may not be the first to touch his own pass unless the ball touches his backboard, basket ring or another player. h. Upon ending his dribble or gaining control of the ball, a player may not touch the floor consecutively with the same foot (hop).

PENALTY: Loss of ball. The ball is awarded to the opposing team at the sideline, nearest spot of the violation but no nearer the baseline than the foul line extended.

Hats off to the League. They simply didn’t have to update their rulebook. Doing nothing was totally an option — they hold all the cards. But they did what strikes me as undeniably the right thing. They got their rulebook, and their referees, on the same page. Nicely played. That’s leadership, and in its way it was bold.

There may be a public relations price to pay, too. Many told me last spring that such a rewording would never happen. One NBA source said that it would anger far too many fans, who would see it as the league letting the players do whatever they want. Right or not, and sometimes with racial overtones, a big bunch of fans just hate the idea that NBA players are getting away with something.

If comments on ESPN.com are representative, this rule change is not being taken lightly. A small minority are positive about the change. But most responses are more like these:

Sinestrojoe Like they call walking anyway . NBA is nothing more than glorified streetball.

Inisfree19 Let’s be honest and call this new rule by its proper name, “The Lebron Rule.” Since he already takes three steps and lowers his shoulder, is he now allowed to take four steps?

buphelow I mean really, why even bother dribbling the ball at all. Lets just get rid of that nit-picky little aspect of the sport as well.

coolhippie51 Once again the NBA has proved it is more about the show than the basketball product. They should consider changeing their name to WWB as they enforce rules as they please to insure an outcome they want.

robertrwebster Let’s allow two fouls before calling a foul, too. Oops — already doing that.

rogersxx1 And for those saying the game is being ruined, it’s too late.

tomjam7777 Rules? The NBA has rules? Easy solution — make dribbling optional. The NBA — Not Basketball Anymore.

jhett09 Terrible! I was already planning on watching hardly any NBA, now it’ll be even less. Can’t stand how much they baby the best players in the world.

vijayfan This is a joke, right?? Right??

I salute the idea that fans feel protective of the game. I’m thrilled people get mad when they see things happen to basketball that they don’t like. All that passion keeps the whole thing rolling.

But I don’t see it on this topic. As of this week, the way it is written is the way referees have been instructed to call it for as long as anyone can remember. It’s hard to imagine there will be a noticeable difference in what we see on the court this season.

And sure, anyone with a Tivo knows that referees make mistakes sometimes. But having spent time with NBA referees I can tell you it’s wrong not to see them as serious professionals. They’re getting things right that most of us know nothing about. (Can you pass this quiz?)

As for those who doubt the quality of the basketball being played in the NBA: Honestly, are you really watching?

Can you take steps in basketball?

In basketball, traveling is a violation of the rules that occurs when a player holding the ball moves one or both their feet illegally. Traveling is also called, predominantly in a streetball game, “walking” or “steps”. A travel can also be called via carrying or an unestablished pivot foot.

Can you take 3 steps in basketball?

Taking more than two steps with control of the ball is considered a travel, so in this case, three steps is a travel. Oftentimes a player will catch the ball while taking a step but not have full control of it and then take two more steps for a layup or dunk, this is legal.

How many steps are you allowed in basketball?

two steps
A player who receives the ball while he is progressing or upon completion of a dribble, may take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing must release the ball to start his dribble before his second step.

How many steps can you take in basketball for a layup?

“A layup is the action of a player dribbling towards the hoop, taking two steps, and then laying the basketball into the hoop off the backboard.”

Can you take 2 steps in basketball without dribbling?

The definition of a travel is when a player illegally moves one or both feet. If a player takes three steps or more before dribbling, or changes pivot foot, it’s a traveling violation. That means a player can take two steps before he has to dribble.

Can you take two steps without dribbling?

Can I take 2 steps without dribbling?

Why is hop step not a travel?

Re: Why aren’t hop steps and euro steps considered traveling Because you are allowed two steps when coming to a stop. This includes passing or shooting. Neither of those moves break that rule.

How many overtimes allowed in college basketball?

Unlike the NBA, college basketball uses two 20-minutes halves, as opposed to four quarters. However, all programs affiliated with the NCAA (Divisions I, II and III) play five-minute overtimes, just like in the pros.

How many PSI should you put in a basketball?

In the United States, we measure this force using psi, or pounds per square inch. Conventional wisdom is that a basketball needs 8 psi to be properly inflated. A car tire, just for a comparison, needs 40 psi. Most basketballs have inflation instructions printed right on them.

How many substitutes are allowed in basketball?

Basketball rules –. Five players are required on each team to begin play. Once the action is under way, fewer than five can play if no legal substitutes are available.

How many overtimes are in basketball?

The National Basketball Association holds five-minute overtime periods, regardless of how many OTs are played. The NBA consists of four 12-minute quarters, and allows for 130 seconds between the end of the fourth quarter and overtime, as well as between each overtime period. The most overtimes in an NBA game is six.

Is Hop Step illegal?

However the case of so-called ‘Hop step’ has become violation as it is also a violation in the NBA. This means: A player may not touch the floor consecutively with the same foot or both feet after ending his dribble or gaining control of the ball.

Is a hop step two steps?

Once you stop dribbling, the foot that first hits the floor doesn’t count because you were dribbling while it was moving. After this step you can either do two steps with one foot or you can take one step and then jump off that foot and land with two feet at the same time, that is a hop step.

Is a Euro step a hop step?

Giroux! A hop step is clearly jumping and landing with the ball. A eurostep is two steps(picking up pivot foot).

