How to draw a detailed tree

Draw trees to branch out your skills and learn the basics of landscape drawing. Follow this drawing tutorial to learn how to sketch a tree from trunk to branches.

How to draw a detailed tree

Discover the art of the arbor.

There are over three trillion trees on earth, each with its own character and unique appearance, so it’s no wonder trees are among the most common yet beautiful subjects to draw. You might be surprised at how easy drawing a realistic tree is. Give it a try and see for yourself.

Six steps for a realistic tree drawing.

Follow along as artist and illustrator Spencer Nugent shows you an easy and effective way to draw a deciduous tree, step by step.

1. Draw the basic structure.

Start out with a few leading lines to indicate the general shape and guide the direction of the tree branches. For this tree, Nugent chose to start with a graphite pencil in Adobe Fresco for a pencil drawing style. Pen and ink will also work well with this method, but you may want to save the watercolors or colored pencils for later in the process.

How to draw a detailed tree

Image by Spencer Nugent

2. Draw cylinders over the lines to form the tree trunk.

In their most basic shape, trees are cylindrical forms. Draw cylindrical shapes over your structural lines to fill out the roots, trunk, and main branches for a more 3D appearance. “It’s always helpful to look at real trees to understand how the branches work,” says Nugent. “Typically with branches, you’ll find that the tree trunk is thicker and there’s a tapering that happens as you move further into the branches of the tree.”

How to draw a detailed tree

Image by Spencer Nugent

3. Fill in branches with foliage and leaves.

Sketch a rough outline for the foliage of your tree, also called the tree crown. “Introduce a jitter or some undulations to your lines. That’s going to give your tree a bit more of a natural feel,” says Nugent. You don’t necessarily have to draw individual leaves for your tree to look realistic. Be sure to vary the weight of your strokes as you go. Brushes in digital drawing apps like Adobe Fresco are pressure sensitive, so you can easily switch up the weight and thickness of your strokes.

How to draw a detailed tree

Image by Spencer Nugent

4. Trace your final outline.

On a new layer, trace over your final outline of the tree with a thicker black pen or marker. Once this is done, you can hide all layers underneath your new outline to keep your workspace clean.

How to draw a detailed tree

Image by Spencer Nugent

5. Fill in bark on the tree trunk.

It’s important to vary your line weight in the trunk as well. Make sure to contour your lines to the shape of the trunk you outlined; your placement will help suggest and bring definition to the shape without overdrawing the pattern.

How to draw a detailed tree

Image by Spencer Nugent

6. Add shading and finishing details.

Shade your tree to give it dimension. Typically, boughs closer to the trunk will be in shadow, while boughs at the top of the tree will be more exposed to light. You can also fill in your shading and highlights with a light source in mind for more directional detail work. “If you’re not sure you’re achieving enough contrast, squint your eyes and look at your sketch. It’s like having a conversation with your drawing,” says Nugent. Add any finishing touches to the trunk, roots, or surrounding ground, and your tree is complete.

How to draw a detailed tree

How to draw a detailed tree

Tips for drawing different types of trees.

If you want to go beyond the basic trunk and bush-like foliage, you’ll want to notice how different trees look and model yours on a specific type of tree. For example, a pine tree will require different crown drawing techniques than an oak tree. An old tree might have deeply defined trunk details and gnarls while a young tree should have a cleaner, less marked trunk. Find inspiration for any type of tree from the reference photos available in Adobe Stock.

No matter what kind of tree you set out to draw, keep these six steps in mind. If your tree isn’t looking as good as you’d like, don’t give up. Use your eraser as needed, but try to draw through each stroke if you can. Your lines may not be perfect, but they’ll retain their continuity and energy, which is important when drawing organic shapes.

This simple tutorial explains how to draw a tree in four steps. The examples are of a tree without leaves where all of the small branches are visible.

How to draw a detailed treeTree drawing step by step

A tree like the one in this tutorial is not very complicated to draw but can take some patience in order to go over all of it’s small branches.

Step 1 – Make a Basic Line Sketch

To start the tree drawing you can simply make a few lines to indicate the general directions of it’s trunk and some of it’s larger branches.

Step 2 – Draw the Trunk & Large Branches

Now draw out the actual shapes of the trunk and larger branches of the tree.

Generally the trunk and branches get progressively thinner as they go towards the top so be sure to keep this in mind when drawing. You also want to add some bumps and fairly sharp twists here and there to make the branches look more natural.

Step 3- Draw the Smaller Branches

Add the smaller branches to finish the line drawing.

You will need to add quite a few small branches for the tree to look natural. If you are making a fairly small drawing like the one in this example you can draw the smallest branches with just one line each which can make things a little faster and easier. Also note that while they do curve in slightly different directions overall the small branches tend to sort of “fan out” around the tree so draw accordingly.

Step 4 – Finish the Drawing by Applying Shading

Finally you can shade in the tree to make it look a little bit more realistic.

For this example we will apply some very basic shading making the tree slightly darker on the right side to show that the light is coming from the upper left of the drawing.

You can add a bit of a gradient for the larger branches and the trunk. For the smaller branches simply try and shade them slightly lighter on the left side of the drawing and darker on the right.

Once you are done with the shading you should have a finished drawing of a tree.

Conclusion

This is a fairly simple tutorial that focuses on drawing a tree with no leaves. For drawing leaves on a branch see:

Palm Tree Drawing

When your goal is to learn how to draw a palm tree, there is some essential tips that you’ll need to follow in order to get started.

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Basic Equipment You Will Need

First, you’ll need to decide what type of medium you will be working with.

You could use graphite, ink, pastel, or anything else that feels like an approach that appeals to you.

Next, choose your surface; again, choose anything that seems like a good option so long as it will work for the medium you will be using.

  • Pencils
  • Pens
  • Paper
  • Reference Image or Palm Tree to Draw

Draw a Palm Tree Step by Step

Sketch The Tree Tunk Outline

Your starting point should be the same whenever you start any new drawing. It should be a light sketch. This is the foundation that everything else is built on top of.

Much like the foundation of a home, the initial sketch should be solid before you start trying to move on to more advanced parts of the drawing.

To keep in mind, your trunk outline should be done with a light hand. This will enable you to go back and make corrections as you go from a simple sketch to a more advanced drawing.

How to Draw Palm Trees Leaves

Palm tree leaves are unique in the tree world because they are much larger and more prominent than any other type of tree you’ll ever encounter.

They are also structured differently than other trees. Most trees have branches that start from large to small as they spread out from the tree’s trunk. At the ends of the branches are the smallest part of the tree.

It’s here that leaves grow. But, palm tree leaves don’t grow on branches. They grow directly from the tree. They are so large that they are the size of many other types of tree branches! How do you draw them?

They have a roughly triangular shape, so start by sketching the basic shape. Once you have the basic shape, you can then start to refine the sketch by defining the different parts of the leaf.

Draw the Edge of the Tropical Leaves

One of the more exciting features of palm trees is the sharp edges along the ends of each leaf.

Typically you should avoid drawing sharp edges when drawing natural forms, but in the case of palm trees, you should embrace doing this.

The edge of each leaf should be clearly defined. This will help to give structure to your drawing and provide it with a clear definition where there should be a clear definition.

Draw the Shadows

Once the trunk and leaves have been drawn, that covers most of the essential structure of the palm tree. At this point, you should start to add more details, including adding shadows.

Adding shadows and creating a range of values is how we, as artists, can create the illusion of depth when drawing something on a flat surface.

One of the most common mistakes that artists of all experience levels make is not creating shadows with a full range of values. It is acceptable for you to create the darkest values in an image.

It’s a necessity if you want your image to look realistic. Study your subject, then start adding shadows going from light to dark.

You’ll probably be surprised at how quickly this will help to transform your sketch into a finished drawing.

Draw Coconuts

When drawing palm trees, one thing that you can’t forget is to add the coconuts. Without coconuts, a palm tree will be missing one of the essential features that define it as a palm tree. Fortunately, coconuts are simple to draw.

They are spheres with some textures on them. Make sure that you pay attention to how they are arranged on the tree. If you just start putting coconuts everywhere, it will not look right.

Place them correctly and add texture and shadows to them, and they are one of those little details that can go a long way toward making your palm tree look more realistic.

Also, make sure to draw your coconuts the way that they appear when they are still in the husk on the tree. Everyone thinks of coconut and probably pictures around, a brown sphere.

But, in the tree, coconuts are larger and have a green husk still.

Add Detail and Texture to the Tree Trunk

When drawing most subjects, you want to add details and then do your shading on top of the details. If needed, you can go back in and add additional details after you’re done to tighten things up.

But, when drawing a palm tree, you’ll want to add the shading first, then go back and add the texture and details.

This is because the details and texture are relatively simple, and if you shade on top of them, you could quickly lose them beneath the shading.

Draw the Base of the Palm Tree Drawing

One thing that palm trees have in common with other types of trees is that the base will be wider than the rest of the trunk.

Make sure that you give your palm tree a solid base that looks like it would support the rest of the tree. Also, make sure to draw the ground and add some details.

Drawing a few fallen coconuts on the ground can make a huge difference in how realistic your drawing looks.

Add Additional Background

After finishing your palm tree and ground, take some time to add some more background details. If you draw a tree just sitting in an open space, it will not look like a realistic scene.

But, if you draw a palm tree on a beach, surrounded by sand, fallen coconuts, and maybe some seagulls and a crab, you’re getting somewhere!

What about adding some crashing waves in the distance or some clouds? Why not?

You have an artistic license here, so do whatever you think you need to do to complete your drawing.

Additional Questions:

How to Draw Tropical Trees

If you enjoy drawing a palm tree, make sure to take the time to start exploring how to draw other types of tropical trees as well.

Tropical trees all have a similar appearance, with large green leaves, making them an interesting subject to draw.

Another benefit is that tropical trees are very distinctive compared to non-tropical trees, so when someone sees your drawing, they’ll automatically know what kind of tree they are looking at.

Ian Walsh is the creator and author of improvedrawing.com and an Art teacher based in Merseyside in the United Kingdom. He holds a BA in Fine Art and a PGCE in teaching Art and Design. He has been teaching Art for over 24 Years in different parts of the UK. When not teaching Ian spending his time developing this website and creating content for the improvedrawing channel.

