How to do an illusion kick

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An illusion kick is considered one of the most eye-catching moves while dancing and doing gymnastics. It requires excellent flexibility, as well as the proper posture and position. It takes time to learn for most people, but it’s well worth the end result. This wikiHow will guide you through the process.

Warming up is essential before doing any dance move or trick. [1] X Trustworthy Source Mayo Clinic Educational website from one of the world’s leading hospitals Go to source This is a warm-up that you can do before doing an illusion kick.

How to do an illusion kick

How to do an illusion kick

Tip: Try doing push-ups to strengthen your arms.

How to do an illusion kick

How to do an illusion kick

How to do an illusion kick

How to do an illusion kick

Remember: If you cannot do your splits yet, the illusion will look incomplete and not how you’d expect it to look. You can continue to practice, though. Read How to Do a Split for a detailed guide if you haven’t gotten your splits yet.

An illusion kick is considered one of the most eye-catching moves while dancing and doing gymnastics. It requires excellent flexibility, as well as the proper posture and position. It takes time to learn for most people, but it’s well worth the end result. This wikiHow will guide you through the process.

Steps

Part 1 of 2: Warming Up Download Article

Warming up is essential before doing any dance move or trick. This is a warm-up that you can do before doing an illusion kick.

How to do an illusion kick

Start off by rotating your neck. Since you must stretch and loosen up all your muscles, start with the neck. Rotate it in a circular motion.

How to do an illusion kick

Rotate your arms. Throw your arms in a circular motion, moving them both forward and backward for 20 seconds each.

  • You can do other motions such as throwing them up and down and moving them from side-to-side.

Tip: Try doing push-ups to strengthen your arms.

How to do an illusion kick

Move your hip and knees. Rotate your hip and knees both clockwise and anti-clockwise.

  • To rotate your knees, place your hands on them, and move both your hip and knees.
  • Another way to stretch your knees is by pulling them up to your chest and holding them there for 10 counts.

How to do an illusion kick

Do Lunges. Lunges are important before attempting an illusion kick, as your thighs need to be strong enough to hold half your body’s weight.

How to do an illusion kick

Point and flex your feet. Sit down and point your toes in front of you. Flex them after a few seconds. Do this at least 12 times.

  • You can rotate your ankle to loosen it up, too.

How to do an illusion kick

Do a few stretching exercises. While you’re on the carpet, you can do several exercises to stretch your muscles. These are extremely important and beneficial before you do your illusion kick. Read How to Stretch for different stretching ideas.

  • Stretch your legs apart in a split. If you can’t do a split, stretch your legs apart as far as they can go. Try to hold your toes and touch the floor with your head without bending your knees.

Remember: If you cannot do your splits yet, the illusion will look incomplete and not how you’d expect it to look. You can continue to practice, though. Read How to Do a Split for a detailed guide if you haven’t gotten your splits yet.

Part 2 of 2: Doing the Kick Download Article

Once you’re warmed up, you can start doing the kick.

How to do an illusion kick

Start in the “Mountain Pose”. Do the Mountain Pose on the floor or a mat. Make sure that your palms and feet are touching the round completely, your back is not arched, and that your knees aren’t bent.

How to do an illusion kick

Bring your leg up. Bring your leg up in a split-like position in the air, with one leg down. Try not to stand on your toes while doing it, as this can make you lose balance and fall.

  • The leg that is brought up varies from person-to-person. Just because you’re a right-sided person, it doesn’t mean that you find bringing your right leg up comfortable. Try bringing both of them up, and figure out which side comforts you and is easier.

How to do an illusion kick

Do half a turn. With your hands on both sides of your foot, do a releve, but it mustn’t be too high. Turn your body slowly to the opposite of where you started from.

  • Keep practicing this continuously. After you turn well with your foot down, pull your leg high up in the air and try again.

How to do an illusion kick

Try kicking without using your hands. Stand up and try kicking your leg up straight in the air without doing the Mountain Pose or touching the ground with your hands. If you practice a few times, it’ll soon come naturally.

