How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

The gymnast should begin in front support. They should kick back through a regular cast, with their hips away from the bar. The cast should be around and over horizontal. Their body should be in an exactly straight position. Their arms should be straight and their head in the middle position. Before their hips return to the bar, they should lean back with their shoulders, creating speed to execute a circle around the bar. The scope of the early drop is to create as much distance between the hands and the hips as possible. The body should be in a hollow position, with the hips turning around the bar. The gymnast’s elbows should be tight, and their buttocks squeezed. When the gymnast reaches the candlestick position, they should start pushing back the bar with an opened shoulder angle. As they execute the skill they should shift their wrists around the bar as they rotate. At the last quarter of the circle, they should shift their wrists again, keeping their arms tight in order to reach the support position. They should finish the skill in front support. The entire skill should be performed with a neutral head position. As the circle becomes more refined, the athlete will be able to open the shoulders earlier and more forcefully at the completion of the shoulder circle. This will eventually develop into the free hip to handstand, in which the gymnast should direct their body to vertical from their feet and push back stronger on the bar.

Drills

How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

Cast Handstand

In the support position, the gymnast compresses their body to a maximum piked position. Lift the legs up and lean forward with the shoulders at the same time. Arms are tight. Next follows a strong back swing upward. The body is straight and slightly arched. The legs and arms are tight, with the head in a middle position. The gymnast pushes back on the bar and cleans the shoulder angle. The skill finishes in a handstand.

How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

Back Hip Circle

The gymnast should begin in front support. They should kick back with a regular cast with their hips away from the bar. When their hips return to the bar, they should lean back with their shoulders, creating speed to execute a circle around the bar. The body should be in a hollow position, with their hips turning around the bar. Their elbows should be tight, and their buttocks squeezed. As they execute the skill they should shift their wrists around the bar as they rotate. They should finish the skill in front support. The entire skill should be performed with a neutral head position.

How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

Candle Stick on High Bar

The gymnast should put themselves in an inverted hang with their hips touching the bar. Their body should be straight with their chin down. They should squeeze their back and buttocks muscles. This skill should be performed with a hold.

How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

Support on Wall Bar

The gymnast should hold support on a wall bar (also known as a stall bar or Swedish ladder). The gymnast should maintain a straight or hollow bodied position. The gymnast should attempt to have their hips touch the bar, focusing on a strong pull from their arms. This skill should be performed with tight arms, and chin down.

Kick with Dumbbell

From 45° under horizontal, the gymnast raises the dumbbells over and behind the head. The arms are tight. The body is in a hollow position. Repeat several times.

Kick with Elastic

Hook a bungee around the wall bar (also known as a stall bar or Swedish ladder), the height of the bungee should be equal to the height of the gymnast’s hips/belly. The gymnast should face the wall, grab the elastic and pull it back behind the body. The arms should be tight and the body straight.

How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

Candle Stick Swings with Assistance

The gymnast performs a swing in a lower vertical candlestick position. The coach assists with the acceleration of the swings.

How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

Free Hip Jump

The gymnast performs the free hip circle on the lower bar, but instead of finishing in support, they jump on the ground. It helps for the gymnast to emphasizes pushing the bar to create momentum.

Integral part of gymnastics coaching process are skill drills. They help gymnasts to learn easier and technically correct. With GYM DRILL PRO you will find variety of ideas for the most the basic gymnastics skills. There are plenty of images with skill drill progressions. It is intended to support explicitly the qualified coaches in their daily coaching business. DO NOT practice without the guidance of proper professionals.