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How to draw a detailed tree

Idealized Views

First things first—you must break free of any idealized views you have about trees. That is, what you think a typical tree looks like.

Take a moment to shut your eyes and picture a tree in your mind. What do you see? That tree is not based on reality, but rather the ideas and experiences you have had with trees throughout your life.

For me, and many others I imagine, I see a tree with rich umber wood and luscious green leaves. Some trees look like that, but not all!

These idealized views may seem harmless, but they can work behind the scenes to bias our decisions and paint things that are not actually there. I see it all the time in beginner paintings—they are unsure about the color of the leaves, so they default to green, even if the leaves are warm yellows and oranges.

Leaves are not always green. Wood is not always brown. The sky is not always blue.

Be careful about letting your idealized views dominate how you paint. Paint the tree as you see it.

I will show you what I mean using the following reference photo:

How to draw a detailed tree

The trees in the foreground are dark and underexposed in the photo. Because it is hard to make out any color, my mind defaults to green and brown. It seems the more ambiguous the colors, the more my idealized views take over. Regarding the trees in the background, beginner painters would be prone to overusing green and underusing yellow and orange.

Simplification

A tree is a complex arrangement of shapes, lines, colors, and other elements. You must learn how to simplify this information to make any sense of it and paint a coherent picture. Even realists like Ivan Shishkin simplified to some extent.

If you could only see basic color shapes, what would the tree look like?

For example, take this reference photo:

How to draw a detailed tree

This is a complex scene, with countless leaves, branches, shadows, highlights, accents, and colors. Not long ago, I would have put this in the “too hard” basket as my untrained eyes would have been overwhelmed by information. But now, I am able to tune out the noise and narrow down on the important details.

To give you an idea of what I see, below is the start of a recent study. Nothing more than basic color shapes. It took me about 10 minutes to get to this stage. Yet, even with such primitive detail, there is a quality of realism to it. That is the beauty of narrowing down on the important details and getting them right.

How to draw a detailed tree

Below is the end result. Keep in mind this is just a small study done in preparation for a larger work (to be revealed shortly, along with progress shots).

How to draw a detailed tree

I have also been playing around with filters in Photoshop to simplify the noise without picking up a brush (see the two examples below). But this is a matter for a separate post.

How to draw a detailed tree

How to draw a detailed tree

Once you see the tree in terms of basic color shapes, the rest is much easier. As long as you stay true to these basic elements, your tree will end up looking somewhat realistic. The amount of detail you use from there is up to you. If you enjoy getting lost in the detail, by all means, paint every leaf and branch. But you do not have to.

Here are some questions to help pull key details from the sea of information:

  • What is the lightest light/darkest dark?
  • What is positive/negative space?
  • What is the hardest edge? (The softest edge is, by nature, difficult to spot).
  • What is the focal point?
  • What is the most saturated color?

If you want more examples of simplification, check out the work of Sir Arthur Streeton. He was a master of it. His paintings appear fresh and spontaneous, yet there is a remarkable sense of realism. In the painting below, notice how he intricately rendered a few trees in the bottom right. This almost fools you into thinking the rest of the painting is equally detailed.

How to draw a detailed tree

How To Draw A Tree Art Projects For Kids

. . . Apr 18, 2020 · learn how to sketch simple trees for a landscape drawing and how to draw a more detailed tree as part of a study in itself. this is the fourth lesson in a se. Fill in branches with foliage and leaves. sketch a rough outline for the foliage of your tree, also called the tree crown. “introduce a jitter or some undulations to your lines. that’s going to give your tree a bit more of a natural feel,” says nugent. you don’t necessarily have to draw individual leaves for your tree ….

How to draw a detailed tree

How To Draw A Tree Art Projects For Kids

How to draw a detailed tree

How To Draw A Tree

How to draw a detailed tree

How To Draw A Tree Happy Family Art

How to draw a detailed tree

How To Draw A Detailed Tree 11 Steps With Pictures Wikihow

How to draw a detailed tree

Whether it’s beautiful cherry blossoms, fresh green trees, or autumn leaves turning red and yellow, trees add seasonality and flair to your illustrations.

A background with a tree can be expressed by using tones and materials, but it is difficult to find a tree that matches your image.

So, here are some basic tips on how to draw a tree so you can get the tree you envisioned.

1. Draw the positioning of the leaves and trunk

The first step is to draw the position of the tree and the size of the tree in which part of the tree will be drawn.
The tree can be roughly divided into two parts, the leaf part and the trunk part, so I draw the positioning of these two parts first.

How to draw a detailed tree

2. Draw the positioning of the leaf parts

When drawing a tree, the leaves are often the most confusing part of the tree.

As you can see in the photo of a tree with few leaves, the leaves are attached to each branch in a clump.
When you draw the leaves, you should think of this clump as one part of the tree and draw it as you go, so it’s easier to create a three-dimensional effect.

Once you have drawn the position of the leaves and trunk, you can draw the position of each part roughly by referring to a photograph.
At this point, I draw a simple circle to locate the parts without worrying about the shape of the leaves.

How to draw a detailed tree

3. Draw the base

When the positioning is completed, create a new layer and draw the base in one color.
Choose a color for the darkest shadow image and draw the silhouette of the tree.

How to draw a detailed tree

The sunlit areas appear yellowish and the shadows appear bluish.
Therefore, I have chosen a strong blue color for the shadows.

The underlying color can be adjusted to some extent by using filters afterwards, so don’t worry too much about the color.

4. Add color to the base

Once you’ve painted the primer, create a new layer on top of the underlying layer and press the clipping button.
By doing this, you can color only the underlying area, so let’s roughly light and darken the underlying layer.

How to draw a detailed tree

Here is an image of the light hitting me from the top left corner, making the yellow-green to blue color increasingly more intense from the light to the dark.
(I’m using an airbrush.)

5. Painting the lightest part of the leaf

Once the base is drawn, create a new layer and draw the brighter parts of the leaves by clipping them.

How to draw a detailed tree

What I’m using here is not a pen brush with a clear outline, but an acrylic brush that can be blurred by adjusting the brush pressure.

Since the area is exposed to the sun, I will paint it with a slightly yellowish green color.
Again, don’t worry too much about the shape of the leaves, but paint a firmer shape.

6. Connect the base and the light areas

The colors of the light areas and the darker areas underneath appear to be floating away from each other, so we’ll add an intermediate color to blend them in.
Create a new layer underneath the light area layer and apply the neutral color by clipping.

How to draw a detailed tree

7. Shine a soft light

Once the light areas and the base are blended in, now create a layer at the top and airbrush a soft light to bring out more light.

How to draw a detailed tree

8. Painting the texture of leaves

I used a watercolour brush to add the chunky silhouette of the leaves to each part of the image, as it looks smooth as it is.

How to draw a detailed tree

9. Outline the leaves

After drawing the silhouette of the leaves on the part, it’s time to contour the entire image.

Trim the base layer and add leaves to make the silhouette look more like that.

How to draw a detailed tree

Here, the underlying layer is scraped off with a pen brush (transparent color).

[How to choose a transparent color]

Next to the color selection window square, there is a plaid square.
You can select a transparent color by pressing on this area.

How to draw a detailed tree

10. Adding Shadows

Once the shape is in place, add a few more darker shadows to give it a crisp, three-dimensional look.

Create a new layer at the top and clipping, then use the airbrush to draw shadows on the leaves and other objects in the back of the image.

How to draw a detailed tree

You can learn more about finishing the tree, including highlights from the trunk area after this, in the article How to Draw a Tree (2), which you can also refer to here.

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If you want to go beyond the basic trunk and bush-like foliage, you’ll want to notice how different trees look and model yours on a specific type of tree. For example, a pine tree will require different crown drawing techniques than an oak tree. An old tree might have deeply defined trunk details and gnarls while a young tree should have a cleaner, less marked trunk. Find inspiration for any type of tree from the reference photos available in Adobe Stock.

No matter what kind of tree you set out to draw, keep these six steps in mind. If your tree isn’t looking as good as you’d like, don’t give up. Use your eraser as needed, but try to draw through each stroke if you can. Your lines may not be perfect, but they’ll retain their continuity and energy, which is important when drawing organic shapes.

How To Draw A Tree – YouTube Learn how to draw a tree by following along with us. This is a great activity to celebrate Earth Day!Become an Art Club member https://www.artforkidshub.com

How to draw a tree: A step-by-step tutorial | Adobe Fill in bark on the tree trunk. It’s important to vary your line weight in the trunk as well. Make sure to contour your lines to the shape of the trunk you outlined; your placement will help suggest and bring definition to the shape without overdrawing the pattern. Image by Spencer Nugent 6. Add shading and finishing details

How to Draw a Tree Step by Step for Beginners In 8 Minutes Subscribe How to Draw a Tree Step by Step for Beginners In 8 Minutes Here comes new video where i am drawing a tree in 8 minutes. Left this also in real time so it would be easier to see how it

How to Draw a Detailed Tree: 11 Steps (with Pictures) – wikiHow Drawing a Fir Tree Download Article 1 Sketch a thin line that will be the tree’s trunk. Use a 6B or dark pencil to draw a thin line on your paper. Make the line as tall as you’d like your fir tree to be. [10] You can make your tree trunk as straight or curved as you like. 2 Make a few short branches coming from the top of the trunk

How to draw a tree easy | Tree drawing for beginners – YouTube How to draw a tree easy | Tree drawing for beginners | How to draw a tree easy | Tree drawing for kidsE-mail :: [email protected]’t forget

How To Draw A Tree – Happy Family Art How To Draw A Tree: Tree # 1 I start with a line and the general shape that I would like the crown to be. Then I add a few lines to indicate the main branches. Make the trunk thicker. It is thick towards the bottom and the roots, and narrows closer to a point toward the top. The same thing with the branches

3 Ways to Draw a Tree – wikiHow Sketching a Winter Tree Download Article 1 Draw a trunk with 3 large circles on top of it. To make the trunk, draw 2 vertical lines next to each other that taper in toward the top. When you draw the 3 circles, put 2 on the bottom 1 on the top. [6] Try to make the circles around the same size, but they don’t need to be perfect

How to draw a tree: A step-by-step tutorial | Adobe Fill in bark on the tree trunk. It’s important to vary your line weight in the trunk as well. Make sure to contour your lines to the shape of the trunk you outlined; your placement will help suggest and bring definition to the shape without overdrawing the pattern. Image by Spencer Nugent 6. Add shading and finishing details

How to Draw A Tree : Step By Step Guide Step 1 Draw a single line for the trunk and a round shape for the crown. Step 2 Draw few straight lines for the branches Step 3 Now we draw 2 parallel lines around the trunk to make it thicker and also draw the roots. Step 3 By following the above step we also make the main branches thicker as illustrated

How to Sketch & Draw Trees – YouTube Learn how to sketch simple trees for a landscape drawing and how to draw a more detailed tree as part of a study in itself. This is the fourth lesson in a se

Putting this all together

Iowa Pasture Drawing

How to draw a detailed treeI have started on the right foreground tree. I have laid in all the branches as that really helps keep me on track where the branch bundles need to go. I am going to start with an F hardness less for the leaves on the top of the tree.