Add the half-turn to your kick. Try to turn without using your hands, and kick your leg as high into the air as you can. This will help the illusion look smooth.

Practice. It’s great that you did your illusion. All you have to do now is keep practicing until you’re satisfied with how it turned out.

Transcript

So now we’re going to teach you the front side flip. And once again it’s all about the kick flip and a front side 180. And for some reason when I do a front side flip then my foot is pretty much pointing this way, but a lot of people do it differently. But you want to have your foot in the middle of the board like this, and you flick it side ways, and it’s all about your hips and shoulders turning.

Speaker 2: Your upper body is going to turn first and then your going to kick flip and kind of meet the board with your legs half way, and bring around the rest of the way, and land backwards and roll away.

Speaker 1: Another thing not to do with a front side flip is sometimes people do a mystery flip where, it goes in between your legs and it doesn’t even flip at all. It’s kind of like an illusion, it is called an illusion flip, isn’t it?

Speaker 1: So, it’s really important to meet it half way, and catch it right in the middle and then U turn.

Speaker 2: Illusion flip is not Ollieing before you do the kick flip. A front side flip should be Ollie and then kick flip, like just do not want to do Illusion flips. The hardest part is pretty much just learning is it’s a trick that going to take you some time. It’s like a back side flip, you know you got to have your kick flips and your 180’s on lock. And it’s going to be a trick you’re going to practice for weeks before you can get it really doubt in. So be patient with it.

Speaker 1: So that’s how you do a front side flip.

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How to do an illusion kick

Have your splits and needles (six o’clock) is great to have perfected before doing your illusion.

Step onto your right foot. Tilt forward, put your hands flat on the ground and bring your left leg all the way up until your legs are in a straight line. Put all of your weight on your right foot, not on your hands.

Next, rotate your needle. Walk your right heel around and use your hands to turn around. This helps you get used to the rotation of an illusion.

Try doing a pirouette or a la secondes into an illusion! Swing your arms back, swing your right leg back while diving your head down to the ground. Drive your right shoulder to face back to the corner.

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Research suggests that goalkeepers can influence the accuracy of penalty shots by assuming a posture that mimics a classic optical illusion.

Netherlands’ goalkeeper Tim Krul saves a penalty during the penalty shoot-out of the quarter-final football match between the Netherlands and Costa Rica at the Fonte Nova Arena in Salvador during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on July 5, 2014. Photograph: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images Photograph: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images

Netherlands’ goalkeeper Tim Krul saves a penalty during the penalty shoot-out of the quarter-final football match between the Netherlands and Costa Rica at the Fonte Nova Arena in Salvador during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on July 5, 2014. Photograph: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images Photograph: ODD ANDERSEN/AFP/Getty Images

Last modified on Wed 14 Feb 2018 21.16 GMT

A sportsperson’s performance on the playing field can alter the way they see things, which in turn can affect their subsequent performance. A football player who scores a goal, for example, will perceive their target as being bigger than it actually is, making it easier for them to score again, whereas a miss makes them perceive it as smaller and, therefore, harder to hit.

This interplay between action and perception happens subconsciously, and so we have little or no control over it. But could players also influence their opponent’s actions by deliberately altering their perceptions? The answer seems to be “yes” – according to a small study published in 2008, goalkeepers can influence the direction and accuracy of penalty kicks by adopting a posture that mimics a classic optical illusion.

The Müller-Lyer illusion. Source: Wikipedia Photograph: Wikipedia

The Müller-Lyer illusion (left) is a well-known illusion consisting of two parallel lines, one bounded by arrowheads pointing towards each other, the other by arrowheads pointing away from each other. Although both are exactly tye same length, people typically perceive one as being longer than the other, and this is often explained in terms of depth cues: We perceive one line as representing the inside corner of a room, and the other as representing the near corner of a building. Because depth perception involves judging distances, we assume that the inside corner is farther away, and therefore perceive that line to be the longer of the two.