Below I have viewed and listed several on-line videos for Twister competitive athletes to view on various topics. Some are just for fun, some are motivational and some are very detailed. I will add/subtract more stuff as I come across it. I watched each one and tried to eliminate any that had questionable content (like vulgar rap music backgrounds). Please let me know right away if I missed something. You may get a warning but they are all u-tube videos scanned as virus free. [email protected] . additional website: Drills and Skills

  • Vaultings
    • Basic handspring:
      • Many drills (5:38)..
        (5:38) .. yurchenko-2 (0:09) .. yurchenko-3 (1:11) .. yurchenko-4 (9:25) Al Fong
        (0:16)
      • Tap Swing:forward tap (2:19) . Tap swing drills Part-1. more (part-2)
      • Pull over: pull-over(1) tips (1:37) . pull-over(2) (1:37) ..
      • Back Hip Circle: underswing drills (5:38) .
      • Home Bar:multi-drills (5:04)
      • Kips:Learning kips-1 (08:00) .. Learning kips-2 (07:04).. Kip mistakes (02:59) ..
      • Shoot through:Learning shoot thru’s (03:18) .. (02:39)
      • Dismounts: 1/2 turn dismount (03:52)
      • Cast Handstand:Cast handst-1 (02:38) .. Cast handst-2 (01:57) .. Cast handst-3 (01:52) .. Cast handst-4 (01:26)
      • Stalders:stalders-1 (01:43) .. stalders-2 (06:43) .. stalder elements (02:37)
      • Release moves: Tkachev (01:23) .. Several Release moves (04:01) .. flyaway 1/2 low to high bar (00:15) .. front flyaway low bar to high bar (00:07) .. many bar changes (03:48)
      • Other giants: German Giants (01:09 very unusual) .. Inverted giant-1 (00:09) ..
        (01:05) .. (05:13) .. (01:37) ..
      • Leaps/Jumps: tourjete 1/2 (01:06) .. leap drill-1 (01:03) .. leap drill-2 (00:52) .. leap drill-3 (01:14) .. leap drill-4 (01:09) .. F.I.G. Leap list (05:55) ..
      • Turns: Turns (0:54) .. turn drills 01:52) ..
      • Mushroom: home mushroom (00:20) .. how to make a mushroom (04:04) ..
      • Circles: learning circles-1 (02:06) .. *learning circles-2* .. learning circles-UK .. more mushroom circles
      • Compare: Chinese beginners (just like us)
      • Pendulum swings: Stride swings,, .. Scissor to Handstand
      • Kasamotsu: kasamotsu-1 ..
      • Mens:most Difficult Vaults
        .. Level 5-6 swing .. back up-rise .. adv.swinging very good, PeachBasket-2 (shows the compression swings) long and loaded with drills
      • new moves on P-barsFile-1, File-2
      • Advanced Support skills: Makuts, Healy and related skills
      • Pull-over, Cast (back hip circle), Under-shoot to swing First skills: Skin-the-cat, pull over, and back hip circle
      • Pull-over: In our gym, we teach to chin-up first, followed by lifting the legs to the bar. Note that there are different approaches to every trick. Pull-overs at Twisters (using kick-leg and simulated High bar), Pull-over (tutorial) (8:25)
      • Cast back hip circle-undershoot (BEST)(Girls bar) but taught perfect for Level 3-4 boys,
      • Free Hip (clear hip): Getting started (1:25) ..
      • single German Giant .. full German Giant .. stalders 1:43 3:52
      • Tap swings, .. Tap swing-flyaway,
      • Kohei Uchimura AA Best Ever
      • Round-off: No.1 ‘How to’ (6:10) . Fix a crooked RO (2:52) . Stretch the hurdle (0:47) .
      • Back Tumbling: head drills (2:36) . tumble Trac ()
      • Front Tumbling: wrists connected drills (1:33)
      • Twisting: What makes us twist (2:11) . twisting direction (0:46).
        • Front twisting: begin front twisting (2:46) .
        • Back Twisting: Learning an Arabian (2:01) . Back Full progressions (3:40)
        • Pull-ups: Dropsets
        • Press to handstand: Boys tutorial-1, Girls tutorial-1, Girls-Endo press,
        • Why some boys are so much stronger than others
            .. tobie & jake-2 .. jake-3 .. other
          • Stroe Giuliano 5 yr. old .. intro(4:10) .. bottle pushups .. long(25 min)
          • Mens: 5-hardest tricks .. most difficult skills-2 (10 min.)
          • more mens Unusual skills
          • Womens: Unique skills (men & women) ..
            (loud obnoxious music..) .. double mini-tramp finals (long but awesome) (many years old but still impressive) .. quadrifus pike .. 1+1/2 twisting quad

