How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Imagine this: You’re running full speed ahead, the goal is within arm’s reach, your teammates are screaming your name, victory is so close you can practically taste it. There’s just one problem. A defender is charging right in your direction and is determined to close you down. What do you do? You begin to hesitate and just as memories of your coaches teachings begin to resurface, the adrenaline causes you to lose all focus and your brain can’t seem to remember the skills you’ve practising. If only you had a guide in these situations…

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

So here it is: How to Master a Step Over

The skill was reportedly invented by Argentine striker Pedro Calomino in the early 1900s, the step over is one of the most prolific tricks in football, and when executed well, it’s one of the most effective tricks to send your defender lunging in the wrong direction. Today the skill has been popularized by Cristiano Ronaldo and his super quick step overs before scoring a goal and making the fans roar! In case you are a striker hungry for goals, check out our guide to becoming a top goal scoring striker for top tips.

The stepover is a simple skill that you can learn through practice at home, training and matches. It can come in different variations, beginning by the simplest “inside” or “outside” step overs, becoming more complicated with the amounts of feints, stops, and speed changes.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

HOW TO DO AN INSIDE STEP OVER:

Step 1:
Approach the ball as if you’re going to make touch/pass with the inside of your foot.

Step 2:
Instead of making contact with the ball, swing your foot around the front of the ball and “Step over”. Step around the ball towards the center of your body.

Step 3:
With the same foot which is now on the other side of the ball, use your outside touch to move the ball in the opposite direction.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

HOW TO DO AN OUTSIDE STEP OVER:

Step 1:
Approach the ball as if you’re going to make touch/pass with the inside of your foot.

Step 2:
Instead of making contact with the ball, swing your foot around the front of the ball and “Step over”. This time step over the ball in the direction away from the midline of your body.

Step 3:
Use the outside of your opposite foot to push the ball in the opposite direction

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

How to practice:

For when you first start practicing go through the motions standing still with the ball. Once you’ve gotten comfortable with the motions, place a cone around 10 meters ahead which will be your defender and another about 8 meters ahead. Begin by dribbling at a slow constant pace. Do the step over at the 8m cone and change speed at the “defender” at 10m.

Remember, practice makes perfect. Repeating the variations at different speeds is the best way to incorporate the step over into your playing style.

The effectiveness of the step over isn’t only because of the fake, but because of the change in pace. When approaching the move slow down and speed up to further trip up the defender.

When you first start, you might find yourself looking down at your feet when running through the motion. Make it a habit to practice looking up and ahead.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Key points to remember:

1. Angle your body in the direction of the fake
2. Always touch the ball with the outside of the foot after the feint
3. Change pace and speed up after your touch

Once you’ve mastered the basic step over remember to have fun! Add feints by increasing the number of times you “step over” experiment with other tricks and skills like a Cruyff Turn! Becoming a better footballer is all about repetition and learning through practice, afterall “practice makes permanent”! Step-overs are one of the core skills taught and practiced on a regular basis at WMF. Within the first 10 minutes of a session, our coaches work to getting each player over 1000 touches on the ball and most of this is done through perfecting skills like step-overs!

Basically I'm (19f) trying to get back into football after about a 1.5 year hiatus and my step overs are terrible. I have the basic foundation of how to do it but I can't properly execute it with the proper speed. I can barely do it stationary and if I do it while running it's either in slow motion or I end up hitting my ankle. Can you guys give me any tips on how to better my stepovers? Thanks in advance.

Honestly your better off just feinting then exploding the out in the opposite direction. Step overs are really easy to read and you need to be close for them to work and once you do one step over the defender is close enough to either stick a foot in or go to ground and win the ball

I'm 30 played CB my whole life and can guarantee you feinting is far more effective because then you've almost turned the defender

Gotta agree here 21 played mostly CB and FB in recent years.

Players that beat me are mostly those with good body feints and ball controlling skills. Rarely the flashy stepover type. Also the only situation a stepover seems useful to me is at the edge of the box when you either try to cut inside or go to the goalline to get a cross in. think about if you really need this skill and if its worth putting your time into that i

Stepovers are one of the most efficient ways for getting around your opponent.

However, you need to perform them quickly and intelligently in order to benefit from them.

Here are some general things you can adapt in order to improve your stepovers. Let’s start.

1. Using a Cone

Bring a cone or similar and put it on the ground. Then, step away from the cone about 10 yards and start to drive the ball towards it.

You should pretend that the cone is an opponent and that you want to get around it.