Research into the Müller-Lyer illusion has focused almost exclusively on how people perceive abstract geometrical figures under laboratory conditions, and has rarely examined how they might affect everyday life. One exception is this 2003 study, which showed that high-cut bathing suits make women’s legs look longer, because the Y-shaped contours formed by the leg openings mimic one set of arrowheads in the illusion.

Psychologists John van der Kamp and Rich Masters decided to examine whether goalkeepers can influence penalty-takers’ behaviour by adopting postures that mimic the Müller-Lyer illusion.

In football, the goal is eight yards wide and eight feet high, and penalty shots are taken from a spot just 12 yards in front of the goal mouth, at an average speed of 70 miles per hour. In this situation, then, the goalkeeper has very little time to react, and the odds are stacked heavily against them. They can, however, try to anticipate where the ball will go using information form the penalty-taker’s movements.

In 2007, van der Kamp and Masters showed that goalkeepers can also influence the direction of the penalty kick by standing very slightly off-centre. In this follow-up study, they wanted to find out if postures that mimic the Müller-Lyer illusion can influence penalty-takers’ actions by altering their perception of the goalkeeper’s size.

They recruited 15 male undergraduates and showed them photographs of goalkeepers standing in one of four different postures – the “arms-out” posture, with their arms stretched out to the side at shoulder height; “arms-up,” with their arms pointing upwards and outwards; “arms-down,” with their arms out and pointing downwards; and “arms-parallel,” with their arms held alongside their bodies.

Each participant was shown each of these photographs five times, in a randomised order and, after viewing each photograph, was then asked to estimate the goalkeeper’s height by making a mark on a vertical line on a sheet of paper. The participants overestimated the height of the goalkeeper adopting the “arms-up” posture by an average of 0.24cm, but underestimated the size of those in the “arms-down” and “arms-parallel” postures, by an average of 0.35 and 0.51cm, respectively, regardless of the actual size of the person in the photograph.

Having established that the goalkeeper’s posture can influence perception of their size, the researchers ran another experiment designed to test how this might affect aiming accuracy. In a pilot study they had shown that participants were more accurate at throwing than at kicking, and so they used simulated handball penalty throws instead of penalty kicks.

In this experiment, another 24 male undergraduates were asked to throw balls at a handball goal projected onto a screen together with one of the four goalkeeper photographs used in the previous experiment. The researchers used high-speed video cameras to record the trajectory of each throw, and used the footage to determine where each throw landed relative to the goalkeeper’s midline.

When the photograph showed the goalkeeper in the “arms-up” posture, the participants perceived him to bigger than he actually was, and consequently threw the balls further from his body, by an average of nearly 4cm. But when it showed him in the “arms-down” or “arms=parallel” postures, they perceived him as being smaller, and so threw the balls closer to him.

This suggests that postures which make the goalkeeper seem bigger will result in the penalty-taker directing the ball away from his body, whereas those that make him seem smaller are more likely to result in penalty kicks aimed closer to them.

A goalkeeper may thus influence the penalty-taker’s actions, and increase the likelihood that they will save a penalty kick, by adjusting their posture accordingly. van der Kamp and Masters conclude that “analysis of real-life goalkeeper behaviour may bear this out,” and since then have published preliminary data suggesting that their findings are indeed applicable to real-life situations.

Reference: van der Kamp, J. & Masters, R. S. W. (2008). The human Müller-Lyer illusion in goalkeeping. Perception, 37: 951-954. [PDF]

It’s the end of a long day, and your mix sounds slammin’.

The 808 is shaking the floor. The kick hits you in the chest. The bass sounds monstrous.

You lean back in your cushy office chair and smile.

“Dave Pensado has nothing on me,” you conclude. “Should I call Mix Magazine for an interview?”

But before clicking bounce, you decide to listen one more time.

How to do an illusion kick

Suddenly, the 808 is nowhere to be found. Your “massive” kick sounds like a bag of rice being hit with a spoon. And the monstrous bass is a tinny, wimpy mess.

“Is this really how people are going to hear my mix?” You wonder. “There’s got to be a better way.”

Luckily, there is. The following tips will help you make mixes that sound great on small speakers. Follow the advice below, and you’ll avoid this MacBook nightmare—guaranteed.