          Information

          Gym Fun

          Staff Portal

          Twister’s Gymnastics | Ricardo Appel | 321 Stagecoach Rd | Grand Island, Ne 68801 | (308) 381-0217

          A free hip circle, also known as a clear hip circle or a back hip circle, is an advanced gymnastics move. To do one, you need to pull yourself up onto the bar, swing your body under it, and then bring your body back up and over the bar for a complete rotation.

          How do you practice hip circles?

          Stand tall with feet at hip-width. Keeping your hands in front of your stomach, pull your right knee up until it is parallel with the floor, then pull the knee out, opening up the hip. Return to the start position and repeat on the other side.

          Are hip circles bad for you?

          Then do circles with your left leg. Hip circles help strengthen and stabilize muscles around the joint. Consider making larger circles or adding additional sets as your hips get stronger. Remember to talk with your health care team before beginning a new exercise routine.

          What level is front hip circle?

          Because the dreaded front hip circle is seen only in level 3, it is one of those more-or-less dead-end skills that doesn’t really lead to anything else, down the road.

          What skills do you need for Level 3 gymnastics?

          Level 3 Gymnastics Requirements: Floor

          • split jump with 90° split.
          • handstand forward roll.
          • handstand to a bridge kickover.
          • leap with 90° split.
          • backward roll to 45° above horizontal, lower to pushup position.
          • round-off back-handspring*

          What level is a back hip circle?

          level 2
          The back hip circle is first used in level 2 women gymnastics. On bars, the back hip circle is usually performed in combination with a cast. To perform the skill, the gymnast rests on the bar in a front support.

          How do you transition from hip circle to free hip circle?

          How do I build strength for the free hip circle?

          How do you do a back hip circle with a cast?

          This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. wikiHow’s Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards.

          This article has been viewed 40,289 times.

          A free hip circle, also known as a clear hip circle or a back hip circle, is an advanced gymnastics move. To do one, you need to pull yourself up onto the bar, swing your body under it, and then bring your body back up and over the bar for a complete rotation. It can be daunting to do a free hip circle, so coaches usually recommend building up to it using a cast, drop, and fall drill. Once you have mastered this, you can transition to doing free hip circles.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          • If you don’t have mats that are thicker than 12 in (30 cm), you may also layer several mats to create this amount of thickness.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          • If you cannot reach the bar, you can either jump up to grasp it or have a teacher or coach help you reach it.

          Tip: Weight lifting is a great way to build strength for the free hip circle. If you are not yet strong enough to lift yourself up to the bar or to hold onto the bar for long, then work on building your upper body strength.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          • If you are new to bar work, then you may need someone to help lift you up to the bar. Ask your coach, parent, or gymnastics teacher for help.
          • Keep your head in a neutral position throughout the exercise. Do not look up, down, or to the side. Just keep your head facing straight ahead.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          • You might need to be spotted by a coach or teacher the first time you try this.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          • This is a crucial part of properly executing a free hip circle. If you don’t get enough momentum here, you won’t be able to swing your entire body back under and over the bar.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          • This completes a cast, drop, and fall! Practice this often to build your skills for the free hip circle.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          • Make sure that there are plenty of mats under and around the bar in case you fall!

          Warning: Don’t try to do a free hip circle for the first time while you are alone! You can be seriously injured if you fall. If possible, have a coach or teacher spot you until you feel comfortable doing the move on your own.

          I am currently teaching a group of seven girls, and the two skills they are struggling most on is their chin up pull arounds and back hip circles.
          Only one person out of the group can successully pull around with good shape.