Believe me, even if the cone is not moving you will probably stumble on it few times. I know this by my own experience 🙂

However, this is a good sign because if you can’t get around that cone properly you will not either be able to get around your opponent.

Therefore, be sure to practice even more before trying out your stepovers in a real soccer game.

2. Passive Teammate

Ask a teammate to attack you but tell him that he should not try to steal the ball from you.

This one is my favorite because you will actually practice on real game situations with a real opponent.

If you want to increase the difficulty of this exercise you may give your teammate permission to act like a real defender.

This is even better because if you manage to get around your teammate successfully then you will also be able to get around your opponents.

3. Real Game

Perform your stepovers in a real soccer game. This one is also a form of practice even if you are actually performing your stepovers in a real soccer match.

It doesn’t matter how often you practice on the 2 points above if you never dare to use your move in a real game.

Don’t be afraid of failure, instead approach your opponent with the ball and be resolute while performing the move.

Some Pointers

Summary

Practice makes perfect for everything that you want to achieve in the world of soccer. It’s going to be tempting to get discouraged just because things don’t come naturally to you. Fight through that feeling to reach new heights – you can do it!

See the guidance at the top of this page to understand why you are not seeing interactive Football/Soccer images.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Warm Up

Organization: 20 x 20 Grid. 5 yard aparts each cone.

Instructions: Players perform the following ball mastery moves:

Introduce the "Step-Over" between each of the ball mastery moves. For advanced players, introduce "Step-Over/Scissors Combo".

Coaching Points:

Ball of their feet

Small/Soft touches on the ball

Progressions:

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

See the guidance at the top of this page to understand why you are not seeing interactive Football/Soccer images.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Technical Part

Organization: Same Setup. Players form 2 Lines as in diagram. Continous Movement.

Instructions:

Player take a touch out of their right feet and perform the step-over with the left. Alternating between left and right foot. Second person goes as soon as first person crosses the second cone.

Coaching Points:

Turn your body angled in the direction you are faking to go

Bring dominant leg around front of the ball

Touch in opposite direction, away from defender, with outside of foot

Progressions:

Add a step-over scissor combination.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

See the guidance at the top of this page to understand why you are not seeing interactive Football/Soccer images.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Limited Pressure

Organization: Same Setup. 3 Players in each of the cones with one cone empty. One passive defender in the middle without a ball.

Instructions:

Player in the middle acts as a passive defender and pressurizes anyone of the outisde players. Players perform the step-over and move to the open cone. Repeat for a couple of minutes and rotate players in the middle.

Coaching Points:

Body movement to unbalance defender

Change pace and accelerate after the move

Progressions:

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

See the guidance at the top of this page to understand why you are not seeing interactive Football/Soccer images.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Organization: 2 Lines. Defending Team with a ball each.

Instructions:

Defender in blue plays the ball to white and runs around the White Player to play a 1v1. Attacker scores by dribbling over either of the two gates.

To encourage positive attacking, players in white need to perform atleast one COD move before scoring in either goal.

Defender can score by shooting in either goal once they win the ball.

Change roles after several minutes.

Coaching Points:

Positive First Touch to Attack Space Ahead

Cut in front of the defender

Recognize where pressure and where space is

Accelerating out of the turn

Encourage Creativity and Taking Risks

Progressions:

Attackers starts with the ball. Defender becomes live on attackers touch.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

See the guidance at the top of this page to understand why you are not seeing interactive Football/Soccer images.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Organization: Same Setup but remove all the cones in the middle of the field. Add four Puck Goals or Gates on both sides of the grid.

One line of Blues starts with the ball. White attacks first.

Instructions:

First player in blue dribbles to the center of the field and stops the ball for their teammates coming from the opposite side who then passes to the first white player in either line. After the pass, first player from the opposite line joins to create a 2 v 2.

Players need to score in the opposite side of where they received the ball.

Coaching Points:

Positive First Touch to Commit Defender

Angles and Distance of Support

Encouraging the use of the "Step-Over" when in a 1v1 situation.

If there’s a defender standing in the way between an attacker and the goal, then using a step-over is a great way to create space for a shot.

What this session is about

  1. Improving dribbling skills and close control.
  2. Feinting to wrong-foot and beat the last defender.
  3. Shooting across the goalkeeper.

What to think about

  • Dribble – Approach defender slowly, step-over, accelerate past.
  • Step-over – When moving right, left foot circles ball once anti-clockwise, left shoulder dips, outside of right foot pushes ball past.
  • Shooting – Non-kicking foot alongside ball, “laces” through middle-to-top half, head still, eyes on ball, body over it, follow through.