Those need to have some definitive distinction to them to register as ‘leaves’.I have included a detail shot of how I hold my pencil. (Yeah..I’m a lefty). When I am working on the leaves I hold my pencil with the barrel resting on my little finger and clasped lightly between my index finger and thumb. I also do not rest my arm, wrist on the paper.

Sometimes for balance I will rest the tip of my little finger on the paper. The wrist stays stiff and my pencil strokes are created by using the entire arm. This method takes quite a bit of practice to learn to control your pencil strokes (especially with small areas), however, it gives a great freedom of pencil strokes. For tighter control, I use the pencil in the standard writing hold.Well, that was long winded. oh I forgot, the grass under the trees I started with a 3H to get a smooth even shade and then introduced an F for darker clumps of grass.It’s a bit detailed but I hope this helps.

How to draw a detailed tree

10/1/05: Continued to work on the trees and grass. I’ve used B lead on the tree on the left and I’m using 3H on the grass to build up the shadows.

10/3/05: I think I am now finished with this one. I have darken and evened out the trees in the foreground and have darken the grass in the lower right foreground.

With the Block Diagram template, you can use tree shapes to represent hierarchies, such as family trees or tournament plans.

How to draw a detailed tree

Note: Before following these steps, make sure that AutoConnect is active. On the View tab, in the Visual Aids group, the AutoConnect check box should be selected.

Click File > New > Templates > General, and then open Block Diagram.

From the Blocks and Blocks Raised stencils, drag block shapes onto the drawing page to represent stages in a tree structure.

To add text to a shape, select the shape, and then type.

Indicate relationships between the blocks by connecting the shapes:

Drag a shape from a stencil onto the drawing page and position it near another shape.

How to draw a detailed tree

While still holding down the mouse button, move the pointer over one of the blue triangles. The triangle turns dark blue.

Release the mouse button. The shape is placed on the drawing page, and a connector is added and glued to both shapes.

How to draw a detailed tree

Tip: To reverse the direction of the arrow on a connector, see Edit connector lines, arrows, or points.

Use tree shapes to represent hierarchical stages in a tree diagram:

From Blocks, drag a tree shape onto the drawing page. If you want two branches, use a Double-tree shape. If you want two or more branches, use a Multi-tree shape.

Drag the endpoints How to draw a detailed treeon the tree shapes to connection points on block shapes. The endpoints turn red when they are glued.

Drag the control handles How to draw a detailed treeon the tree shapes to create more branches or to change the branch length or position.

How to draw a detailed tree

1 Drag the control handle on the trunk to the right to create more branches.

2 Drag the control handle at the end of a branch horizontally or vertically to change its position.

See Also

Note: Before following these steps, make sure that AutoConnect is active. On the View tab, in the Visual Aids group, the AutoConnect check box should be selected.

Click File > New, click General under Template Categories, and then open Block Diagram.

From the Blocks and Blocks Raised stencils, drag block shapes onto the drawing page to represent stages in a tree structure.

To add text to a shape, select the shape, and then type.

Indicate relationships between the blocks by connecting the shapes:

Drag a shape from a stencil onto the drawing page and position it near another shape.

How to draw a detailed tree

While still holding down the mouse button, move the pointer over one of the blue triangles. The triangle turns dark blue.

Release the mouse button. The shape is placed on the drawing page, and a connector is added and glued to both shapes.

How to draw a detailed tree

Tip: To reverse the direction of the arrow on a connector, right-click the line, click Arrows on the mini toolbar that appears, and then choose a new arrow direction or style.

Use tree shapes to represent hierarchical stages in a tree diagram:

From Blocks, drag a tree shape onto the drawing page. If you want two branches, use a Double-tree shape. If you want two or more branches, use a Multi-tree shape.

Drag the endpoints How to draw a detailed treeon the tree shapes to connection points on block shapes. The endpoints turn red when they are glued.

Drag the control handles How to draw a detailed treeon the tree shapes to create more branches or to change the branch length or position.

How to draw a detailed tree

1 Drag the control handle on the trunk to the right to create more branches.

2 Drag the control handle at the end of a branch horizontally or vertically to change its position.

Note: Before following these steps, make sure that AutoConnect is active on the standard toolbar.

On the File menu, point to New, point to General, and then click Block Diagram.

From the Blocks and Blocks Raised stencils, drag block shapes onto the drawing page to represent stages in a tree structure.

To add text to a shape, select the shape, and then type.

Indicate relationships between the blocks by connecting the shapes:

Drag a shape from a stencil onto the drawing page and position it near another shape.

How to draw a detailed tree

While still holding down the mouse button, move the pointer over one of the blue triangles. The triangle turns dark blue.

Release the mouse button. The shape is placed on the drawing page, and a connector is added and glued to both shapes.

How to draw a detailed tree

Tip: To reverse the direction of the arrow on a connector, on the Shape menu, point to Operations, and then click Reverse Ends.

Use tree shapes to represent hierarchical stages in a tree diagram:

From Blocks, drag a tree shape onto the drawing page. If you want two branches, use a Double-tree shape. If you want two or more branches, use a Multi-tree shape.

Drag the endpoints How to draw a detailed treeon the tree shapes to connection points on block shapes. The endpoints turn red when they are glued.

Drag the control handles How to draw a detailed treeon the tree shapes to create more branches or to change the branch length or position.

How to draw a detailed tree

1 Drag the control handle on the trunk to the right to create more branches.

2 Drag the control handle at the end of a branch horizontally or vertically to change its position.

How to draw a detailed tree

Photo: Stock Photos from Anna_Andre/Shutterstock

Who doesn’t love to draw flowers? Famous artists like Claude Monet, Henri Matisse, and Georgia O’Keeffe are known for their creative depictions of colorful plants. And of course, no painter is as well known for their sunflower art as Vincent van Gogh. His iconic series of sunflower paintings have captured the eyes and hearts of art-lovers from around the world, and inspired many artists to create their own interpretations of this quirky plant.

If capturing the unique beauty of this large flower seems tricky, don’t worry. Like any subject, the key is to take it step by step and at your own pace. We’ve put together a tutorial to help you follow in the Dutch master’s footsteps and draw your own illustration of a sunflower. Ready to give it a go? All you’ll need to get started is a pencil, eraser, pen, and some paper. Now then—let’s draw a sunflower!

Learn How to Draw a Sunflower Step by Step

Step 1: Draw a circle

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Start by drawing a large circle near the top of your paper—this will be the center of the sunflower.

Step 2: Sketch the petals

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Next, we’re going to add the petals. Looking at a reference photo, lightly sketch diamond-like shapes around the circle. Feel free to make some of the petals bend or curl to give the sunflower a bit of character. If you want to make a fuller-looking sunflower, then layer more petals in the back until you’re satisfied. In this tutorial, the sunflower looks more or less even all the way around, but feel free to make it asymmetrical as well.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Step 3: Add the stem

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Afterward, we’re going to add a thick stem that goes down almost to the end of the page.

Step 4: Add leaves

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Next, add a few smaller stems that reach out on either side of the main stem. Then, draw a variety of small, medium, and large leaves at the end of these stems. Try curling some of the leaves to bring a sense of realism to the drawing.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Step 5: Draw concentric circles in the center

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

The center of a sunflower is full of depth. So, to help us map out how to sketch it, we’re going to draw two concentric circles. Try to draw these as even as you can, but don’t worry too much, as they’ll be fleshed out with texture soon.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Step 6: Sketch the seeds

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Starting at the outer part of the flower’s center, begin drawing rows of small ovals. While the outer ring should be fairly spaced out, the second ring will be quite dense. Then, at the very center, just add a few ovals here and there, making sure to keep it mostly white.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Step 7: Add definition to the sunflower

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Now, we’re going to erase any remaining guidelines and add some definition to the sunflower. Starting with the petals, sketch some creases in the center of each shape. Then, draw fine hairs all over the stem and add veins in the leaves.

Step 8: Add embellishments

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Although this step is optional, consider adding some embellishments to your sunflower drawing to make it a finished illustration. An easy way to do this is to create a circular border with a protractor and draw small circles along the curved line. This way the viewer’s eyes are drawn to the head of the sunflower.

Step 9: Go over the drawing in ink

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

At last, it’s time to complete our illustration by going over it in ink. So, place a scrap of paper under your drawing hand, and carefully go over the pencil lines with your favorite pen. Once you’ve gone over all of the linework, feel free to add some texture to key areas like the stem, leaves, and petals. Stippling and hatching are two great techniques you can use. After you’re done inking, make sure you wait a considerable amount of time for the ink to dry, before erasing any remaining pencil marks. You can either fill the drawing in with color or leave it as is for a striking black and white illustration of a sunflower!

This tutorial shows how to draw the sun in four different ways. Each examples includes step by step drawing instructions and illustrated examples.

How to draw a detailed treeSun drawing in different styles

Above is a preview of the four different examples featured in this tutorial. Each one shows the sun drawn in a different style.

For each of the drawings it’s recommended that you start in pencil and make very light lines as you will either want to erase them or have them blend into the color later on.

Drawing the Sun Step by Step

The sun drawing in this example is fairly simple but it may take a bit of time to add all of it’s rays.

Step 1 – Make a Line Drawing

First make a circle to outline the sun itself. Next project a series of lines going out from it for the rays. Try and make these of slightly different length.

Remember to use a pencil and keep the lines as light as you can so that they are just barely visible.