          One girl can do both the skills, but with terrible shape. Her back hip circle is just her whipping around the bar, and it is not consistent at all. She goes into an arch. In her oull around she does the same- flinging her head back and arching.

          Two girls do not have very much strength at all. One of them does not try, while the other is quite young but does try her hardest, so I am not as worried about her (close to pull around). Each session they have 15 minutes of strength, but one girl just will not try.

          The other girls in the group aren’t miles away from a pull around, and hopefully they are getting better.

          If anyone has any advice on what to do with the girls it would be very much appreciated.
          Also back hip circle drills (preferably with little to no spotting involved) are needed as I cannot seem to find any anywhere online. Thank you!

          Jard.the.gymnast

          • Jul 18, 2018
          • #2

          We have had succes with therabands.

          Around 2:50

          That video has great drills too

          For pullovers I’d let them do candle hangs on the bar. If they can, pull up to candle. Or put a block to walk on.

          Take a look at that video for more ideas.

          coachmolly

          • Jul 18, 2018
          • #3

          Is this a class preparing for competitive gymnastics? Or is it a recreational class? That makes a little bit of a difference. Recreational kids very often struggle with the strength necessary for a pullover with feet together and correct form and, given their limited time in the gym, it can take a long time to get to the point they are doing it themselves. They often become frustrated with the lack of progress and don’t give their best effort, in those cases I am willing to sacrifice a little bit of form to let them feel success with the skill. Then when they get to the point of getting up on the bar successfully, I worry about fixing the details.
          For kids on a competitive track, I try very hard to teach it correctly from the beginning as these children are often those who have shown a good amount of strength and are capable of performing the skill correctly. We do lots of strength- holding chin over bar, tuck & L-hangs, modified pull-ups (hang from bar with heels on a block in a pike position)- as they get stronger they try to lift chin over bar as well as lifting up heels from the block. We do tons of spotted pullovers. I also do pullovers in a row- start first one from the floor and finish in front support, do a controlled roll back over the bar and finish in a hang with chin up over the bar and lift back into a 2nd and 3rd pullover. I spot quite a bit in the beginning but then work down to as needed as they get better at the skill (jumping back in if form gets yucky).

          For back hips, I do lots of shaping on the floor together as a group at first and then as side stations as the kids become able to do the stations on their own. Holding a cast position with feet up on a block or exercise ball, lying on their back with feed slightly elevated pushing hips up and a hollow chest (shown in one of the videos Jard posted)- when they get good at that I will sometimes have them try on a stability ball. Hollow holds. On the bar, I will just have them start in front support and put my hand behind their back telling them to lean into my hand. Usually kids want to cast and pull their feet under the bar to whip around the circle rather than falling back with their shoulders. So we do lots of leaning. Then move to slow motion spotted back hips stopping on the lean, the bottom candle, and then back to front support. Then a little faster. As soon as they start losing their shape we take a step back. Then we add the cast. Sometimes slightly older kids or kids with better body awareness don’t need as much hands on spotting and figure it out pretty quickly with the drills. Sometimes they get frustrated over not being able to do it themselves (because they can get around the bar so they think they have the skill) so sometimes I’ll let them give it a go after a bunch of rounds of drills to give them the thrill and see progress.

          hollyvh

          • Jul 18, 2018
          • #4

          We have had succes with therabands.

          Around 2:50

          That video has great drills too

          For pullovers I’d let them do candle hangs on the bar. If they can, pull up to candle. Or put a block to walk on.

          Take a look at that video for more ideas.