Don’t Attempt The Impossible

First, a word of caution.

Don’t attempt to make a mix sound perfect on small speakers. This is a waste of time, and will often lead to compromises that make things worse. An 808 will never sound massive on an iPhone. This would defy the laws of physics.

Try to please everyone, and you’ll end up pleasing no one. Instead, just make sure whatever propels the groove and sells the song doesn’t disappear. Let the other stuff go.

The Poor Man’s Auratone

How to do an illusion kick

An original pair of Auratone studio monitors

Many mixers swear by Auratones.

These 4 1/2″ monitors have almost no top or bottom end—they’re all midrange. Monitoring through them will help you avoid many mix translation surprises.

Master-mixer Jack Joseph Puig explains it best:

“I have always felt that midrange is the most important band. The one common factor with all systems is they all have midrange. Some systems have or don’t have subwoofers, and some have or don’t have extended high frequencies. But all have midrange. Get the midrange right.”

If you don’t have a pair of Auratones (or modern equivalents, like the Avantone MixCubes), you can achieve a similar effect by strapping an EQ across your mix bus. I call this the “poor man’s Auratone” technique. Here’s how to pull it off:

  1. Add an EQ to your mix bus (any will do).
  2. Set a high-pass filter to 18 dB per octave at 170 Hz.
  3. Set a low-pass filter to 18 dB per octave at 5 kHz.

How to do an illusion kick

FabFilter’s Pro-Q 2, set up with the poor man’s Auratone technique

(I recommend saving this as a preset, so you can pull it up easily while mixing.)

To take this technique further, sum your mix bus to mono. This will simulate the experience of listening on an iPhone or in a grocery store. (Yes, mono still matters. Think about it—when you step back a few feet from any pair of speakers, you’re effectively listening in mono.)

If key tracks become hard to hear or disappear when you kick in the EQ, the following techniques will help.

Crafting The Aural Illusion

Some tracks—like 808s and sine basses—disappear completely on small speakers.

Because tracks like these have almost all their frequency content in the low end. And small speakers can’t play back low end.

So how do you get an 808 to cut through on small speakers?

Distortion creates harmonics. And since harmonics extend up the frequency spectrum, small speakers can play them back.

But that’s not the only reason this technique works.

When you hear harmonics, you also “hear” the fundamental frequencies they were created from, even if those frequencies don’t actually exist. Your brain fills in the blanks. Meaning you’ll hear low end, even when it’s not there.

I call this the aural illusion technique, and it’s a great way to trick listeners into hearing low end on small speakers. (This is how plugins like Waves’ RBass and MaxBass work.)

How to do an illusion kick

To pull this off, just add a little crunch using your favorite distortion plugin (I like SoundToys’ Decapitator). Remember—a little goes a long way. Obvious distortion is not the goal. You just need a bit of color to help the track cut through.

This is one of my favorite ways to enhance bass. It can add clarity and presence, without muddying up the low end.

Own The Upper Bass

We all love sub-bass.

But as mixers, we tend to go a little trigger happy with it. We’re quick to add anything below 80 Hz. After all, there’s nothing more exciting than feeling the floor shake.

The only problem? You’ll never hear this stuff on small speakers. Because most don’t extend below 80 Hz.

But they do play back bass above 80 Hz.

“Whaaat Jason…there’s bass above 80 Hz?”

Yes! And don’t forget it.

The upper bass region—from 80 to 200 Hz—is crucial. Pay close attention to it while mixing. If you can center the punch of a kick at 80 or 100 Hz instead of 60 Hz, it will often translate much better on small speakers.

Opt For Clicky Kicks

We all love kicks that rattle the floor. But when it comes to making them cut, more sub usually isn’t the answer.

The most important part of a kick is the click on top. This is usually found around 5 kHz, but can vary based on the drum.

To add clarity to the kick, look here first.

How to do an illusion kick

FabFilter’s Pro-Q 2, set to boost 5 kHz on a kick drum

Since all speakers play back this part of the frequency spectrum, it’s often the best place to boost. Like the aural illusion technique above, this will often make listeners feel like they’re hearing more low end than they actually are.