Step 2 – Apply Color

Color the circle of the sun yellow and the rays orange. Use the ray lines from the previous step as guides and make them thicker when tracing over them with the orange. A good way to do this is using marker (as they tend to be really bright) but you can also use colored pencils.

If coloring with markers you can wait for them to dry and then go over your drawing with an eraser to remove any hints of the pencil lines.

If you want a simpler drawing you can leave it at this stage or you can move on to the next step.

Step 3 – Add Gradient

To make the sun look a little more interesting add some color gradients. Start by first blurring it’s outer edges. An easy way to do this is with a yellow pencil.

Step 4 – Finish the Sun Drawing

Using an orange pencil create another gradient that forms a blurry outline around the inner edge of the circle. Make the gradient darker as it moves away from the edge and then again lighter as it moves towards the center.

Drawing a Stylized Sun Step by Step

This example of the sun is slightly more stylized and closer to something that may be used by a designer.

Step 1 – Make a Line Drawing

Similar to the previous example start by drawing a circle. Around the circle draw the sun rays as randomly sized zigzags.

Step 2 – Apply Color

Again same as the previous example color the circle of the sun yellow and the rays orange. You can do this with markers, paints or colored pencils.

You can leave it at this stage for a simpler looking drawing or move on to the next step.

Step 3 – Add Gradient

Using an orange pencil blend the outer edges of the sun with the sun rays so that the circle looks blurred.

Step 4 – Finish the Sun Drawing

Again using an orange pencil create another gradient that leaves a blurry yellow outline around the edges of the sun. It should get darker going away from the yellow outline and then lighter again towards the center of the sun.

Drawing a Cartoon Sun Step by Step

This example shows how to draw a cartoon style sun.

Step 1 – Make a Line Drawing

Once again start by drawing a circle and then add the outline of the sun rays around that. You can draw them as pretty much a bunch of curves that all join together.

Step 2 – Apply Color

Again color the sun yellow and the rays orange with either colored pencils, paints or markers.

Similar to the previous two examples you can once again either leave the sun as it is or move on the next step.

Step 3 – Add Gradient

Blend the edges of the sun into the rays using an orange pencil so that the circle looks blurred.

Step 4 – Finish the Sun Drawing

Again using an orange pencil add another gradient that leaves a yellow outline between the sun and the rays. This gradient should get darker as it moves away from the yellow outline and then lighter again towards the middle of the sun.

Drawing a Realistic Sun Step by Step

This final example is for drawing a slightly more realistic looking sun.

Step 1 – Make a Line Drawing

For this first step simply draw a light circle using a pencil.

Step 2 – Apply Color

Color the sun itself with paints colored pencils or markers. For the rays you can use either a pencil or pastels to create a smooth orange gradient that gets lighter as it goes away form the sun.

Step 3 – Add Gradient

Add a smaller orange gradient going in the opposite direction and blends the outer edges of the sun into the rays.

You can leave the drawing at this stage and still have a nice and somewhat realistic looking sun or you can go on to the next step.

Step 4 – Finish the Sun Drawing

Same as the other examples use an orange pencil and create a gradient that leaves a yellow outline between the sun and the rays. The gradient should get darker as it moves away form this yellow outline and then again lighter as it moves towards the center of the sun.

Conclusion

These examples can help you draw the sun in four different styles. Hopefully you’ve found a style that you like.

For more similar tutorials also see the following:

First steps

When creating my artwork, the trees and foliage become an integral part of the landscape. How the trees, grass and foliage are represented in a drawing have a direct impact on the entire mood of the drawing.

In figuring out how to draw trees myself, I discovered some references that provided me with an excellent foundation to developing my own style. The most influential and important reference that I can recommend is Mike Sibley’s book “Drawing from Line to Life”. This is the best art technique book on the market. Mike also has an on-line tutorial on trees and grasses at www.SibleyFineArt.com.

Other items that are beneficial include are the Smithsonian Handbook on Trees (This will provide information on the general shapes and varieties of trees) and my digital camera!

Understanding Your Subject Matter

I have sketched out leaves, leaf bundles, branches and different types of trees, trying to understand their general structure. Through observation and sketching, you can discover a lot about trees.

How to draw a detailed tree

How to draw a detailed tree

How to draw a detailed tree How to draw a detailed tree

Typical sketches of varieties of trees.

These exercises help you to better understand the textures and three dimensional forms of trees.

The anatomy of a tree

Drawing a bare winter tree is an excellent way to learn the anatomy of a tree. Let’s start at the base of the tree.

How to plant the tree firmly in the ground? I always pay particular attention to this step when drawing. If that tree is not on solid fittings, it will look like it is floating on the paper.

  • Most trees will flair out just as they meet the ground. Emphasizing this flare, and avoiding drawing the tree trunk straight, will give the tree a good base.
  • Remember that trees are actually a cylinder in shape. The shading should represent a cylindrical object. Also the bark of the tree will gradually get more dense on the edges as it wraps itself around the tree. (See sample below).
  • Be sure to put shadow at that base and draw the grass ‘around’ the trunk.
  • Change and vary the weight of your pencil stroke to help develop depth in your tree. The darker areas should have a heavier weighted line. ‘Feel’ those shadows go through your hand as you lay down that pencil stroke.

How to draw a detailed tree

How to draw a detailed treeHow to draw a detailed tree

Tips for drawing a winter tree

  • Pay particular attention to the ‘points of articulation’. This means the point of where every limb attaches to the trunk, every branch to limb and every twig to the branch. This is what helps identifies the type of tree it is. Drawing the correct proportions and angles of these points is what ‘creates’ the tree.
  • A common mistake is drawing the branches too straight. Try to identify those knots and kinks, and those bends in the branches. This gives ‘life’ to the tree. To help see these, it is helpful to observe the negative space between the branches instead of looking just at the branch.
  • Another common mistake is making the branches too thick.
  • One more tip. watch the angle of the joints. The angles between the branches should be wider at the bottom of the tree and gradually become tighter at the top of the tree.

How to draw a detailed tree How to draw a detailed tree

My sketch here uses the same reference tree that I used for the trunk.

I worked to feel the flow of the limbs and I kept the shading to a minimum. The branches are kept thin and emphasis has been placed on the kinks and knots. I did not draw all those little branches at the top – but gave the suggestion of them. Hopefully, the viewer will ‘fill in’ the rest. This tree is very simple and non-descriptive but serves to show these tips very well.

How to draw a detailed tree

Elements of Creating a Decision Tree

A decision tree starts from one end of the sheet of paper or the computer document, usually the left-hand side. The starting point extends in a series of branches or forks, each representing a decision, and it may continue to expand into sub branches, until it generates two or more results or nodes. The tree expands or grows until at least one branch leads to a decision node or a chance node.

The nodes of a decision tree are:

  • Decision node: Decision nodes, conventionally represented by squares, represent an outcome defined by the user. The attribute undergoes some test or evaluation at this node, and each possible outcome of such evaluation generates a branch and a sub-tree.
  • Leaf node: Leaf nodes indicate the value of the target attribute
  • Chance node: Chance nodes, conventionally represented by circles, represent uncertain outcomes under the mercy of external forces
  • End node: End nodes, conventionally represented by triangles, represent the end of the path.

Once you learn how to create a decision tree, you will realize it is not that difficult a task.

How to Draw a Decision Tree

People generally draw decision trees on paper. Many computer applications nevertheless exist to aid this process. Some applications even generate decision trees automatically by feeding the algorithm.

How do you draw a decision tree? The steps to create a decision tree diagram manually are:

  1. Take a large sheet of paper. The more options there are, and the more complex the decision, the larger the sheet of paper required will be.
  2. As a starting point for the decision tree, draw a small square around the center of the left side of the paper. If the description is too large to fit the square, use legends by including a number in the tree and referencing the number to the description either at the bottom of the page or in another page
  3. Draw out lines (forks) to the right of the square box. Draw one line each for each possible solution to the issue, and describe the solution along the line. Keep the lines as far apart as possible to expand the tree later.
  4. Illustrate the results or the outcomes of the solution at the end of each line. If the outcome is uncertain, draw a circle (chance node). If the outcome leads to another issue, draw a square (decision node). If the issue is resolved with the solution, draw a triangle (end node). Describe the outcome above the square or circle, or use legends, as appropriate.
  5. Repeat steps 2 through 4 for each new square at the end of the solution lines, and so on until there are no more squares, and all lines have either a circle or blank ending.
  6. The circles that represent uncertainty remain as they are. A good practice is to assign a probability value, or the chance of such an outcome happening.

Since it is difficult to predict at onset the number of lines and sub-lines each solution generates, the decision tree might require one or more redraws, owing to paucity of space to illustrate or represent options and or sub options at certain spaces..

It is a good idea to challenge and review all squares and circles for possible overlooked solutions before finalizing the draft.

Evaluation

Using the decision tree diagram to evaluate the best decision among the various options can take many forms, depending on the purpose of the tree.

One basic and simple option is to assign a cash value or score to each possible outcome, by estimating the worth or value generated if the specific outcome comes to pass, and selecting the outcome that scores the most. For circles or chance nodes that have uncertain results, multiply the value by the probability percentage. For instance, if the value is $1000 and the probability of happening is 50 percent, the value for that chance node is $500.

Decision trees are simple tools that make all possible options or decisions to an issue explicit.

How to draw a detailed tree

While tracing your ancestry back as far as possible is fun, it’s even better when you can present the findings in a handsome family tree chart. From hand-drawn genealogy charts to computer-generated ancestor trees, there are many different ways to chart and display your family history.

Create It Yourself

If you want to create something personal and your family is fairly small, consider creating your own family tree. You can draw the basic connections in a line-and-box format, or get more creative by embellishing with vines, flowers, etc. You can also display the family in an actual tree format, using the roots for descendants and leaves (or apples) for the ancestors. Can’t draw a straight line? Try a flowchart or diagramming program to create any chart you can imagine.

Branch Out With Software

While most genealogy software programs offer basic computer-generated family tree charts, you can get even better results by taking advantage of add-on programs. For example, Legacy Charting Companion expands the charting capabilities of the Legacy Family Tree program, allowing you to create and print a variety of ancestor, descendant, hourglass, fan and bowtie charts ranging in size from 8.5-by-11-inch printouts to 9-foot displays.