          Thank you so much! I will definitely be using many of those drills.

          hollyvh

          • Jul 18, 2018
          • #5

          Is this a class preparing for competitive gymnastics? Or is it a recreational class? That makes a little bit of a difference. Recreational kids very often struggle with the strength necessary for a pullover with feet together and correct form and, given their limited time in the gym, it can take a long time to get to the point they are doing it themselves. They often become frustrated with the lack of progress and don’t give their best effort, in those cases I am willing to sacrifice a little bit of form to let them feel success with the skill. Then when they get to the point of getting up on the bar successfully, I worry about fixing the details.
          For kids on a competitive track, I try very hard to teach it correctly from the beginning as these children are often those who have shown a good amount of strength and are capable of performing the skill correctly. We do lots of strength- holding chin over bar, tuck & L-hangs, modified pull-ups (hang from bar with heels on a block in a pike position)- as they get stronger they try to lift chin over bar as well as lifting up heels from the block. We do tons of spotted pullovers. I also do pullovers in a row- start first one from the floor and finish in front support, do a controlled roll back over the bar and finish in a hang with chin up over the bar and lift back into a 2nd and 3rd pullover. I spot quite a bit in the beginning but then work down to as needed as they get better at the skill (jumping back in if form gets yucky).

          For back hips, I do lots of shaping on the floor together as a group at first and then as side stations as the kids become able to do the stations on their own. Holding a cast position with feet up on a block or exercise ball, lying on their back with feed slightly elevated pushing hips up and a hollow chest (shown in one of the videos Jard posted)- when they get good at that I will sometimes have them try on a stability ball. Hollow holds. On the bar, I will just have them start in front support and put my hand behind their back telling them to lean into my hand. Usually kids want to cast and pull their feet under the bar to whip around the circle rather than falling back with their shoulders. So we do lots of leaning. Then move to slow motion spotted back hips stopping on the lean, the bottom candle, and then back to front support. Then a little faster. As soon as they start losing their shape we take a step back. Then we add the cast. Sometimes slightly older kids or kids with better body awareness don’t need as much hands on spotting and figure it out pretty quickly with the drills. Sometimes they get frustrated over not being able to do it themselves (because they can get around the bar so they think they have the skill) so sometimes I’ll let them give it a go after a bunch of rounds of drills to give them the thrill and see progress.

          Get your back hip with good technique and learn strength moves to help get you there too. Training with a stuntwoman, gymnastics coach, and acrobat is fun!

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          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

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          Gymnastics: how to do a back hip circle on the bars with coach meggin

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          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          This piece of apparatus is common to both Womens and Mens Artisitc Gymnastics. To perform a vault, the gymnast runs down a 1 metre wide x 25 metre long carpet runway. This is the first phase of the vault performance, referred to as ‘The Run’.

          The next stage of the vault performance is called ‘Pre-Flight’, this is the moment from when the gymnasts movement transitions from contact with the springboard to the third stage ‘Contact’ with the vault table.

          The fourth stage ‘Post-Flight’ can be performed in different body positions, and cen range from simple skills over the vault table to incorporating saltos and twists. The best vaults are explosive off the springboard and when pushing off the vault table.

          Judges watch for proper body alignment, form, quick repulsion, the height and distance travelled, as well as the number of saltos and twists. Generally, the more saltos and twists, the higher the difficulty value of the vault. In addition, gymnasts should “stick” the final stage of the vault performance ‘The Landing’ by taking no extra steps.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          Uneven Bars (UB)

          The uneven bars are sometimes called the “uneven parallel bars,” “asymmetric bars” or simply the “bars.”

          The bars are parallel to each other and can be adjusted and set at different heights, with the low bar ranging between 1.4 and 1.8 metres, and the high bar ranging from 2.1 to 2.5 metres, however at senior competitive standard the dimensions are fixed.

          The most recognizable skills on uneven bars are release moves, pirouettes, and circles.

          The entire routine should flow from one movement to the next without pauses, extra swings or additional supports. The most daring parts of the routine are often in the high-flying release moves and dismounts. Release moves can go from low bar to high bar, from high bar to low bar, or from releasing one bar and re-grasping the same bar. Many gymnasts also use pirouetting into release moves to earn a high difficulty value. Exact handstand positions are expected with large deductions for even minor deviations.