Can you take a step after a hop step?

You can take another “step” as long as you keep your pivot down, but what you’re doing sounds like a travel. This. As long as your pivot foot is down you can “step” out of your stance.

Are you allowed to take 2 steps without dribbling?

It’s only legal if you’re on the move. If you’re moving such running, cutting, or going toward the basket then you can take two steps without dribbling to take a lay up or take a jump shot. If you were on the move while catching the ball, you can also take two steps after catching the ball to come to a full stop.

Is there illegal touching in basketball?

In basketball, basket interference is the violation of (a) touching the ball or any part of the basket (including the net) while the ball is on the rim of the basket, (b) touching the ball when it is within the cylinder extending upwards from the rim, (c) reaching up through the basket from below and touching the ball.

What is the 8-second rule in basketball?

8-second rule When a player has the ball in their own half or ‘backcourt’, they have 8 seconds to move the ball over the halfway line into the ‘frontcourt’.

What is a shot clock violation?

If a team fails to attempt a field goal within the time allotted, a shot clock violation shall be called. The ball is awarded to the defensive team on the sideline, nearest the spot where play was suspended but no nearer to the baseline than the free throw line extended.

What is the 25 second rule in tennis?

After the chair umpire announces the score, a server will have 25 seconds to start the next point. If the player has not started the service motion at the completion of the 25-second countdown, the chair umpire will issue a violation.

What happens with a shot clock violation?

A shot clock violation results in a turnover. The opposing team will get to inbound the ball and start a new possession. As long as the ball has left a player’s hands and is in the air by the time the shot clock hits zero, it is not considered a shot clock violation-although the ball still needs to hit the rim.

What is 24 or 30 second clock shot clock?

A shot clock is a countdown timer used in basketball that provides a set amount of time (24–35 seconds, depending on the league) that a team may possess the ball before attempting to score a field goal. It is distinct from the game clock, which displays the time remaining in the period of play.

Is the shot clock on the floor real?

TNT’s New On-Court Shot Clock Is an Abomination Last month, TNT introduced a new, horrifying feature on its NBA broadcasts: a digital shot clock that’s superimposed onto the floor just behind the foul line. Unlike the yellow first-down line, however, TNT’s digital shot clock is completely unnecessary.

Which position is referred to as the 4 in basketball?

Basketball positions with the numbers as they are known: 1–Point guard. 2–Shooting guard. 3– Small forward. 4–Power forward.

Table of Contents

How to do a basketball hop step

Can you take 3 steps in basketball?

Taking more than two steps with control of the ball is considered a travel, so in this case, three steps is a travel. Oftentimes a player will catch the ball while taking a step but not have full control of it and then take two more steps for a layup or dunk, this is legal.

Does basketball take 2 or 3 steps?

Quote from NBA Rulebook. You’re allowed 2 steps upon completion of a dribble, so if you dribble while pushing off of one foot it is not counted toward one of your 2 allowed steps.

How many steps can you take for a layup?

You are allowed to take two steps after you have stopped dribbling when you shoot a layup.

What is a zero step in basketball?

The zero step refers to the step taken when gaining control of the ball. When dribbling, the zero step gathering happens as the ball is gathered in 2 hands or let it rest in 1 hand. Similarly when moving and catching a ball.

Do NBA players carry the ball?

So yes, many players carry the ball. Many players also try to draw fouls, but we seem to agree that what James Harden does is excessive.

Is 2 steps a travel in basketball?

In basketball, traveling is a violation of the rules that occurs when a player holding the ball moves one or both their feet illegally. . When a player has taken more than 2 steps without the ball being dribbled, a traveling violation is called.

Can you take 2 steps in basketball?

A player who receives the ball while he is progressing or upon completion of a dribble, may take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball. . If he jumps with both feet he must release the ball before either foot touches the floor. A player who lands with one foot first may only pivot using that foot.

Can I walk more than 2 steps in basketball?

When a player has taken more than 2 steps without the ball being dribbled, a traveling violation is called. In 2018, FIBA revised the rule so that one can take a “gather step” before taking the 2 steps. A travel can also be called via carrying or an unestablished pivot foot.

Is it legal to take two steps in basketball?

This occurrence is more commonly referred to as taking “two-and-a-half steps”, where the half step is the “gather step”. This half step is what makes the majority of euro-steps look so effortless and sexy. As for whether this is considered legal in NCAA/International basketball, I have no idea.

How many steps are allowed in a dribble in the NBA?

Quote from NBA Rulebook. You’re allowed 2 steps upon completion of a dribble, so if you dribble while pushing off of one foot it is not counted toward one of your 2 allowed steps. Conclusion: This occurrence is more commonly referred to as taking “two-and-a-half steps”, where the half step is the “gather step”.

How to do a 6 step layup in basketball?

How to Do a Layup (6-Steps) 1 Eyes Up 2 Outside Foot Step (Long) 3 Inside Foot Step (High) 4 Protect the Ball 5 Follow Through 6 Practice!

What happens if you do a hop step in basketball?

Even executed perfectly, some officials may still call you for traveling, as it can be difficult to discern a hop step from a travel. Possession of the ball and prior use of a player’s allotted pivot can also influence traveling calls. Dribble the ball slowly down the court. You should pay close attention to footwork and stance.

We all watch the NBA or basketball highlights and see a play that leads to dunk, then stop and think how many steps did he take? was that legal. We think the referee missed the call, actually, we know the referee missed the call. So we question ourselves?