Use a Chart Printing Service

If you want a pretty family tree chart without having to deal with designing and printing, try one of the many Family Tree chart printing services that specialize in printing large family trees in both color and black and white. Some, such as Family Tree Illustration will custom design a chart for you, while others allow you to select from a number of different formats. Some require a family tree file in GEDCOM format, but some work from your own handwritten family tree. Perfect for family reunions and large frames, charts can usually be printed in large format.

Pre-Printed Charts Make it Simple

From basic pedigree charts to elaborate, rose-covered fan charts, pre-printed genealogy charts make it easy to display your family tree in style. A number of simpler family tree charts are available for free download online. Other, more elaborate family tree charts are available for purchase from various vendors.

Designer Family Trees

If you’re looking for something a little fancier, innumerable calligraphers and artists can render your family tree on vellum or parchment with hand-drawn letters and elaborate designs. For example, Marie Lynskey charges anywhere from $150 for a simple four-generation family tree lettered on parchment to more than $1500 for an illustrated family tree with numerous generations displayed on vellum. Park City, Utah-based artist Saundra Diehl turns dull family tree charts into a work of art, using watercolor and pen and ink to create a custom watercolor painting of your family tree on aged parchment.

I need to draw a tree, and constantly using dotty and including the PNGs is starting to be a pain. Is there a way to get LaTeX to draw it’s own trees that doesn’t involve learning an entirely new language like TikZ?

3 Answers 3

While I’d normally second Will Robertson’s comment, since TikZ is fantastic and worth learning, I think TikZ’s overkill for this situation. I personally find its tree specification syntax bulkier than necessary. My preferred tool for the job is the qtree package (which is on CTAN, too, and is apparently included in both TeX Live and MikTeX). The package is really simple to use. Consider the following TeX:

This produces the following tree:

How to draw a detailed tree

That’s all it takes! And what’s great about it is that the TeX description reads like the tree. I can glance at the TeX, and I instantly know what the created tree is going to look like. The basic syntax is simply [.node-name subtrees. ] ; \qroof , which draws the triangle, requires its node name at the end, instead. The \1 is just a shortcut for a math-mode prime. In addition, qtree will always render _ and ^ as sub- and super-scripts, too. (Unless you turn this off.)

In general, you can provide node names at the beginning ( [.+ 1 [.* 2 3 ]] ) or the end ( [ 1 [ 2 3 ].* ].+ ); you can even provide node names in both places, but then they must match (unsurprisingly). This, incidentally, is why \qroof takes its node name the way it does. You can even leave the node name off entirely to get a node with a smooth join. If any of this is unclear, check out the manual.

Now, qtree as-is has one downside, which is that it is designed for simple trees. It does offer limited support for changing inter-node spacing, framing parts of trees, and things like that, but it’s not capable of doing anything incredibly fancy. But luckily, if you want that, you can still get it: enter tikz-qtree. This package allows you to leverage the full power of TikZ to draw your trees. The two obvious features are: (a) instead of text, the labels in a tree can be arbitrary \node s; and (b) you can redefine how it draws the edges to get arrows, dashed lines, curving edges, and so on. But it’s more powerful than just this: if you embed a \Tree into a TikZ picture, you can do whatever you want with the nodes, such as circle them, draw arrows between them for a transformation, etc.

Maybe you don’t need this power now, but the take-home message is that using qtree won’t lock you in to the simple trees. If you decide that you want the more powerful trees, all you need to do is change one import; everything will keep working the way it did, but you get more power, too. I’m not sure if tikz-qtree this actually uses qtree under the hood or not, but either way, all the syntax for qtree still works, and the output is identical, at least as far as I can tell.

(PS: Linguists, please excuse/correct any errors in the above tree; it’s been a year or two since my syntax course.)

A mind map is a detailed chart that addresses a coordinated assortment of musings and thoughts regarding a specific subject/idea. Mind maps in work breakdown structure template word are generally utilized by various kinds of people in numerous fields. They are beneficial visual devices for getting the hang of, putting together, and arranging.

Mind maps can be drawn by hand or with the assistance of a computerized instrument. You can make a mind map utilizing MS Word. In the event that you don’t have the foggiest idea of how to make a mind map in Word, at that point, follow our instructional exercise referenced in this article.

How to create a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) in Word

Dispatch MS Word in any form you have in your work area and select an exact page. To make a mind map in Word, you can either utilize the basic shapes or select the SmartArt Graphics choice in Illustration bunch under the Insert tab. Shockingly, there is no mind map template in Word.

Before you start spreading out your mind map, you need to have the principal subject in mind. Distinguish the vital data about your theme and how they identify with it. Presently, to plan the mind map, Microsoft word utilizes any of the accompanying alternatives.

Utilizing Basic Shapes

Go to the Insert tab and snap on the drop-down bolt under Shapes; you will locate a few distinct shapes like square shapes, basic shapes, lines, block bolts, stream diagrams, and so on here. Select the ideal shape for your fundamental subject and draw it on your page with a work breakdown structure template for Word.

MS Word has many arranging alternatives to alter and redo the mind map. Double-tap on the map to change it. Utilize the Home Tab and Insert Tab to change your mind map.

Whenever you have finished your mind map, click on File and save for dispatching the sub-window. Name your archive, select document area, and snap-on Save.

How to make a Work Breakdown Structure diagram in EdrawMind

EdrawMind is an excellent application for making work breakdown structure diagram and different kinds of graphs. It is effectively accessible for various stages like Web, Desktop, and Mobile. To figure out how to do a work breakdown structure on Word utilizing EdrawMind, follow these means:

At first, open the EdrawMind work region application. You will see different kinds of maps under Available Templates. After that pick the Radial Map template for your WBS structure mind map. You can pick an instant template to browse in the EdrawMind application where you can start your mind mapping with no further ado.

How to draw a detailed tree

To draw a mind map without any planning, use the gadgets in Home Tab in the EdrawMind work programming to make a mind map, click on Topic for the essential subject, add any littler points or exchangeable topics, in conclusion, add map branches utilizing or demonstrating the Relationship decision. Finally, you can likewise enter text as per your mind map.

How to draw a detailed tree

By add tones and visual signifiers to make your mind map engaging. You can use the Format Tab on the right half of the screen to play with colors, text styles, establishment, etc. Moreover, you can add pictures, blueprints, watermarks, and anything is possible from that point! Continue to change until you are satisfied

How to export a EdrawMind Work Breakdown Structure diagram as a Word file?

When you complete your work breakdown structure mind map in EdrawMind, explore the File tab, click Export and select Export to Word on the right menu. At that point, you will have an editable Word mind map and can embed the map into any record.

Likewise, EdrawMind also bolsters clients to trade their manifestations in a few everyday record arrangements. There will be no problems and restraint for you to send or share your mind map with others. All of you can see, alter or change the work breakdown structure template word in the MS Word program.

How to draw a detailed tree

Introduction: How to Draw Dragons

How to draw a detailed tree

How to draw a detailed tree

How to draw a detailed tree

Ahh the dragon, the one monster to appear in nearly every human culture, it is little wonder many seek to recreate it. This Instructable will attempt to shed light on drawing this marvelous creature of our imagination (or perhaps not just of our imagination?).
This Instructable maybe slightly advanced for some beginner artists, for a very, good, very simple Instructable on drawing dragons, see How to Draw Dragons, by Keith-Kid.
This is also my answer for one of Life’s Burning Questions.

Step 1: Let’s Get Started.

This Instructable is to give you a brush up on dragon speculative biology (for a better understanding of how they may work), and a step-by-step on sketching a dragon.
Materials you will need to complete the drawing:

Sketch pencils, I used mostly a 0.5mm mechanical pencil with HB lead
Eraser, I personally recommend kneaded rubber erasers
Paper, I used parchment, just because I like the smoothness
Light, good lighting is essential to any artwork
Surface, to draw on, I prefer angled, but flat will do

Just because it’s funny, watch this:

Step 2: Dragonology 101

To be able to draw anything, you must know what you are drawing. Here’s a crash-course on dragonology. To skip this relatively important step and just draw a freaking winged lizard, head to step 4.

Here’s some links to several sources of speculative dragon biology and a bit ‘o dragon lore
Here be Dragons! Add Tip Ask Question Comment Download

Step 3: Dragon Examples/Models

Generally it is a good idea to have a model for your artwork. But by the general nature of dragon and fantasy artwork, models are rather hard to find (dude if Elvish models were easy to find. ). So we will do the next best thing. check out other peoples’ work. It’s not plagiarism, since we aren’t copying there work, so don’t feel bad about drawing dragons and whatnot very similar to someone else’s. Some of the links in step 2 have a lot of artwork. Go ahead and check them out, save some of them and pull them up on screen while your drawing. Believe me, having some sort of reference makes the task much easier and less time consuming. Here are some more works that aren’t on the links I gave that were very helpful for me.

Step 4: ”Now” We’ll Draw a Dragon

Right, time to crack out your art supplies listed in step 1.

A short note before we begin
I am not a great artist
Nor am I a pretty good artist
I’m just a kid who likes drawing things that fly about in his head
For that reason don’t limit yourself to what I am showing you. Draw what you want.
We’ll sketch a bipedal (2legged) dragon moving about on the ground. Due to the nature of sketching, you will find instructions on the images as notes. Once done with this simple pencil sketch, go ahead and add color with whatever medium you have handy (paints, pencils, ink. )

I’ll add tutorials on a dragon with rider, and an Oriental once I have the time.

On the thought of time, for a simple sketch like this, it doesn’t take long to draw it (just it takes me awhile to scan upload post etc. ), don’t use the excuse of not having enough time to avoid drawing.

Step 5: Conclusion

Presto! You’ve drawn a halfway decent picture of a dragon, slap yourself on the back.
Now what? Well simply put, keep drawing, it’s the only way you will get better at it. When I get some time, I’ll add a tutorial on drawing a dragon with its rider (it’ll be the same dragon and gal as in the picture I showed you), and drawing Oriental dragons.

Suggestions and comments are welcome!

Live long and prosper,
RocketScientist2015

How to draw a detailed tree

Introduction: How to Paint a Palm Tree

How to paint a palm tree for beginners

Step 1: Step 1: Supplies

You will need acrylic paint in Brown shades and green shades, paper plate, paper to paint on (I used watercolor paper) and a paint brush (a flat edge brush will work best).