          In a pirouette, a gymnast turns on her hands while in the handstand position. She may use a variety of different hand positions during the turn.

          Circles, such as giants and free hip circles, are exactly like they sound: The gymnast circles the bar, either stretched out in a handstand or with his or her hips close to the bar.

          There are three phases to bar routine, the first phase being ‘The Mount’, where the gymnast starts the second phase, ‘The Routine’, by catching the bar with a simple hop or a more complicated jump, flip or catch. Good form is important throughout the bar routine and judges will be looking for straight legs, pointed toes and an extended body in handstand positions. The final phase is termed ‘The Dismount’ whereby the gymnast lets go of the bar, performs one or more flips and/or twists and lands on the mat below. Both height and distance from the bar are judged. The goal of every gymnast is to stick the landing on his or her dismount. That is to land without moving her feet.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          Balance Beam (BB)

          Simply referred to as ‘Beam’ the apparatus is 10cm wide, measures 5 metres along its length and stands at approximately 1.25metres in height. Although the beam appears to be hard, modern beams are slightly sprung and covered in leather or suede material.

          There are many types of skills on balance beam, including leaps, jumps, turns, holds and acrobatic moves. However, it takes great deal of courage and concentration to perform difficult tumbling and dance skills on beam. Gymnasts often dread the event because a fall off the apparatus means a full point deduction.

          In a leap, the gymnast propels herself off of one foot, performs a split at some point in the air, and lands on one foot. The gymnast must hit a full split (180 degrees or more) to avoid deductions. More difficult leaps include ring leaps, twisting leaps (with a turn during the leap) and switch leaps, where the gymnast starts on one leg and kicks the other leg forward then back into the split position.

          Jumps are similar to leaps, except the gymnast takes off from two feet and lands on two feet. Ring jumps, sheep jumps, and twisting jumps in various positions are commonly-seen jumps at the elite level.

          Every gymnast must perform at least one turn — a skill in which the gymnast pirouettes on one foot at least 360 degrees around (a full turn). The more revolutions a gymnast does the more difficult it is, so double and triple turns are rated more highly than full turns. Gymnasts also can add to their difficulty score by performing turns with their free leg high in the air, or in a crouch position low to the beam.

          Holds include scales and handstands. There are many fewer holds in beam routines today than in the past, simply because gymnasts don’t have time to spare doing hold moves — they want to pack in as many skills as they can of high value, and these skills take up more time than others and are generally of lower value.

          Acrobatic moves encompass a wide variety of skills, ranging from walkovers to handsprings to flips, performed forward and backward. High-level gymnasts do acrobatic moves in combination, and some of the toughest combinations being done involve full-twisting back flips in the tucked or stretched position.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          Floor exercise (FX)

          The final piece of apparatus in WAG is the floor exercise simply referred to as ‘Floor’, the performance area is 12×12 metres with a 1 metre run off perimeter making the overall dimensions 14×14 metres.

          The floor provides a gymnast an opportunity to express their personality through the choice of music (at senior levels) and choreography. Throughout the routine, the gymnast must harmoniously blend dance elements and tumbling while making versatile use of floor space, changing both the direction and level of movement.

          The floor routine is choreographed to music, lasting no more than 90 seconds and covering the entire floor area. There are predetermined skill requirements which vary by the level of gymnast, such as leaps and turns, and tumbling passes.

          The floor routine poise, beauty, strength, power and stamina to continue at peak performance throughout the entire routine and the gymnast must maintain energy and excellence, which can be challenging because of the demanding content in the exercise.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics

          The uneven bars are an apparatus in women’s artistic gymnastics. The bars are the second exercise, completed after the vault. The Olympic order of events is the vault, uneven bars, balance beam, and the floor.

          The uneven bars are sometimes called the “uneven parallel bars,” “asymmetric bars” or simply the “bars.”

          Dimensions of the Uneven Bars

          The bars are parallel to each other and set at different heights, with the low bar set to about 5 and a half feet above the floor and the high bar usually taller than 8 feet.