How many steps is a travel in basketball? Taking more than two steps with control of the ball is considered a travel, so in this case, three steps is a travel. Oftentimes a player will catch the ball while taking a step but not have full control of it and then take two more steps for a layup or dunk, this is legal. It is only a travel violation if the referee blows the whistle.

Travel violations can happen in many ways, but in the end, you are technically allowed two steps when in control of the ball. Taking more than two steps is not the only way to travel, let’s look at what else is considered a travel.

More On Travelling

We can say that 3 steps is a travel but really it depends, for example picking up your pivot foot is a travel and that’s one step. If you catch the ball in motion it has to be out of your hands bypassing, shooting, or dribbling, if not this can be a travel. Jumping up and down with the ball is a travel, so it obviously depends on the type of violation.

How to do a basketball hop step

Easy to Understand Travel Violations

Below I have listed the rules to traveling as per the NBA rule book but if you don’t want to go through the fluff I will list in simple terms what other ways in basketball is a travel besides taking more than two steps.

In no particular order doing these things may result in a travel violation call:

  • Picking up the pivot foot.
  • If you land with a left then right and while catching the ball the first foot which in this case is the left is the pivot foot. If you use the right foot it is actually a travel.
  • Switching pivot feet.
  • Taking more than two steps without a dribble or motion to shoot.
  • Standing still you may not take a step without a dribble before the pivot foot is released.
  • Catching your own airball is a travel, it must hit the backboard or rim or touch another player.
  • You may not jump up and down with the ball you must release it on the way up, and catch it mid-air on the way down.
  • You may not take two steps after a jump stop.
  • If you fall to the ground you may not slide, roll or move on the floor with the ball.
  • Pass to yourself off the backboard unless you’re in motion to layup/dunk it.
  • Jab step to quickly and in the process pick up your pivot foot before dribbling the ball.
  • Catching the ball and then taking your two steps to set up for a shot at the hoop.
  • Up and Under is usually done in the post, you fake out the defender with a shot, defender jumps and you go underneath him by taking a step, you must be in the process of shooting the ball as you lift up your pivot foot.

How to do a basketball hop step

Nba Rules on Travelling

So what do the rules say I will go over them using the NBA Rule Book as a reference, most of these rules are universal. You can find the traveling rules in Section XIII—Traveling.

1 . A player who receives the ball while standing still may pivot, using either foot as the pivot foot.

A player who catches the ball and is standing still can pivot but can not take any steps.

2. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing or upon completion of a dribble, may take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball.

This is pretty clear you are given 2 steps to come to a complete stop, pass or shoot. Sometimes this isn’t always called when it is more than 2 steps as the player is running it may be difficult to catch, happens all the time in the NBA where the player looked like they took 3 steps.

3. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing must release the ball to start his dribble before his second step.

I feel this could have been worded better, usually, the ball is not in full control of the player’s hand until the second step which isn’t a travel. Even when the ball is in full control a lot of players do not put the ball down by the second step more like they have already taken their second step and now dribbled not released the ball.

How to do a basketball hop step

  1. The first step occurs when a foot, or both feet, touch the floor after gaining control of the ball.
  2. The second step occurs after the first step when the other foot touches the floor, or both feet touch the floor simultaneously.
  3. A player who comes to a stop on step one when both feet are on the floor or touch the floor simultaneously may pivot using either foot as his pivot. If he jumps with both feet he must release the ball before either foot touches the floor.
  4. A player who lands with one foot first may only pivot using that foot.
  5. A progressing player who jumps off one foot on the first step may land with both feet simultaneously for the second step. In this situation, the player may not pivot with either foot and if one or both feet leave the floor the ball must be released before either returns to the floor.

This is why in basketball footwork is so important, there are many ways to travel, as you can see in most cases the if you lift up the pivot foot before releasing the ball this will be a travel violation.

(e) In starting a dribble after (1) receiving the ball while standing still, or (2) coming to a legal stop, the ball must be out of the player’s hand before the pivot foot is raised off the floor.

This is one of the most common travel violations, may not be called very often in the NBA.

(f) If a player, with the ball in his possession, raises his pivot foot off the floor, he must pass or shoot before his pivot foot returns to the floor. If he drops the ball while in the air, he may not be the first to touch the ball.

This all has to be in motion you can’t let the pivot foot hang in the air.

(g) A player who falls to the floor while holding the ball, or while coming to a stop, may not gain an advantage by sliding.

Any movement and you are more than likely to get called for a travel. You may dribble from the floor if you are that skilled.

How to do a basketball hop step

Is The Step Back A Travel

Many people think that the step back is a travel, to those that play basketball it looks normal to those who just spectate it may look awkward to them. The way that I can explain the step-back is a backward jump stop or sideway jump stop. This move is actually legal.

Sometimes it is a travel, the player will take one too many steps, this is on the ref to call it. But when done right the step back is a very difficult move to guard that James Harden lives by.

I watched videos of James Harden doing step-back three’s this offseason and shooting them off one foot and making it during pickup games, this will be interesting to see if he pulls this off in a real game this season.

If your looking for more rules to the game of basketball check out my other articles down below.

by Nick Bartlett, on May 27, 2019 3:35:21 PM

Throughout the past few years we’ve noticed that there are many “fundamentals” within basketball that are rather controversial – especially on social media.

And recently we’ve tried to get to the bottom of these issues and get both sides of each argument before making our own definitive decision.

Back in January we asked the question to coaches on Twitter on whether they like the “1-2 step” or “Hop” in a catch and shoot situation:

🏀 COACHES & TRAINERS: When teaching footwork in a catch and shoot situation, what do you prefer?