Step 2: Step 2: Preparation

Put you paints onto your paper plate (or other surface to mix your paints), you may need to add a small amount of water to your paints to thin them out a bit. Decide how tall and how big you want your palm tree to be and how long you want your palm leaves to be.

Step 3: Step 3: Sketch

Sketch out the rough outline of the area of the palm tree in pencil or something that can be erased or easily painted over. this is only to get an idea of the size, shape and placement of the palm leaves.

Step 4: Step 4: Choose Colors

Choose all of the colors you want for your Palm tree (The trunk, the Palm Leaves and coconuts if desired) Trunk- Earth brown, with a misty beige highlights. Palm Fronds- forest green with leave green highlights. Coconuts mix a small amount of forest green and earth brown, then highlight with misty Beige. You don’t have to use these colors, they were just the ones I choose to use. Feel free to use any colors you would like.

Step 5: Step 5: Begin to Paint

Paint the trunk of your palm tree with a darker brown, and add highlights to add dimension. I used an Earth brown for the trunk and a misty Beige for the highlights. To draw the highlights I simply made criss-crossing lines, but remember to not make them too uniform.You don’t need to add too much detail as this is your first palm tree

Step 6: Step 6: Painting the Palm Leaves

Get a brush(A flat edge brush will work best, thought other brushes should work too) and dip the tip of your brush into a liberal amount of dark green paint. Then on a piece of scratch paper with the flat tip of your brush draw a line in a sort of half arc lifting the brush as you move down to mimic the look of a palm leaf. Your lines should be dark and thick at the top and lighter and thinner at the bottom. I would recommend doing a few practice leaves on a piece of scratch paper. (The first picture is a line that shows the rough angle your brush should follow and the second picture is a leaf I did on scratch paper as an example)

Step 7: Step 7: Adding Highlights to the Palm Leaves

Paint your palm leaves onto your trunk just as you did on the scratch paper.Then take the lighter green paint and add highlights to the palm leaves. I used the same technique I used to paint the whole leave, but only on pieces of the leaves to help show depth.

Step 8: Step 8: How Many Palm Leaves

Add as many palm leaves to your tree as you desire, I usually do five to six leaves.

Step 9: Step 9: Adding Coconuts

Mix dark brown with a small amount of your dark green, so that the color is a little darker than the trunk, paint three small circles under the palm leaves on the trunk and use the misty beige to add highlight to them to look like coconuts.

Step 10: Step 10: Add Any More Desired Details

Add any more details you want and do touch up work as needed. Leave it to dry for a few minutes.

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  • House Interpretations
  • Tree Interpretations
  • Person Interpretations

The house-tree-person test can be an effective way to evaluate children, people with brain damage and people with a limited ability to communicate for personality disorders 2. A projective personality test, the house-tree-person test requires the test taker to draw a house, a tree and a person 3. The test is then used as a measure of self-perception, outlook and sometimes brain damage. Interpretations of the test are subjective, and based loosely on a set of basic principles.

House Interpretations

Notice the size of the house: a small house represents renunciation of family life, while a large house means the person is overwhelmed by his family.

Examples of Speech Goals for Traumatic Brain Injuries

Observe the walls of the house: weak lines represent fragility in the ego, while strong lines mean the need to fortify boundaries.

Determine the amount of detail put into the roof: the more detail, the more the person concentrates on fantasies, while an incomplete roof means evading formidable ideas.

Affective Symptoms in Mental Health

Note the inclusion of windows, doors and sidewalks, which indicate openness to interacting with other people.

Discern the inclusion of bushes, shades, shutters, bars and curtains, which indicate a person’s hesitation to open himself to others.

  • Notice the size of the house: a small house represents renunciation of family life, while a large house means the person is overwhelmed by his family.
  • Observe the walls of the house: weak lines represent fragility in the ego, while strong lines mean the need to fortify boundaries.

Tree Interpretations

Notice the size of the trunk: a small trunk represents a weak ego, while a large trunk means a larger ego.

Observe whether the trunk is split in half, which indicates a split personality.

Determine what kind of limbs were drawn: detached or small branches represent a difficulty communicating with others, big branches mean connecting with others too much, pointy branches indicate hostility and dead branches represent desolation.

Note whether leaves are included: drawing leaves represents successfully connecting with others, while no leaves means emptiness and detached leaves indicates a lack of nurturance.

Discern the details of the roots of the tree: while normal roots represent a grounded person, a lack of roots means instability, exaggerated roots indicate an obsession with examining reality and dead roots represent feeling completely removed from reality.

  • Notice the size of the trunk: a small trunk represents a weak ego, while a large trunk means a larger ego.
  • Note whether leaves are included: drawing leaves represents successfully connecting with others, while no leaves means emptiness and detached leaves indicates a lack of nurturance.

Person Interpretations

Notice the position of the arms: open arms represent an inclination to connect with others, closed arms mean hostility and disconnected arms indicate defenselessness.

Observe the position of the hands: pointed fingers and balled fists represent hostility, while hidden or gloved hands mean antisocial tendencies.

Note the details of the legs and feet: figures cut off at the bottom of the paper represent powerlessness, while both large and small feet mean the need for greater stability.

Determine the details of the mouth: an open or large mouth represents dependence, a closed mouth means rejection of needs and a slash mouth or teeth indicate verbal hostility.

Discern how detailed the face is: the use of more facial details indicates a person’s need to portray himself in an acceptable way.

Consult someone trained in administering the house-tree-person test for most accurate interpretations. Remember that the test is subjective, and that the meaning of details of a drawing may differ between test takers.

How to draw a detailed tree

Every player wants to know the easiest way to hit a draw. When a left-handed golfer strives to produce a draw shot using the driver, it means that the ball curves from the left to the right. But do you know what a draw shot off the tee does? It increases distance. Learning how to hit a draw gives you a better opportunity to hit the fairway on dogleg holes. So I’m going to teach you how to hit a draw in golf step by step below.

But before I do that, let me first explain what a draw in golf is.

Because without understanding what it does, how do you expect to know how it’s done? So let’s begin, shall we?

How to draw a detailed tree

3 SECRET MOVES I WISH I WAS SHOWN WHEN I FIRST PLAYED GOLF

What is a draw in golf?

For a right-handed player, a draw shot is when the golf ball curves from the right to the left. This is what many beginner and amateur golfers struggle with on the golf course. It doesn’t matter if you use an iron to produce a draw into the green or use a wood to hit a high-intensity draw off the tee. A draw will always be the most coveted shot in the game of golf. There’s a lot of difference between a fade and a draw. We all know that, right? But did you know that a draw shot travels farther than a fade shot?

And not only that, the shape that a draw shot generates looks much better than a fade shot. You should also know that hitting a draw has a single underlying concept.

So the technique remains the same whether you use an iron, wood, or driver to hit a draw.

When you want to hit a draw in golf, you have to create sidespin on the golf ball, so it curves to the left for a right-handed player.

And to do this, the clubface, during impact, should be slightly closed depending on the path of your swing.

More often than not, beginners make the mistake of leaving the clubface open during impact. And this produces either slices or fades.

Any golf ball that starts in the left direction and draws left is known as a pull draw. While the opposite is known as a push draw.

On the other hand, any golf ball that starts in a straight direction and pulls straight too is called a straight draw.

How to draw a detailed tree

How to draw a detailed tree

In this super easy drawing instruction, I will show you how to draw a person for kids.

Earlier on the pages of Howtodrawforkids.com, I have already shown you how to draw a man for kids. These two instructions are quite similar to each other, except that this guide is laid out in much more detail, which means this instruction will be easier.

Step 1

Let’s start drawing a person by depicting a head in the form of an oval.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 2

Next, below the head, depict the torso in the form of a vertically elongated rectangle.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 3

Now depict legs below the torso using straight long lines.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 4

Now go up again and draw the arms with four simple lines.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 5

Now, draw the palms and fingers with short, curved lines.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 6

A very simple stage in which draw a cylindrical neck and clothing lines on the wrists.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 7

Now go down to the very bottom of the sketch and depict the shoes with simple straight lines.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 8

Move to the head and draw the eyes as circles and eyebrows above the eyes.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 9

Draw a nose between the eyes. After that depict a smile just below.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 10

Use a few simple, curved lines to draw the person’s hairstyle.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 11

The easiest stage in the guide on how to draw a person for kids, in which you just need to depict ears.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 12

Now, with the help of an eraser, get rid of all the construction lines from the person drawing.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 13

Now is the time to paint the drawing of the person. Any colors of your choice can be applied here.

How to draw a detailed tree

To make your person drawing more voluminous and convincing, add shadows. You can also add highlights to the eyes and some designs on clothes. This will make your drawing of a person different from my example.

If this instruction on how to draw a person for kids was interesting to you, then visit the People category, where you will find a lot of cool drawing instructions.

How to draw a detailed tree

Decision trees are one of the most popular machine learning algorithms but also the most powerful. This article is going to explain how they work from a non-technical perspective.

One of the reasons they are so powerful is because they can be easily visualised so that a human can understand whats going on. Imagine a flowchart, where each level is a question with a yes or no answer. Eventually an answer will give you a solution to the initial problem. That is a decision tree. Everybody subconsciously uses decision trees all the time for most menial tasks. Decision trees in machine learning take that ability and multiply it to be able to artificially perform complex decision making tasks.

A lot of the time it can be very difficult to understand how a machine learning algorithm comes to its decision, making them unusable for many scenarios. This is especially true for cases where the decision might need to be contested, such as in the criminal justice system, health industry and for strategic business decisions. This is even more of a factor for customer-facing machine learning algorithms now that customers have a “right to an explanation” under GDPR. A decision tree’s ability for human comprehension is a major advantage.

The decision tree analyses a data set in order to construct a set of rules, or questions, which are used to predict a class. Let us consider a dataset consisting of lots of different animals and some of their characteristics. These characteristics can be used to predict their class. If we take an eagle and an elephant, a question that would split these two animals would be ‘Does this animal have two legs?’ or perhaps ‘Does this animal weight under 500kg?’. The answer no for either of these questions would lead to the classification of an elephant, whereas yes would be an eagle.