Don’t believe me? Listen to a few of your favorite records. Notice how much click there is on the kick. There’s often a lot less low end than you think.

PS—If you’re mixing a sub-kick with nothing above 200 Hz, a boost at 5 kHz won’t do you much good. Instead, augment the track with a hi-hat sample, or add another kick with a high-pass filter (set so just the click cuts through). This is more effective than trying to boost something that isn’t there in the first place.

What are your favorite techniques for crafting mixes that sound great on small speakers? Let me know by leaving a comment below!

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amberdezi

Member
  • May 24, 2010
  • #1
  • if anyone knows how to do one, can you PLEASE tell me some tips? and if youre reeeeally bored, you can always make a “how-to” video and put it on youtube, if you want . im sure a lot of people would be thankful for it, since i cant find ANY “how to do an illusion” videos!

    all i know is you have to be flexible, and thankfully, that is my strongest point. i was always the most flexible in my classes when i was younger, and i have maintained my flexibility over the years, and can still do deep oversplits in all three splits. also, i doubt there are, but if there are any known drills for an illusion, you can tell me those, too!

    thank you sooooo much you guys!

    livelifetumble8dx

    Member
    • May 24, 2010
  • #2
  • flippinlolly

    Member
    • May 24, 2010
  • #3
  • amberdezi

    Member
    • May 24, 2010
  • #4
  • dunno

    Banned
    • May 26, 2010
  • #5
  • this one is pretty good.

    flippinlolly

    Member
    • May 26, 2010
  • #6
  • Stretchsportguy

    Guest
    • Jun 8, 2010
  • #7
  • KyraGymnast

    Member
    • Jun 11, 2010
  • #8
  • I’ve been reading all of these replies and even though they all sound great in explaining the technical side of the illusion, they are very confusing as to how to actually do it.

    Now all you really have to know how to do to be able to do an illusion is a cartwheel (easy peesy) and

    a needle kick (a kick where you bend down and touch one foot, while the other leg kicks up into a full split or scale- also pretty easy- it’s pretty much like down a scale with your chest on your base leg).

    After you got the needle kick down, you start trying to turn when you are doing it – kind of like doing a cartwheel in one place. Your base foot stays on the ground the whole time.

    You will do a half turn, and end up facing the opposite way you started

    I found this video on youtube.com– this shows what a good one looks like (just ignore the spinning before hand, you dont have to do that )

    It shows a single, double and triple. I know this isn’t the best video, but it at least shows what it should look like-

    I know it’s confusing, and your best bet is to have someone teach you in person, but I hope this helped.

    E ye-high kicks are the iconic kicks that we Rockettes are known for! We kick to the height of our eye, with the leg slightly crossed in towards the center line of the body. In eye-high kicks, our legs are parallel. Even though our heights range from 5’6″ to 5’10 ½”, doing our kicks in this way gives the illusion that we are all kicking at the exact same height.

    So how do we get our legs all the way up to eye level? Any dancer knows that maintaining and improving your flexibility through stretching is crucial to any dance training. Dynamic stretching prepares the whole body for exercise by using controlled movements that increase heart rate and overall blood flow to the muscle while also increasing flexibility … all of which we need to support our stamina and endurance when performing our eye-high kicks. In the Christmas Spectacular, we perform about 300 kicks per show!

    How-To: Traditional eye-high kicks are done straight ahead, but we have a few different variations (did you see our edgy “Welcome to New York” kickline from the creative genius of Mia Michaels?!).

    Piano Kicks How to do an illusion kickThe kicking leg comes down and crosses in front of (and slightly to the side of) the supporting leg. The foot comes down with a light tap and pops back up again for another eye-high kick.

    Angle Kicks How to do an illusion kickThese are eye-high kicks, aimed on an angle. Our gaze and our torsos shift slightly to the angle, and the toe of the kicking leg is aimed on the same angle.

    Rond de Jambe Kicks The kicking leg loops up and around, with the leg making a rond de jambe that ends in a passé.