Feel free to share your thoughts in the comments. We’re planning to write a blog post in this topic and you could be featured!

You can see the percentages of each choice which are very interesting but there were some great comments as well.

In Favor of “Both”

Here’s one of our favorites from our partner, Mike Dunn:

For younger kids I find the hop is easier. Reason being it’s an easier concept to grasp when explaining the purpose of coming off of both legs with an equal amount of power. 1-2 step usually comes a little further down the line. Need to be able to do BOTH!

And a great quote from another one of our partners, Reid Ouse of Catalyst Training:

”A good habit is a bad habit when it’s your only habit.” Need to be able to both – multiple habits depending on the situation

In Favor of the “1-2 Step”

But we had a few responses that were very heavy in supporting the 1-2 step like this one from Seth Duke:

This shouldn’t be a question. A 1-2 step is the smoothest and most common way to flow into a jumper. A jump stop for starters leaves you off balance and if you land wrong can twist your ankle on take off. A hop is just not practical.

In Favor of “The Hop”

And last, here’s one from our friend Coach Chris Straker that feels like “The Hop” is the best option the majority of the time:

If we’re coming down off a screen or cutting in to the shot there are time for a 1-2 most of the time I feel the hop is the best option

Our take

We tend to lean towards “being able to do BOTH is important in different situations” AND “every player is going to be slightly different in what they adopt.”

For me personally, I was always taught the 1-2 step and “planting on your inside foot” when shooting in a catch and shoot situation AND off the move. However, I feel like “the hop” has become more popular as of late – especially in catch and shoot situations.

One benefit of “the hop” is being able to choose your pivot foot if you don’t shoot. I can also see how – if timed correctly – “the hop” would help create a quicker shot release.

However, as someone who spent many years focusing on the 1-2 step, I believe it would be hard for me to adopt a new way of shooting. Granted, I’m not sure the rec league games I play in now matter as much as aspiring high school, college, and pro players 🙂

I personally believe that players should practice both and understand what works best for them and what is most comfortable for them to execute in a game situation.

Your Thoughts?

Let us know in the comments! This is a fascinating topic and we want to hear from as many coaches/trainers/players as possible. Any other shooting questions you’d like us to help answer on Twitter?

For more articles and tips like this, make sure to subscribe to our blog newsletter!

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James Harden isn’t traveling on his drives to the basket. Get educated about the “gather” step.

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Share All sharing options for: This James Harden ‘travel’ is actually totally legal. Here’s why

James Harden has become one of the NBA’s most polarizing players as he’s grown into the best pure-scorer alive. While no one denies Harden ’s numbers are incredible — he’s leading the NBA in scoring at 35.2 points per game, five points ahead of Giannis Antetokounmpo — how he gets them has become a topic of national debate.

Harden ’s offensive arsenal has been built on a barrage of step-back and side-step three-pointers combined with an unprecedented ability to draw fouls, but the part of his game that confounds so many people is his euro-step layup.

Harden didn’t invent the euro-step, but it sure looks like he’s perfected it. When Harden picks up his dribble and goes into the move, defenses are at his mercy to surrender two points. The move has become so effective that it’s led to many opposing fans, players, and announcers calling for it to be whistled as a travel.

It happened again during the Houston Rockets’ 120-110 victory over the Utah Jazz Saturday night. Harden again led the way for Houston with 38 points, but it’s one play in particular that has driven conversation in the hours since. As Harden attacked the Jazz defense and used a euro-step layup to score a bucket, Utah’s announcers were pleading for a traveling call on TV.

Either way James still has this in his bag pic.twitter.com/YnwNA3Hka4

At first glance, it sure looks like Harden is taking three steps before he scores the ball, which would be against the rules and should be whistled as a travel. But if you look at the NBA rule book and watch the play again, it’s pretty clear this isn’t traveling. It’s a totally legal move.

It all comes back to the “gather” step. Here’s how the NBA rule book defines a gather:

For a player who is in control of the ball while dribbling, the gather is defined as the point where a player does any one of the following:

Puts two hands on the ball, or otherwise permits the ball to come to rest, while he is in control of it;

Puts a hand under the ball and brings it to a pause; or

Otherwise gains enough control of the ball to hold it, change hands, pass, shoot, or cradle it against his body.

Incorporating the Gather into the Traveling Rule

The gather will be expressly incorporated into the traveling rule to clarify how many steps a player may take after he receives the ball while progressing or completes his dribble:

A player who gathers the ball while progressing may (a) take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball or (b) if he has not yet dribbled, one step prior to releasing the ball to start his dribble.

A player who gathers the ball while dribbling may take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball.

The first step occurs when a foot, or both feet, touch the floor after the player gathers the ball.

That last line is the most important. NBA officials don’t start counting steps until the gather is complete. Harden and other stars like Antetokounmpo have been able to leverage that rule to their advantage when driving to the basket.

Watch the Harden play above again. Harden is gathering the ball as he makes his first step. That is legal according to the rule book and does not start the count on how many steps Harden is allowed to take:

How to do a basketball hop step

Harden then takes two steps and lays the ball in. It does appear he drags his back foot into his final step, but as Basketball Breakdown and others have pointed out, that’s legal as well.

No, Harden isn’t traveling when he goes into his euro-step layup, even if it looks that way to casual fans. This is a legal move because of how the gather is defined in the rule book. Remember that the next time someone complains that Harden is taking three steps.