          This height is adjustable, and Junior Olympic gymnasts and collegiate gymnasts often use the bars at different heights. For elite gymnasts, however, these measurements are standardized.

          The width between the bars is approximately 6 feet. Again, this is adjustable in Junior Olympics and collegiate gymnastics, but not in international elite competitions.

          Types of Uneven Bar Skills

          The most recognizable skills on uneven bars are release moves, pirouettes, and circles.

          In a release move, a gymnast lets go of the bar and then re-grasps it. He or she can perform a release move from the high bar to the low bar, from the low bar to the high bar, or on the same bar.

          Common release moves for advanced gymnasts include the Jaeger, Tkatchev/reverse hecht, Gienger, Pak salto, and Shaposhnikova. These skills are named after the first person who performed the move and then submitted it to a special committee, so these sometimes unusual names are just the names of gymnasts.

          In a pirouette, a gymnast turns on her hands while in the handstand position. She may use a variety of different hand positions during the turn.

          Circles, such as giants and free hip circles, are exactly like they sound: the gymnast circles the bar, either stretched out in a handstand or with his or her hips close to the bar.

          A Bar Routine

          Gymnasts perform three phases of a bar routine:

          1. The Mount

          Most gymnasts simply hop onto the low bar or high bar and get started. Sometimes, though, a gymnast will do a more interesting mount, such as jumping over the low bar or even doing a flip to catch the bar.

          2. The Routine

          A bar routine consists of about 15-20 skills and should flow from one move to the next and use both bars. There shouldn’t be any pauses or extra swings. There is no time limit on bars, but routines usually last about 30-45 seconds.

          Combining two or more skills together earns the gymnast a higher difficulty score, and you’ll see many gymnasts attempt pirouettes immediately into release moves or even pair multiple release moves.

          Good form is important throughout. The judges are looking for straight legs, pointed toes and an extended body in handstand positions.

          3. The Dismount

          To dismount, the gymnast lets go of the bar, performs one or more flips and/or twists, and lands on the mat below. Both the height and distance from the bar are judged. The goal of every gymnast is to stick the landing on his or her dismount, which means to land without moving the feet.

          The Best Bar Workers

          The uneven bars have not always been a strong event for the United States, but there are still stand-out competitors.

          Olympic champion Nastia Liukin excelled in the event, winning the Olympic silver medal, two world silver medals, and one world gold. Watch Nastia Liukin on the bars here.

          Gabby Douglas led the U.S. team on the uneven bars at the 2012 Olympics and made the individual event finals there as well. Four years later, she helped the squad repeat its gold-medal performance in the team event. Watch Gabrielle Douglas on the bars.

          Madison Kocian tied for gold at the 2015 world championships and won the silver medal at the 2016 Olympics. Watch Madison Kocian on the bars.

          Worldwide, Aliya Mustafina (Russia), Viktoria Komova (Russia), Huang Huidan (China) and Fan Yilin (China) have been other top bar workers.

          One of the best ever on bars was Russian Svetlana Khorkina. She won two Olympic golds (1996 and 2000) and five world golds (1995, 1996, 1997, 1999 and 2001) in the event.

          How to do a free hip circle in gymnastics
          So, I asked for your feedback on this blog series about what you wanted to hear more about and the majority of people wanted more information about training and also gymnastics technical information like understanding the code of points and various requirements for competitions.

          If you do have any specific requests please do feel free to get in touch on the adult gymnastics Facebook group, as I’ll be happy to share these.

          In this entry I am going to be talking about bars.

          I didn’t compete on bars at all last year. This was because I didn’t have enough skills to put a routine together. The skills that I needed either required greater strength than I had or were quite scary to try. It’s not uncommon in adult competitions for people to choose to sit out of bars. In the all-around you only count three out of four scores in the women’s competition so this means you can sit out on one piece of apparatus. Obviously, that increases pressure on the other three pieces of apparatus as you don’t leave room for any falls, but it does mean you don’t have to worry about a piece you are really struggling with.