These rules can be built up to create a model that can classify complex situations. To extend the animal classification example, consider the scenario of needing to classify a selection of animals into mammals, birds, fish. Look at the visualised decision tree to see how two simple questions can be used to split the data.

How to draw a detailed tree

These simple questions layered one after another, allow the classification of a wide range of animals. This is the power of decision trees. Now if we give the trained decision tree a new animal, for example a dog, it will classify it. Does a dog breath air? Yes. Does a dog lay eggs? No. Therefore the model will classify it as a mammal, the correct answer!

When a human constructs a decision tree, the questions and answers are based off their logic and knowledge. In data science the creation of these rules is usually governed by an algorithm learning which questions to ask by analysing the entire data set. To put this into context we will come back to the animal example, the algorithm will look at all the animals to figure out that all animals that don’t breath air and notice that they are all fish. This mathematically splits the dataset by it’s class. This creates powerful algorithms that can classify new data into classes in a way that any human can understand.

Decision trees can become much more powerful when used as ensembles. Ensembles are clever ways of combining decision trees to create a more powerful model. These ensembles create state of the art machine learning algorithms that can outperform neural networks in some cases. The two most popular ensemble techniques are random forests and gradient boosting.

Thank you for reading. Please checkout my next article on a beginners guide to deep learning. Or if you are interested further articles on a beginner’s guide to data science or applying AI to business please visit Miminal.

What do you want to do with process mapping?

Contents

  • Why use a process map?
  • Preparing for process mapping
  • Steps to creating a process map
  • Numbering conventions

Process mapping is used to visually demonstrate all the steps and decisions in a particular process. A process map or flowchart describes the flow of materials and information, displays the tasks associated with a process, shows the decisions that need to be made along the chain and shows the essential relationships between the process steps.

Want to create your own process map? Try Lucidchart. It’s fast, easy, and totally free.

Why use a process map?

Creating a process map helps organize processes andВ makes information visible to everyone. By creating a process map or flowchart, you are producing a visual example of the process to better understand it and see areas for improvement. The act of flowcharting to improve a process was first introduced in 1921 by Frank Gilbreth to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

How to draw a detailed tree

Preparing for process mapping

It’s important to include everyone involved in the process: workers, suppliers, customers and supervisors. Everyone involved needs to clearly understand what the goals of the process are, agree with deadlines and have some knowledge of basic process mapping. You can create a flowchart by hand or in a software program like Microsoft Word, Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Visio or Microsoft PowerPoint; however, there are other software programs specifically built for creating a process flowchart. Using a process mapping software, especially a cloud-based software like Lucidchart, makes it easy to create, save and share your work. Following these basic steps to creating process maps will make them easier to build and to understand.

Diagramming is quick and easy with Lucidchart. Start a free trial today to start creating and collaborating.

Steps to creating a process map

  • Step 1: Identify the problem:
    • What is the process that needs to be visualized? Type its title at the top of the document.
  • Step 2: Brainstorm all the activities that will be involved:
    • At this point, sequencing the steps isn’t important, but it may help you to remember the steps needed for your process. Decide what level of detail to include. Determine who does what and when it is done.
  • Step 3: Figure out boundaries:
    • Where or when does the process start?
    • Where or when does the process stop?
  • Step 4: Determine and sequence the steps:
    • It’s helpful to have a verb begin the description. You can show either the general flow or every detailed action or decision.
  • Step 5: Draw basic flowchart symbols:
    • Each element in a process map is represented by a specific flowchart symbol, which together represent process mapping symbols:В В
      • Ovals show the beginning or the endingВ of a process.
      • Rectangles show an operation or activity that needs to be done.
      • Arrows represent the direction of flow.
      • Diamonds show a point where a decision must be made.В Arrows coming out of a diamond are usually labeled yes or no.В Only one arrow comes out of an activity box.В If more than is needed, you should probably use a decision diamond.
      • Parallelograms showВ inputs or outputs.

How to draw a detailed tree

  • Step 6: Finalize the process flowchart
    • Review the flowchart with other stakeholders (team member, workers, supervisors, suppliers, customers, etc.) to make sure everyone is in agreement.
    • Make sure you’ve included important chart information like a title and date, which will make it easy to reference.
    • Helpful questions to ask:
      • Is the process being run how it should?
      • Will team members follow the charted process?
      • Is everyone in agreement with the process map flow?
      • Is anything redundant?
      • Are any steps missing?

Numbering conventions

To help with process map organization, you can number the process maps and process steps. Here’s a process mapping numbering convention example:

  • Process 1
    • Sub-process 1.1
      • Sub-process 1.1.1
      • Sub-process 1.1.2
      • Sub-process 1.1.3
    • Sub-process 1.2
      • Sub-process 1.2.1
      • Sub-process 1.2.2
  • Process 2
    • Sub-process 2.1
      • Sub-process 2.1.1
      • Sub-process 2.1.2
  • Process 3
    • Sub-process 3.1
      • Sub-process 3.1.1
      • Sub-process 3.1.2
    • Sub-process 3.2
      • Sub-process 3.2.1

Process maps provide valuable insights into how aВ businesses or an organization can improve processes. When important information is presented visually, it increases understanding and collaboration for any project.

Helpful Resources

  • Process Mapping Symbols and Notation
  • What is Process Mapping

To create a process map in Lucidchart, simply drag-and-drop ready-made or custom process mapping symbols to show information.В Lucidchart makes it simple to create and rearrange shapes, add labels and comments and even use custom styling in your process map

Want to create your own process map? Try Lucidchart. It’s fast, easy, and totally free.

How to draw a detailed tree

Stock Photos from Cathy Keifer/Shutterstock

Once you have learned how to draw flowers, there is no better way to accompany a bucolic garden than with a beautiful butterfly. These colorful insects go hand in hand with springtime and come in a variety of colors and patterns. The monarch butterfly is among the most recognizable with its striking orange and black pattern.

Want to learn how to capture a monarch butterfly in pen and ink? Don’t let the intricate wings deter you—in this tutorial we’ll break down how to draw a butterfly in five easy steps. So grab some paper and your favorite art supplies and let’s get started!

Learn How to Draw a Butterfly in 5 Easy Steps

Step 1: Find a reference photograph

Stock Photos from Butterfly Hunter/Shutterstock

It’s good practice to do a bit of research before beginning any drawing. In the case of butterflies, it’s especially important to have a few good photos of the specific species you want to draw, as the wing pattern can be hard to replicate accurately. Peruse different image sources, like Pinterest, until you find pictures that suit your purpose. Additionally, if you’re unfamiliar with drawing insects, or if you’re looking to make a realistic drawing of the butterfly’s anatomy, consider referencing a diagram illustration.

This tutorial will be looking at how to draw a monarch butterfly. Specifically, we’ll be illustrating a side view of the insect with its wings up in the air.

Stock Photos from Butterfly Hunter/Shutterstock

Step 2: Draw the body

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Using your pencil of choice, begin sketching the body of the butterfly. Start with a small circle for the head and connect it to an oval-like thorax which should be twice the length of the head. Then, draw a long and thin abdomen that protrudes slightly at the end into a bulbous shape.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

With the body in place, you can add the legs to the butterfly’s thorax. Move halfway down and draw the forelegs in three parts. Then, sketch the hind leg towards the end of the thorax—again in three parts. Once you’re satisfied with the legs, go ahead and draw one large eye on the butterfly’s head. This should take up most of the room in the circle.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Next, add two antennae at the top of the head, a little above the butterfly’s eye. Underneath the head, you can draw the curly, straw-like proboscis—this is how a butterfly feeds on flowers.

Step 3: Add the wings

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

With the body of the butterfly drawn, it’s time to add the wings. Beginning at the thorax, sketch a slightly rectangular forewing, which should measure a little longer than the butterfly’s body. Then, attach a more oval-like hindwing that ends in the abdomen. Afterward, sketch an indication of the other forewing, starting at the head and ending halfway into the more prominent wing.

Step 4: Draw the wing pattern

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Now that you’ve drawn your butterfly, it’s time to flesh out the details. Monarch butterflies have a black and orange wing pattern that resembles stained glass. To emulate this in a pen illustration, start demarcating the orange and black parts of the butterfly’s wings.

According to the reference photograph, monarch butterflies have a black “border” around the wings, and within them are rectangular sections of different sizes that would be the orange areas.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Next, fill in the top borders of the butterfly’s wings with two rows of smaller rectangle shapes—these will be the white spots along the black border.

Step 5: Go over the illustration in ink

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Once you’ve finished your pencil drawing of a monarch butterfly, you can find your favorite pens and begin going over the graphite lines with ink.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

After you’ve gone over the outline in pen, slowly begin filling in the pattern with black ink. Remember to check back with your reference photograph often at this stage to ensure you’re capturing the design correctly.

Tip: If you want to add depth to a “white” area of a black and white illustration, consider using stippling or hatching. This is also a useful way to indicate the delicacy of the butterfly’s wings.

Photo & Art: Margherita Cole | My Modern Met

Want to embellish your monarch butterfly? An easy way to do this is by adding a simple black border and placing a few sparkles or bubbles around the body and wings—like fairy dust. Or, if you’re searching for a way to complete your illustration, you can learn how to draw a rose and other types of flowers that your butterfly would love to visit.

The House-Tree-Person (HTP) test in clinical psychology is part of the series of a group of projective tests which help in the assessment of personality traits. The HTP test is also administered to identify mental disorders like schizophrenia. Get to know how this test is interpreted.

How to draw a detailed tree

The House-Tree-Person (HTP) test in clinical psychology is part of the series of a group of projective tests which help in the assessment of personality traits. The HTP test is also administered to identify mental disorders like schizophrenia. Get to know how this test is interpreted.

Did you know?

Based on Goodenough’s Draw-a-Man Test (1926), HTP was originally a technique to assess children’s intelligence.

If we are told to draw some object, we might either shy away (for not being good at it) or we might enjoy the process itself (regardless of our artistic abilities). Whichever way, drawing gives us a sense of revisiting our childhood memories full of such fun activities.

Similar to writing, the act of drawing forms a powerful medium for us to let our emotions out. In fact, as we know, and some of us might even have experienced, that forms of fine art, including drawing, are seen to be stress-releasing activities. Off the mind and onto the paper. This is the knack behind a psychological personality test like the House-Tree-person test. It is like reading our minds from what we have scribbled or sketched on a sheet of paper.