This is a highlighted and annotated version of the FIBA travel rule, including links to videos. Paragraph numbers are used to facilitate cross-reference. For key videos see

Travelling is the illegal movement of one foot or both feet beyond the limits outlined in this article, in any direction, while holding a live ball on the playing court.

A pivot is the legal movement in which a player who is holding a live ball on the playing court steps once or more than once in any direction with the same foot, while the other foot, called the pivot foot, is kept at its point of contact with the floor.

Establishing a pivot foot by a player who catches a live ball on the playing court:

  1. A player who catches the ball while standing with both feet on the floor:
    1. The moment one foot is lifted, the other foot becomes the pivot foot.
    2. To start a dribble, the pivot foot may not be lifted before the ball is released from the hand(s).
      • See 2018 FIBA Traveling Rules at 5:01 (travel).
    3. To pass or shoot for a field goal, the player may jump off a pivot foot, but neither foot may be returned to the floor before the ball is released from the hand(s).
      • Nothing new here.
  2. A player who catches the ball while he is progressing, or upon completion of a dribble, may take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball:
      • NBA language is basically the same, using “gathers” instead of “catches”; the first steps occurs when a foot, or both feet, touch the floor after the player gathers the ball.
      • Catching a pass while progressing can be on one foot or in the air; a catch on two feet is covered by paragraph 1 (as is a catch in the air then landing on two feet, see 2(g) below). See
        • Stationary start before dribble
        • NBA Video – Traveling and the Gather at 4:10 of video #1 (Moe Wagner).
    1. If, after receiving the ball, a player shall release the ball to start his dribble before his second step.
      • NBA wording is that a player may take one step prior to releasing the ball to start his dribble.
      • While moving, you can catch the ball on one foot (gather), take a first step, then release the ball to dribble before a second step hits the floor. See
        • Kyle Lowry clip
        • 2018 FIBA Traveling Rules at 8:26
        • NBA Video – Traveling and the Gather at 6:15 of video #1.
      • If you catch the ball in the air and land on one foot, that is the first step, and the ball has to be released to dribble before the next step hits the floor.
        • See NBA Video – Traveling and the Gather at 6:44 of video #1 (travel by Rudy Gobert, gather with both feet in the air, step 1-2).
      • This is not stationary situation 1(b) where the ball has to be released before a pivot foot is lifted from the floor.
      • See Shooting – Sackmann pull-ups .
    2. The first step occurs when one foot or both feet touch the floor after gaining control of the ball.
      • Basically the same as the NBA. Note the key phrase “after gaining control of the ball”.
      • If one foot is on the floor when gaining control of the ball on the move, that is not the first step, it is the gather step or zero step (step 0).
        • See Travelling Rules Interpretation at 0:26 (zero step) and 0:54 (when you take control of the ball with one foot on the ground that foot is zero).
      • If both feet are in the air when gaining control of the ball, there is no gather step, landing on one foot or both feet will be the first step; this is not new, see 2(e) and 2(g) below.
        • See NBA Video – Traveling and the Gather (video #1) at 5:50 – Klay Thompson catches in the air and takes 3 steps, it’s a travel.
    3. The second step occurs after the first step when the other foot touches the floor or both feet touch the floor simultaneously.
      • For layups off a catch, see
        • Pick and roll clip (0-1-2)
        • 2018 FIBA Traveling Rules at 0:17
        • NBA Video – Traveling and the Gather (video #1)
          • at 5:05 – gather, step 1, step 2
          • at 5:33 – travel by Klay Thompson (gather-1-2-3)
      • For layups off the dribble, see
        • Travelling Rules Interpretation at 0:26 (dribble, zero step, 1st step, 2nd step)
        • Dribble step, gather step, step 1, step 2.
      • For layups off a catch and dribble, see
        • DeAndre Jordan clip
        • 2018 FIBA Traveling Rules at 8:27.
      • If a moving player catches on one foot (the gather), takes a first step then stops with another step, the first step is the pivot foot , and 1(b) applies to start a dribble.
        • See 2018 FIBA Traveling Rules at 2:42 (lift from corner to 0-1-2 stop).
      • See 2(f) if a player lands on both feet after the first step.
    4. If the player who comes to a stop on his first step has both feet on the floor or they touch the floor simultaneously, he may pivot using either foot as his pivot foot. If he then jumps with both feet, no foot may return to the floor before the ball is released from the hand(s).
      • See 1(a) and 1(c) above.
      • A moving player who catches on one foot then stops with the other foot, or hops off the one foot to land on both feet, does not yet have a pivot foot. The footwork is gather step, first step (not first step, second step). To initiate a dribble, 1(b) applies.
      • See 2018 FIBA Traveling Rules at
        • 3:29 – lift, left-right stop, drive left, left foot (gather step) is the pivot foot.
        • 3:53 – lift, left-right stop, drive right, right foot (first step) is the pivot foot.
        • 4:13 – catch on right foot, hop to land on both feet, drive right.
        • 4:35 – catch on left foot, hop to land on both feet, drive left.
      • See Shooting – Angled pull-up .
    5. If a player lands with one foot he may only pivot using that foot.
      • To repeat, there is no gather step on a catch in the air, landing on one foot (or both feet) is the first step. This is not new.
    6. If a player jumps off one foot on the first step , he may land with both feet simultaneously for the second step. In this situation, the player may not pivot with either foot. If one foot or both feet then leave the floor, no foot may return to the floor before the ball is released from the hand(s).
      • Not new. This is different from catching on the move on one foot then jumping to land on both feet (gather step, first step), where either foot can be the pivot foot. See 2(d) and
        • 2018 FIBA Traveling Rules at 7:58 (spin drop step, hop, step thru – travel)
        • Travelling Rules Interpretation at 6:20 (dribble, 0, 1, jump stop).
    7. If both feet are off the floor and the player lands on both feet simultaneously, the moment one foot is lifted the other foot becomes the pivot foot.
      • Not new, see 1(a), also Travelling Rules Interpretation at 5:53 (the new rules apply to a player who is moving, on a jump stop the old rules apply)
    8. A player may not touch the floor consecutively with the same foot or both feet after ending his dribble or gaining control of the ball.
      • Not new; see Same foot twice clip.