          With all competitions cancelled for the year, and with this increased period of time out of the gym, I spent a lot of time thinking about how I could increase my strength – something which had been preventing me from competing some of my bars skills. A lot of this has been very basic, adding in regular conditioning sessions which involve press-ups and planks, and holding handstands against a wall. I’ve also been doing repetitions with dumbbells. Another area that has required strengthening has been by core, and I’ve found doing regular v-sits has been helpful as well as trying leg lifts (admittedly this would be a more effective exercise if I was using wall-bars rather than how I’m doing it, but it’s still a helpful exercise).

          I’ve also been practicing my dish and arch shapes in readiness for swinging on the bars themselves.

          The great news is that all of these exercises can be done at home without the need for equipment, (with the exceptions of the weight related exercises) so anyone can add these in during the week.

          I mentioned in my previous blog how amazed I was that my conditioning paid off when I hit bars and that suddenly I was able to complete a circle up, which I hadn’t been able to do before. The same could be said when I was practicing my swinging and also my overall stamina to continue on what is a physically demanding piece of apparatus!

          I haven’t yet conquered the mental challenges with some of the other skills and this is possibly made harder by not being able to have a coach to spot you due to the measures around Covid-19 – although maybe that’s good for me!

          One of these goals is working on a straddle and a squat on to the low bar. I can now climb on which is progress for me, but the straddle on still needs work and this is completely psychological.

          The other mental block – which seems to be consistent on floor too – is going backwards. I can’t yet do a forward hip circle, but that is largely due to getting the technique right however, the backward hip circle is definitely in the mind which is weird because essentially I’ve just done the same thing with a circle up. Oh dear! Still – I’m confident I will have some kind of bars routine together for when competitions start again, hopefully sometime next year.

          The moves that I’ve described are all acceptable for the novice level in Women’s Artistic competitions, so it will be a case of making sure everything is clean and minimises the chances of getting deductions on execution and that is a case of PRACTICE!

          Theres so many American level 10’s with these insane skills. I think videos like this are the modern equivalent to all those unidentified/obscure USSR gymnasts on video doing skills that aren’t even done today.

          For a L10, is the strategy behind these videos to get the attention of NCAA scouts?

          Klein went to developmental camp last week and verified a double twisting yurchenko.

          Well shittttttt lol

          That is SO cool!

          Could we also call this a layout Hindorff?

          Or a layout Shang

          Karis German also does the Stalder version!

          I’m having trouble visualizing what that would even look like. Insanely cool.

          Yes yes yes! This is all of my clear hip dreams (that I mentioned in the unpopular opinions thread) coming true. Give the clear hip/free hip a chance people and make some magic!

          Hard agree. More clear hips please!

          It’s insane and she barely built any momentum going into it!

          Is she committed anywhere?

          Ah, so awesome! I absolutely die for hip circles preceding releases, my favorite is probably hip circle + tkachevs!

          Is anyone willing to ELI5 for me? ? I think it looks cool, but I’m not a gymnast so I don’t see what everyone else is seeing. What makes this one special?

          It’s never been done before!

          The only laid-out tkatchev variation that currently exists is a Nabieva. A Nabieva is a toe-on tkatchev in the laid out position.

          This would also be a laid-out tkatchev, but instead of starting from a toe-on, it starts from a free-hip-circle.

          Other free hip tkatchev entries are the “Hindorff” which has the release itself done in a straddle, and the “Shang” which is done piked.

          Does that clear it up?

          Ninja Edit: Free hip = clear hip. It’s the same thing. Kind of like how some people say backhandspring, others say flic flac.

          Your Source for Professional Gymnastics Information

          • Posted on December 12, 2010
          • by Gymnastics Zone
          • in Gymnastics Terms

          Free Hip Handstand: Same as a Clear Hip Handstand or Clear Hip Circle.

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