Set-up

Area approx 40 x 20m with a pole or triangular cone placed in the middle. Using poles or corner flags, create target zones in the corners of the goals.

Warm up Session Developments Game Situation Warm Down
15 minutes 10 minutes 20 minutes 10 minutes 5 minutes

What you get your players to do

Split players into two groups, starting from opposite corners of the pitch to the right of each goal. The first player from each group starts at the same time by dribbling towards the pole, performing a step-over to the right then shooting into the corner of the goal. After shooting the players join the back of the other line and the second players set off.

Move the groups to start from the corners of the pitch to the left of each goal, so they practice their step-overs to the left.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Player attacks the pole, performing a stepover before shooting into the far corner.

Development

Replace the pole in the middle with a pair of passive defenders (players who have just taken a shot can be the defender for a turn).

You can also remove the poles in each goal and add a goalkeeper at either end.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Passive defenders and goalkeepers are added to test the technique.

Game situation

Two teams of 4 players line up 20-25 metres from goal. The 1st player from Team A must use their skill to beat the 1st player from Team B and score past the goalkeeper (1). After the shot, the 1st player from Team A becomes the defender in the 1v1 situation and tries to stop the 2nd player from Team B (2).

Award points for successfully completing the step-over, for scoring, and bonus points for scoring across the goalkeeper in the corner. The team with the most points wins.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

In a continuous attacking and defending game players score points for step-overs, goals and accuracy.

What to call out

  • “Start slowly at first to get technique right”
  • “Keep the ball under close control”
  • “Now blast past the defender”
  • “Hit the target”

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

About Tony Carr

Tony Carr is one of the most influential figures in English football. The former West Ham Academy director has brought through – from the youth team to the first team – players like Glen Johnson, John Terry, Rio Ferdinand, Frank Lampard, Michael Carrick, Joe Cole and Jermain Defoe.

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According to Wikipedia, the step over (also known as the pedalada, the denílson, or the scissors) is a dribbling move or feint, in football, used to fool a defensive player into thinking the offensive player, in possession of the ball, is going to move in a direction they do not intend to move in.

The move was popularized in the mid-1990s by one of the greatest strikers to grace the game of football, Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima, aka R9. In his prime, Ronaldo tormented defenses with this fundamental, yet, effective move.

The French national team was discussing Ronaldo’s deadly step overs during practice at the beginning of the video.

From a movement perspective, the step over is a unique skill that requires the offensive player to move their lower extremities around the ball in a circular fashion with lightning-quick speeds and silky smooth coordination. This movement is called circumduction.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

movement of a limb or extremity so that the distal end describes a circle while the proximal end remains fixed

Why Your Step Over Suck?

There are multiple reasons why you may have a poor track record of executing step overs. For this post, I will focus on what I consider the most critical quality, joint range of motion. Hip circumduction entails the sequential combination of flexion, extension, abduction, and adduction at the joint. If there is a limitation in any of these movement planes, you will have a difficult time executing step overs, and many fundamental footballing tasks.

Major factors leading to joint range of motion limitations include, prior injury, inflammation, overuse, postural imbalances, fatigue and dysfunctional breathing.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Range of motion:

The full movement potential of a joint

You find yourself one on one with the keeper and you attempt the step over move. You step over with the left, then with the right. You are now within an arms length of the keeper and the only movement option is to move the ball laterally with the outside of the left boot and tuck the ball into the goal. The keeper anticipates this move and he is now diving towards the ball. The lateral manipulation of the ball requires you abduct the left leg in a way that you do not lose control of the ball and create enough distance between the ball and the keeper diving at your feet. A limitation in hip abduction would limit your ability to move the ball laterally and away from the keeper.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Hip abduction is the movement of the leg away from the midline of the body

How to Fix?

Restoring normal joint range of motion is very complex. First, you have to assess your joint range of motion to see if you are outside of the normative ranges for each movement plane. This should be completed by a skilled practitioner to ensure accuracy and interpretation. The practitioner will then determine the underlying cause of the joint limitation and prescribe corrective exercises to restore normal function.

Football is a game of inches and angles. Limitations in joint range of motion can not only impact your ability to execute fundamental skills, but it can also lead to injury, inaccuracy, movement dysfunctions, exercise intolerance, and vision issues, to name a few.