A player falling, lying or sitting on the floor:

How to do a basketball hop step

Posted On: 08/9/21 9:00 AM

I got another opportunity to evaluate some girls basketball at the HSSE National Tournament in Benton, AR during the weekend of July 24-25th. This was HSSE’s first national tournament so the field was small but there was still good basketball played and some players stood out to me.

How to do a basketball hop stepAtesa Johnson | Arkansas Blaze (Lafayette County High School) | Combo Guard | 2025

Atesa is an athletic player that slashes to the basket. She often scored points for her team just by finding ways to score. She uses her athletic ability well in the half-court and in transition. Atesa also displayed the ability to finish at the rim a number of different ways.

How to do a basketball hop stepLindsey Lockheart | South Arkansas Lady Wolves (El Dorado High School) | Combo Guard/Wing | 2023

Lindsey showed the most potential of all the players at the national tournament. When she decided to make a play, whether it was scoring or creating for someone else, she did it. She can shoot the three, score in transition, handles the rock, and anticipate on defense.

How to do a basketball hop step

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How to do a basketball hop step

Table of Contents

  • What is a Basketball Swing Step?
  • Footwork
  • Protecting The Ball

What is a Basketball Swing Step?

A swing step in basketball is a move used by a player on a drive to the basket. Similar to a Euro step, a swing step allows the ball handler to sidestep the defender and finish at the rim, usually with a layup or a floater.

The footwork of a swing step builds upon the fundamental footwork that precedes a regular layup. On a swing step, however, the first step after the dribble is bigger and helps the ball handler to change direction.

Footwork

For the purposes of making these instructions more clear, these steps will refer to a swing step being used when approaching the defender on the right side of his body, which will generally happen on the right side of the court. To use the move on the left, simply replace “right” with “left” and vice versa.

The swing step starts with the ball handler getting low as he drives to the hoop. he takes one last dribble with his right hand and steps with his left foot simultaneously. As the player picks up his dribble, he takes a large, exaggerated step with his right foot across the body of the defender. After this step, the ball handler’s right foot and hip should be on the inside of the defender. The ball handler finishes by taking one more step with his left foot before finishing with a shot at the rim.

Protecting The Ball

As with any drive to the basket, the ball handler needs to protect the ball from defenders. The best way to do this is to keep the ball as far away from the defense as possible.

An effective strategy for the ball handler is to bring the ball over his head while performing the swing step across the defender’s body. When swinging the ball overhead from the right side of the body to the left, the exaggerated step should turn into a slight hop as the player gets out of his initial low dribbling stance to stretch vertically and stand up. This will ensure the ball is as far from the defender’s grasp as possible.

Alternatively, the ball handler can bring the ball down low to his knees during the swing step. Rather than standing up during the large step however, the ball handler gets even lower. Again, this keeps the ball away from the defender.

The ball handler even has the option to bring the ball behind his back, transferring it from the right hand to the left hand in order to protect the ball.

I’ve recently started playing basketball and was wondering about some of the comments made about this (pretty cool) NBA commercial featuring LeBron James. It looks like he takes 1 step after receiving the ball before dribbling it, is that considered to be a travel? I doubt the NBA would make a commercial showing a blatant violation so I’m assuming it’s valid but want to know what the exact rule is.

How to do a basketball hop step

2 Answers 2

You would think they wouldn’t include a blatant violation, but they did. From the NBA Rules Section XIV:

f. In starting a dribble after (1) receiving the ball while standing still, or (2) coming to a legal stop, the ball must be out of the player’s hand before the pivot foot is raised off the floor.

From listening to my friends who I would consider avid NBA fans, travelling and carrying seem to be the most common complaints where modern referees often ignore the written rules.

How to do a basketball hop step

There’s also some additional information regarding traveling in the 2011-12 NBA Rulebook:

Section XIII—Traveling

a. A player who receives the ball while standing still may pivot, using either foot as the pivot foot.

b. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing or upon completion of a dribble, may take two steps in coming to a stop, passing or shooting the ball. A player who receives the ball while he is progressing must release the ball to start his dribble before his second step.

The first step occurs when a foot, or both feet, touch the floor after gaining control of the ball.

The second step occurs after the first step when the other foot touches the floor, or both feet touch the floor simultaneously.

A player who comes to a stop on step one when both feet are on the floor or touch the floor simultaneously may pivot using either foot as his pivot. If he jumps with both feet he must release the ball before either foot touches the floor.

A player who lands with one foot first may only pivot using that foot.

A progressing player who jumps off one foot on the first step may land with both feet simultaneously for the second step. In this situation, the player may not pivot with either foot and if one or both feet leave the floor the ball must be released before either returns to the floor.

Columnists have blasted the rule:

And while you’re at it, clean up traveling, too (the two-steps-and-bunny-hop is especially insulting to the memory of Dr. James).