The House-Tree-Person (HTP) Test

This test is a technique developed by John Buck, an early clinical psychologist in 1948, which was later updated in 1969. This, and such other contributions from him are remarkable, especially on the background of his meager and scattered formal training in psychology.

HTP is a projective personality test, wherein a person responds to a given stimuli, and the responses give clues about the person’s hidden emotions or internal conflicts. The individual taking the test is asked to draw primary objects like a house, tree, and a person; that’s why the name. These drawings render a measure of self perceptions and attitudes inherent in a personality.

The HTP test is adhered to, along with other techniques, in cases where there is likelihood of brain damage, other neurological disorders, or to evaluate brain damage in patients of schizophrenia.

It can be taken by anyone who is 3 years old or above. The test consumes around 150 minutes. The person taking the test is first asked to draw, and then is later questioned based on his/her illustration. Usually, the first phase of drawing is colored using crayons, and then pencil is used for the next phase. The instructions given to the test-taker are quite short and simple. “Draw me as good a house as you can”, states it well. Once the picture of a house is completed, the test-taker is asked to draw a tree, and later a person.

Questions

After the test-taker draws objects, the administrator poses some questions to him/her. These help in knowing the reasoning behind how an individual perceives himself and his surroundings.

– Is it a happy house? What is the house made of? Who stays in the house? What is it like at night? Do people visit the house?

– Is the tree alive? What kind of a tree is it? How old would that tree be? Who waters the tree?

– How does that person feel? Is that man/woman happy? How old is that person?

Interpretation

The interpretation of the HTP test is said to be a difficult task. The older version included both, quantitative and qualitative elements for interpreting results. However, the quantitative assessment methods are no more considered appropriate, with the progress in testing methods. So, interpretation relies heavily on subjective reading of the pictorial representations. Every sketch can symbolize many ideas: the level of satisfaction with the house at present, degree of rigidity of the subject’s personality, contact with reality, fears or obsessions, intra-personal balance, the person’s subconscious picture of his/her development, etc.

Emotional strengths or attributes like self-esteem and confidence can be reflected from how dark or light the lines in the drawing are. Flexibility or rigidity of a personality and the strength of ego can easily be deciphered from the details of the drawing.

Here are some primary attributes associated with these three illustrative objects of a HTP test.

House

Roof: The intellectual side of a person. It is associated with fantasizing and ideation too. Too little focus on the roof may suggest fears of ghosts in the attic.

Wall: An indication of how strong one’s ego is.

Doors and Windows: The relation of the person with the world outside. It hints at the receptiveness, interaction with others, and perception about the environment.

Size: If the house is small, it might mean a rejection of one’s life at home.

Pathways: Those leading directly to the door exemplify accessibility and openness, unlike when there is no pathway, indicating a closed, solitary, and distant state of mind. A fencing around the house could be a sign of defensiveness.

Tree Trunk: The inner strength of an individual might be suggested from the tree trunk drawn. A slender trunk and large branches may suggest a need for satisfaction. Dark shadings of the trunk suggest anxiety about one’s self.

Branches: These might also hint towards an individual’s relation with the external world. A tree drawn without branches might indicate less contact with other people.

Person

Observations about where the person is placed on the page, the amount of detail shown from the drawing, etc., are part of significant interpretations. The person drawn of the same gender is usually taken to be the test-taker himself or herself.
Arms and Hands: Position of the hands, open of closed fists, and specific gestures, if any, indicate behavioral traits.

Legs and Feet: Drawing or not drawing feet, and the stance or the overall body posture is reflected from little strokes of lines, helping gauge inherent emotions like fear.

Face: A lot of details concentrated on the face of the person drawn can be representative of one’s desire to present oneself in an acceptable/satisfactory/adequate social light.

This test is not considered to be reliable or valid by many, as it is mainly a subjectively scored personality test. There also are variations in how the test is administered: in one or two phases, all drawings on single or separate sheets of paper, asking to draw two different persons (one of each gender), either using crayon or pencil (not both), different questions asked, etc.

Disclaimer: This compilation is only for informative purposes. Consult a psychoanalyst for the proper conduct and interpretation of an HTP test.

With our simple step by step how to draw a lion tutorial you will be drawing a lion of your own in no time.

With just nine easy steps to follow, this tutorial is great both for beginners and kids. No erasor required!

How to draw a detailed tree

*this post contains affiliate links*How to draw a detailed tree

How to Draw a Lion

How to draw a detailed tree

  • our printable lion drawing guide (optional)
  • pencil or marker
  • paper
  • coloring supplies

Step by Step Easy Lion Drawing Tutorial

Step 1

We’ll start by drawing the head. Draw a U shape, with the middle part slightly wider.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 2

Connect the end points of your U shape with a wavy line.

also draw a triangle shape with rounded edges for the nose.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 3

A few curved lines are next. Two above the nose, and two bellow.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 4

Draw eyes and a few dots under the nose.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 5

Next comes the mane. Draw a wavy circle around the head.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 6

Draw ears inside the mane.

Also draw two curved lines – like you would ( ), for the body.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 7

Next come the front legs.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 8

Amd the back legs.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 9

Fimish up with the tail and feet.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 10

Color your lion drawing.

How to draw a detailed tree

Get the How to Draw a Lion Directed Drawing Printable

How to draw a detailed tree

Unlock VIP Printables – Become a Member

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Posted on Last updated: July 29, 2021

Learn 2 easy ways to transfer your drawings/letters from paper onto canvas for a painting.

How to draw a detailed tree

Looking for an easy way how to transfer your drawing onto canvas?

In this post I will show you 2 ways to transfer them! These methods also applies to the FREE printable stencils I provide in my painting tutorials.

Why Transfer Your Drawing?

Having a traced design of your drawing (on canvas) before you start painting serves as a guideline of where your colors should go and what your shapes should look like.

That way you can focus on the painting part- without worrying if your proportions of your subject are too big or too small.

This makes painting process less stressful and more enjoyable – especially for beginners.

And you won’t be any less of an artist- even experienced artist use these methods!

Let’s look at the most popular and fastest method first…

Full Length Step-by Step Video Tutorial on YouTube

Click the image below for the full video tutorial

Method 1: Transfer a Drawing using Transfer Paper / Carbon paper

You can get an inexpensive pack of transfer paper and use a sheet between your paper sketch and canvas (or wood) to etch in your design.

This is the quickest method, that doesn’t require prepping your paper. It also provides the sharpest transfer.

Instructions

1.Place the transfer paper onto canvas (or wood)

2. Put your paper sketch (or printable stencil) on top of the transfer paper

3. Using sharpened pencil (or mechanical pencil) trace over your paper design.

How to draw a detailed tree

4.Lift away the tracing paper and printable stencil and yours canvas should now have an outline of your drawing

How to draw a detailed tree

5. Paint / color / fill in as desired.

How to draw a detailed tree

Method 2: Transfer A Drawing Without Transfer Paper (pencil method)

This method requires a simple unleaded pencil (which you probably have at home). This method works similarly to the tracing paper method above, but it requires prepping your paper before hand.

Check out the step by step instructions below.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 1

Take your paper sketch or printable stencil and lay it down on the table with design side down

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 2

Take your pencil and color over top the drawing (on the back side of the paper)

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 3

Flip the paper, design side up now and place it onto your canvas or wood panel.

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 4

Now taking a sharp pencil (or mechanical pencil) trace over your design. This will etch it onto the canvas

How to draw a detailed tree

Step 5

Lift off the paper design and your traced pencil design will be transferred onto your canvas or wood panel. Paint or fill in as desired!

How to draw a detailed tree

FREE Sunflower Stencil Printable

If you’d like to try to transfer over the sunflower photo, you can use the free printable below. You can also follow the step by step painting instructions in how to paint a sunflower tutorial.

How to print: Right click on image below, save as jpg to your computer and print out on your printer.

How to draw a detailed tree

Hope you enjoyed these 2 simple ways how to transfer drawing onto canvas.

Now, have some fun filling in your newly traced design! Get your creative on!

If you want some fun beginner step by step painting tutorials, check them out here!

If you like this tutorial, put a pin on it!

How to draw a detailed tree

Posted on Last updated: July 29, 2021

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Wednesday 22nd of September 2021

I have transfer carbon paper and want to trace something onto a black canvas, how do you do that?

Friday 15th of October 2021

Hi Donna, To transfer your design using carbon paper: place your carbon paper (shiny side up) down on your canvas, then your design over top the carbon paper. Then you can trace using a sharp pencil over the design. Once you’re done, lift the carbon paper off and your design should be transferred over. Hope that helps. Cheers, Jasmine

Thursday 8th of July 2021

Hi could you send me the colours you used for your shine bright picture, also couldn’t get to print the sunflower

Saturday 17th of July 2021

You can access the full sunflower “shine bright” tutorial with paint colors and instructions here: how to paint a sunflower tutorial. The download of the traceable stencil is also available at the bottom of that post. Let me know if you have any issues accessing it.

Wednesday 24th of March 2021

Dear Jasmine, Thank you so much for your enthusiasm. I love that you are willing to share your knowledge. Art is the best part of life. Lee Barnett

Saturday 27th of March 2021

Thank you Lee 🙂 It makes me happy to share my love of art with others – And 100% agree art is the best!

Saturday 22nd of August 2020

Thank you Jasmine I will. It may take some time.

Friday 14th of August 2020

Hi Jasmine, I accidentally found your site tonight and I am glad I have. I have always wanted to try acrylic painting but I either didn’t have the time or the mindset to stop being scared of trying to just give it ago. I have Parkinson’s Disease and I am 69 years old, now retired and I can’t draw a stick man truely but now I want to give painting a try. I have looked at Acrylic Pouring and it looks easy but I don’t just want to do that. I want to try and create a proper painting. With your wonderfull, easy to understand and follow instructions, I think I will be able to give it ago. Thank you for sharing your knowledge and experience. Looking forward to following you and learning from you.

Saturday 15th of August 2020

That’s so wonderful to hear Lyn!! Super glad you are giving painting a go, and that you’re filled with inspiration, it’s a great feeling and one that opens up many doors :). Wishing you a joyful and exciting journey into painting, so excited for you!!😄 Don’t hesitate to reach out if you ever have any questions on the tutorials. Cheers, Jasmine

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