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Sessions

Answers

Community Drills

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Autosave 6803773

In 2/3 groups players stand in single file, 1 player from each group goes at a time They dribble ball in between cones & perform ball mastery skills a.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Technique – Skills Corridor

All players have a ball and start at one side of the rectangle. They have to dribble the ball under control to the other side of the rectangle and bac.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Skills Session

In pairs each player on the cone facing opposite each other about 15 yards apartPlayers dribble with the ball and practice different skillsStep OversR.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

step overs

blue starts dribling to blue cone then does right left stepover then dribbles to white coneand does left right stepover then passes to green palyer wh.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Skill Squares

Set out multiple 5×5 skill squares. Players to move freely around the area and whenever they enter a skill square they must perform a skill befor.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Skill Square

Players either run or dribble ball around a square using different movements and dribbling / control skills. Encourage players to use different m.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Dribble to score

Set out 2 goals on each end of a pitch with cones 1m apart marking out a central area. All players to have a ball each and will attempt to dribbl.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Skills in pairs

1 Toe taps2 Step overs3 Penguin-players dribble to the cone, complete the skill to get past the cone and dribble to next player.- keeping the ball und.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Circle – Dribbling

Players dribble around circle using different parts of their foot and different skills including drag backs, hook turns and step oversEncourage player.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Warm Up – Ball Mastery/ ManipulationAutosave 3917735

Each player will have a ball at their feet and will use the entire rectangular space provided to dribble within.Players will be encouraged to attempt .

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In this video you'll learn one of the most commonly-used pieces of football skill around.

This is a classic bit of skill that all regularly footballer should try adding to their game

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In this video, you'll learn how to do a stepver

The stepover allows you to dribble around an opponent in front of you

It consists of tricking your opponent by making them think that you're going to dribble the ball in one direction, and then actually dribbling it in another

It's possible to do a stepover with each leg and then to link them together one after the other

To do a stepover with your left leg, dribble the ball towards your opponent

As soon as your opponent is in front of you, with a gap of about two metres, bring your left leg over and around the ball in a half-circle motion

To execute this, bypass the ball on the right hand side and position your foot at the same height as the ball on the left hand side

Next, bring the ball over to your right with the side of your right foot

You can do a stepover with your right leg by bypassing the ball on the left hand side, positioning your foot to the right of the ball, and then bringing it back with the outside of your left foot

Righ-footed players are naturally inclined to do a stepover with their right foot, and therefore to dribble with their left foot

It's the opposite for left-footed players

There are three important points when dribbling around your opponent with a stepover; pressing down with your leg after stepping over the ball, the speed of the skill, and speeding up afterwards

Firstly, pushing down with your leg

Once you've stepped over and around the ball in a half circle motion with your left or right leg, press down on that same leg to give some momentum to your change in direction

This movement will also make the tricking of your opponent at the beginning more believable

Next, the speed of the skill

Execute your stepover quickly

Without speed, the illusion won't work, and you won't get past your opponent

Lastly, speeding up afterwards

About two or three metres after the stepover, suddenly speed up to put a bit of distance between you and your opponent

You'll be well clear of them!

You can do a few stepovers before picking a side to stay on

We advise you not to do them too often because the more you do, the less your opponent will be taken by surprise!

It is part of a vast repertoire of tricks at his disposal. The Portuguese international uses the step over as a way to take the ball around opponents without simply outrunning them. It is a clever way to beat an opponent while keeping the ball closely controlled.

Who brought leg over in football?

The move was reportedly invented by Argentine striker Pedro Calomino in the early 1900s.

How did Ronaldo get so good?

“He was incredibly dedicated and competitive in training, he wanted to do everything better than every other player, to learn to do tricks all the time,” recalls Fortune. “He was always the best at step overs, but he started doing them with weights strapped to his ankles so that it would be easier in a real game.

What is the difference between a step over and scissors?

* The stepover can is an outside-in move whereas the scissor is an inside-out move. * To execute the stepover, the ball can be, but does not have to be, moving. * The stepover can be executed when moving forward, sideways, or backward.

What is step into step over and step out?

step into -> go into the subroutine and wait for next action. step over -> jump over the subroutine without waiting again. step out -> if you are in the subroutine, you will leave it without waiting again.

What is a step over exercise?

The exercise is a lot like a box step-up, but with the addition of two weights, either dumbbells or kettlebells. Stepping not just up but over taxes and tones the lower body in a different way than just squatting.

Are step overs effective?

The skill was reportedly invented by Argentine striker Pedro Calomino in the early 1900s, the step over is one of the most prolific tricks in football, and when executed well, it’s one of the most effective tricks to send your defender lunging in the wrong direction.