So the rule specified in @Will Cole’s answer conflicts somewhat with this one. According to this 2009 ESPN article, the league has generally instructed refs not to enforce the rule.

How to do a basketball hop step

How to do a basketball hop step

How to do a basketball hop step

Referee officials JB Derosa, Josh Tiven, and Nick Buchert discuss a play during the game between the Phoenix Suns and Orlando Magic on December 26, 2018 at Amway Center in Orlando, Florida. /VCG Photo

After a summer of reinforcements and readjustments, the 30 teams in the U.S. National Basketball Association are gearing up towards the 74th season, set to kick off on October 22. However, the East and West conferences weren’t the only ones busy at the drawing board.

League officials, as they do between seasons, revisited controversial plays and noteworthy calls in an effort to conform to the seemingly ever-evolving rules of basketball with “new language.”

The NBA introduced newly-defined rules regarding traveling violations on Tuesday that tried putting to rest the controversy surrounding some offensive players’ moves, including the signature “step-back” by Houston Rockets star shooting guard James Harden: a move that is so unique and unusual it seems like he takes an illegal three steps before shooting.

Officials are determined not to allow offensive players to take more than the allowed two steps after “gathering” the ball and have, therefore, issued new guidelines to help clear the smoke.

How to do a basketball hop step

James Harden #13 of the Houston Rockets drives to the basket against the Shanghai Sharks during the pre-season on September 30, 2019 at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas. /VCG Photo

“The official NBA rule book will now have a section that formally defines the ‘gather.’ The text of the rule will also be revised to provide additional clarity regarding how many steps a player may take after the gather occurs,” read the NBA statement.

For a player who receives a pass or gains possession of a loose ball, the “gather” is defined as the point where the player gains enough control of the ball to hold it, change hands, pass, shoot, or cradle it against his body.

Gathering also applies when a player is in control of the ball while dribbling and does any of the following:

– Puts two hands on the ball, or otherwise permits the ball to come to rest, while he is in control of it.

– Puts a hand under the ball and brings it to a pause.

– Gains enough control of the ball to hold it, change hands, pass, shoot, or cradle it against his body.

It is after the “gather” that the NBA says a player can take the allotted two steps.

Scoring stars like Lebron James and Stephen Curry already have an advantage since the “hand-checking” on the perimeter was made illegal in 2004, essentially freeing up the court so players can drive to the rim without much physical resistance from a defender.

Referee Tyler Ford looks on during a game between the Memphis Grizzlies and the Minnesota Timberwolves during the Finals of the Las Vegas Summer League on July 15, 2019 at the Thomas & Mack Center in Las Vegas, Nevada. /VCG Photo

“If we can’t allow people to hand check, we can’t allow them to travel because then they’re almost unguardable,” vice president of referee operations Mark Wunderlich told the Associated Press.

The traveling guidelines may seem like they’re meant to give moves like Harden’s “back-step” a pass, but it’s rather meant to “eliminate the gap between the rule as written and how it has been applied in NBA games.” Or in other words, quell the controversy.

“It is legal, except for the fact that he gets a third step in every now and then when his rhythm is just off, which shows you the highlight of how difficult it is,” Monty McCutchen, the NBA’s head of referee development and training told the AP.

An educational video was reportedly sent to teams, while referees visited the coaches’ pre-season meetings so they could do demonstrations for them.

Another video was posted by the NBA on Twitter using real examples of double-take moves that either violated or followed the traveling rule.

VP and Head of Referee Development & Training Monty McCutchen provides an overview of rules regarding Traveling for Dribbling Players, and addresses the newly-defined concept of the “gather” on October 1, 2019. /Twitter screen grab

Rockets head coach Mike D’Antoni praised the decision, while rival San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich criticized such moves last year saying that the step-back 3-point shot came when players “jump backwards and travel and shoot a 3.”

Leaders of the referee team praised Harden for his cleverness and creativity.

“On the dribble, we always talk about dribbling you can take two legal steps to the basket, right? No one ever thought about on the gather after you dribble you can take two legal steps backwards,” Wunderlich said.

Will the signature “step-back” traveling speculation now be put to rest? That depends on how fans and teams react to calls during the upcoming games. They will surely be following each step as closely as the referees.

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Re: RULE QUESTION: Are you allowed to pumpfake/pivot after a HOPSTEP .

One more very important thing, i have noticed that many fans (even in this forum) confuse a hop step with a jump stop and hence confuse the rules.

The key to determine whether you can pivot after the jump stop is whether you terminate your dribble with a foot still on the floor (this is a HOP STEP, doing a hop step into a jump stop) or terminate the dribble after the jump with both feet in the air (this is a 100% JUMP STOP). For the latter, either foot may be used as a pivot provided you land on the floor with both feet simultaneously after the jump.

Yes a hop step ends up with a jump stop and that procedure looks kindof similar to just doing a jump stop. but since the hop step was made before the jump stop the jump stop now has different rules. understand?

Last edited by pauk; 02-10-2013 at 12:20 PM .

Re: RULE QUESTION: Are you allowed to pumpfake/pivot after a HOPSTEP .

Don’t like the rules, then quit watching basketball! It’s really that damn simple.

Re: RULE QUESTION: Are you allowed to pumpfake/pivot after a HOPSTEP .

When receiving a pass with a jump-stop, you can pivot after the jump-stop and either foot can become the pivot foot. This is especially helpful for post players. A perimeter player can catch the ball with a jump-stop and then pivot into triple-threat position if necessary and use the non-pivot foot for executing jab-step fakes or a drive step.