How to do the perfect step overs in soccer

Scoring goals is at the heart of “the beautiful game,” but beating defenders in soccer is what makes the crowd rise up out of their seats.

They’re also the moments that create goal-scoring opportunities and give the game its excitement and texture. Whether it be a Scissors move, a Fake, a Nutmeg or a crafty acceleration that leaves a defender in the dust, beating players in one-on-one situations is a skill that must be practiced with repetition and then executed with confidence. A recent study found that skill—more so than size, strength, speed, balance and fitness—was the single biggest predictor of in-game success for soccer players. If you’re not skilled enough to beat defenders in one-on-one situations, your performance will suffer.

Here are four soccer dribbling drills to help you beat more defenders on the pitch.

1. Get Confident With Creative Soccer Dribbling Drills

Would a soccer player rather be compared to a predictable robot or a spontaneous magician? Let’s hope you said the latter.

To that end, creativity is the secret weapon that ensures a defender cannot predict an attacker’s next move. Since the game is 90-minutes long, defenders are bound to figure out a player who lacks creativity. Can he or she beat a defender left and right? Can he or she do more than the same move every time? Knowing how to perform multiple moves at any given time is bound to confuse defenders and make them fear your next one-on-one battle.

The best way to practice creativity is to be comfortable on the ball by performing “freestyle” soccer dribbling drills.

The drill shown in the video above is an example of one that has no rules and little structure, but helps a player become more comfortable with the ball at their feet. The dribbler must simply stay in constant motion (30-second intervals work well) in and around the circle of cones and do whatever it takes to avoid the cones. You’ll naturally find yourself practicing a wide variety of dribbling moves as you navigate through the crowd of cones.

This drill is perfect for learning how to swirl around in tight spaces, be competent with multiple directions, and explore new skills. Creativity is all about experimentation and figuring out what works best for your feet.

Performing uncertain reaction drills with a partner can help simulate the spontaneous decision-making process. In this drill, a partner simply drops cones in front of the dribbler at random intervals and the dribbler must make a move to avoid them:

Once you’ve mastered these drills, it’s important to have the confidence to attempt to execute these moves during practice. Pulling it off will only add to your confidence and execution skills. If your execution is less than ideal, there’s very little drawback (you’re just in practice, after all) and you’ll be able to hone in on exactly what went wrong.

2. Get Comfortable With Changing Pace

The best attackers are so comfortable with the ball at their feet that they’re able to quickly change speeds to deceive their defenders.

Since a defender’s back is to the goal during a one-on-one scenario, the one thing that will terrify him is an attacker coming at him at high speed. Defenders are already at a disadvantage because they have to turn their bodies to catch the attacker, so being able to accelerate by them after a move is the best way to dart into the box and go for the goal.

Practicing one-on-one moves at high speed also translates to the energy system demands of the game (anaerobic power), and allows players to be less susceptible to physiological and mental fatigue while performing skills. If a player is conditioned with anaerobic power, the more likely it is that their mind will be sharp when it comes to cleanly executing moves.

An attacker can also draw in a defender by decelerating as they take them on one on one, then once they create space with their move, exploding as quickly as they can to catch the defender off balance and leave them behind.

Just like creativity, speed with the ball is a multi-faceted approach. Learn how to go fast, learn how to slow down and deceive, and know when to change the pace at any given moment. The best players are rarely the ones who run all-out, all the time.

3. Train Your Lateral Power

The majority of one-on-one soccer dribbling moves are performed in the frontal plane, such as fakes, scissors and step-overs. A player can be technically gifted, but if they do not have the lateral power to explode off their plant foot, the defender is going to have more time to disrupt their dribble and they’re going to have difficulty creating separation.

This is when that behind-the-scenes training in the gym comes into play. Building real lateral power requires a myriad of strength and plyometric drills performed without the ball. One drill that is excellent for building lateral power is bounding, which can then be progressed to loaded bounding for the optimal amount of fas- twitch muscle recruitment.

4. Master the Basics

Beating defenders is all about going at them with confidence. If a player has any inkling of self doubt, it could cause hesitation. Doubt and indifference are the enemy of an effective dribbler. One way to fight that doubt is by continuing to work on creativity, lateral power and speed with the ball.

Confidence can also be developed by mastering the foundational moves a player is likely already familiar with. Once these moves can be performed with full confidence, a player can begin to integrate subtle variations.

Proficiency with basic moves as well as an ability to add new flavor to them instantly makes a player confident and unpredictable. Better yet, it allows a player to become a magician of the game rather than a robot.