But a player who already has possession of the ball that makes a dribble move into the lane, picks up the dribble, takes off of one foot, and then lands a two-footed jump-stop, so far so good. this is a “HOP STEP”. Technically this is 3 steps, but the last 2 counts as 1 since both feet land at the same time and take of at the same time. many confuse this with a travel, but it is not. its a travel (3 steps) only if both feet dont land at the same time or if both feet dont leave the ground at the same time (when you jump).

Hence why after landing, the player cannot move either foot and has no pivot foot since the one step was already used up prior to the jump-stop.

Once you are in that jump stop the player can just stand and do his pump fake how much he ever wants (unless he is in the paint, 3 seconds), he can jump upward, but must either shoot or pass the ball before either foot touches the floor again.

To answer your question. you can pumpfake but you cant pivot after a hop step.

WOW pauk knows the rules better than 90% of the board.

Just admit lebron travels. thats all i’m asking.

How to do a basketball hop step

The drop step is one of the most basic moves on a basketball court, and should be a staple for any player who wants to score around the basket.

It’s a move that every youth player should be introduced to at the youth level, and every advanced player should fine tune over time – regardless of their position.

Though it is simple, the drop step can still be one of the most effective ways to score around the basket when performed correctly.

What is the Drop Step?

The drop step is an easy-to-learn move that is designed to create an open layup for a player who is trying to score on the block.

At a glance, it appears that the offensive player is merely catching the ball, taking a step towards the basket, and shooting a layup…

But, of course, perfecting the move requires more than that.

How to Execute the Drop Step in 5 Steps

The drop step is the perfect first post move for a young player to learn because it can be taught in very basic steps:

1. Catch the Ball in a Low, Wide Stance

Setting up the perfect drop step begins with fighting for position on the block.

In order to put yourself in a good place to score, this means getting yourself in an athletic position with your defender on your back.

Your arms should be out wide, giving the passer a big target to throw the ball, and also preventing the defender from getting around you to steal the entry pass.

Another goal should be to catch the ball with both feet on the ground.

When using the drop step, you will usually step towards the baseline – but you want your defender to think that you could go either direction.

2. Take a Big Step Towards the Baseline

After catching the ball with both feet on the ground, your top foot becomes your pivot foot when performing the drop step.

With your bottom foot, take a big step towards the baseline.

Ideally, this step will seal your defender on your high side so that you have an open layup.

The quickness and size of this step are crucial to the effectiveness of the drop step.

If that step does not get you past your defender or at least in a better position to finish, then the drop step will be much easier to guard.

3. Square Your Shoulders to the Backboard

After sealing your defender with a big step towards the baseline, that foot becomes your new pivot foot.

Use one power dribble and step through with your top leg and get your shoulders parallel to the backboard.

Depending on how effectively your drop step has worked, it may not always be possible to get your shoulders all the way square with the backboard.

If your defender is still closely defending the move, you’ll want to get as close to square as possible, while also using your body to protect the ball.

4. Jump Off Two Feet

The drop step is a power move.

It starts on two feet, requires strength to execute, and it ends on two feet.

Once you’re squared up to the hoop, jump off both feet with the idea of exploding up at the rim.

This could vary based on age level, but a good goal to set is jumping high enough to slap the backboard while finishing.

5. Use the Backboard for a Power Finish

Even if you were unable to get your shoulders all the way square to the backboard with your drop step, you should have an angle that allows you to use the backboard for a finish.

Some post moves like the hook shot allow for more finesse or the opportunity to aim for a swish instead of using the backboard…

But the drop step should finish with a shot off the glass 99% of the time.

How to do a basketball hop step

Tips for the Perfect Drop Step

Now that we’ve established the basic steps of performing the drop step, here are a few pointers that can help players perfect the move:

1. Seal Your Defender on the High Side

The drop step is a usually move that takes you toward the baseline, which means it will be more effective if that space is open for you.

It may not be possible in all cases, but sometimes you can set yourself up for the perfect drop step before even catching the ball by using your body to seal the defender on your high shoulder.

2. Check the Middle of the Floor

Since you may not have been able to completely seal your defender before catching the ball, there’s a good chance that he will still be between you and the basket when you catch the ball.

When this happens, you should bring the ball to your chin and then first look to the middle of the floor to see how the defense has reacted to the post touch.

Checking the middle will allow you to see where your own defender is guarding you, and will also be the quickest way to see if a teammate may be open on the opposite block, cutting through the lane, or available for a kick out three point shot.

3. “Sell” That You’re Going Middle

Again, the drop step is designed to take you towards the baseline…

So the more you can convince your defender that you are actually going toward the middle, the more effective the move will be.

Even if your defender is playing straight behind you when you first catch the ball, you can still set up a drop step by making a shoulder fake to the middle.

You could also use an extra dribble to set your defender up in that direction.

4. Change Speeds

Regardless of whether you are able to seal your defender right away or if you have to set him up towards the middle before making your drop step…

One big key to the effectiveness of the move is how quickly it is made.

Setting up for post position can be a slow, physical process — and setting your defender up should be as well.

Then, once you have slowly convinced him you’re making a move towards the middle, the spin back and step towards the baseline need to be quick in order to create an open layup.

Conclusion

The drop step may be seen as elementary to some higher level players, as it is a basic move that doesn’t include any flash.

However, when used effectively, it’s still a very powerful and effective way to score around the basket.

The goal of any offense is to create easy scoring opportunities, and when the finer details of the drop step are perfected by a player who has a presence around the basket, the drop step has the potential to create the highest percentage shot in the game.